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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, September 23, 1893, Image 1

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TODAY'S FORECAST.
FOR THE DISTRICT OF SOUTH
ERN CALIFORNIA: FAIR WRATH
BR; SLIGHTLY COOLER; WEST
ERLY WINDS.
VOL. XL. NO. 165
DOUBLE-BREASTED : :
DU I 0 DIJESS & SCHOOL SUITS
A Large and Elegant Line at Prices That Defy Competition.
OVERCOATS, BUSINESS AND (IpMTJ pIMpM
DRESS SUITS FOR - - - ULlt 1 LLlVlLlt
In All the Latest Styleß. We Are Showing
MOST ELEGANT LINE OF NECKWEAR
Ever Seen in Los Angeles.
Mullen, Bluett & Co.
OPR. 9PRINQ &. FIRST STREETS.
CRYSTAL PALACE
138,140 AND 142 SOUTH MAIN STREET.
WE HAVE THE FINEST LINE AND
BIGGEST STOCK OF - - - -
Haviland & Co.'s China
AND
White China For Decorating
At tbe LOWEST PRICES in the City. We Show, Among Others, the Following
Shapes : THE MARSEILLES, N ©NUPHAR, RICHELIEU, HENRY 11, WHEAT,
POMPADOUR, TURGOT, TRIANON, FRANCE, etc. All of the Latest Desiirns.
Complete Line of LA CROIX'S PAINTS and Other Material for CHINA DEC
ORATING.
A SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR TWO WEEKS ONLY.
MEYBERQ BROS.
SOMETHING NEW
WE ARE SHOWING IN OUR
CARPET MB RUG IPffIMIT
A Snperh and Varied Llp» of Private Patterns Produced to Meet
the K.qutrtmenls of the llost JlXnctlu'g Taste*.
pi TI Tt T?T , O AXMINSTERS, WILTONS, MOQUETTE3, VELVETS,
UAnilLlO BEO36ELS, TAPESTRY, INOUAI.Ni.
We Hare Received a Very Choice Collection of Handsome Rags, Which Have
Been Carefully Selected and Merit Special Attention.
nTTfiri ORIENTAL, TURKISH, PERSIAN, JAPANKBE, SMYRNA, ANGORA
KIM T. 1 AND TUB. ISPAHAN AND IvENNiN f i3Ti)N ART SQUARES,
A » A LARGE VARIETY IN ALL, SIZE 3.
PTTDT A TfVTO An unusually fine assortment in Portiere, I.see and 811k Curtaim,
L;UI"\I.A.IINO Bft! ' 11 Sllk '' Ind; * Muslins, Fieuoa Oretous, i-lusaus, etc.
LOS ANGELES FURNITURE COMPANY,
225-7-9 S. BROAII WAY, OPP. 'IITY HALL.
TWO GOLD MEDALS
Two First Prizes for Large and Small Photographs
-EWORLD'S FAIR&-
Convention of the Photographic Association of America over some ol the most eminent oho
tend e TEN liVu'MX'.ioS'at °' ****
220 SOUTH SPRUNG STREET. jZ^lViZtt;^
BARKER 8R05.,"
uSBb, Successors to Bailey & Barker Bros.,
litvi moved inio iheir .new quarters iv th 3 Stint
|T ' ~TJ |||^BB sonßloci, COB. THIKO A fePRINGSTJ.,
V.S j where they show as drawers oi undo
lm PARLOR SET, 5 Pieces, Solid Oik, at m
( WiD-ROOM SEr, IkJ \M, at $10.51
Drawers of Trade. CARPETS—Run ia and See How Low.
WILLIAMSON'S MUSIC~STORE
, " N V.^ M y»,RS, BR PIANOS ~™ SELLER,
NEWMAN BROS. R ' ™*~ORG A m'S~ NFEDli'am *
Air Circulating Reed Cells. . 8; verTougu*!.
A POLL LINE OF MUSIC AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENT*
SEWING MACHINESv
Standard, Rotary Shuttle, White aud Other Lon» Shntlls Aichlne?, Sopplloa, etc
337 SOUTH SPIjINO BT«EBT, 413 ly
'
§S. CONRADI,
- - OPTICIAN - -
Watchmaker and Jeweler
181 and 138 W. Spring St.
