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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, February 25, 1893, Image 1

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TODAY'S FORECAST.
FOR THE DISTRICT OF SOUTH
ERN CALIFORNIA, FAIR WEATH
ER, STATIONARY TEIIPERATURE
AND NORTHERLY WINDS.
VOL. XXXIX. NO. 137.
j SPRING 1893. . |
| ~ I
I JUST ARRIVED, A FINE LOT OF f
SPRING OVERCOATS! j
♦ *
♦ We Are Offering a Big Inducement in a $12 Line ♦
j MULLEN, BLUETT & CO., f
f COR. SPRING AND FIRST STS. t
• !
♦»♦♦»♦»♦❖♦♦♦♦♦»♦»»»»»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
CRYSTAL PAL AGE,
138-140-142 S. MAIN ST.
ON SPECIAL SALE THIS WEEK:
A LINE OF FINE ENGLISH PORCELAIN
CHAMBER SETS,
In six-piece or ten-piece sets. We aye selling them at a lower price than
ever before.
WE SHOW THE LARGEST AND FINEST ASSORTMENT OF
DINNER SETS
In the city, at prices that cannot be beaten.
CALL AND SEE THEM AND BE CONVINCED.
MEYBERG BROS.
RANCHERS!
o{jb 'WAIN I ID!
BY THE
CUDAHY PACKING COMPANY,
ON JULY 1, 1893,
By which time our packing house, with a hilling capacity of
150,000 hogs annually, will be completed.
\\7H REQUIRE 800 HOGS DAILY in order to operate our present plant to Its full capacity
V > and ate prepared to increase it to any extent necessary to care for all the hogß that may be
offered us
We solicit rorrespondence both from th"se wanting hogs lor breeding purposes and from
those having thoroughbred breeding stock for sale.
Information furnished regarding the successful breeding and growing of hogs. Sfc
The Cudahy Packing Co.,
Los Angeles, Ceil.
Packers of the Celebrated " REX " Brand of Hams, Bacon,
2. 2 a Lard, Canned Meats and Extract of Beef
:Y TTILLIAMBON BROS., having purchased for
VV caßh, at a very large discount, the stock of
[S 11 i ? PIANOS and' ORGANS carried by W. T.
U i \A ♦ Somes, are offering: the aame at greatly reduced prices.
nirrsnitriTn 2 These goods must be sold at once to make room for
D/IDPfIIMV ♦ NKW STOCK from the east. Intending purchasers
Urlltll H I 11 U * will WB " t0 ina P ect these bargains at
—in- | Williamson's Music Store,
DTJI MHO I X 327 SOUTH SPRING ST.
I 114 NI liS I X Largest stock of Musical Instruments, Sheet Music,
1 inilV/U 1 J Music Books, etc., in town. Standard and White
215 lm X Sewing Machines, ar.d all supplies. 327 H. Spriug at.
Fred. A. Salisbury
DEALER IN
WOOD, COAL, HAT, GRAIN AID CHARCOAL
AND THE CELEBRATED
WELLINGTON COAL.
No. 345 South Spring Street. Tel. 226
FINE CARRIAGES.
HAWLEY, KING & CO.,
-^:AGENTSK-
Columbus Buggy Co. New Haven Carriage Co.
Binghamton Fancy Buckboards. Geneva Carriage Co.
Branch Carriage Repository, 210-212 H. Main St.
FARM IMPLEMENTS
At Our Main Store, 164-168 North Los Angeles Street.
The Herald
LOS ANGELES: SATURDAY MOKNING, FEBRUARY 2,„ 1893.
INSCRIBE IT ON HIS TOMB.
Attempted Assassination of
John W. Mackey.
The Bonanza King Shot in the
Back by a Crank.
The Murderer Then Tnfliets a Mortal
Wound on Himself.
Mackey's Injuries Not Necessarily Fatal.
