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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, September 11, 1893, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1893-09-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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TODAY'S FORECAST.
FOR DISTRICT OP SOUTHERN
CALIFORNIA: FAIR WBATHER;
NEARLY STATIONARY TEnPER-
Al URL; WESTERLY WINDS.
VOL. XL. NO. 153
THE LAST CHANGE «
THE FEW REMAINING
Summer Suits For Wta Must Go
WE HAVE MARKED THEM TO ABOUT
ONE-HALF THEIR FORMER PRICE
Our Fall Stock Is Complete and Novelties Abound.
ONE PRICE TO ALL
Mullen, Bluett & Co.
OPR. SPRING 6c FIRST STREETS. _ _
CRYSTAL PA LAG E
138, 140, 142 S. Main St.
BIG DRIVES THIS WEEK IN
OUR LAMP DEPARTMENT
NIGHT LAMPS, complete, cut from 25c. to 150.-
HAND LAMPS, with burner and chimney, cutTrom 30c to 20c.
FINE GLASS LAMPS, complete, cut from 35c to 25c.
DECORATED STAND LAMPS, with fancy shades, cut from
$1.50 to 05c.
ELEGANT VASE LAMPS, with shades to match, cut from
$2.50 to $1.50. *
BANQUET LAMPS, with B. &. n. bumr and silk fringed
shade, cut from $3.50 to $2.25.
M EYBERG BROS.
LOOK AT OUR SHOW WINDOW.
SOMETHING NEW
%
WE ARE SHOWING IN OUR
CARPET MB RUG DEPARTMENT
A Superb and Varied Line of Private Pattern* Produced to Meet
the X qutrtaieuu of the M"!tt kxitcitnf (Vats*
I'» UUL'TC AXMINSTERB, WILTONS, MOQUETTES. VELVETS,
LArVrJlllO BrindsnLS, TAPESTRY, INGRAINS.
We Have Received a Very Choice Collection of Handsome Rugs, Which Have
Been Carefully Selected and Merit Special Attention.
"DTTPC ORIENTAL, TURKISH, PEBSIAN, JAPANESE, SMYRNA, ANGORA
KUIIO ASD FDK - ISPAHAN AND KENNJNGSI'ON ART SQUARES,
At\J\AKJ A LARGE VARIETY IN ALL SIZES.
PTT'DT'A TMC An unusually fine assorlmcnt ln Portiere., Lace and Bilk Curtains.
B ** n a U k, > lndla Mu « llc ». Stench Oretons. Plushes, etc
LOS ANGELES FURNITURE COMPANY,
225-7-9 8. BROADWAY, OFF PITY HALL.
\\\
TWO GOLD MEDALS
Two First Prizes for Large and Small Photographs
-3 WORL. D ' S FAIR if-
Convention of t'.ie Photographio Association of America over aome of the most eminent Dho.
«N MiS tt' excett S S , t u I pe?^or!t°y < : raP,B,e " l " c 1 «" « <*
a^oVirt't 1 j 220 SOUTH SPRING STREET. |&gag!!
BARKER BROS.,
y*Aav. Successors to Bailey & Barker Bros.,
iltll iTwi Have moved into Ihelr new quarters in the Slim-
WT- 'jTf aouJJlook, CSR. THIRD & nPRINOSTJ.,
Hr... ■mmtMEf^{' : w "ere they show as drawers ol trade
! lACE CURTAINS ai $1 Per Pair.
mm m > s Pieces ' m 0ak < at m
Drawers of Trade. GABPETS—Ruq ia and See How Low.
WILLIAMSON'S MUSIC STORE
PIANOS
NEWMAN BKOS., ORGANS NEEnHAM 8
Air Circulating Reed Cells. SilverTongued.
A FULL LINE OF MDSIC AND MUSIUAL INSTRUMENTS.
SEWING MACHINES
Standard, Rotary Shuttle, White and Other Long Shuttle Machinef, Supplies, etc
337 SOUTH SPRING STREET. 413 ly
© S. CONRADI,
" • OPTICIAN - -
Watchmaker aid Jeweler
181 »nd IS3 N. Spring-St.
KINK LUMOND BKTTI^A A BPiOI ALTY.
WAICHIJS, CLOCKS AND JBtVKLKY
OAKEFULLY REPAIRED AMu
The Herald
CHAS. VICTOR HALL TRACT,
OF ADAMS STREET.
