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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, September 24, 1893, Image 4

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LOS ANGELES HERALD
DAILY AND WBEKLI.
THE OFFICIAL CITY PAPER.
Josirii D. Lynch. Jamks J. Ayiri.
AVERS &- LYNCH,
PUBLISHERS,
BK.I AND 2*5 WEST SECOND STREET.
TEUSPHONE 186.
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Entered at the Postofflet at Los Angeles as
second-class mall mater.
ANNOUNCEMENTS.
Tho p»p?rs of all dellnqnontms.il subscribers
lothe Daily Hs'ii.D will be promptly discon
tinued hereafter. No papers will be sent to
subs, rlbers by m»ll unless the same have been
said for In auvanco. This rule is iiiflexlb'e.
tn P. Fi«her. newspaper advertising airent, 21
HeKi-mtV Exchange, 8»n Francisco, is «v au
thorized agent. This paper is kept on file in
hie office
The Hesai.-) is rold at the Occidental Hotel
news blind, Man Franclsoc, for sc. a copy.
SUNDAY, SKPTEMIIER 24, 180.1.
AN INDEX TO YESTERDAY.
BY TILKORAPII-President Cleveland to
be arraigned for dereliction of offlolal duty
In the senate Senator Stewart alter the
chief executivo with a (harp stlak ...Na
tional capital gossip ...Two students shot
while attempting to rob the bank of tbe
normal school at Valparaiso, Ind... Ne
bra ka cattle thieves In tho toils—
Doings at the worH's fair.... Anarthist
headquarters raided in Vienna....A severe
snowstorm in northern England and in
Italy ...No change in the situation iv
Brazil....The Argentine rebellion — Mit
chell signs articles to fight Corbeit... .Sol.y
Smith in good condition for his fight with
Uixon Ives wins the billiard match —
Sporting mlsoellany...Fatal explosion in a
San Francisco boarding houte ...Pacific
coast newß.
LOCAL AND MISCELLANEOUS—State
division by B. A. C. Stephens . Reminis
p censes of a trl r. across the continent by R. H.
Hewitt .. .'fammany's letter from San Fran
cisco... Japanese F shermen, by Gervalse
Purcell Justices courts ...Mrs. Mulen
charged with shooting her father.... Thj
courts a"d new suits....Tae Grant-ijilbcrt
case The flic commission toenfotco the
putting of file escapes on ail high bul.dlcgs
Edgar Fleming, the Coronado justice,
has the felony cbarge sgalust him dismissed
Seventh regiment notes.
NEIGHBORING PLACES.
TJh vbbsitv—lmprovements at the college
....The uew faculty.
Terminal Island-Local affairs.
COMFTON-News notes.
Santa Monica—Wharf notes... .Personals.
Vkrnondale-A lodge of Fraternal Wheel
ers formed.
Pomona—An astronomical lecture Notes.
Obanok County—The Anaheim bank mat
ter Local affairs.
REDLANns—National guard election and
target practice.
RtvftKnuE—A distinguished visitor,.
San Hbrnarlino—The Bear Valley company
in tiouble....A nurder mystery.
Mr, L. N. Breed, of the
Southern California National Bank, in a
communication eleewhero, denies that
that bent is on tho bond of the new
county treasurer, Fleming.
The number of appalling railway ac
cidenta that are taking place in the eaßt
lately ia absolutely without example. We
are now sei ved with diurnal catastrophes.
In fine, taking the roster of casualties on
land and sea, they frequently amount to
the fatalities of an ordinary battle. Tbe
laws relating to the careless handling of
railway trains ou:jht to be made very
much more stringent than they now are.
The determination of tha Southern
Pacific Railway of Kentucky to pay its
back taxes iB one of the moat agreeable
' eigna of the timea. Tbe fact is that
that powerful corporation reached that
conclusion at a time when money was
very scarce indeed, and thia ia a spe
cially favorable eign that in the future
the Southern Pacific Railway really
intends to Btay out of politics. At the
same time the money so paid will be a
great help to the Btate and tbe several
counties thereof.
Perhaps it ia ecarcely a matter of in
ternational moment, now that Bismarck
ia on the brink of the grave, and
hardly likely to figure again in German
politics, but there in something very
appropriate in ' the reconciliation be
tween Emperor William and tbe Prince
of Blood and Iron. It showed two
things with striking force, viz., that the
young emperor hae lost much of hiß
headatrongimpetuoaity—in other wordß,
tbat his head has lost much of its "big
neßa"; and, secondly, that age usb
cooled off the ardoraof'Mad Bismarck."
