OCR Interpretation


The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, September 28, 1893, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1893-09-28/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

TODAY'S FORECAST.
FOR THE DISTRICT OF SOUTH
ERN CALIFORNIA: FAIR WEATH
ER; NEARLY STATIONARY TEM
PERATURE: WESTERLY WINDS.
VOL. XL. NO. 170
DOUBLE-BREASTED f :
DU I 0 6c SCHOOL SUITS
A Large and Elegant Line at Prices That Defy Competition.
~Ts B F r ss . A : D GENTLEMEN
In AU the Latest Styles. We Are Showing
MOST ELEGANT LINE OF NECKWEAF
i v
Ever Seen in Loa Angeles.
Mullen, Bluett 8c Co.
OOR. SPRING Sc. FIRST STREETS.
i CRYSTAL PALACE
138,140 AND 142 SOUTH MAIN STREET.
WE HAVE THE FINEBT LINE AND
# BIGGEST STOCK OF - - • •
Haviland & Co/s China
I , AND
White China For Decorating
At the LOWEST PRICES in the City. We Show, Anion? Others, tbe Foi low inn
Shapes: THE MARSEILLES,NBNUPHAK. RICHELIEU. HENRY 11, WHEAT.
POMPADOUR. TOR.GOT, TRIANON, FRANCE, etc. AU of tbe Latest Designi!
Complete Line of LA CROIX'S PAINTS and Other Material for CHINA DEC
ORATING.
A SPECIAL DISCOUNT FOR TWO WEEKS ONLY.
MEYBERG BROS.
SOMETHING NEW
WE ARE SHOWING IN OUR
CARPET Mil RUG DEPARTUEKT
A Superb and Varied Line of Prlvat- Pattern. Prod'tceo to Meet
the Ssqubemeau ot the Most Exacting Tastoi -
PA DDPTC AXMINSTBRS, WILTONS, MOQUKTTE3 VELVIT3,
LAKJrJjIO BRUSSELS. TAPESTRY, INGRAINS.
We Have Received a Very Choice Collection of Handsome Rom. Which Have
Been Carefully Selected and Merit Special Attention.
"DTTPC ORIENTAL, TORKISH, PBBBIAN, JAPANESE, SMYRNA. A KOORA
nUUJ ASD rV& - IsI>A HAN AND KENNiN-toTON ART SQUARES.
At \J A LARGE VARIETY IN ALL SIZES.
PTTDT A IMO An J ln .?,! nal,T . fln ' assortment lv Portiere-, Laoe and bilk Curtetm,
UUjUIAIINO Ba«h Silks, India Muslins, French Cretons, Plushes, etc. '
LOS ANGELES FURNITURE COMPANY,
225-7-9 S. BROADWAY. OPP. TIT HALL.
TWO GOLD MEDALS
Two First Prizes for Large and Small Photographs
EWORLD'S FAlRjf
efcA-e »ua *3K Li.t IJr 'rXCOUtJUO'J uui suiioc.orlty,
220 SOUTH SPRING STREET. \&J&<ifr ,, An « e,< "
-- - - - - -TT- - r I r.Q tt'T As Uolluabo k
BARKER BROS. ~
SUCCESSORS TO BULKY & BARK Kit BICOS. •
f5& H * ve Mo7eJ Intj Th sir New Quarters
V]L/| in the itintiou filoclc, Corner
Third an, Spring Sti.
V\l / II Thlslsnotthe kind of i carpet exhibition we
yy I IN aro giving-, but wo are inaklug a dlsp.ay fully
/CX-T"^ r-J It as attractive and a great d-al more remarkable.