Large home villa lots for s ,lo in the Southwest:
avenues SO leet wlae, lined with Paims, Mon
terey P.nes. dravillas Peppers, the new Gum
ot Algler- and Magaol.ai, etc., wh.ch will give
a pars like effect 10 sii miles ol street*. Lots
are 5,1x150 to 14-foot alleys.
f j9O KjK INSIdE LOT*: $10 per month till
one-naif is paid, or one third cash aud balance
In five years; or JI you build you can liava five
yearn' time. U-t one while you can. Auply to
olfi cc. 14:23 West First atreet. 7-14 tim
LOS ANGELES: MONDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 11, 1893.
PANIC-STRICKEN CHINESE.
Consternation Has Seized the
Celestials.
They Are All Very Anxious to
Register Now.
Marshal Gard and His Five Prisoners
In Han Francisco.
Unregistered Coolies Leaving the State
in Large Numbers -A General JBxo
dua from Sen Bernardino.
Acts or Vlolenoe.
By tne Associated Press.
San Francisco, Sept. 10.—The first
Chinamen to have their sentences of
deportation under the Geary registra
tion act executed arrived in San Fran
cisco from Los Angelea yesterday, and
are confined in the county jail, where
they will be detained nntil Tuesday,
when they will be sent back to the
celestial kingdom on the steamer China.
There are five Chineae in the batch, and
they came here in charge of United
States Marshal Hard, who will ccc them
on board the steamer and will not leave
them until ha has the captain's receipt
lor them. The Chinese are, all labor
ers, and were arrested on warrants is
sued from the United States' court in
Los Angeles. They were taken before
Judge Ross and by hint sentenced to be
deported aa they had not complied with
the law requiring Chinese in the United
States to be registered. Collector Wise
was notified by telegram that tbe Chin
ese were on their way to San Francisco,
and was requested to receive the pris
oners. Tbe collector telegraphed to
Washington for instructions, and the
answer came last evening instructing
bim to notify the marshal in charge of
the prisoners that be would have to
look out for tbem nntil they were on
board the steamer, as the entire matter
rested with tbe courts, and the marshal
was the man properly authorized to
carry out its order.
The news that tbe Chinese had ar
rived in the city and would be placed on
the steamer leaving Tuesday, created a
aenaation all through Chinatown here.
Tbe matter was the only subject of con
versation among the Chinese of all
classes last night. Tbe presidents of the
Six companies held a conference yester
day afternoon at the consul-general's
office, and not a few dispatches passed
between them and tbe Chinese legation
at Washington. profess to
knowweartiiS ioCa! Chinese are about
to do, declare that the consul-general
and the Six companies are preparing a
Petition to send to President Cleveland.
The document will place the b'anie tor
the Chinese not registering heretofore
upon the faith they gave tbeir American
legal advisers, who assured them that
the Geary law could not stand. It will
promise allegiance in the future, and
pray for an extension of the time in
which to allow them to register.
In view of the recent developments
tbe Chineae question ie creating much
pnblic interest here, though there seems
no probability of any violence among
the classes who are most hostile to the
Chinese. United States Judges Mc-
Kenna and Morrow are expected to de
cide an important case tomorrow in
volving the deportation of an unregis
tered Chinaman, and if they decide in
favor of deportation, it is probable that
an effort will be made to bave a number
of Chinese in thia city arrested. An
organization known aa the Anti-Chinese
Law and Order league, which is led by
several local and anti-Chinese agitators,
baa arranged for a large mass meeting
Thursday at which efforts will be made
to secure the rigid enforcement of tbe
Geary act, and among other things a
memorial will be addressed to congress
calling for an appropriation for. funds
necessary to enforce the law.
The situation iv the interior of tbe
state does not seem to indicate the
probability of any very serious acta of
violence agaiust Chinese laborers. The
attacks upon Chinese grape-pickera
near Fresno, Friday, seem to' have
been made by a party of rough char
acters, more for the purpose of robbing
than anything else. One of the China
men attacked there ia in a dangerous
condition and may not recover.
