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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, September 26, 1893, Image 1

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TODAY'S FORECAST.
FOR THE DISTRICT OF SOUTH
ERN CALIFORNIA: FAIR WEATH
ER; SLIOHTLV COOLER TUES
DAY; WESTERLY WINDS.
VOL. XL. NO. 168
DOUBLE-BREASTED :
DU 10 DI?ESS & SCHOOL SUITS
*\ A Large and Elegant Line at Prices That Defy Competifion.
OVERCOATS, BUSINESS AND fIpKITJ Pjl/IpKI
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The Herald
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LOS ANGELES: TUESDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 26, 1893.
AN UNENVIABLE RECORD.
The Coast Seamen's Union in
Bad Repute.
A Long List of Crimes Placed
to Its Credit.
Saturday Night's Outrage the Climax
of the Series.
Heavy Reward* Offered for the Arrest
of the Conspirators—Three Suspects
In Custody—The Ship Own
ers Declare War.
By tho Associated Press.
San Francisco, Sept. 25. —Saturday
night's dynamite outrage, in which four
men were killed and two more badly in
jured, one fatally, was the culmination
of a long series of illegal acts which
have been attributed to tbe Coast Sea
men's union. For several years the un
ion has been waging a bitter war azainet
the non-union Bailors and their employ
ers and have resortod lo many acts of
intimidation in other coast ports, as well
ao r>aii Francisco. At this port, at va
rious times, five schooners, barken
tineo and barks wore cat adrift, one of
them nearly goiuu ashore. The ship
Tacoina and the brig Percy Edwards
had their anchor chains nearly sawed
through. The ship Columbia had her
standing rigging* rut and her sails torn
to shreds. Dynamite was placed in
tho hold of the steamer liawnmore, but
the clockwork which was to have ex
ploded the machine did not go, and tne
vessel was saved. A few months ago ti
stick of dynamite was found on the cyl
inder head of the. the tug Ethel and
Marion, and a Pujjet Snnnd collier came
into port with a stick of dynamite in her
engine room. In addition to these,
numerous! small bjatß were scuttled and
smashed and non-union sailors beaten.
No one was ever punished lor these
deeds, and the men who were lighting
tho non,union eailoro grow hold.
TUKEROftS REWARDS OFFERED,
The principal development today in
the dynamite outrage of Saturday night
was the increased interest manifested in
the capffcre of Its authors. Ooverftor
Markham offered a reward of $1000,
Chief Crowley added (250 to it, and the
Ship-Owners' association put np an in
dependent $500, making a total of
$1750. The theory ia that among scch
dastardly cowards as the men capable of
ench worit there mnst-toe-eome \r*ltor
whom gold will bait sufficiently
to back up the fear that prompts
turning informer. Chief Crowley
detailed half a dozen detectives today to
aid Detective Egan and Sergeant Helms
of the harbor police in the search for
the men who planned and carried out
the deed of death. The chief is driving
his men with whip and spur, and that
he is in deadly earnest is Bhown by tbe
amount of work he is doing in pereon.
THE Sllir-OWNEHS' ACTION.
The directors of the Ship Owners'
association held a long session during
the afternoon, at which they added $500
lo the two rewardi mentioned above,
and donated $50 towards the burial ex
penses of Edward Murphy and James
McUinnes, the two Bailors killed by the
bomb. The sentitnont of tbe shipown
ers, as manifested at the meeting, from
which not a single director was absent,
wits very strongly in favor of
crushing tiie sailors' union ont
of existence. President Simpson's
idea that there can be no safety
for life or property as long as the
union hue tbe semblance of life, was
concurred in by -ivery man present, and
ono result of the horror of Saturday
night is that now the union' will have
to make a defensive light for existence
instead of an offensive tight for patron
age. By a special resolution it
wan agreed that tho members of the
Ship-owners' Association are read/ and
Willing to risk ; their property and
spend thoir money in exhausting every
means "to end tbe reign of terror," in
the language of the agreement, "so long
conducted by the organization."
TUB INCITING OK OUTRAGES.