The graceful tender of the courtesies of
his imperial castlea by the emperor to
tbe aick Btateeman shows that William
himself ia becoming a politician. After
all, he has only arrived at tho age when
men begin to gather wisdom from ex
perience. _________
The ladies of tbe Friday Morning club
have tackled the Chinese question in
good shape. Their chosen exponent has
treated the f übject of exclusion in a very
elaborate paper. She opposes the ex
clusion laws for tbe reason that they are
not animated by the true principle oi
punitive legislation. The Chinese are
not punished by deportation for crime
but for being cheap laborers. Com
plaint is also made that they are the
only foreigners which the law discrimin
ates against. Perhaps a mitigation oi
the severity of this arraignment might
be found in tbe fact that they are the
only foreigners who come to this coun
try with no intention of making it their
home or of raising families. Tbe United
States institutions are designed lor
homes, not for snch a civilization as the
mongolian would bring us. Our gallantry
will not permit us to take issue with the
ladies in this controversy; but when we
are told tbat the bideoua slavery of the
women in Chinatown only equals that
ofßuena Viata and Alameda streets, we
confess that we cannot see it in that
way. The records of our courts bear
witness that the Chinese women are
bought and aold aa chattels; tbat tbey
range in market 'value from $593 to
$2000 apiece, and that it ia more difficult
for them to eacape from tbe shameful
yoke than it ever was for a black slave
in tbe old south. The other women al
luded to have afforded no similar record
to the courts aa far aa wo know.
GRATIFYING TO HIS FRIENDS AND SUP
PORTERS.
The attitude ol Senator White on the
silver question is such ac shows this
young etatesmsn to be possessed oi ex
ceptional sagacity. It may perhaps
diminish his ability to dispense the fed
eral patronage, but it shows tbat he is
aware of the real needs of the American
people and of mankind at iarge. No
pent up Utica controls his sympathies,
and he stands for not only the boundless
American continent but for tbe people
of all hemispheres in standing by silver
—a money so ancient that tbe first real
estate transaction recorded in history—
the purchase of the field of Macpelah
by Abraham—was made in talents of
silver. Senator White never concealed
bis devotion to the white metal as one
of the twin moneys of the constitution,
and what he may lose in the ability to
reward his friends in the shape of office
he will make up a hundred fold by his
enduring etrengtb with the people.
To tbe honor of our townsman it must
be said that be has placed himself on a
splendid eminence, strikingly in keeping
with tbe dignified position oi a United
States senator. There are many people
who look upon tbat exalted Btation, fit
tingly maintained, as equal in dignity
to tbat of the presidency itself. What
ever may be eaid of the status of the
two trusts, all the presidents of the
United States put together, with the ex
ception of Washington, Jefferson, Jack
son and Lincoln, have collectively not
possessed theweigbtof Senator Webster
or Senator Clay. The senate is right in
maintaining its senatorial dignity, and
our own young senator shows tbat he is
alive to his noble trust by declining to
yield his convictions of tbe public good
to tbe blandishments of power. That
there will be a reaction in Washing-,
ton tbat will sustain the senatorial tra
ditions is unhesitatingly believed. It
may not come today or tomorrow, but it
is certain to come some day, and that
not remotely. Tbe American people
just now are doing a heap of thinking,
and tbeir preference and judgment both
lead tbem back to the ideas which pre
vailed in the good old days—those in
which the presidentof the United States
was punctilious in maintaining his own
rights and observing those of tbe co
ordinate branches of the government.
A process of education is now nnder way
in governmental affairs tbat will be oi
incalculable benefit in bringing the pec
pie and officials hack to the honest,
severe and Bimple standards of the
fathere. ________
THEY WILL FARE BADLY.
It ia nsual to point to the large voto in
the house of representatives in favor of
the repeal of the purchasing clause of
the Sherman act ac proof of the general
Bentiment of the country in favor of Mr.