WV-"/'' r \SW CVPtll were made to bo p'lt down, and you
W<Z-£nI KsS *^- VVI W JU " ' lUak tbl " wtl ' u " rloes **N made
)\-\V . *?' ,r>!u «»» manner in which we hay. put
lr~~ JL r!~ '1 r ' l4J£l%,. W n\ V' 0m Yoa CK 'P et >"*» flo "r »nd we
"our our figures. That Is nt mere talk' For
per(u ' " (,Qof »'»»<">. O'lrAbi Ity of texture and
V- li'iii iM v i .un J mrj "■ j' Hffl «"™«»dniarjr cheapness, we will- match
» "» ,,U,t • nT,hl "« on ,be conttnent our line of
' t&7j& 'MM «•">*«»• , Wo carry a lar«a stock of Fuinl-
*; zjj£~^~~~u±,_ r . _ tnio »nd Drapery,
WILLIAMSON'S MUSIC STORE
oBN^fh< J {, r K L u s PIANOS MATBU ,,W „
li. MIOINGER. i' ii ' V ~ > i:RALUULL.R.
. KEWMAN KitOd., nt) ri „ M _ b^ITUABABNES.
Air Circulating Reed Coll*. G A N S UEKIjIIAM,
—' m ■ i i E«.ver Tongued.
A FULL LINE OF MUSIC AND MOSICiL IN3TRCMii\'Tt
SEWING MACHINES
EUndard, Rotary Shuttle White and Other ton , SBnHIs Machines, Supplies, eta
SOUTH BTQBET. 4 18 lv
§S. CONRADI,
- - OPTICIAN - -
Watchmaker and Jeweler
n!« t !!!3 S . SI , rlo1(8t ,
COX. FBANKUN.
ND HUTTING A SFKCfALrY
[AIOHES, Cl.Oi'KS AND JBWKUiY
aHUWULbY KEPAIKKI, ANj WAhEASTaj).
U 7 ly >
The Herald
CHAS, VICTOR HALL TRACT,
OF ADAM 9 STREET.
la'gibnmi vim lots for laieln the coutu went
avo.u-s sj leot wide, lined wita Falnm, Mon
t-Tey i;m -f. Gravllb.a, Foppew, the new unm
o( AiKlerSem MegnolU*, mc , which will Bive
11 ,' v •»* »tte» «1 •Meet*, Lois
eieAOtl&O tv 11 loot aiiera,
$3*o Kuk $10 per month UU
ou.-i oil is pen), or one-third ea<h nnd balaiico
in Aye ye«r»; or if you Im.Jd jwu can have 11 Ye
years'time. Get ouo whh« you can. Apply to
oibce, WJ West First street. 7-14 Urn
LOS ANGELES; THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 2", 1893.
THE 'FRISCO DYNAMITARD.
Chief Crowley Succeeds in
Bagging His Game.
The Eight Man Believed to Be
in Custody.
Alex. Soreneon Arrrsted for Satur
day Night's Crime.
Be la a Member of tha Seaman's Union.
The Arrest Mad* at Stockton - Con
clusive Kvlrlence Asgalnat
the Frlaouar.
By the Associated Pres..
Stockton, Sept. 27.—Alexander Soren.
■on, answering the deecription of the
man wanted by Chief of Police Crowley
of San Francisco, ac tbe owD9r of tbe
valise found there which contained
dynamite, waa arretted here this even,
inn on the scow schooner Maria Nelson,
which waa loading bay and ready to
leave for San Francisco. Tbe police be
lieve he ii the man wanted in connec
tion with the fatal explosion at tbe
non-union tailor boarding house; but
he aayi be has not been in San Francleco
for two weeks. He saya be knows noth
ing about the valiae found, and tbat it
ia not bia. The arreat waa made on a
telegram received ftom Crowley, saying
tbat Sorenaon waa on a schooner here.
Sorenaon aaya he has bean here a week.
He waa found in a saloon on the levy,
and waa arrested by '' Detective Carroll
and taken to jail.
THE RIGHT MAN IN CUSTODY.
San Francisco, Sept.27.—Axel Soren
aon, whoae name was on the valiae con
taining dynamite which waa left at a
lodging house iaat Saturday nigbt, is
now generally eappoied to be tbe fiend
wbo fired tbe fatal bomb last Saturday
night.