COX. FRANK I IN.
KINK DIAMOND HETTiNO A SPECIALTY.
WATCHES, CLOCKS AND JKWELUY
JAREFULLY REPAIRED ANu WARRANTED.
9-7 ly
The Herald
CHAS. VICTOR HALL TRACT,
OF ADAM 9 STREET.
La'gi borne villa, lots for taloln the Soutnwest;
avei.Uss St) teot wioe, Plied with Palms, Mon
terey Pines, UravlUss, Peppers, the new i»um
of Algiers an.. Magnolias, etc , which will rlto
a pars; like eile-i to six miles ot streets. Lots
arH. r ,Otiau to 11 toot alleys.
tH3BO Fult INSIDit I.UTB: ¥10 per month till
out-uali is paid, or one-third cash and balance
lv five yoar»; or if you build you cnu haye Aye
years'time. Get ouu while you can. AO'lyio
office, 'i'l'i West F,rst street. 7-11 Om
LOS ANGELES; SATURDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 23, 1893.
REPEAL MEN ARE HOPEFUL
They Expect to Take a Vote
at an Early Date.
Both Sides Agree to Extend
the Daily Sessions.
The Silver Men Believe It Will In
nre to Their Benefit.
They Will Endeavor to Displace the Re
peal Bill With the Elections BUI.
Senate and House Pro
ceed ings.
By the Associated press.
Washington, Sept. 22. —The repeal
men in the senate are still hopefnl of
reaching a vote at a comparatively early
date, and none of them place tbe time
beyond the first week in October. It
will be observed that this will be in
time to get tbe bill out of the way for
the federal elections bill, if that bill
should come over from the house of rep
resentatives on the Oth of October, as it
probably will. They say, however,
even in case the federal elections bill
should reach the senate before tbe finan
cial bill is out of tbe way, there wonld
be no danger of displacing the latter
measure.
The Bilver senators believe on agree
ment was reached today, whicb will in
ure to their benefit, &nd are very much
pleased with it. They are determined
to hold on nntil it can be ascertained
whether the elections bill can be taken
up in the senate to the displacement of
the silver bill. It is understood tbat
the agreement is for only one week, but
it ia presumed, if necessary, it will be
renewed at the expiration of tbat time.
SENATE PROCEEDINGS.
The I lot urn Resolution and the Repeal
Bill Discussed.
Washington, Sept. 22.—1n the senate
today Allen (Pop.) of Nebraska intro
duced a bill making tbe dollar (which
may be coined of 412.5 grains silver or
25.8 grains gold) tbe nnit of value. Tbe
bill also repeals the Sherman act and
provides that owners of silver may de
posit it in the mint, which (less 20 por
cent for seigniorage to be coined and pat
in the treasury) shall be coined into
standard dollars for his benefit.
Mitchell of Oregon introduced i bill
appropriating $375,000 fer the construc
tion of two steam revenue cntters for the
Pacific coast.
The resolution of Piatt of Connecticut
for a cloture rule was then taken up.
Wolcott of Colorado epoke in favor of
bringing the question to a vote, though
opposed to the cloture, as the only way
of determining whether or not the sen
ate wanted to stifle debate. He said
if it failed tv pass criticism on the oppo
nents of repeal inußt cease.
Teller of Colorado occupied the bal
ance of the time until 2 o'clock in a
speech against the proposed change in
rules.
The repeal bill was then taken np and
George (Dem.) of Mississippi concluded
his speech begun on Wednesday against
the bill.
Hansbrough (Rep.) of North Dakota
then addressed the senate in opposition
to repeal.
Stewart (Rep.) of Nevada followed,
aud proceeded to argue that gold had
risen in valne while silver had remained
a staple measure of value.
When Stewart sat down, Voorhees
said: " \ may cay that a consultation has
taken place this afternoon between the
friends and opponents of the pending
measure, which resulted in an agree
ment as to the hours which we will
occupy in debate. Without going into
details T am warranted in moving tbat
next Monday and after, the hour of
meeting shall be 11 o'clock and adjourn
ment take place at ti."
There being no objection, tbe chair
declared it so ordered.
Voorhees then moved an executive
session, after which tbe senate ad
journed.
HOUSE PROCEEDINGS.