A dispatch from Tulare announces
that an attack had been made upon
Chinese vegetable peddlers there. A
party of four men on horseback rode to
their bunk house at night, produced
pistole and demanded money from the
Chinese. The Chinese said there waa
not any. The robbers said they would
kill them, so the Chinese brought ont a
money bag with $175. After that the
robbers went through their pockAs and
extracted $15 more. One Chinaman
tried to get away, but was knocked
down with a club. A man named Clark
has been arrested for this offense, and
warrants have been issued for the arrest
of others.
A dispatch from San Bernardino
states that 300 Chinese cooks, waiters
and other laborers quit work this morn
ing by order of the Six Companies. The
Southern hotel is closed for lack of help.
The Chinese say they will return to
China. ,
EXODUS OF THE COOLIES.
Chinese Quit Work and Kmlgrate From
San Bernardino.
Ban Bebnakdino. Cal., Sept. 10.—All
tbe Chinamen of this city and the sur
rounding country quit work this morn
ing, with the exception of a mere hand
ful who registered under the Weary law.
As far as can be learned, only three
Chinamen are at work today. Scores of
them have bought tickets and are de
parting on every train for either Los
Angeles or San Francisco. Not a Chi
nese vegetable wagon bas been seen on
the streetß today.
A leading Chjnaman states that this
sudden action and excitement was
brought about by a story tbat a United
States officer took $146 from the person
of a Chinaman arrested for violation of i
the deary act and used it to bny tickets
to China for half a dozan other China
men who had no money. Whether
trne or not, the story is circulating
among the Chinamen here, and those
wbo have money are leaving.
All the Chinese waahhousea are clos
ing, or are badly crippled lor want of
help. Tbe Chinese talk about a proba
ble massacre of Americans in China and
similar retaliation here later on, and say
the only safe place for them is in their
own conntry. The hotels and restaur
ants found it difficult to get cooks and
dishwashers or) so short notice, and some
of them failed to open their door, today.
Deputy United States Marshal Faris
passed through the city today in charge
of four Chinamen arrested at Redlands,
which added to tbe excitement of tbe
Celestials here, as tbey are informed a
nnmber of warrants of arrest have been
made ont against Celestials of this city.
A HOTEL BURNED.
Tha Hostelry at Lagana Beach De
stroyed by Hre.
Special to the lleralo.
Santa Ana, Sept. 10. —The Laguna
Beach hotel was destroyed by fire laat
nigbt, the entire bnilding being reduced
to a pile of ruins. The loss, which is
$4000, is partly covered by insurance.
Many gneats were in tbe hotel at the
time, one of whom was seriously in
jured.
AND STILL THEY COME.
CHINESE ENTERED AT THE PORT
OF NEW YORK.
Uonles of the Heathen Admitted Dnder
the Guise of Students mid Actors.
The Exclusion Law Practi
cally Mnllllled.
By the Associated Pres..
New York, Sept. 10. —The provisions
of tbe Chinese exclusion act are prac
tically nullified at this port, for in nine
cases out of ten tbose seeking admit
tance are able to pass tbe ordeal of the
rigid examination and investigations.
Collector Kilbreth, in looking over a lot
of alleged merchants, students and act
ors the other day, said: "There ia cer
tainly fraud here," and yet after the
most rigid examination be was unable
to shake tbe testimony of a single indi
vidual. Their credentials being seem
ingly correct, tbey were admitted. Ac
cording to the suspicions of men moat
intimately associated with Chinese
cases, there is an organization of smug
glers, having headquarters and agents
in Hong Kong, Vancouver, B. 0., San
Francisco, New Orleans, Havana and,
Naw York. The. prtiWiptf porta are
Havana and Now York, tbeotber cities
being merely forwarding stations. Other
features which make this scheme possi
ble are the Free Masonry of the Chi
nese, kinship, money and tbe desire to
circumvent the exclusion law.
The cases of Btudentß and actors who
enter tbe conntry for the liret time are
most interesting. These all come across
the continent from the Pacific coast to
New Orleans in bond and go thence to
Havana. Tbey undoubtedly receive in
structions on the way, but tbe finishing
touches to their education are, put on at
Havana, wbere they remain sometimes
a month, sometimes longer. In Havana
tbey almost invariably are domiciled
with Ynng Sing, and when they reach
New York they are met by Ynng
Lung, bia cousin, or Lee Foy, the latter's
partner. These three have been openly
denounced by the Chinese inspector at
this port as smugglers. The examina
tions of the applicants for admission
take place in tbe main cabins of the
Ward line steamers. The Chinese, to
prove they are not laborers, have per
mitted their finger nails to grow from the
day on which tbey left their own country.