Wilaon'a bill. Ab a matter of fact, half
of the Damocratic and aoino of the Re
publican voteß in iavor of unconditional
repeal were recorded against the senti
ment of the constituencies of the con
gressman who so voted. Many of these
glib and brazen Judas Iscariota had
pledged themselves on a huudred
slumps, in speeches long, loud and ve
hement, to fight the battle of the white
metal to tho la-.t ditch. There are
abundant Bigna that the betrayed con
stituents of these perßona remember
theee pledges, and that tbey are bitterly
resentful at the treachery whose devel
opment they have watched with
great interest and indignation. In
Texaß they have indulged in the most
earnest manifestations oi indignation.
Quite a number of tbe journals of the
Lone Star state have printed the names
of the recalcitrant members of the house
of representatives from tbat common
wealth in a mourning border, very
plainly intimating the portending fate
of these betrayers ol pledgee. That they
will have a hot time with their constit
uents let no man doubt, and thia will be
especially tbe case with the individuals
hailing from the southern states. The
people of that section are accustomed to
thinking with great intensity. Sophistry
will go a very little way with them.
They know that cotton waa eellinir at 19
cants a pound when silver was demone
tized in 1873, when the white metal
waa worth *1.32 an ounce; and that
when it ia only worth 71 to 75
centa an ounce, cotton only brings
seven and three quarter cents a pound.
An argument l:ke that appeaia both to
the pocket norve and tothe intelligence
of a people who permit no paltering
upon the part of their public men.
That the earns intense iudignation ex
ists in the western etates at the Rpostacy
of mßny members of the house
of representatives from that section
let no man doubt. The western
farmer, like tho southern planter,
haa noted tbe steady declension of
his wheat and other staples of hie la
bor, following upon thnt of silver, and
he will be equally ready to wreak ven
geance npon the mierepresontatives of
hie interests and section.
Senator White in hia speech against
the repeal oi the Sherman purchasing
act made a neat point when he cited
that portion of Cleveland's message in
which the president says that the time
has come when silver and gold must
part company, in answer to the claim
made by Wilson and others, that the re
peal oi tbe Sherman act ie for tbe pur
poße of rehabilitating silver. Cleveland
has succeeded in cloßing every eilver
mine in tbe country and filling every
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SUNDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 24. 1893
road leading out from Colorado, Mon
tana and Nevada with discharged min
ers who are seeking work and food in
other elates. If his message to congress
merely urging the repeal of tbe Sherman
purchasing act could accomplish bo
great a disaster, what must follow tbe
passage of tbe repeal measure itself
without some compensating legislation
in behalf of silver? Tbe coming winter
will tell the Btory. A million of hungry
men out of work will be the answer to
this most atrocious policy. But these
men will not etarve if they can help it,
and as they are compelled to be idle by
no fault of theirs, tbey naturally con
clude that they have aa good right to
live aa Cleveland and tbe gold-hugs who
have brought penury and want upon
tbem. We can see, on a email scale,
what thece million of idle men will do
when the pinch of hunger comes, by
glancing at the way in which tbe hun
dreds of seekers after work acted along
the San Joaquin valley. They just took
what they wanted whenever they came
to an eating station. The unemployed
all over tbe United States will band
themselves together everywhere and
satiate their hunger by forced contribu
tions from tboee who have food. What
auch ecer.ee of disorder will lead to,
everybody knows. It will be another
illustration of tbe good old ways of tne
good old barona in the golden days oi
history: "Let him take who has the
power; let him keep who can." The
maxim of the men of the mailed hand
will be adopted and acted upon by the
men with tbe horny lists.
Every true American must be pleased
with tbe fact tbat tho senate is not par
ticularly hasty in confirming the nom
ination of Van Alen to tbe ambassador
ship of Italy. It is a nomination which
Cleveland ought never to have made,
and one tbat will go far to lower tbe es
timation in which tbe president ia held
by even bis most devoted friends. Tbe
New York World saya that Cloveland
paya a campaign debt by thia nomina
tion, ior Van Alen,. who is a son-in
law of Wm. Aator, contributed a very
largo Bum to the campaign fund to aid
in hia election. But this is not the
worst feature of the scandalous nomina
tion. Van Alen is a cell-expatriated
American, an Anglo-maniac of tbe worst
type. He ia a well-known London club
man, where he ia held in contempt by
the very people be toadies to. He out
drawls tbe broadest Britisher in hia
efforts to apeak English as it should
be spoken, "you knaw." His as
sociations and sympathies aro al
together with the English, and ii he
ever bad a drop of American blood
in bia veins he hae oozed it out in toady
ing to the British aristocracy. What a
Democratic president wanted to appoint
this sprig of an Anglomanlac aa a repre
sentative of our people to the Italian
court, for is beyond comprehension. If
he wanted to recognize the money aid
Van Alen contributed to his campaign
fund, he might have paid him back in
come other way. We are aaaured by one
who well knows tbe estimation in which
M& Men held by th« young bloods of
tho i.ngiiHti clubs, that he in tho
butt of constant ridicule, not only
on account of bis affected mannerisms,
but because he iB considered a fool.