Both of Representative Load's Chinese
Reatilutluns Adopted.
Washington, Sept. 22.—1n the house
today the report of tbe committee on ac
counts, abolishing elerke to unimport
ant committees, was agreed to.
Loud of California, rising to a ques
tion of privilege, called the attention of
the house to the fact tbat two resolu
tions of ino.uiry, which he introduced
over a week ago, had not been reported
to tbe house. The first was a resolution
calling upon the attorney-general for tbe
instructions (riven United States district
judges and United States marshals re
lating to the Geary Chinese exclusion
act. Loud explained that he pursued
the unusual course of calling up this
resolution as a privileged question, be
cause oi the near approach of possible
legislation on the subject (the Everett
bill) and tbe bouse had a right to know
what steps had been taken to enforce
tbe present exclusion act.
[Resolutions of inquiry addressed to
the heads of departments, under the
rules, must be reported to the houee
within a week.]
After some discussion, participated in
by Gates, Springer and McCreary, the
chair held that Loud'u question wae
privileged and the previous question on
the resolution was ordered. Agreed to.
The other resolution, calling on tbe
secretary of the treasury for the instruc
tions forward o collectors of customs
and other officials ol the department,
with reference t the enforcement oi tbe
Geary law; also information as to the
number of Chinese in tbe country, tbe
number deported, and the number
registered under the act) was also
agreed to.
Adjourned,
THE PENSION BOLL.
Commissioner I.ochren Submits Ills First
Annual Report.
Washington, Sept. 22. —Pension Com
missioner Lochren submitted his annual
report to the secretary of tho interior
today. It shows: Pensioners on the
rolls, 900,012, a net increase of 80,914
during the year; claims for increase of
pensions allowed, 24,715. For addi
tional pensions under the act of June
27, 1800, there were allowed 31,090
claims. Under both heads, 115,221
claims were rejected. Claims pending,
771,150; paid for pensions during the
year, $150,740,407; balance at the close
of the year, $2,437,371.
Tfio commissioner thinks tho appro
priations for the next fiscal year are am
ple.
The estimates for the fiscal year 1895
amount to $102,031,550. He thinks from
}805 tbe pension list will decrease. It
is thought that tbe number of applica
tions will decreaie, owing to the lapse of
time since the war. A tendency in this
direction is already manifest.
The commissioner then defends his
course in suspending certain pensions
granted by former commissioners under
the act of June 27,1890, saying he sought
honestly and fairty to carry out the pro
visions of the law, citing instant-en, de
claring they and others such were grant
ed in evident violation of the law.
AMBASSADOR VAN ALLEN.
I Opposition Developing to the Confirma
tion uf His Appointment*
Washington, Sept. 22. —Thero ie con
siderable talk on tbe floor of the senate
regarding the appointment of J. Van
Allen to be ambassador to Italy, and
while the appointment has not been be
fore the senate a sufficient length of
time to permit a thorough canvasa of its
fitness, the sentiment so far developed
ia certainly adverse to Van Alien, and it
haa become evident that hie confirma
tion will be strongly opposed,
NOT A MONOMETALLISM
PRESIDENT CLEVELAND DENIES
THE SOFT IMPEACHMENT.
Be Declarea that He Favora the Use of
Silver aa Money Under Certain
Restrictions—How Will Con
gress Vote?
Nbw York, Sept. 22.—President
Cleveland hae taken occasion to deny
that he is a mono-metallist, and to de
clare that he is in favor of tho utiliza
tion of silver, so far as it can possibly bo
dean with eu.ety to sound currency.
This otatement regarding the president's
position was made by Governor Thomas
J. Jones of Alabama. Although Gov
ernor Jones admitted that the president
had said much beside on the silver
question, ho said he did not feel at
liberty to make any statement public.
Governor Jones said he did not think
the president or anyone else could, tell
just how congress ia going to vote on
tbe eilver matter.
PULLMAN OUT ON RAIL.
The Charge Against Him Trnmped Up
by Gamblers*
San Die<io, Sept. 22.—A. M. Pullman,
living nt Valley of the Palms, who was
arreated at Ensenada last Friday, for
complicity in the abduction of Whit
man, has been released on ball, United
States *Vice-Contul Godbe signing Mb
bonds. Pullman wsb advised fry
his friends here to demand an imme
diate trial, as it ia claimed there is no
evidence whatever against him. It ia
said the whole story of the kidnaping
emanated from a few gamblers who
were disappointed by Whitman's sur
render, aa they had formed a plan to
relieve Whitman of his money.