In the argument over the responsibil
ity of the anion for past outrages, it waa
decided that the association does not
charge the nnion with directly inciting
or inducing members to such awful
deeds of bloodshed and destruction,
but does charge them with stir
ricg them up by speech and action
in a manner calculated to make
individual members take just such steps
of war. There is evidence in tbe hands
of the association, says Secretary Wil
liams, to prove that men of bad charac
ter have been paid from the union treas
ury for the sole labor of beating non
union sailors and sympathizers and
destroying property.
"The eituation is this," said Mr.
Williams, "there is a great supply of
sailors on this coast, and. there always
will be such a supply that a
strike or tie-up on lha part
oi the union must neceeßarily
fail. Nine-tenths of the deep-water
sailor* who enter port on tbe coaet come
out with the intention of leaving their
ships and going into the coasting trade.
The union leaders know just how
anxious the men are to quit long voy
aging for coasting, and this leaves them
violence as a sole recourse. Their policy
for years has been to beat and maltreat
all non-union men, thereby driving them
away again or forcing them into the
union ranks."
UNION BAILORS OFFER A REWARD.
The Sailors' Union of the Pacific, at a
meeting tonight, offered a reward of
$1000 for the arrest and conviction of the
parties who exploded the bomb in front
of the Curtin's boarding house Saturday
night. A committee was also appointed
to make arrangements for a mass meet
ing, to be held in Metropolitan ..ail
soon, for the purpose of placing the
union in a proper fight before the public
by condemning the dynamite outrage.
PCddOX stCWC'SIMO THK TOWSI.
Tho police are scouring tha town to
•tetaiu a clue to tbe identity ot tbe
fiends who caused Saturday night's ex
plosion. Chief Crowley says he be
lieves the Coast Seaman's nnion is re
sponsible for the deed, and tbat the
members of the nnion knew
that the explosion was to occur.
Tbe chief this morning ordered
the arrest of Secretary Fnreeeth of the
union and he was taken into custody.
Fnreeeth denies all knowledge of the
crime and a vigorous pumping by the
police failed to extract any information
trom him. He was roleased alter being
questioned by tbe police.
VICTIMS OF THE EXPLOSION.
John Curtin and Charles Bernard, two
of tbe victims of the Saturday night ex
plosion, are still alive, though there is
hardly a chance for Bernard's recovery.
Both his eyes were blown out and tbe
drums of bis care broken. Young Cur
tin ia the only one of the victims who is
a*ble to tell anything of what occurred
previous to the explosion, lie says he
saw an old black valise in the doorway
and picked it op, then he remembered
bis father's warning about picking up
Btrange packages, and suddenly dropped
it and ran across the street, exclaiming:
"It'sdynamite." Theothermen laughed
at tbe idea and gathered curiously
around the valiee. Suddenly there was
a roar and Curtin remembered no more
till ne found himself bleeding and
wounded in the street.
THREE SUSPECTS ARRESTED.
Three men have been arrested for the
crime. They are John Tyrrell, Jamea
Woods and Terrence Tracy. Tyrrell and
Woods are the men who threatened
Mtp. Curtin a few days ago. Th6y were
formerly members of the Coa6t Sea
man's union, but were dropped some
time ago for non-payment of dues.
Tracy is a deep sea sailor and has never
belonged to the union.
A MILLION DOLLAR FIRE.
ST. JOSEPH, MO., VISITED BY A
CONFLAGKATIU.\.
Some of the Beat Business Property In
tUe City Destroyed—Firemen Un
able to Cope With the * lumps
for Lack of Water.
St. Joseph, Mo., Sept, 25.—St. Joseph
experienced a million-dollar conflagra
tion today. The cause of the fire wsb
tbe stub of n lighted cigarette thrown
carelessly on the floor of a store room on
the fifth floor of the big department
store of Townsend, Wyatt A Emery.
The fire department could have put out
the fire but for the failure of the water
works pumps to give pressure sufficient
to force vtStei to the required height.
The flames had got beyond the point
where chemical apparatus might have
been of use. When the fifth
floor fell it became apparent that the
building was doomed, and the firemen
then directed their efforts to an attempt
to confine tho lire to the bnilding.
Handicapped by the insufficient water
supply, they were unsuccessful. The
T&wneend & Wyatt bnildiDg became a
roaring furnace and the flames leaping
a hundred feet into the air soon at
tacked the Commercial bank building.