He occunioa the position amongat the
British nobility tbat Jo-Jo does amongst
the fast young men of Los Angelee.
The Benate will do well to figuratively
alap Cleveland in the face for thia
insult to American intelligence
manhood, by refusing to confirm the
nomination. /
We had the pleasure of a call from
Craigie Sharp, jr., yeaterday. TVIr.
Sharp is the commiaaionar-at-large of
the California midwinter fair, and has
come to Lis Angele3 to arouae the Inter
est of our people in that exposition. He
will go before the chamber of commerce
ou Monday and present to that body the
claims which the proposed exhibition
haa upon this aeclion for its good-will
aud aubstantial assistance. 1 nder the
circumstances, Los Angelea will not be
able to contribute ao much to the suc
cess oi thia fine undertaking aa it other
wise would. Our people have been
pretty severely drawn upon to keep our
end up at the world's fair, and there
have been a great number of nnueual
drains upon our liberality in other direc
tions. But that we will do our share
towards making the midwinter venture
a success we have not tho slightest
doubt. - _
We are told that a great effort ia to
be made to revive pugilism in San Fran
tisco, and that thiß is to be started in a
bout bc-tween Peter Maher and Joe Mc-
Auliffe. Here is a fine chance to run
two able bodied duffers into tbe chain
gang in San Francisco. Ab pugilists
thoy are back numbers, and only ap
pear in the ring against capable profes
aora cf the art to be knocked into cocked
hate. Ihey are tbe stalest and pooreßt
of all the played-out pugs. But, waiv
ing tbat view of the matter, San Fran
cisco ehould stand by her lately aaeumed
virtuous attitude. It ehe backslides so
aion people will not have had time to
farniliai :za themselves with her linea
ments in thia new act of public de
corum. .
A OKNTLEMAN who came through the
San Joaquin valley two Java ago in
forms ub that tbe towns along tbe road
are in gieat excitement about the arrival
of banda of hard fisted men from tbe
silver states in search of work. Tbey
don't know what to do with them, and are
trying to get rid of them the easiest way
possible. It, thiß irruption continues,
the newc;me'ra will not only impoverish
the towns they flock into, but will in no
wise better tbeir own condition. The
dilemma will booh become bo serious
tbat tbe whole state will be called upon
to take tome action to remedy it.
Tbe chamber of commerce has ad
opted a resolution indorsing Geary's
bill to suspend immigration to tbia
cr.untry for five yearr. This bill is in
tho right direction. '1 be labor already
in this country ought to have a chance.
The way (n which the monopolistic cor
porations have been encouraging tbe
flooding of the country with low-class
immigration from all parte of the world
of late years ie truly appalling. If such
unlimited extension of the hospitalities
of our country ia permitted to continue
we shall soon be inundated with tbe
offscourings of Europe, and cheap labor
will be aa much the rule in the United
States as it ia in other countries. Tbe
country requires at least a breathing
apell from the Niagara of low-class
immigration that baa been poured upon
it for the past fifteen years. #
Personals
Capt. T. B. Merry left for a trip to
Chicago laat evening.
Mr. J. B. Livengnod, foreman of the
Ontario Observer, ia in the city.
R. B. Burns of WjUiami, Ariz., ia au
tographed at the Hollenbeck; hotel.
General Superintendent Fillmore of
the Southern Pacific company is in tbe
city.
Sheriff E. W. Kav of Tulare county,
and S. Mitchell of Yisalia, are at tbe
Nadeau.
Richard Oird, the Chino sugar king,
accompanied by Mra. Gird, is at the
Hollenbeck.
J. H. Griffes, a special writer on tbe
San Francisco Call and the Chicago
Inter-Ocean, is in tbe city.
Harry E. Fuedge, tbe well known
postal clerk who had been dangerously
ill for the past week, is on a fair road to
recovery.