TUX CBN Til ALI A ROBBERS*
Only Two of 1 hem in Custody—They
Waive Preliminary Hearing.
Centralia, Sept. 22.—Tbe report that
darter, one of the three robbers who
held up an Illinois Central vestibule
train in this city Wednesday evening,
had been caught, was incorrect, darter
m supposed to be hiding in St. Louis.
The two captured bandits, Jones and
O'Dwyer, have waived a preiiminory ex
amination and will be tried at tbe Janu
ary term of the circuit court.
RAZORS IN THE Alii.
A Colored Barber Fatally Carves His
Brother-in-Law.
San Francisco Sept. 22. —William
Harris, a colored barber, fatally cut his
brother-in-law, William Daws (colored)
during a quarrel on Sutter atreet. Har
ris used a razor and gashed Daws in a
frightful manner.
Outhwalte Loses Ills Mare.
Stockton, Sept. 22.—Tbe trotting
mate Mary Caldwell, owned by J. H.
Onthwaite of Sierra Madre, died tonight
of intlammatiou of the bowels. She
was taken sick Tuesday. She was by
Wilkea Boy, and made a record of 2:20
at Sacramento in her firat race.
Thrown Out of His Wagon.
Bakeksl'Teld, Cal., Sept. 22. —Alfred
Polkenhorne, a farmer, was thrown out
of his wagon in town today and seriously
injured. Three of his riba were broken.
It ia supposed they penetrated his lungs.
Hia recovery is doubtful.
It is important to know that a correct
fit in fine "tailoring can be bed at moder
ate prices from H. A. Getz, 112 West
Third slreet.
A sea bath at home with Turk's Island
sea Bait ia exhilarating. Recommended
by all physiviuuH. For sale by all drug
gists ; 15c a package.
For sunburn aud freckles use only
Perfecta Face Cream; safe and sure,
For sale by A. E. Littleboy, druggist.
811 South Spring atreet.
Buffalo Lithia. Woollacott, agent.
SWALLOWED BY THE OCEAN
The Mysterious Sinking of a
Haytian Warship.
Went to the Bottom Without a
Moment's Warning.
The Sea Was Calm and There Was
No Sign of Danger.
Of More Than Four Scorn Souls Aboard
Ouly One Escaped to Tell the
Tale—A Party of Diplomats
Among; the Victims.
By the Afroelated Press.
New York, Sept. 22.—The steamship
Prince Wilhelm, from Port-au-Prince,
brings news of the foundering off Cape
Tiberon, of the Haytian war ship Ales
sandre Petion, with a crew of 80 men
and tbe following diplomats, en route to
Santo Domingo to negotiate a treaty:
General Molini M. Cohen, Haytian ex
minister to Mexico, and M, de Jeans,
Haytian consul-general. One sailor was
saved.
The disaster occurred September 6th,
about 5u miles south from Cape Tiberon.
The cruiser had just been put into com
mission. She left Port-au-Prince Sep
tember 4th, bound for Santo Domingo.
The suddenness and completeness of
the disaster, only one sailor escaping,
makes the affair most mysterious. It is
probable tbe real cause of the wrecking
of the ship will never be known.
SUDDENNESS OF THE DISASTER.
According to the testimony of the
sole survivor there was absolutely no
warning. Neither collision with anoth
er vessel, a submerged coral reef nor a
storm cau account for tbe occurrence.
The day was fair and tbe passengers
were enjoying themselves in the cabin.
Suddenly the vessel began to sink. The
officers of the watch ordered men to pass
the word in tbe cabins and forecastle to
reach the deck quickly and jump over
board. It was already too late. There
was terrible confusion in the cabin as
the panic-stricken passengers struggled
to reach the deck. In a minute from
the time she began to eink tbe vessel
was entirely under water.
THE ONE SURVIVOR.