Tbey are generally asked to deacribe
the ronte by which they cr.me from
China. Thia ia now readily answered;
but a week ago it was a difficult ques
tion. 'They have evidently been en
lightened in tbe meantime. When
asked why they have taken such a
circuitous route to reach New York,
tbev claim either to bave bad business
in Havana or to have stopped to see a
brother-, cousin or friend. Nothing can
transcend their calmness when ans
wering tbe questions, and no amount of
cross examining can shake their testi-
mony.
Within Bix weeks upward of 30 stu
dents have arrived here, 25 have uisap
peared or have been found working in
Chinese restaurants or laundries. In
the same time over 20 actors have
reached New York, and eiuce the first
of the year, 75. There is but one Chi
nese theatre in tbe city. Some actora
appear on the stage for a day or two in
the capacity of "populace" or "aoidiera"
or among the "Ketinue of tbe Man
darin."
Where this smuggling can end no one
can tell. The smugglers, it is said,
guarantee the safe delivery of every
Chinese here for from $100 to $250. At
present the rate Is at the highest figure,
for the investigation is very rigid. The
system of communication kept up be
tween New York and Havana is perfect,
and if an unusual question is put to ap
plicants of today which they cannot an
swer, in two weeks' time every incoming
Chinese can meet it clearly and calmly
and smiling. After reaching this coun
try the Celestials work out the amount
of money advanced in certain instances
by the smugglers here, and it is pre
sumed that the latter add a good sized
sum to tbe amount by way of profit.
The world's fair will cause a rush.
Order early. Full stock, good fit, mod
erate prices, (ietz, tine tailoring, 112
West Third street.
A sea bath at home with Turk's Island
sea salt is exhilarating. Recommended
by all physicians. For sale by all drug
gists ; 15c a package.
Ladies' hats cleaned, dyed, reshaped
and trimmed. California Straw Works,
264 South Main street, opposite Third.
For eunbarn and freckles use only
Perfecta Face Cream; safe and sure,
For sale by A. E. Littleboy, druggist.
311 South Spring street.
THE SITUATION IN BRAZIL
Some Light on Affairs in the
Perturbed Republic.
The Naval Eevolt Will End in
a Grand Fiasco.
Insurgent Warships Shut Up in the
Bay of Rio de Janeiro.
It Ia Not Probable That They Will Bom
bard the Capital—Their Surrender
or Destruction Thought to
Be Inevitable.
By the Associated Press.
London, Sept. 10.—An official dis
patch has been received by tbe Brazilian
legation here which seems to throw
light upon the situation of affaire in
tbat disturbed republic. Tbe message
says Rio de Janeiro is in a state of per
fect tranquillity, notwithstanding
alarming reports to tbe contrary. The
official message adda: "The Brazilian
government ia strong, haa the confidence
of the majority of the people and is able
to represa and will repress all revolts.
Congress has just declared a state of
siege, but the government prefers not
to be obliged to carry out the workings
of martial law."
Tbere is a significant ending to this
message, and that ia that it admits that
the insurgents have attempted to make
several landings at various points, but
they were repulsed, and, it is said, ap
pear to be thoroughly disheartened and
likely to surrender at any moment. The
insurgent squadron, it appears, is now
held in check by the forts at the entrance
ol the bay, where the officers in com
mand have orders to fire npon the rev
olutionary vessels the moment t.hey are
sighted. Gunners are kept at tbeir posts
night and day, and submarine torpedoes
are reported to bave been placed in the
channels likely to be followed by tbe in
surgents if they attempt to put to sea
and steam for Santos with the intention
ef capturing that port and joining issues
with the insurgent forces in the revolted
districts.
This official message is regarded here
as being eomewhat reaaanring, though
the fact is not lost sight of that it is an
"official" communication from the Bra
zilian government, and therefore likely
to depict the situation in the roost fa
vorable colors.
On the other hand, tbe message sent
by the United States minister to Brazil,
Thomas Thompson, is looked upon as
being tbe most trustworthy statement
of affairs existing there. Secretary
Gresham's orders for tbe United States
cruiaer Newark at Norfolk, Va., to set
sail without delay for Bio de Janeiro,
is approved here, as bombardment by
the insurgent fleet would assuredly
cause considerable damage to foreign
merchants.