Xhe Author of the Crime Id«ntmed
as W. O. Rlppey a Bankrupt
Stock Gambler.
By the Associated Pres..]
San Francisco. Feb. 24. —Just a few
minutes after the hells and whistles in
the business portion of the city had an
nounced the noon hour today, and when
tbe down-town streets were crowded
with hurrying men and women on their
way to luncheon, a tragedy occurred
near the principal center of local com
merce. John W. Mackey, the bonanza
king whose millions have made his
name known all over the world, waa
shot and severely wounded by Wesley
Childs Rippey, an old man, crazed by
having lost a fortune he once possessed.
There seemed to be no motive for tha
assault on the millionaire, except that
his would-be assassin had determined to
commit Buicide and had made up his
mind to die in company with one who
was luckier than he in dealing with min
ing securities.
Mr. Mackey was wounded by a bullet
in the back between the sixth and
seventh ribs. This, two hours alter the
shooting, was extracted and he is rest
ing easily. His physicians express
every hope that no inflammation will
occur in which case there will hardly bo
any danger of serious results.
Rippey, who after firing the shot
which he hoped would kill Mackey,
tnrned the pistol's mnzzle against him
self and pulled the trigger, lies mortally
wounded in tbe receiving hospital with
hardly any possibility of recovery.
THE ACT OF A MADMAN.
Were it not for the fact that every cir
cumstance connected with the case
shows that tbe snooting was the act of a
madman, the attack would go on record
as a most cowardly deed, because, pistol
in hand, Kippey lay in wait for his in
tended victim until he saw him walking
from Butter street into Lick alley, a
email thoroußhfara in tha rear of the
as h aoouY the'middle ol
the alley, where suddenly and without
a word of warning, he deliberately shot
htm from behind. Mackey did not know
he waß being followed, and the firet inti
mation he had of it was when he heard
the report of the pistol and felt a eting
ing sensation in his back.
GBEAT EXCITEMENT OVER TIIE SHOOTING.
It being the noon honr tho streetß
were crowded and the news of the shoot
ing Bpread with great rapidity. At first
it was reported both Mackey and his
assailant were dead, and crowds rushed
to the scene of the shooting. The cor
oner was telephoned for and the morgue
wagon came after the bodies, hut in the
meantime Mackey had disappeared and
the assassin, althongh lying motionless
on the pavement, was not dead, and was
taken to the receiving hospital in a pa
trol wagon.
Groups of excited stock brokers and
merchants gathered about and discussed
Mackey's careor and the supposed cause
of the shooting. It was generally
thought the murderer was some old
mining man who fancied himßelf injured
by Mackey. Probably no similar sensa
tion and excitement was caused in thia
city since Judge Terry was shot at
Lathrop by Deputy Marshal Nagle four
years ago.
THE IDENTITY OP TUB ASSASSIN.
It waa first reported that tbe name of
the assassin waa RatclifTe, and subse
quently that hia name waa Dunn.
Dr. Trosael called at the receiving
hospital, however, and identified the
wounded man aa W. C. Rippey. Rippey
told him tbat he had lost considerable
money in atock speculation and at
tributed hia losses to Mackay's manipu
lations.
THE CRIME WAS PREMEDITATED.
The attempt on the life of Mackey
waa deliberate and p.-emeditated. 1 1 ,
waa known that he usually appeared on
the street in that vicinity Boon after the
noon hour, when in San Francisco, and
the old man was there awaiting him,
After shooting himself, Rippey ex
claimed: "My God, I am satisfied!"
and fell on the paved court. When
driven to the receiving hospital he was
conscious, bat could not articulate.
From letters found on hie perßon, it was
shown that the crime was premeditated
and that he wbb demented.
When Mackey's assailant arrived at
the receiving hospital he waa nearly un
conscious. He waa shot through the
left breast. The bullet went clear
through his body and there is no hope
for his recovery. In hia pocket was
found a letter addressed to the Ex
aminer. It waa headed:
"food for reflection."