One of the sailors, as the ship began
to sink under him, snatched a pair of
oars from a liieboat and threw himself
into the water. He caught a plank on
which he drifted for 30 hours with noth
ing to eat or drink. He was picked up
about 50 miles southeast of Port Fo
ment. For a long time the castaway
was unconscious and could not speak.
The lost vessel was doubtless of the
mitrailleuse type of gunboats, bo pop
ular with the HaytiaDS.
THE SON OF A JUDGK.
A Toang American Kntsngled In the
Mealies of ilritUli Jastlce.
London, Sept. 22. —George Atherßtone
Perkioe, claiming to be a eon of Judge
Perkins of Buffalo, N. V., wan again in
tbe Bow Btreet police court today,
charged with obtaining goods under
false pretenses. The charge waa die
missed. Perkins was then arrested again,
charged with stealing the deeds of some
land in California. The property ia said
to be worth $25,000. l'erkine is accused
of having stolen the deeds from a man
named Thompson, who came to London
in order to cell tbe land referred to.
Thompson, it is claimed, was at one
time confined in an aslylum for the in
sane, in California. On the second charge
the prisoner wae remanded.
A FATAL RUNAWAY.
Harry Smith Thrown From a Wagon
uml Killed at Ontario.
San Bernardino, Cal., Sept. 22.—[Spe
cial ]—A runaway at Ontario, attended
with a fatal reeult, occurred today.
Henry Smith, a highly respected citizen
oi that town, was driving a spirited team
hitched to a large wagon, when the
horses became frightened and ran away.
Smith was thrown from tbe wagon and
instantly killed. Coroner Thompson of
this city was notified and repaired to the
scene and held a post mortem examina
tion, and found tbat tbe wagon had
paßeed over his body, cutting his liver
almost in two.
Tbe body was brought to this city and
will be buried tomorrow.
On)d Will Again Flow Out.
New York, Sept. 22. —The foreign
banking houses will not admit that
there is any chance of immediate export
of gold, but other persona aay if the rate
of exchange continues to advance, the
possibility of exportationa will very
quickly become a certainty. According
to well-informed bank presidents, the
bank statement tomorrow will be a very
favorable ono.
Qnlet Restored Mt Roanoke.
Roanoke, Va., Sept. 22. —The intense
excitement of the citizens over the un
fortunate occurrencea of the oaet few
dnya haa subsided and tbe city is now
quiet. The laßt victim of the bloody tt
lair has been buried and the wounded,
with the exception of two, are doing well
and will recover.
Parliament Adjourned.
London, Bept. 22.—Tne bouse of com
mons and the house of lords adjourned
today until November.
WORLD'S FAIR NOTES.
A Western Excursion to Be Given the
Foreign Commissioners.
Chicago, Bept. 22.—After last night's
storm the weather thia morning waa
bright and bracing. It was expected
tbat today's attendance at the fair would
be the largest of the week.
Thia was state commissioners' day.
The general officials of the fair vißited
the various buildings and congratulated
the commissioners on tbeir part in mak
ing the fair a success.
The fishermen concluded their exer
cises today. The principal event waß
the long-distance fly casting, which wae
won by A. C. Leonards of New York,
who cast a line Wi% feet.
Another excnrsion to the far west for
the foreign commissioners is being
planned by Mrs. Houghton, one of the
lady managers from the Btate of Wash
ington. A great many foreign commis
sioners have signified a wish to ace
more of the country, and an excursion
will be organized to give them a chance.
The excursion will travel through Mon
tana, Idaho and Washington, returning
via Bait Lake.
The attendance at the fair today wbb
200,703, of which 109,000 paid.
THE FLOATING HEAD
Positively Irientllleit as Addle Gllmore's.
Dr. West's Defense.
San Fbancisco, Sept. 22.—Dr. Stewart,
a Coluaa dentiat, who filled Addie Gil
more's teeth, today positively identified
the head floating in the bay as here.
Dr. West, who is accused of the murder,
denies that he made a confession to Miss
Gilmore's father that tbe girl died and
that her body had been cut np. West
now says tbat he told Gi'more that
story to get rid of him. West's defense
will be that the girl is still alive and
that tbe prosecution cannot prove tbat
ehe is dead. West appeared for his pre
liminary examination in the police
court this morning. He aaked for a con
tinuance on the ground that his evi
dence was not prepared, and the caee
was accordingly set for next Tuesday.