In view of a statement made by a
Brazilian delegate in Europe to tbe ef
fect that the naval revolt was not in
spired by patriotic motives, the opinion
expressed by naval officers here, is that
the insurgent ships should be treated as
pirates, and if the government of Brazil
is unable to bring tbem to terms, foreign
warships should be called npon to re
store order, though this will be done in
any case if the bombardment of Bio is
attempted.
Buenos Aybes, Sept. 10. —Brazil's
naval insurgents are hemmed in within
tbe confines of the bay, surrounded on
all sides by the land forcea loyal to
Peixoto and, for lack of reinforcements
or supplies, the revolt ia soon expected
to end in a fiasco like Rear-Admiral
Wandenkolk's attempt. The latest
adviceß received here say the insurgents
have attempted to land at various points
in the bay, but have everywhere been
repulsed, and appear to be disheartened.
Admirai Melloß invited tbe garrison in
Santa Cruz to join the revolt, but met
with a firm refusal.
CHOLERA REPORTS.
No Mew Cases at Rail—The Plague's
Kavages lv Constantinople.
London, Sept. 10. —No fresh eases of
cholera were reported at Huh today and
there were no deaths. There are now
only two cholera patients in town, and
they are nearly well. A case of sup
posed cholera haa been found in Lei
cester. A woman who kept a fish shop
was attacked with sickness and died in
a few hours. An autopsy has been
made, but the authorities bave not
made the resnlt public.
The correspondent of the Times at
Constantinople says cholera has broken
out in tbe central prison there and at
the French and municipal hospitals at
Peru. There are also caeca of cholera
in the Solitary lunatic asylum. From
20 to 30 new cases are reported daily,
and 30 per cent of those attacked die.
The existence of the disease has not
caused any panic aa yet, but business
has been much affected.
Explorer Nansen's Hopes.
London, Bept. 10.—The Times this
morning published a long letter from
Explorer Nansen, dated aboard the
ship Fran at Charabowa, Yugorski
strait, August :', 1803, and is probably
tbe last letter written by him before kfts
vessel was caught in the ice. In the
communication Nansen hopes the ice,
which was then evidently closing around
him, will drift him across tbe polar
regions. The letter also describes his
eventful journey since June 21st and out
lines Naueen's futnro programme.
Bismarck Very Ill.
London, Sept. 10.—The Daily News'
correspondent at Kisoengen says: Prince
Bismarck is too ill to travel and his de
parture from here has been postponed
tonight. The ex-chancellor is seriously
ill. He is unable to eat and is generally
in a bad conditiop. He caught a chill
recently in receiving a deputation ol his
Frankfort admirers, and than suffered
from an attack of goat, which was fol
lowed by shingles.
IRISH INDEPENDENCE.
National League Officers Think It la
Time to Declare It.
Naw York, Sept. 10.— H. B. Cannon
of Omaha, Neb., president of the Irish
National league; J. P. Sutton of Lin
coln, Neb., secretary, and William Ly
man of New York, treasurer, have
issued a manifesto to the Irish people
in America, denonncing Gladstone's
home rule bill, and giving tbe reason
why it can never become a law. They
say:
"It appears to us tbe time has come
when the Irish race the world over
should be enlisted in one gigantic move
ment ior the liberation of Ireland. It
has the power to strike tbe chains from
the mother land if it has only tbe will.
A great convention of Irishmen from all
countries, we think, sbonld be called,
and a plan for united action formulated
and adopted. At such a convention the
example of the American patriots might
be emulated and the declaration of Ire
land's independence given to the
world."
Graves' Body Sent Bast.
Denver, Colo., Sept. 10. —The remains
of Dr. Graves, who was found dead last
Sunday in the county jail, where he was
awaiting a rehearing on tbe charge of
having poisoned Mrs. Barnaby of Prov
ideace, R. 1., were sent east tonight, ac
companied by Mrß. Graves.
BUCKLEY COMES BACK.
THE BLIND EX-BOSS AND FAMILY
IN BOSTON.
He Intends to Return to San Francisco
to Fight the Indictments Fending
Agatnat Him—He Is Done
With Politics.
Boston, Sept. 10.—Christopher A.