The text of the letter was as follows :
Paid $150,000 for one Bapphire to place
on the jaded person of hia wife, a cum
sufficient to have saved at leaat 500 of
his paupers from a euicidal grave. Just
think of it I Inscribe it on hie tomb.
(Signed) - W. O. Rippey.
Another letter was directed to Dr. J.
L. Linton, Palace Hotel.
On Rippey'a body was found a loaded
revolver which had not been fired,
showing that be had two pistola and
was prepared to make sure work of it.
A WELL-KNOWN OLD-TIMEB.
William O. Rippey waa well-known to
old-timers in San Francisco. He
born in Cincinnati and leaves a wife and
family there. At one time he was worth
UOO.OOO and made about $50,000 on tho
Comstock. He came to Ban Francisco,
commenced gambling in stocks and coon
loßt his money. At one time he lived
in Denver, where he owned a lot oi
property. Lately he had been without
means and very despondent.
PARTICULARS OP THE TRAGEDY.
John Bonner, who is connected with
a firm of florists on Lick place, came
nearer than any one to being an eye-wit
ness to the ahooting. He assisted Mr.
Mackey to hia buggy and drove hitn to
the millionaire's room at the Palace
hotel.
"I had justgot out of my buggy," said
Bonner to a reporter, "and waa about to
go into my office when f heard a loud
report. Looking down the alloy toward
Sutter atreet I saw a nun with a white
slouch dat and a grv-.y, cloaa-cropped
but rather straggling .beard holding a
smoking revolver in his right hand. He
was roughly dressed. A short distance
from him was Mr. Mackey, whom I im
mediately recognized. He had hia right
hand to his back, a little above tbe
kidneys. Ha waa perfectly cool, and he
walked toward where I was standing as
if oblivious to the fact that hiß would
be murderer was standing clohb behind
him with a pistol leveled at him. It all
happened like a Hash. The rough-look
ing man did not fire at hia intended vic
tim again, but turning the weapon
about pointed it at hia head and fired.
He whirled about in the Btreet and fell
to the ground.
''Probably the only thing that Bayed
Mackey'e life was the fact that Duffy
Bros.' wagon was in the street, and in
crossing over Mackey got the vehicle
between himself and the shooter. Aa
the wounded man approached me I
went forward and nek-J him to get into
the buggy. He complied, and, jumping
in after him, I asked him if he was hurt.
He drew hia hand from behind hia back
and it was covered with blood. He
looked cheerful and aaid that he waa
not rauoh hurt, but perhaps I had better
drive to Dr. Keeney's oflice. We went
there but there war no one in, bo I
drove to tbe Palace hotel and assited
the millionaire up to hia room, on the
' first fl.jjor. At his request I then want
for his secretary, Richard Dey. The
latter and I then went to the doctor's
oflice, but Keeney was still ahaent. Re
turning to the Palace, we found Mr.
Mackey standing in hia room in his
underclothing, and be hid evidently
been examined by a surgeon. In re
sponse to a qneßtion by Mr. Day,
Mackay said he was all right, and that
he had not been much hurt. Then I
left."
MR. M iCKKY'S STAT&.UKNT.
Mr. Mackey when seen by a reportar
in his room in tha Palace hotel Baid he
had never bafore saen (the man;whoßnot
him, and did not know w'iv he did it.
Mackey was veiy cool and walked about
his apartments.
"I waa about to leave for Virginia
City, Nev., thia evening," he said, "aud
waa op my way ti the h del. I walked
np Sntter to Ll«a*tlley to avoid
alleyway a
man jumped out behind m» from a door
way and shot me in the back. He tben
put the pistol to his own breast and
fired one ahot. I know I was injured,
but did not know how htdly. After the
mau fell to the ground 1 walked to the
hotel, told tho people I waa Bhot, and
waited for a doctor."