BISMARCK IS BETTER.
THE IRON PRINCE REGAINING HIS
WONTED STRENGTH.
William SI rock the Popular Chord When
Ha Telegraphed Him His Sympa
thy—The Aged Statesman
Greatly Pleased.
Berlin, Bept. 22.—According to the
reports of his physician, Prince Bis
marck ia regaining strength. Intimate
friends of Prince Bismarck say the old
statesman was greatly, pleased and
touched at receiving the emperor's mes
sage of sympathy and offer of residence
in the imperial castle. The emperor's
telegram to the ex-chancellor ia still
largely discussed, not only by the news
papers in every part of the empire, but
at public gatherings everywhere. Noth
ing that the emperor has done since his
accession to the throne has contributed
so much to his popularity as has thia
recognition of the man who did bo much
for tbe building up of the empire. The
reconciliation between the kaiser and
tbe ex-chancellor haa produced an es
pecially excellent impression in South
Germany.
RIOT IN KANSAS CITT.
members of the American Protective As
sociation Mobbed.
Kansas City, Sept. 22.—A meeting of
the American Protective association an
anti-Cathoiic society, tonight terminated
in a riot in which several persons were
injured. ' Many members carried re
volvers and some marched to the hall
with ehotgnns and rifles on their shoul
ders. Twenty patrolmen were sent to
preserve the peace. When the meeting
was ended, a mob attacked the members
as they filed out of the hall, throwing
rocks and brickbats. The police ar
rested a man, a railroad detective named
Brown. He showed his badge to the
police and was let go. The mg,b stoned
Brown, and drawing a revolver, he pre
pared to defend himself. One of the
mcb, named O'Connor, also drew a re
volver. He and Brown opened fire
simultaneously and each fired two shots.
O'Connor received one bullet in the
thumb. Brown escaped unhurt. Mean
time the police made many arrests.
HEXAGON COINS.
A Syndicate Formed to Coin Legal Ten
der Silver Dollars.
St. Louis, Sept, 22.—A special to the
Republic from Bonham, Texas, says: A
syndicate, including prominent men of
Texas, Colorado, Missouri and Kansas,
is being formed to coin silver into dol
lars of a hexagon shape at the rate of
1100,000 per month or more, if the leg
islatures of these states will declare
such coin legal tender. It is claimed
tiiat no individual or corporation is pro
hibited from coining silver into standard
dollars provided the shape of such
coins is not the aame as the coin issued
by tbe United States government. Cit
izens of California issued hexagon $50
gold nieces in the 50's and no one dis
puted their right.
BY WIND AND WATER.
A Perilous Balloon Ascension Alude
from tr« White City.
Chicago, Sept. 22.—Prof. King of
Philidelpbia, an aeronaut, and Miss
Josie Morris of Ames, lowa, went up in
a balloon this afternoon from tbe world's
fair ground. The air ship blew out over
tbe lake aud began to come down. The
revenue cutter Johnson went to tbe res
cue and on overtaking tbe balloon, some
20 miles north of the city, found it danc
ing along the water. By the aid of a bo.it
loaned from tbe Johnson, King managed
to steer tbe balloon ashore, where be
and Miss Morriß climbed out, none tht
worse for their perilous journey.
Ladies' bats cleaned, dyed, reshaped
and trimmed. California Straw Works,
204 South Main Btreet, opposite Third.
Conn band instruments. Agency ai
Fitzgerald's, cor. Spring and Franklin a ta.
ARTHUR I. STEWART.
DISGRACED BY HIS OWN AC
TIONS, HE STILL HAS THK
NERVE TO MAKE A CHOICE OP
PRISONS.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
ONE MAN'S CARELESSNESS
Causes the Loss of a Dozen
Human Lires.
A Score of Other Bruised and
Bleeding Victims.
An Awful Wreck on the Wabash
Road at Kingsbury, Ind.
The Second Section of a Passenger Train
Made tn Crush Into a Freight on
a Sidetrack—The Result
Is Appalling.
By the Associated Press.
Kingsbury, Ind., Sept. 22.—Eleven
bloody corpses, some torn and mangled
beyond semblance of humanity, a score
of bleeding and bruised victims; such
are the awful resultß of thia morning's
horror occurring at thiß little village on
the Detroit division of the Wabash rail
way.