George M. Walker, a prominent prop
erty owner of Long Beach and brother
of Representative Walker of Massa
chusetts, waa in the city yesterday.
Mr, Cralgie Sharp, jr., of Fresno, ia in
the city. lie ia commissioner at large
for the state for the midwinter fair, to
be held in San Francisco, and is here in
tbe interests of that enterprise.
Sergeant John Duncan, one of San
Francisco's oldest and most popular
police officers, ia taking bis vacation in
Lob Angelea and will visit every point ol
interest hereabouts, remaining here
about a week.
Aa will be seen by a notice in another
column there will be a meeting of the
Democratic city central committeeTuea
day next, at tbe office of J. Marion
Brooke, 9 :30 p. m. A full attendance of
the committee is requested.
Henry P. Wilson, attorney for the
Los Angeles Garbage Creamatory com
pany, leavee today for Albuquerque on
professional business, and from there
will proceed to Chicago where he will
meet hia mother and take in the world's
fair sights.
Mr. Chas. FoTroitcr of the Southern
California world''fair commission, who
has been in Cbicago for the past few
months, returned from the white city
yesterday morriog. He atatea that the
California exkibit is attracting great
attention and the benefits which will
accrue from ijt can hardly be realized.
Mr. end Mrs. Henry .1. Kramer will
return from the east about October Ist,
after having spent the summer at Sara
«—«,« n.~A v^, r if '•'- .k—-fr
iended the »»nual convention oT the
Amerleau Society of professors of danc
ing, nek* *t Chicago from September
6th' to and promises several new
and pr/ity round and equare dances to
the dVncing public.
CITY TEACHERS.
They Hold an Institute Meeting Teitur
dey.
Over 250 teachers were present at
the meeting of the city teachers at the
high schorl yesterday.
The teachers were divided into three
Be*ctions, as a teacher's institute, in
which tbe subjects of the gpecial work
for tbe present school year were taken
np and lull? discussed.
The principals of the varionß schools
held a eeparate meeting, during whicb
tte regular reports and also tbo work oi
special teachera were diacuseed. Prof,
brown, superintendent of the city
schoola, made an excellent address upon
the special yearly work.
Tho line s-ng-elen and Pacific.
Articles of incorporation were filed
yesterday of the Loa Angeles and Pacific
Railway company. Tbe purposes are
Bet forth to construct a railroad between
Los Angelea and Santa Monica. The
incorporators sn.l directors are John
Crocs, Albeit P. Cross, John E. Looinie,
Jamea <•». Garrison and John A. Pirtle
of Loa Angeles, Cnarlea W. Croso and
Cbar!e9 M. Cross of San Franoiao. Tiie
capital stcck ia $200,000, of which $17,000
haa bten en beers bed.
Christ chnrch choir has secarol tho
past week two n»w member* to ita inm
ical 81»if. Dr. L. Scmler, the efficient
choir master, was empowered t > invite
Mrs. Hame Owens and Mra. Simpson to
join the corps of sinners, and to tbe
gratification of the mmical committee,
they have consented to do so. Mrs.
Henca-Owene, the contralto, is too well
known in musical circles to rtquire ex
tended notice, she will be heard espe
cially in the offertory, with Mr. Wil
liam Stephen, the brilliant tenor, in a
dust from one of the oratorios. Mra.
Simpson, late of San Francisco, becomes
tho leading eoprano, and though her
engagement doee not begin ior a week,
yet etie ia to assist immediately at all
Sunday services. Her voica is remark
eblv sweet ami sympathetic, with wide
cotnpaes, and herfriends predicts bright
luiure before her.
Mr*. M. A. Twin, of Now York city,
honorary secretary of ihe Woman's aux
iliary, will shortly vieit the church
people of Loe Angeles. Mra. Tuing i»
juat returning Irom a tour around the
world, during wnich ahe visited the
missions of the Episcopal church. She
has much to tell ot her trip that ia in
terecting, and ia a most agreeable
speaker. There will be a number oi
meetings in St. Paul's church during
Mrs. Twing's visit, to which all are in
vited. Dates and arrangements for
meeting v>iil be given later. It was
expected tbat Mrs. Twing would have
been here October lat end 2d, but her
plans have been necessarily changed.
Vo«U>ril»y, Teetordey.