Sorenaon came here from New York
on tbe ship Sasqcrehana and was paid
off laat April. He ia a Nor wesian and
hia deecription tallies with the descrip
tion of the man who left tbe valiae. He
joined the Sailora' union last April and
it was not until after tbla tbat the
several attempt* were made to blow up
ships-employing non-union men. Ac
cording to the atories told on tbe water
front, Sorenaon it a confirmed dynamite
crank and was always talking; dynamite
and Anarchism in the forecastle.
SOBIt«iSB|| , B OOTfIT.
Two hours before Curtin'a non-union
Bailor boarding bouse was blown up Sat
urday nigbt, a man dressed as a sailor
called at tha hotel and asked if he could
leave a valise there. The request waa
granted and tbe man left. Tho clerk of
the hotel became suspicions and opened
tbe valise. In it were 13 half-pound
sticks of dynamite, a box of fulminate
of mercury cape, half a dozen fuses, a
can containing a liquid labeled "Ter
rorite," several caws used for cutting
metal and a sharp knife. On the valiae
waa tbe name Axel Soreneon. A copy
of tbe Coast Seamen'a Journal was also
in the valiae.
Sorenaon ia on the hooka at tbe Sea
men's nnion aa a member, but the offi
cers of the union today aaid thevdid not
know where he waa, and that tbey did
not ccc him for five months.
The police believe they have found
the outfit 0.l tbe man who caused the
explosion Saturday night and that the
man himself is now in custody.
TIIR TWO INJURED MSN.
John Cvi tin, jr., one of tbe victims of
tbe dynamite explosion of last Sunday
morning, was discharged irom the re
ceiving hospital tbia morning. He is
improving very fast and will recover.
The young .man was taken to bia home
on Beale street. Bernard, the other liv
ing victim, is still in the hospital. His
sight and healing are gone and his
limbs are very badly bruised. Police
Surgeon Summers says Bernard may
live, but hia condition at tbe present
time is critical. Blood poisoning may
act in.
lIIVINE-) UAlUillU.
Proceedings of the Presbyterian and
.episcopal Conferences.
Santa Babbaba, Sept. 27.—The Loa
Angeles presbytery, in session here, has
selected the following officers: Moder
ator, Rev. D. R. Colmery, Loa Angeleß:
temporary dorks, Rev. M. H. MacLeod,
Ontario, J. R. McKee, Fillmore.
This morning several ministers from
the east were received by the presbytery
and tbe afternoon waa given np to the
examination of candidates for the min
istry.
1 he evening waa devoted to the dis
cussion of homo missions, young peo
ple's societies and Obatauqua work, by
various clergymen in attendance.
The Episcopal convocation renewed
its meetings at Trinity church tbis
morning. There are in attendance
Right Rev. Wm. F. Nichols, D. D.-;
Rev. H. B. Reetorlck, dean ; Revs. A. S.
Clark, Taylor, Dntiu, Adams, Marriott,
Sherman, Fletober and other
prominent divines from the south
ern portion of the California diocese.
Rev. Clark of Los Angeles preached this
morning, after which the regular busi
ness was taken up. A delegation was
appointed to carry, to the presbytery
sitting at the Presbyterian church, a
message of fraternal greeting and God
speed. This evening there wss a special
service, at which various interesting
matters wero discussed.
It is important to know that a correct
fit in hue tailoring can be had at moder
ate prices from H. A. Ootz, 112 West
Third street.
A sea bath at Home with Turk's Island
sea salt is exhilarating. Recommended
by all physicians. For sale by all drug
gists; 15c a package.
Ladies' hate cleaned, dyed, reshaped
and trimmed. California Straw Works,
204 South Main street, opposite Third.
WHO ROBBED THE ROBBERS.
Laliberty Makes a Fall Confession or
the Mineral Mange Robbery.