HIS WOUND NOT NECESBARILY FATAL.
Dr. Moree extracted the bullet from
Mackey's back. The bullet entered
below the the right shoulder blade,
struck tho vertebrte and lodged in one of
the spinous procesaea. The doctor said
tho wound was not necessarily fatal, but
it was too aoon to foretell the termina
tion of tho wound.
At I a. m. Rippey waa reported to be
resting eaaier, having Bomewhat re
covered from the first shock of his
wound, but the physicianß have no ex
pectation of hia recovery. Mackey was
aaid to be doing well.
MRS. MACKEY NOTIFIED.
London, Feb. 24.—Mra. Mackey re
ceived a dispatch from America this
evening, saying her husband had been
ahot in San Francisco. Another dis
patch received shortly after 10 o'clock
etateß that hia wound ie not aerioua, and
that there ie no need of her going to
San Francisco. Shortly afterward she
retired for the night.
RIPPEY'S HISTORY.
Hia Family at Cincinnati Greatly
Shocked by the Tragedy.
Cincinnati, Feb. 24.—Tho family of
Wealey C. Kippey, who made the at
tempt on Mackrty'a life, live in a suburb
of this city. His wife lives with her
son William, at Idlewild, six milea
north of here. lie is connected with a
canning company on Elm atreet. The
other bod, Wesley C. Rippey. lives in
the eastern part of Columbia, and is a
government gaugar of spirits, and a man
oi unblemished reputation. Naturally
the news of today caused a terrible
shock.
Thirty yeara or more ago the would-be
murderer engaged in trade connected
with the river interests. He waß rest
less and removed about 1808 to Gape
Hirardeau, Mo., there hia roving
temper led him father west. His family
remained a while at Cape Girardeau,
then returned to Cincinnati, where they
have remained ever since. Only inci
dentally did they hoar of the strange
man during all these yeara. News came
now and then of his wandering on the
plains and in the Rockies. They sup
posed he waß in Denver six yeare ago.
About Bix months ago Wesley Rippav
got a letter from the Safe Depnsit bank
in San Fracisco eating refer nee, be
cause he had applied there to make a
deposit of valuables in the bank's safely
deposit vaults.
Tbe only clew the reporters had was
the similar sound of the names V%sley
C. and William 0. Rippey, Both live
iv different suburbs, which could be
reached only by carriages over dark and
bad roads. The lateness of the hour
aud the necessary hurry of the inter
views, caused come discrepancies in the
reportß. They are in accord, however,
on the main points, though there may
be some dieagreomentß. The family
say he waa never suspected of mental
derangement but he had a mania for
roving, which tore him away from bis
family ties. Neither was he disagreea
ble in his conduct when at home with
hie family. Nothing they ever saw of
him when he wsb with them ever pre
pared them to believo he would ever at
empt to murder anyone. They no*
relieve he must have lost his reason
His name was Wesley C. Rippey.
A FEELING OF HOSTILITY.
Strong Opposition to the
Hawaiian Treaty.
The Rights of the House WiLl
Be Asserted.
A. Lively Debate of the Matter to
Be Had in Congress.
Paul Neumann Endeavoring to Get a
Hoarlng- Before the Senate
Oommltte on Foreign
Relations.
By the Associated Press
Washington, Feb. 24.—A very strong
feeling of hostility to tbe Hawaiian
treaty ia entertained by some of the
leading membera of the house. It iB
probable that the closing hours of con
gress will witneas a lively debate over
the rights of the house in this matter.
The movement was started with Demo
cratic members, but iome Republicans
are inclined to take the same view of the
matter, and will join in voting for a res
olution of the character proposed. At
the meeting of the cub committee of the
committee on ways and means, in charge
of the Springer Hawaiian treaty resolu
tion, this afternoon, the discussion was
lively and full oi interest, but conducted
in secret session. The indications, it iB
said, point to the adoption by tbe ma
jority of the Bub-committee of the ways
and means committee of a Bubstitute for
the Springer resolution declaring tbat
the house haa a right to be consulted
before new territory ib acquired.