Buckley, the blind ex-boas of San Fran
cisco, who was about three years ago
indicted by the California courts, and
"skipped" to Montreal before he was
brought to the bar, arrived here today
from Montreal. Buckley went to Eu
rope, and with hie wife and young eon
has been almost out of the sight of the
parties interested in his whereabouts.
The Cunard line steamer which arrived
this morning brought his family to this
city. Buckley waß interviewed as soon
as he had located his living quarters,
and said that ha had returned to
America with the determination never
again to enter politics. He assumed a
defiant tone when speaking of the in
dictments against him,, which he de
clared were illegally procured. He an
nounced it his purpose to remain in the
east for a few weeks and then proceed
to San Francisco and fight bis case to
tbe end. He expressed himself sb re
solved to stand his ground and contest
tbe legality of the indictments.
BOOMERS IN LINK.
ProapectlTe Settlers of the Oherokeo
Strip Prepared to Register.
Arkansas City, Kan., Sept. 10. —The
government booths at which prospective
settlers of the Cherokee strip moot reg
ister and procure certificates, will be
opened for business tomorrow, when the
boomers will be allowed to register.
Boomers began to line np in front of tbe
booths last evening. Accessions to the
line were being made all last night and
today, and this evening 857 people were
in line, with others falling in every few
minutes. The line is about a quarter of
a mile long. It ia composed of all na
tionalities, ages, conditions and sizes.
Vendors of hot coffee, sandwiches, water
and pie do a thriving -mess along the
line. Counting tv ..yu arrivals there
are now about 12,000 people camped
hereabouts awaiting the opening.
SUNDAY A r IBE FAIR.
A Larger Attendance Yostorday aan
Usual on the Sabbath.
Chicago, Sept. 10. —There was a de
cided increase in attendance at the
world's fair today. The total admis
sions were 47,671, of which 37,885 paid.
Heretofore the number of people who
went through the gates on Sunday has
not exceeded 20,000. The art building
waa thrown open and here a large num
ber of those in attendance spent the af
ternoon. The midway plaiaance had its
share of patronage, and between the
two places the larger portion of the
crowd spent an enjoyable day. Tomor
row is silver day. Exercises will be
held in Muaic hall at 10 o'clock.
BABY RUTH'S BISTER.
Congratulations Pouring In Upon the
Happy Father and Mother.
Washington, Sept. 10.—Congratula
tory telegrams and messages continue to
arrive at the White House, expressing
tbe felicity of the public from one end
of the country to the other over the
happiness which has been brought to
the chief executive of the nation and his
wife by the birth of another child. Both
Mrs. Cleveland and her babe are as well
as the conditions will allow. The day
at the White House was spent very
quietly.
Chtldron Cremated.
Little Rock, Ark., Sept. 10.— T. W.
Whitely, residing near Silver Hill, Ark.,
with the elder members of his family,
attended church last night, leaving five
of his children, ranging in agea from 5 to
13, to care for the house. After the ser
vices were over, he returned to find the
house had been burned to tbe ground
and all five of his children cremated.
The Caetlne's Trial.
New Lonhon, Sept. 10.—The board of
naval inspectors for the trial of the new
gunboat Caatine has been ordered to
meet here Tuesday, September 12th.
The dispatch boat Dolphin, with Secre
tary Herbert on board, who will view
the trial, baa been at anchor in the
harbor since Saturday morning. Tbe
Caatine is expected tomorrow.
Conn band instruments. Agency at
Fitzgerald's, cor. Soring and Franklin sta.
WHO HAS THE BUQS?
PARASITES PURPORTED TO
HAVE BEEN PICKED FOR THIS
PORT BY PROF. KOEBELE PROB
ABLY PURLOINED.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
GUITEAU'S BONES BURIED.
What Wasljjne With the
Assassin's Body.
His Skeleton Not Exposed to the
Public Gaze.
Not On Exhibition in the Medical
Museum as Supposed.
How the Resurrectionists Were Baffled
In Their Attempts to Oet Posses
sion of the Murderer's
Remains.
By tbe Associated Press.