Almost simultaneously the (lames
jumped across the street the Carbery
find Franco blocks. Then it was appar
ent that the whole block was doomed,
and tha fear became general that the
entire business portion of the city would
be swr-pt away. The roofs of the Carbery
and Franne buildings wero burning
when water begou to come. The depart
ment stopped the progress of the fltmea
north at the German-American bank-,
south in the Carbery biock and west at
the building occupied by Hanson, Gar
ret & Brewßter, wholesale dealers.
From the Wyatt, Townsond &
Emery building the flames leaped to the
building occupied by Kanger & Shoup,
crockery dealerß, which quickly suc
cumbed". Then followed the building of
S. U. Allen & Co., wholesale grocers,
and in quick succession a hotel and sev
eral small buildings occupied by email
tradesmen were consumed. It wbb o
o'clock before the fire was under control.
The conflagration had been underway
0 hours. AtO o'clock the fire was still
burning fieicely in the hotels.
The burned district is bounded by
Felix and Edniond, Sixth and Seventh
streets, and the south half of the block
between Edmond and St. Charles, Sixth
anil Seventh.'
Allen Laird and Oliver Knapp, fire
men, fell from a ladder into a burning
building and both were badly burnt.
Fire Chief Kane was badly burned and
a young man named Hunter fell two
Btoriea into a cellar and had two ribs
broken. Calvin Wyatt was struck by
flying bricks and was seriously injured.
JUtURDBR WILL OUt.
Sensational Arrests at Fresno for a Re
cent Crime.
Fresno, Sept. 25.—0n the morning of
the 10th Peter Williams supposedly shot
himself through the head in a lodging
house, dying aoon after. His wife had
just left the room when the deed was
committed. The coroner's jury returned
a verdict of enlcide. The officials thought
differently, and this afternoon J. M.
Burnham, who occupied an adjoining
room on tbe night of the tragedy, waa
arrested at Malaga, near here, charged
with the murder. Williams' widow
was also arrested and lodged in jail as
being an accomplice in tho crime. Lato
tonight another man named Charles
Maurice was arrested. A sensation is
expected.
The World'e Best Marksman.
Chicago, Sept. 25.—Today the in
fantry competition of the United States
army at Fort Sheridan closed. Tho
total scorea leads the world'd beet rec
ord. Sergeant R. N. Davidson made
021, which is thirty-two points ahead of
tne highest score, the beat markemau
ehip in tbe world.
For sunburn and freckles use only
Perfecta Face Cream; safe and sure,
For sale by A. E. Lsttleboy, drugfist.
311 South Spring street.
Conn band instruments. Agency at
Fitzgerald's, cor. Spring and Fianklinats.
SOLLY SMITH'S HARD LUCK
Dixon Knocked Him Ont in
Seven Rounds.
He Put Up a Good Fight, but It
Didn't Count.
The Colored Champion's Rushes Were
Irresistible.
Both Men Were Madly Punished—A
Hoosier Sheriff Arrested Solly
After the Battle for Fight
ing lv Indiana.
By the Asscrlatcd Press.
Coney Island Athletic Club, Sept.
25.—There were a good many sporting
men at Coney Island tonight, but not
so numerous as the club had hoped for.
There was some disappointment when
it was learned that the preliminary bout
between Mike Dunn and Fred Morris,
who were to spar 10 rounds, would not
come off owing to Dunn's illnesa, but
Jim Burge took Dunn's place. Ten
lively rounds were fought, and Bnrge
proved himself by no means an easy
mark for the black cyclone. The de
cision was in favor of Morris.
(leorge Dixon,
Dixon and Smith weighed in six
hours before the meeting, so it could
not be told exactly what they scaled.
It looked, however, as though Smith
was a bit the lighter. Dixon was Cret
in tbe ring, and was but half-heartedly
applauded. Smith was well cheered.
Dixon picked as his seconds George
Godfrey, a Boston colored man; Jack
Narline, of Boston, and Tom O'Rourke,
and a man named Mike Bradley, of
Lawrence, Mass., for his timer. As
usual, Smith chose Billy Delanev, Cor
bett's handler; his brother, Edward
Smith, and Jack Oliver, with Aleck
Gteggains as watch-holder.