THE HAWAIIAN COMMISSIONERS.
Tburston and Cook, of the Hawaiian
commission, have gone to Chicago. The
former will retura to Washington next
week. Cook will join Marsden and
Wilder, commiaeionerß, and Stevenson,
secretary of the commission, at San
Francisco next week and Bail for Hono
lulu on Friday, March 3d.
Paul Neumann, envoy of Queen Liliu
okalani, ia endeavoring to make an ar
gument before the committee on foreign
relations of the senate, supplementary
to the statement heretofore laid by him
before Secretary Foster and by the lat
ter tranßmitted to the senate.
THE DEPOSKn QUEEN'S COMPLAINT.
Faul Neumann haa handed Secretary
of State Foster a precia of the Hawaiian
queen's emapiaiut against the actions of
Minister Stevens. The important fea
tures are the charges that Stevens in
tended to help the revolutionists from
the start, and hia threat to use the
United States forces against the queen
in case she resieted the provisional gov
ernment. After rehearsing the troubleß
which led up to the revolution, Neu
mann saya the native population aa well
as a great number of foreign-born tax
payers and voters, yielded to tbe power
they could have maintained, only be
cause they believed the movement of
the committee of safety waa upheld by
the authorities of the United States of
America. On January 17th, Ministers
Parker aud Peterson called on Min
ister Stevens and asked him
what action would be taken by
him (Stevenß) in case tbe insurgents
attacked her majesty's government and
the government called on him for assist
ance. Stevena replied that he could not
come to the aeeistance of the govern
ment. Petereon then naked him what
he would do if the government should
treat the ineurgents ac rebele and attack
and arreet tbem. Stevene replied that
in that caee he ehould interfere with the
force at his command. Stevens further
said that if a number of responsible citi
zens ehould aßk hia assistance in estab
lißhing a provisional government he
would grant assistance and recognize
and support them. In addition to this
Minister Parker Bent a formal proteat
against the landing of the tailors from
the Boston.
PITTED AGAINST BLAINE.
An Exciting Scene In the Canadian House
Of ' (.jlll i,-.
Ottawa, Ont., Feb. 24.—Ex-Premier
Daviea of Prince Edward's ieland creat
ed a scene in the commons last night by
a terrible arraignment of the govern
ment ' for falsifying the record of tbe
delegates' trip to Washington on re
ciprocity.
Minister Foster reported that the
United Stateß would only grant a treaty
of unlimited scope with a uniform tariff
made at Washington, discriminating
against Great Britain.
IlAviee gave the lie direct to Foster by
reading Blaine'a report to congress ou
the matter, showing that the dominion
government would only accede to a treaty
which included alone natural pro
ducts, something which every Canadian
knew the United States would never
accede to. A list of manufactures, eaid
Davis, was aleo included in the treaty
which the United Stateß would grant,
and aa to a uniform tariff, it was a pure
fabrication. Shaking hia hand in the
face of the finance minister, Davia de
clared that while he (Foster) kept back
the records of the proceedings from par
liament, he was justified in calling him
a falsifier for the pure purpose of de
ceiving the people so that he and his
colleagues might retain their situations.
The report of Blame proved the govern
ment guilty oi deceit, falsehood and po
litical trickery of the worat kind. He
defied Foster to contradict it, and the
minister did not.
A Houie Rule Clrcnlar.
New Yoke, Feb. 24.—The National
Federation of America haß issued a cir
cular to the friends of home rule in
America, which Bays: "The appeal
made by the National Irish party in the
British parliament asking aid to enable
them to aecure a final victory for home
rule in Ireland deservea a response from
every friend of liberty in America."
Successful men Becure tine tailoring
*ith pleasing lit from H. A. Gets, 112
Weßt Third atreet.