Marquette, Migb., Sept. 27.—George
Laliberty made a full confession of the
Mineral Range train robbery at Hough
ton this morning on hia preliminary ex
amination. He aaid King, Butler and
himself stopped tbe train and he ran
tbe engine while King and Butler
robbed the express car. The money
w»s taken to Laliberty'a boarding bouse
at Houghton, placed in a trunk and
checked to Marquette. Laliberty came
down on tbe same train and gave tbe
check to Ed Hogan. Tbe trunk was de
livered to tbe house ot Laliberty'a
father next morning, but found to have
been broken open and all but about
$1100 abstracted. Laliberty also swore
that Ed Hogan told him his -brother
Djminick, the express messenger, knew
the robbery won'd take place. King,
Butler, Laliberty and the two Hogaus
were held for trial in $10.000 bonds each.
Laliberty denied knowing what had be
come of tbe money. Who robbed the
robbers ia still a mystery.
ILL-FATKD BOOMERS.
A Fatal Prairie' Fire Sweeps Over the
Cheroke* Strip.
St. Louis, Sept. 27. — X special to the
Republican frcm Guthrie, Oklahoma,
■ays: A disastrous prairie fire occurred
in the western part of the Cherokee
atrip yeaterday, and scores of settlers
lost their property, and narrowly es
caped with their lives. Mrs. J. S. Ken
nedy and two children were badly
burned. John Baker and Mr. Tbomaa
and family were burned to death. Two
children of Mrs. George Harrison are
misaing. Mrs. Thompson and two chil
dren were (fatally burned. Most of tbe
men were absent at the land office to
file on claims, and the women and chil
dren atruggled against the fire aloue.
WORLD'S J'AIR NOTES.
HOOSIER DAY ALMOST MARRED
BY A» DISASTER.
A Terrible Crush at the Ball Where
Kx-President Harrison Spoke.
Tha Exposition a Finan
cial Baccate.
CnicAQO, Sept. 27.—Indiana day at
he fair waa nearly marred by a serious
accident. Ex-President Harrison's
presence at tbe atate bnilding drew an
enormous crowd* People jammed
against tbe building, and tbe mob be
came a gv. ayi3«r, »auivtMjr»».&i» nate.
When General Harrison had been speak
ing but a few' moments, tbe people
■urged forward to bear his remarks, and
suddenly there waa a scream from the
center of the crowd, .which almost
cansed a panic. Women screamed and
men pushed. The ex-president ceased
speaking and nrged tbe crowd to remain
qniet. A fainting woman was assisted
by General Harrison to the platform,
and there revived. Two other women
were carried out in a fainting condition
before the crowd became quiet.
Indiana had perfect weather for her
day at the fair. The Hoosiers had been
coming for several days and poured in
in drovea today. Exercises were held
at the atate building, at which ad
dresses were delivered by Governor
Matthews, ex-President Harrison and
Gen. Lew Wallace.
The ex-president devoted most of his
speech to Indiana, eulogizing her elo
quently. He took occasion to denounce
in a most emphatic manner the lynch
ing of men in several states.
Three cheers were given for Harrison
at the close of his address, and then
Jamee Whitcomb Riley recited a poem,
When the Frost Is on the Pumpkin.
President Palmer spoke in a happy
vein, and Douglas Shirley concluded tho
speech-making, after which tbe "Hoo-
Sier Nightingaiea" was sung. Tonight
there was a brilliant display oi fireworks
in continuation of tbe celebration.
The total admissions for the day were
231,128, of which 105,801 paid.
The Odd Fellows continued their cele
bration with competitive drills.
Chicago day will be celebrated by tbe
World's Columbian Exposition com'panv
by paying off the entire bonded floating
debt, »c well as the interest. It will
take just a little short of $1,000,000 to
do this. Calculation shows that the in
come of tbe exposition up to October
9th, ndded to the funds already in the
treasury, will reach the required
amount. After Chicago day, the net in
come of the remaining 21 days of the
exposition will be devoted to tbe in
terest of tbe stockholders. It should
average not lees than $100,000 daily,
The religious congress closed tonight,
11 separate farewell addreeces being
made.