Bound one —On the call of time Smith
made a rush and there was a clinch.
Inside work honors were even. Dixon
landed on Smith's body, while tbe latter
ieU short. Dixon sent out his right on
the ear and sent Smith to the floor in a
clean knock-down. Smith took time in
getting up and tried to get his right on
the colored boy's jaw, but failed.
Second round—Dixon missed a left
swing. Smith was in on him like a
flash, rushing Dixon to the ropes and
landing right and left. Alter a short
sparring bout, Smith reached Dixon's
jaw with liis left. Dixon planted
a left swing on Smith's neck, missing a
right swing. Smith closed op him and
uppor-cut him with his right. They
clinched and shouldered each other.
Dixon reached Smith with two right
hand swings. Smith slipped to his
knees and took full time to rise.
The third round was full of excite
ment. Smith went down lour times,
twice by clean blows, twice in rushes.
After the last fall the (Jalifornian came
up, taking full time, with a smile on hia
face.
Holly Smith.
Fourth round—Dixon planted blow
alter blow on Smith's body and more
over gained another knock down.
Fifth round —Dixon gent Smith to hia
knees. Smith came back with a lucky
right-hander on the noae, and Dixon got
a cut that made him bleed. The blow
almost staggered the featherweight
champion and he did no more forcing
for a moment. Smith gained confidence
and eailed in, but swung hia hand too
high, and Dixon lived. Dixon slugged
Solly in tho face three times, getting
back only one good punch in the neck.
Sixth round —Dixon caught another
in tho nose, renewing the flow of blood.
' Smith next Biunehed Dixon iv the
mouth and the colored boy rushed and
missed. Hia eye waa closed aad his
nose resembled v piece of raw beef.
The seventh round settled things.
Smith came out from his corner looking
strong enough, though he had hia right
eye well blacked. He planted his right
and lolt on Dixon's body. Dixon missed
and then planted his right on Smith's
face. Sinu'i iv return landed a right
hander. Dizou then floored wtth
a terrific straight right. The Californian
staggered to his feet, only to be floored
again. Again he rose just as tbe gong
eonnded, bnt he was too weak to keep
his feet, and fell again near the corner.
He gamely staggered once more to his
feet, and, reeling like a drunken man,
essayed to continue, but the referee ad
vancing between, motioned him back to
his corner, Dixon wasdeclared the win
ner in the seventh round.
The announcement gave tho time of
tbe seventh round aa 2 minutes 42 sec
onds ; the time of the fight was 2f> min
utes and 42 seconds, the unanimous
verdict was that Smith gave Dixon a
good tight, bnt could not withstand the
colored boy's constant rushing.
While on the way to the dressing
room alter the fight, the sheriff from
Indiana arrested Solly Smith because of
the part ho took in the fight with
Johnny Griffin at Boby, Ind., a short
time ago. The sheriff then sought dili
gently after Johnny Griffin, but had
not located him at a very late hour.
More Roby Fighters Arrested.
Valparaiso, Ind.. Sept. 25.—At
Crown Point today O'Malley, Coetello,
Woods and Siler, who were indicted by
the grand jury for riotous conspiracy
for participating in prize fights at Roby,
appeared and were ordered under arrest
by Judge Gillette. The judge demanded
bonds aggregating $70,000. Their coun
sel succeeded in having tbe bonds re
duced to $20,000. Tbe trial was set for
next Monday.
Corbett Signs the Articles.
New York, Sept. 25.—James J. Cor
bett, the pugilistic champion, signed
formal articles of agreement at Asbury
Park this morning to fight with Charleß
Mitchell, the English champion, before
tbe Coney Island Athletic club some
time in December. Mitchell has already
signed the articles.
EIGHT EXCITING HEATS.
FREE-FOR-ALL TROT AT STOCK
TON FINISHED.
Dnrfee's Black Stallion McKinney Took
First Money—The Horses Tired Oat
With Much Scoring — Sev
eral Drivers Fined,
Stockton, Sept, 25.—The free-for-all
trot, postponed from Saturday, after
two heats were run, was called at 1
o'clock today, with six horses in it.