ALLEN fIANVEL.
ALLAN MANVEL'S DEATH
THE PRESIDENT OF THE BANTA
FE PASSES AWAY.
He Came to Ban Diego Too I,ate to
Recuperate His Health—The
Distinguished mag
nate's Career.
San Diego, Feb. 23.—Allan Manvel,
president of the Santa Fe railroad, died
early this morning at the Hotel Del
Coronado, where he arrived three weeka
ago from St. Paul for the benefit of his
failing health, accompanied by hia wife.
It ia believed the cause of his death waa
Bright'B disease.
THE FUNERAL TO TAKE PLACE TODAY.
Manvel'B funeral is to take place at 2
p. m. Saturday in the White parlora of
the Hotel Del Coronado, and will be
private. It waa intended when A.
Speara, ono of the Santa Fe directors
who come with the party, left in a spec
ial for Santa Barbara, that in caee of the
president's death, this car would return
and be attached to Manvel'a special to
make a funeral train to go through to
Chicago, but so far no orders have been
received.
MANVEL AND THE SANTA FE.
What His Work Accomplished for the
Great Corporation.
The following was written for the
Herald by a gentleman intimate with
all matters pertaining to the Santa Fe
company and ita development:
The death of Allen Manvel, president
of the Atchison, To per. a and Santa Fe
Railroad company, the greatest syetem
under one management in the world,
iB full of moment. Mr. Manvel haß lit
erally worn himself out in the interests
of the Atchison eyetem.
The Atchiaou system has a mileage of
9343 miles, it begins in Chicago, passes
through Illinois, Missouri, Texas, In
dian Territory, Okalahoma, lowa, Kan
sas, Colorado, New Mexico, Arizona,
California and Old Mexico. It employs
perhaps 15,000 man, affording support
to at least 50,000 men, women and
children.
I will not enter into its earlier history,
but will begin at a period within the
memory of all of us—lßßß-89.
For 10 years previous to 1888 tbe sys
tem had grown like a mushroom in the
night. Its president, Wm. B. Strong,
waß a man of unquestioned ability, but
too little familiar with the details of the
system, and suddenly the great corpora
tion found itself in financial embarrass
ment. Miles of railroad had been con
structed in Kansas that could never hope
to be remunerative, at least within tbe
lifetime of thoße now living. A costly
and unprofitable purchase of the Gulf,
Colorado and Santa Fe had been made;
interest on the entire bonded indebted
ness was eating them up, and ruin stared
tbe directora in the face. "Who will be
our Moses.?" was the cry that went up
in Boßton, in New York and in London.
The public were all pessimists; wise
bankers and others aaid, "Bankruptcy."
Mr. Strong began to reduce expenses.
Whisperings were heard that certain
officials of the system in high position
had become rich and no one seemed to
know where tire money came from. At
thia critical juncture Measra. Baring of
London, Peabody of Boston and
Magoun of New York, all large
holders of the Atchison securities,
quietly convinced by purchase and
moral suasion that the only hope of
saving the great corporation from dis
intergation lay in giving them full pow
er. A new directory was formed, and to
the Burprise of the prophets.
Allen Manvel, general manager of the
Great Northern railroad, was elected
president. In qualifications he excelled
as one of the most capable operative rail
road men in tbe northwest, and his
economy, his wisdom and bis modesty
was known to the bankers, who had
now called him to a position equal iv
rank to any railroad official in the
world.
A critical examination of the entire
line, ita chops, its equipment, its official
and clerical force down to the section
man, was made in person by Mr. Man
vel.
Decapitation waß not the general rule.
C. W. Smith, first vice-president re
SUNDAY DINNER.
THE RESOURCES OF THE CITY
IIARKETS WILL BE FOUND OUT
LINED ON THE SEVENTH PAGE
OF TODAY'S " HERALD."