United American Mechanlos.
Dbs Moinbs, la., Sept.. 27 —Tne Na
. tlonal Council of the United Order of
American Mechanics at its session today
decided not to change the name by
dropping '.'Mechanics," and voted to
hold the next annual meeting at Provi
dence, R. I. The following officers wure
elected: National councillor. A. E.
Dodge, New Hampshire; national vice
councillor, W. A. Simons, Connecticut;
national secretary, Ex-national Council
lor John Sever, Pennsylvania; national
treasurer, Ex-np.tioual Councillor Joseph
H. Shlnn, New Jersey; national mar
shal, Georgi H. Smith, Massachusetts,
re elected; national protector, George
B. Ludbtm. New Jersey; national book
keeper, J. O. Just, West Virginia.
Declared UnconatltuMonal.
"Wichita, Kan., Sept. 27.—Judge Reed
today declared the eight hour law con
trary to both the state and federal con
stitutions and in restraint of liberty of
action. Claims aggregating hundreds
of thousands of dollars for overtifne,
under this act, are. pending against
every county and city in the state.
.For. sunburn and freckles use only
Perfectn Face Cream; safe and sure,
Fof sale by A. E. Liulabsy, druggist.
31.1 South Spring street.
PICKED UP PIECE-MEAL.
Developments in the Addie
Gilmour Case.
More Fragments of Her Body
Found in tlie Bay.
The Preliminary Examination of
Dr. West Begun.
Hie Confession of H|« Guilt, to Bis Vic
tim's Father Not Admitted ac
Kvldence — Demujclug;
Testimony.
By Ihe Associated Prei'.
San Francisco, Sept. 27. —Tb«e remains
of Addie Gilmour, tbe girl who is sup
posed to have been murdered and cntup
by Dr. West, are being found piecemeal.
Today were found in an oil can floating
in the bay near the Berkeley shore, two
arms and the hands, tbigha and calves
of the legs, the spleen and intestines of
a human body. Wrapped up in tbe in
testines was a woman's purse and sev
eral bair ornaments. On top of the
piecef otiflesh were pieces of iron to keep
them down.
TUE FRAGMENTS IDKNTIPIID.
There is no doubt that these are frag
ments of Addie Gilmour'a body. Prev
ious to this only tbe bead and one foot
.of the missing girl had been found.
Tne puree, hatpins and other orna
ments found with the portions of tbe
body were identified by Mias Emma Gil
mour as belonging to her aister, Addie
Gilmour.
west's examination.
The preliminary examination of Dr.
West commenced in the police court to
day. The court room was crowded and
a squad of police bad to be detailed to 1
clear the corridors of tbe city ball, in
order to give access to the building. The
dead woman's father was the first wit
ness and he testified in regard to visiting
Dr. West to ascertain tbe whereabouts
of bis daughter.
Witneae was about to relate the con
fession which WeeAmade to him tbat
tbe woman had died in bia office, but
tbe court refuted to permit this testi
mony to be given, as Gilmour admitted
that before West made tbe contest iou he
(Gilmour) had told him he would not
be punished.
AMnnioAif w'lwjsr'a TMnMOMV.
D. B. Flymire, a medical etndent, tea
tifled that he had known Addie Gil
mour come time, and tbat abe had told
bim last July that she intended to have
an unlawful operation performed. 'He
knew that she had visited Dr. West for
tbat purpose. He had visited ber at
West's office and tbe girl had told him
then in West's presence that an opera
tion had been performed and that it was
successful. Two days later he again
visited West's office and found tbat
Addie Gilmour was gone. •
CONCLUSIVE EVIDENCE.
The police in searching the office of
Dr. West today found in a box of rub
bish two buttons from Addie Gilmour's
jacket. These buttons correspond with
those found with portions of the
body in the oil can washed ashore
this afternoon at Oakland. Tbe police
consider this conclusive evidence that
the body of Miss Oilman was cut up in
Dr. West's ofiice and not taken from the
office intact as bia defense maintains.