McKinney and Whipple each had one
heat to his credit. In the pools Mc-
Kinney sold the favorite at $3, Steve
Whipple at $10, the field at $20, with
Ottinger, Shy lock, Richmond, jr., and
Ki&saabb. ia the bunch. The horses
had scored 14 timea up to 2:15, the
horses breaking up and not holding
well together. The judges fined the
drivers of Ottinger and Whipple for
coming np ahead. Sanders, who drove
Whipple, was fined $30 and Keating
$15. Whipple led to the home stretch,
Ottinger second, when Ottinger forged
ahead and won the heat by two
lengths, Whipple second, Shylock
third. Klamath broke on the firßt
quarter and came in just in saving
distance. Time, 2:11.
AN EXCITING FINISH.
On tbe send-off of the last heat Kla
math was pocketed and McKinney took
the pole. At the quarter they were
bunched, but McKinney moved ahead
and led at the half by a length. Kla
math went up and McKinney incaeased
his lead several lengths. Klamath
got his speed again and passed
Ottinger. Within a hundred yards
of the wire McKinney went off
his feet and Klamath caught up but
broke and McKinney went under tbe
wire the winner by a noße. It was a
grand finish. Ottinger came in four
lengths behind and McKinney was given
first money, Ottinger second money,
Klamath third money, Shylock fourth.
Summary:
FREE FOP ALL TROT.
McKinney, 2, 1, 4, 4, 2,1. 2, i.
3, 1, 2, 1. 2, 8, 3.
Klamath,s, 5, 5, t, 4, 3,1, 2.
Shylock, 3, 4, 3, 3, (stabled).
Richmond, jr., 4, 6, 0, ti. (etabled).
Steve Whipple, 1, 2, 2, 5, 3, (shoe
dropped).
Time, 2:13. 2:11K, 2:11)6, 2:14, 2:16,
2:10)6, 2:16)£, 2:22.
OTHER EVENTS.
Unfinished pacing—Jingler won, Ger
aldine second, Major Lambert third;
time. 2:16.
Trotting, three-year-olds for country
horses—Baritone first, Mohave second;
time, 2:21.
SAN JOSE BACKS,
San Jose, Sept. 25.—The district fair
opened today with a fair attendance.
The races resulted as follows:
Trotting, yearlings—Turner won,
Merle M. second, Frank Brandon third;
time, 1:33.
Trotting, 2-year-olds — Clover Note
won, John Bury second, Boubrette
third; time, 2:32.
Trotting, 4-year-oldß— Alviso won,
Minnie B. second, Detector distanced;
time,
National League Baseball.
Cincinnati, Sept. 25.—The Bride
grooms' error gave the game to the
Reds. Cincinnati, 11; Brooklyn, 4.
Cleveland, Sept. 25.—TheClevelands
won by hitting Stockdale hard. Cleve
land, 10; Washington, 5.
Louisville, Sept. 25.—The champions
easily defeated the Colonels. Louis-,
ville,4; Boßton, 9.
Chicago, Sept. 25.—Tbe Colts and
Giants put up a fine game. Chicago, 5;
New York, 4.
Sr. Lol ls, Sept. 25.—The Browns were
slaughtered by Baltimore. St. Louis, 5;
Baltimore, 17.
It is imoortant to know that a correct
fit in fine "tailoring can be had at moder
ate prices from 11. A. Qetz, 112 Weßt
Third street.
A sea bath at home with Turk's Island
sea salt ia exhilarating. Recommended
by all physicians. For aale by ail drug
gists ; 15c a package.
Ladies' huts cleaned, dyed, reshaped
and trimmed. California Straw Works,
South Main etrset, opijouita Third.
COUNTY TREASURER.
riR. FLEniNa files his bond,
BUI' THE COURTS HAVE YET TO
DETER/TINE WHETHER HE IS
TREASURER OR NOT.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
HAULED OVER THE COALS.
Senator Stewart Roasts the
President.
The Silver Statesman's Scath
ing Criticisms.
Burning Invectives Hurled at tne
Nation's Chief.
Cleveland Denounced as an Uneducated
Frlff and an Arrogant Vsurper
of Power—The Invective
to Be Continued.
By the Associated Tress.