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
signed. J. F. Goddard, third vice-pres
ident, resigned; no stain was attached
to either gentlemen, they simply pre
ferred Bailing under a different captain.
Then came tbe three years ot work,
work, work, for Allen Manvel. Every,
thing purchased was first approved by
him; every salary raised was only done
by him. Every expense watched as only
he knew how to watch, from 8 o'clock
in the morning nntil late at night, seven
days in the week and 52 weeks in the
year ho toiled, hia private car was his
office much of this time; today in Den
ver, tomorrow i n Texas, then to Califor
nia, to New York—everywhere his sharp
and quick judgment was at work.
At the beginning of 1892, the fruits
began to appear, the system had met
every obligation, traffic began to in
crease throughout Kansas, New Mexico
and California. The Southern Califor
nia linea had been placed in the hands
of K. H. Wade, an able officer; this was
one of Mr. Manvel'B first official acts.
This increase in earnings aud every
where evidence appeared that made
stockholder hopeful that '94 would
again show the Atchison a dividend
paying property, then when the work
seemed almost done came the inevitable
result of overwork. The machine called
the brain had drawn the vital force
from every part of.'the worker's anatomy.
Mr. Manvel began to realize that he was
killing himself and eaid "I must rest."
PRESIDENTIAL POSSIBILITIES.
The other day Robert Harris, a di
rector and dark horae in the Atchison
reserve, started for California, and this
haa canaed all the railroad men to
prophesy. There are three viee-presi
denta of tbe system, A. A. Robinson, X.
D. Springer and J. W. Reinhart. While
either of these gentlemen are fully com
petent to fill the exalted position left
vacant by Mr. Manvel, it is highly prob
able that Robert Harris will succeed
Allen Manvel, who has demonstrated
himself as one of the most able, one of
the most modest and the most honest
presidents, ever in cjntrol of a greal
railway.
AN OPPRESSIVE ORDINANCE.
Chicago Railroad Men Say It Is Impoi
nt Mo to Elevate Their Tracks.
Chicago, Feb. 24.—The railroad man*
agera are of the opinion that the new
track elevation ordinance which became
a law thia afternoon by receivrng the
signature of the mayor, requires more
than the companies can perform. Pres*
ident Miller of the Chicago, Milwaukee
and St. Paul said if the law was enforced
it would, in all probability, result in tha
railroads giving up their terminals in
the city and removing outside the limits.
He said .it is no exaggeration
to say that to elevate the tracks
in the manner required would
practically bankrupt every one
of the roade. It would be extremely
difficult to raise the money necessary
unless they could arrow that the earn
iuga were sufficient to cover the in
tereet, and that cannot be shown by any
of the companies. If they are compelled
to retire beyond the city limits, many
large industries now located near their
tracks in the city will undoubtedly fol
low them, and public will be put to great
inconvenience. Miller think the grade
croßßing problem could be solved in some
practical way; perhaps by building vi
aducts where neceßsary. * Many other
railroad officials expressed similar
opinions.
'flu' San Dlvko Jetty.
San Diego, Feb. 24.—A private die
patch waa received from Washington
tonigbt, conveying the intelligence that
the United Stateß attorney general tele
graphed to United States District Attor
ney Allen, at Loa Angelea, to close a
deal with the Coronado Beach company
for land required for jetty purposes.
Pursuant to auch inatructions the money
will be at once paid over, and the' prop
erty will be conveyed to the war depart
ment. The construction of the jetty will
not be long delayed. The plans'have
been prepared, and Col. W. H. H.
Benyanrd of the engineering corps of the
army will advertise for bids for the
work. The coat of the work will ap
proximate $500,000.
The FadOn Mali's I.ateßt More.
Panama, Feb. 24.—The Pacific mail
is trying to secure an option on the
Tehuantepec railroad and announoes its
intention toabandou the islhume, nnlese
the Panama railway cornea to terms Ist
the matter of through freight.

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