I'KOSPKIII-VY IN ARIZONA.
Tlnisly Rains Make Fat Live Stock,
dold Mining; Looking Up,
Yuma, Sept. 27.—Timely and well dis
tributed rains during the past three
months have given an abundance of feed
for live stock. Cattle are in excellent
condition and are being shipped into
California at very fair prices. Consider
ing the drawbacks of tbe past few sea
sons live stock is in excellent condition.
Gold mining throughout Arizona has
received a new impetns since the de
cline of silver. Never in the history of
Arizona have so many inquiries been
made for gold properties, and never has
so much prospecting and development
work been dont. Water and fuel are
abundant and hitherto dry sections are
affording prospectors mu,ch scope for
further discoveries. The''silver mines
are holding their own, but eastern and
European capitalists are seeking good
gold properties. Tbe coming winter
promises to be the best for many years.
BAN 11EKNHUDINO COURTS.
The Uoehtu Mnrder Case Cornea Up for
Trial.
San Bkrnardino, Sept. 27.—The trial
of the Mexicans Solano and Madai, for
assault with intent to kill Barcelona, re
sulted in a disagreement today,
In tbe case of The People against But
ton, charged with the murder of Gus
Boehm in Bear valley, a motion to dis
miss the indictment was overruled by
the superior court, and tho defendant was
given until next Saturday in which to
plead. Mis attorney gave notice ot In
tention to move torn change —ol venue
on the ground that the defenoant could
not get a fair and impartial trial at the
hands of a juiy in this county, owing to
the excited condition of the public
mind against Button.
K«eelved by tho President.
Washington, Sspt. 27. —Members of
the Veteran Firemen's association of
California visited tbe White Home,
where the president accorded them a
special reception at 1 o'clock tbis after
noon.
French Ap/urnnm<;:, ia Slam.
Parh, Sept. 27.—A dispatch from
Cnantibun, Siam, says the French
cruiser Aloulte captured Paknam fort,
put the garrison inside and proceeded
to build rifle pits arouud tbe barracks.
Conn band instruments. Agency at
Fitzgerald's, cor. Soring nnd Franklinsts.
A BIG CONTRACT.
Folsom to Furnish Sacramento With
Light antl Power.
Scramento, Sept.27.—The Sacramento
Electric Power and Light company has
closed a contract with the General Elec
tric company for furnishing material
and erecting a plant for tbe transmis
sion of power from their works at Foi
flom, to this city, a distance of 10 miles.
It will take, however, 324
miles of copper wire of 500,000
pounds weight. The specifications cover
equally the three-phase system of tbe
General Electric company, and the two
phase system of the Westinghouse com
pany. Provision is made for cut out sta
tions at convenient points, that the lines
may be divided into three sections and
grounded or cross connection made, so
that nothing short of total prostration of
the plant will interrupt operation. Work
is to be completed within 10 months.
It is also provided that the company
shall forfeit $5*3 per day for each day the
work is incomplete after the expiration
of tbe time named. Tbis is one of the
most important enterprises ever brought
to a head in the interior of the state. It
means the transmission of almost untold
motive power from the great water sys
tem at Folaom to Sacramento for operat
ing street cars, city lighting, power for
factories, etc.
THE MIUWISTSH FAIR.
Contracts for All the Halldlng-a bat One
Let.'
' San Francisco, Sept. 27.—Contracts
have been let for the construction of two
more buildings for tbe midwinter fair,
viz., tho horticultural building, at a
cost of $51,000, and the tine arts build
ing, at a cost of $54,800. As the con
tracts have been let and work already
commenced on tbe manufacturer and
liberal arts and mechanic arts build
ings, there now only remains one to be
contracted for, viz., the administration
building.