Washington, Sept. 25.—The first thing
in the senate today, after routine morn
ing business, was consideration of
Stewart's resolution, offered on Satur
day, arraigning the president for at
tempting to coerce congress into passing
the silver repeal bill, thereby impairing
the independence of the ca-ordinate
branches of the government, in viola
tion of the constitution and destructive
of the government. The Nevada sena
tor had scarcely spoken a dozen words
in snppqrt of bis resolution when Man
derson of Nebraska interrupted him
with the point that there was no
quorum. Enough senators finally strol
led in to make a quorum, and Stewart
proceeded. He began by referring to
the recent centennial anniversary of tha
laying of the foundation stone of the
capitol, when, he said, the president,
with more than 100,000 high paid gov
ernment offices to bestow, with the veto
power designed only for extraordinary
occasions, backed by concentrated capi
tal and a "venal press," tnrning to
tbe senate winz, declared in menacing
tones tbat if the representatives there
assembled legislated in passion or preju
dice in behalf of sectional or selfish in
terests, the time when the corner stone
was laid, or the circumstances surround
ing it, waa not worth mentioning. This
sentiment, cheered by the thoughtless
multitude, was construed by the venal
press as a rebuke from the president to
tho guilty, venal senate.
TIIE USURPATION OF POWER.
Stewart then quoted from the history
of England as to the parliamentary
struggle with the Stuarts. Coming to
the present time, he charged that the
president, in disregard oi his ostb. of
office, allowed the secretary of the
treasury to violate the act which made
the purchase of 4,500,000 ounces of sil
ver per month mandatory, by < exercising
unlawful discretion in purchasing a
smaller amount.
Stewart declared tbat at no time since
Charles 1., either in England or the
United States, had any king or presi
dent openly and defiantly disobeyed a
statute which he himself had declared
mandatory, or allowed his subordinates
to do the same thing. Was it not time
to sound an alarm?
"If constitutional liberty is of any
valne at all," said the senator, "we
should Btand up and aay to the presi
dent : ' You have overstepped the
mark. We cannot afford to have the
laws of congress disregarded.' "
Stewart thon said the president had
no exalted opinion of the senate or the
house. He seemed to regard them aa
appendageß of the executive. In one of
his letters the president spoke of expect
ing soon to have a "session of congress
on his hands." That spoke volumes
touching the president's opinion of the
co-ordinate branches of the government.
Cleveland's conceit.
Stewart then read from the Cincin
nati Times-Star an interview with the
president in which he Raid the repeal of
the silver purchasing act could not be
effected this year. There was no news
paper reporter, Stewart said, who would
misrepresent Cleveland in the columns
of his paper. They all had too much
respect for tbe office to do that. The ar
ticle continued: "The people are with
me and my policy," said the president,
"but I fear 1 shall not be able to com
mand action from congress. I never
saw such obstinacy as exists among tha
members ot congress on the silver ques
tion. It is useless to appeal to them
now."
The assumption of tbe president that
he knew btst, said Stewart, and that
those who had studied the subject all
their lives were wrong, was remarkable.
When such Bentimentß were uttured by
the chief executive, it became perti
nent to inquire where and when did he
acquire all his knowledge; where and
when did he have an opportunity to fa
miliarize himself with the wants and
needs of the American people, and with
the science of money and economies;
where and when did he study It and Ta
what school?
grover's lack of knowledge.
"I believe," Baid Stewart, "that
Mr. Cleveland is tbe only president who
has ever presided at the White house
who did not possess a liberal education,
either in soma college or on a farm
where he communed with nature and
learned nature's laws. I believe eithei
a country education among the people,
or a collegiate education, is necessary.
I do not believe the education of a clerk
or a lawyer, without a liberal education
in college or a liberal education by
studying the books of nature, can fit »
men to preside over the destiny of thia
country. The three greatest presidents
we ever had received that liberal educa
tion which nature affords, by coming in
contact with the people and taking a
wider view of the laws of man and ol
nature than can be obtained in a law
office or in a sheriff's o.fice, or in the
office of a mayor or any other contracted
place where the great book of nature is
cloaed."
}fe cited Washington, Linooln and
Jackson as great examples of great pres
idents, as the result of liberal educa
tion. Unfortunately the present presi
dent was denied both a culiego educa
tion and ti.at grand and better educa
tion taat came from cummunion with
the great producing classes of tha eoua

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