Washington, Sept. 10.—Deputy Ward
en Buss of the district jail made the
statement today that the skeleton of
Guiieau, the assassin of President Gar
field, was not on exhibition at the Med
ical museum, as haß been generally sup
posed. It will be remembered that for
a long time prior to the execution, stren
uous efforts were made to ascertain
where Gniteau was to be buried. Per
sons acting in the interest of the resur
rectionists, both those who wanted the
body for dissection, as well as several
enterprising museum proprietors who
much desired to secure it for exhibition
p v r poses, industriously questioned every
one who it was thought possessed the
slightest knowledge. Great precautions
were taken to prevent tbe grave from
being robbed. The following mode oi
procedure was agreed upon to prevent
the body from being stolen:
In order to obviate whatever legal
difficulties might arise and to forestall all
claims the sister or brother of the mur
derer might take, it was decided that he
should make a will bequeathing his
body to Dr. Hicks, and it will probably
be remembered the will when published
created some curiosity by the wording
of it, giving as it did the body to be
disposed of as tbe beneficiary saw fit
After going over tbe whole matter and
realizing that it would be impossible to
properly protect tbe corpse, it wae de
cided to bury it in the jail. The night
of the banging after the autopsy, the
body "remained in a cheap coffin in the
chapel of the jail.
"Upon my arrival at the jail early on
Saturday morning following the execu
tion," said Hubs, "I secured a couple of
trusties, snd taking them with me pro
ceeded to the laundry room. It was a
little room just to the east of the en
gine room, dimly lighted by a small
barred grating, and made an almost
ideal tomb. Two amateur grave dig
gers went to work and, quickly remov
ing the flooring, dug a grave sufficient!/
deep. By the time the body had been
brought down from the chapel and the
grave finished, Hicks arrived to conduct
the funeral services.
"There was only a small party that
stood about tbat open grave and listened
to the solemn reading of the burial ser
vices. General Crocker, who was ward
en, was present and, 1 believe, Charley
Reed, the lawyer who waa an assistant
in Guiieau's defense, besides several
guards and the two prisoners who dug
the grave. It was a weird scene and
one I shall never forget. The burial in
such a somber place was particularly
nerve-trying, and I think we all felt re
lieved when Dr. Hicks had concluded
and the darkies began to cover up the
coffin. This did not consume much
time, and it was not long before the
grave was filled up and the flooring re
stored to its normal position.
"There waa no particular compact
made as to secrecy among us, but it
seemed to be generally understood that
we would maintain silence, especially
aa there waß considerable excitement at
the time. The atory that the body had
been secretly removed to the medical
museum was permitted to be uncon
tradicted, iust aa I state, because we did
not believe it concerned anyone. What
became of the brains and other organs
of tbe assassin which were removed at
the autopsy beld immediately after the
execution, I do not know, except the
spleen is on exhibition at the museum.
Whatever elso is left of the man who
murdered President Garfield lies be
neath the floor of the laundry room of
the jail."
JIM OOSBETT'B UNCLE.
His Dead Body Found In the Missouri
River.
Jbffbbbon City, Mo., Sept. 10,—The
body of a man named Corbett was found
in tbe river at Osage City today. Ha
came down the river some days ago in
a covered flat boat and said he had come
from the head of the Misaouri and was
on his way to Chicago. He aaid he was
an uncle of James Corbett, the pugilist.
He appeared to be in fairly good circum
stances and talked familiarly about the
Corbett family. It is not known whether
he committed suicide or was drowned
by accident.
The Parliament or Religion.
Chicago, Sept. 10. —Tomorrow in the
Art institute the parliament of religion
will begin. The first day's work will
consist largely of addresses of welcome
and reaponseß. Religions which bave
fought each other will for the first time
in tbe history of the world be represent
ed in one congress, and priests and
missionaries of every faith will compare
the beliefs which they represent. Many
prominent people from all parts of tta»
world will bo present.
Stabbed the Wrour Man.
Victoria, B. 0., Sept. 10.—Alfred
Jonea, a colored seaman of tbe bark
Ratbdown, now in Sidney harbor, waa
fatally stabbed this morning by a fellow
sailor named Wilson, who mistook him
in the darkness for another sailor with
whom he had quarreled. Jones died on
the way to tbe hospital. Wilson was
arrested, knife in hand.
A Hurricane Fight.
DirnoquE, la., Sept. 10.—Billy Hinds
of Providtnce, knocked out Jack Ed
wards, the Chicago welter weight, in
four rounds this morning. It was a
hurricane fight.

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