WfIEBE CLEVELAND I#AT
THE PSESIDENT'S POSITION ON
THE FINANCIAL QUESTION.
lie Sets It Forth In a Letter tn Governor
Norfhen of Georgia—He Wants a
Currency That Is Ruth
Safe and Stable.
, Atlanta, Ga., Sept. 27. —In reply to a
letter from Governor Northeo, asking the
president to give his position on finan
cial matters, Mr. Cleveland baa sent tbe
following:
Executive Mansion, )
D. C., Sept. 25th.f
Hon"! wVjTNbrtlion.
My DeakSir: I hardly know bow to
reply to your letter of the Isth Instant.
It seems to me that I am plainly on
record concerning tbe financial question.
My letter accepting the nomination to
the presidency, when read in connec
tion with tbe message lately sent to
congress in extraordinary session, ap
pears to me to be very explicit. I want
a currency tbat is stable And safe in the
hands of our people. I will not know
ingly be implicated in a condition tbat
will make me in the least degree
answerable to any laborer or farmer in
the United States for another shrinkage
in the purchasing power ol the dollar he
has received for a full dollar's worth of
the product of his toil.
I not only want our currency to be of
such n character tbat all kinds of dollars
will he at equal purchasing power at
home, but I want it to be of such a char
acter as wili demonstrate abroad our
wisdom and good faith, thus placing
upon a firm foundation our credit among
the nations oi the earth. I want
the financial conditions and the laws
relating to our currency so safe and re
assuring tbat those who have money
will spend and invest it in business and
new enterprises, instead of holding it.
You cannot cure fright by calling it
foolish and unreasonable, and you can
not prevent a frightened man from
hoarding his money, I want good,
Bound and stable money and a condition
of confidence that will keep it in use.
Within the limits of what I have
written, I am a friend of silver, but I
believe its proper place in our curroucy
can only be fixed by a readjustment of
our currency legislation and tbe inaugu
ration of Aconßistentand comprehensive
financial scheme. I think such a thing
can only be entered upon profitably and
hopefully alter the repeal of ihe law
which ib charged with all our financial
noes. In the present state of the public
■ mind this law cannot be built upon nor
patched in such a way as to relieve the
situation. 1 am therefore opposed to
free and unlimited Coinage of silver by
this country alone and independently,
aud I am iv favor of the immediate and
unconditional repeal of tbe purchasing
clause of the so-called Sherman law.
I confess I am astonished by the op
position in the senate to such prompt
action as would relieve tho present uu
lortunate situation. My daily prayer is
that the de'ay occasioned by such oppo
sition may not be the cause of plunging
the country into deeper depression than
it has yet known, and that the Demo
cratic party may not be justly held re
sponsible for such a catastrophe. Yours
very truly, Gbover Cleveland.
DRANK AND QUAKKELLEO,
J. W. Sutherland Shot by Kd Beebe at
Red lands.
Redlands, Sspt. 27.— J. W. Suther
land, a well-known contractor of Red
lands, waa shot at 2 o'clock tonight by
Ed Beebe, a bee-keeper. The men had
been drinking heavl'y and started home
in Beebe'e buggy. Ten blocks out they
got into a quarrel, and Beebe fired a re
volver, the ball striking Sutherland just
under the left eye. Sutherland is still
alive, and it is not known how badly he
is in jured. Beebe started for San Ber
nardino, and officers have left in search
ot him. Both men boro good reputa
tions.
The Ills Four Vote.
Cincinnati, Sept. 27. —The result of
the voting of the Big Four trainmen on
tbe question of strike will be known
this morning. Indications point to the
defeat of the striae.
HOW ABOUT THIS?
A CERTAIN TRANSACTION BY
THE BOARD CP EDUCATION
THAT SEE/IS WORTHY OF AN
EXPLANATION. ,
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
AT THE NATION'S CAPITAL
Debate 011 the Dubois Reso
lution in the Senate.
A Colloquy Between Wolcott
and Gorman.
Teller Again Speaks Against the
Repeal Di 1.