THE DEATH ROLL.
The list of dead is as follows:
Charles Bierbe, San Francisco, 29
years old, unmarried.
Miss Nellie B. Tucker, Newton, Mass.
H. E. Seeley, Germany.
Harry French, Toronto.
Engineer John Green, Ashley, Ind,,
He leaves a wife and four children.
J. H. McKenna, Hyde Park, Mass.
Miss Alice H. Reed, East Boston.
Warren G. Bider, aged 4, of Arizona.
Mrs. Burbank, New Orleans, La.
Baggagemaeter Lyons, Detroit.
J. D. Roundy, La Moille, la.
Condnctor J. E. Coulter, of Detroit.
A LIST OF THE INJURED.
The injured in the hospital at Peru,,
Ind., are: Samuel Canfield and wife of
Utica, N. V.; 8. Olive Hill of Somers
worth, N. H.; Miaa Anna Hill, Olive's
sister; G. W. Hodgaen and wife of Do
ver, N. H.; Frank P. Dow of Fair Ha
ven, Wash., a journalist, contusion of
the head and shoulders bruised; W.
Rider and wife of Phcenix, Ariz., and
their foster daughter, Mr. Rider being
cut about the head and Mrra. Rider's
thigh fractured; the daughter ia inter
nally injured. Rider's foster son was
killed.
Mr. Dow was in tbe smoker. How he
crawled out of the wreck he does not
know. He says he assisted in pulling
out two young women, then, exhansted,
fainted on tbe bank. He is able to sit
up, but his face is a terrible Bight.
William Evans, Edward Rush, Will
iam Hoskins and Albert Moulton, aged
12 to 14, orphan home boys of London,
England; James B. Wookey, Henry
Aaron, Sidney Fleming, James Lane,
Charles Botham and Herbert Lane,
members of a troop of handbell ringers,
all are injured.
Others injured are: Otto Houk, Ger
many ; Mrs. Dougan, Aurdianne, Pa.;
W. J. HotchkißS, Mrs. Roundy, La'
Moille, la., leg broken; Mrs. Keller,'
Massachusetts, may die; M«s. Seavey,
New Hampshire; Fireman Walker, Fira
nian Barber.
A BUAKKMAN'S CABEBESSNESB,
Crushed and splintered timbers and
broken truaa roda; warped and frac
tured trucka; two giant locomotives dis
mantled and literally welded together
attest in fearful reality the awful results
of one man's carelessness. The calamity
ia directly attributable to Brakeman
Herbert Thompson's carelessness. He
has disappeared and all efforts to find
him thus far been in vain.
TUB STORY OF TUB WRECK.
The story of the wreck is as follows:
Vestibuled train No. 55, from Detroit
to Chicago, was running in two sec
tions, and Was due to pasa this station
at 4:10 a. m. Fast freight No. 92 was
on the siding here, waiting to allow No.
55 to pass. The firat section of No. 55
passed at 5:15, and by its whistle called
the attention of the freight crew to tbe
second Bection. The engineer replied,
but it seema Brakeman Thompson did
not notice the signal aud went ahead to
open the switch for No. 92 to leave. He
had hardly done this bofore the second
section of No. 55 was seen bearing down.
Thompson eeemed to be paralyzed.
Swerving to tbe left, tbe ponderous
mass of steel, drawing its precions load,
lunged heavily into the waiting freight
train with a horrible crash.
THE RESULT OF THE CRASH.
The result of the crash was fearful
and the scene that ensued was awful.
Nearly all the passengers were asleep,
and the suddenness of the crash so daaed
the unfortunates that for a few minutes
all was still, save for the escaping steam,
but soon tbe agonized screams of the
wounded and dying rent the air. The
few uninjured bad not the presence of
mind to make an effort to rescue the
imprisoned victims, bat with the arrival
of a number of residents the work ol
releasing the hapless victims wae soon
under way.
THE WORK OF RESCUE.
Owing to the huge masa into which
the wreck was piled it was a perilous
undertaking, and some hours elapsed
before the last living victim was re
moved, and tbe dead were finally extri
cated only after the arrival of a crew
with apparatus.
'J he dead, aa fast as taken from th«

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