The books of the Adams-street Homenteirt
Tract No. 2 w r> opened yestoMav. Obtain
pro*pfctuo quickly; 138 lots, *10 a mcnlh,
tyiiuuuiiaitfeik P»icu tpZTt'*. .mi;,.- .... ... ..i.*,
tha ma la-ge restO. nei-1-, Uroal uvetnus, tM ,
now ready. Southern California Laid Co., 230
Hoi tli Main st.
You Can Hunt!
It's SPORT to See the Way Our Competitors Complain of the Low Prices We Quote.
MADE XO MEASURE $25 for $20 CASH!
MADE TO MEASURE $50 for $40 CASH!
Best of Trimmings and Workmanship. And, if Need Be, We Can Make
Suits in Twenty-four Hours.
Trousers, $5.00 to $14.00.
Stores |v }y\ Latest
In fls!\ 7\\l New
Every V \JiJJ York
Large X) t4 F as hi° n
City. J/ 1 \ ' Plates.
Si 'p X * *
We Claim for this Fall's Importations Pre-eminence.
"NICOLX, THE TAILOR,"
13-4 S. SPRING ST., LOS ANGELES.
CjAMPBELL'S i
ALIFORNIA
TnBt BIFORa GOIXG TO
t MEXICO TO BUTCOEIOB
20 Per Ctnt fed
OPALS
SOUVENIR SPOONS
—AND OTHER GOODS.—
Call wd See Oar Nock.
£jy-LAuGBST CURIO BTORL—SM
ON TF! X OOAST.
C/VMPBELL'S CURIO STORE,
9-8 ly
15 FOLDING BEDS 15
WE HIV! COS. liNED TO US
15 Oak Folding Beds
WITH MIRROB FROSTS,
TO BE DISPJSED OF
REGARDLESS OF COST.
MATLOCK & REED,
4,i (i and 421', :■. Spring St.
If YOU lUVB DEFECTIVE EYES
«i„I vilue timul co i»ult ut No c»«e of def«c
ufe viaio i wiurj B u.*. s ai-. r«aui™d * too
■onu'lwwl ns. Tho cotro.il adlastmeiil
1./ i-ir«H-i Is mitt-as important *< l«o ftotfeot
t ln« of o.. q ''i aud S . sMeutlflo H.li..«aiH
m"kl7.i ..f ifl«»9i»a«l frame" our ..illy >j.l
u(Tm tiWa.iy). fives exAraluod aud noiod
SS?»i iinarn-; We usie'.octno power, sivl are
inVon'ly nonaeham thai g.-luds(rlaM* .10 order
T« MAR-mc'tZ. losdlng «WW,M« Optic
bLank
BOOKS.
Glass & Long,
TEMPLE AND NEW HI3H STS.
Tel s:i.V H-3 7IU m LO* AN6EI.ES
, powdeb.
733 erxru and bkoaowa*.
COMINGS Wm }
That Magic Tool, the Air Brush,
..>•>*<>« Bid diiw vlimohv.. . , to omo. o<
Exclusively in Making
THE NEW SEPIA PORTRAITS
COPIED F*:M PHOTO OR ORIGINAL SITTINO.
Studio, No. 221 South Spring Street, Up Stairs.
Sketches Made For Any Kind of Illustration, Engraving, Etc. 0-17 mm
OJIBBTTa BDW.D.BILENT.
THE SILENT & BETTS CO.
REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE. ..
rnij bai w_l?m«dwftv west Bide, the third lot Honth of new brick building
.oolwl^
Further particular* of . .
THE SILENT & BETTS COMPANY, Agents,
N - , K . IJOKKK.It HKOONO Sr. AHO BROADWAY. ' A NItKLKS. „,
NILE9PEABE
WE WILL NOT-BE UNDERSOLD.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
I CARPETS, LINOLEUMS, ETC j
WAY DOWN FOR THE NEXT 30 DAYS.
, 337, 339 and 341 S. Spring St.
613-3 m | „
3 NO ONE SHOULD FAIL TO TRY
SALINE SULPHUR SYBUP. a
It Is Prepared Kyprejsly For Snlptaur Bsths at Home.
/.cvroj.Tj wvirnv rath TITB INTO A f-ULPIiUR HPEING CURES F.VEUHATIiJI
IT CONVERTS EVERY BATH TOB livju A UNIIX(:K [,,,« D sOI.PHIfR BATHS.
87 lm A * mJo£k. 1W » 5.., tin

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