Three Hours' Roll Call In the House
for a Quorum—Discussion uf
the Tucker Elections Bill
Resumed.
By the Associated Press.
Washington, Sept. 27.—1n the senate
today tbe resolution offered yesterday
by Dubois, Rep., of Idaho to postpone
legislation respecting the federal elec
tions laws, finance and tariff until Jan
uary 25, 1894, because of the vacancies
in the senatorial representation of Mon
tana, Washington and Wyoming, was
taken up. Dubois addressed the senate
in advocacy of its adoption. He detailed
the importance of the question involved
in the interest of these but partially
represented states in tbe legislation en
gaging tbe attention of congress. Ha
had no doubt if the resolution was
adopted the governors ot those states
would lay aside every consideration than
tbat of duty to their states, and tbat a
full quota of senators wonld be present
when congress resumed consideration of
the matters referred to in the retolu
tion.
Washburn (Rep.), Minnesota, in
quired whether mere was any more
prospect of tbe election of senators from
those states, if the resolution was adopt
ed, than now.
Dubois had not a shadow of a doubt
that the legislatures would be assembled
and elect senators if these matters were
postponed. The people of those states
firmly believed the senate intended to
rob them of partof their representation,
then pass these laws before they could
send senators to tbe senate. He repud
iated that idea, but it was prevalent in
those states.
Mitchell (Rep.) of Oregon regarded the
proportion, aa .the senator 'from Idaho,
one of tbe most remarkable ever pier
eeuted to tbe senate, and for this reason,
notwithstanding his great sympathy
with tbe three states wbo for tne time
being were depr ved of fall representa
tion, he would oppose the resolution to
tbe bitter end. It was a proposition
tnat could not be maintained for a soli
tary moment. The governor* of those
states had taken no sttspe to eecnre full
representation for their states, and yet
the senate was asked to postpone im
portant legislation to accommodate the
convenience of those states.
Chandler (Rep.; of New Hampshire
said the course to pursue was to post
pone tbe resolution until legitimate
action on tbe repeal bill was discussed.
Woicott (Rep.) of Colorado said, al
though the resolution would be of no
practical benefit, its introduction was a
source of gratification, because it was a
notice to the people of Washington,
Montana and Wyoming that their inter
est; were not forgotten. The opponents
of repeal knew that tho Democratic side
of tbe senate did not favor tbe cloture;
on the Republican side, outside of the
silver senators, there were many senators
who did not favor tbe cloture. We are
meeting them fairly as men now, and
endeavoring to see this question pre
sented fairly before the country. We
are not without definite information that
a certain arrangement has been sought
to be consummated between certain sen
ators upon tins side and certain senators
on tbe other side of the chamber that it
was initiated by a senator who is sup
posed to be the . teerer of so many Dem
ocratic cenators as have left their
party and its platform and linked
themselves with the fortune of thjtir
executive, and led on this hide of tha
chamber by a dominant apoetie of pro
tection—the two senators, supposed to
belong on opposite uf the cham
ber, but who seem now tobesitliif,
very cose together, referring to Ali
rich (Kep.) of Rhode Inland, occupying
a seat d'reetly in front of G jrtuan (utm )
of Maryland.
•'We understand," continued Woi
cott, "that wo are to be met witb the'
demand that the eenate shall meet at
11 in the morning and sit until mid
night. Any ouch attempt to hariaus
this body will be futile."
Allen of Nebraska, debating the reso
lution, referred to tho goat distress in
New Yaik city, when Hill (Dem ) of
New York tbat tbe wisest
and easiest way to relieve tho rtiatrets
would be to repeal the cS:ierman act.
tiorruan enid he understood perfectly
that the resolution ot Dutois was one of
a series introduced for the purpose of
contuming the two morning hours. Tbe
silver senators were doing more to be
little the senate in the eyes of the peo
ple of the country than anything that
ever before occurred.
Coming to the roference to himself,
Gorman said he did not holieve the sen
ator from Colorado would stand upon
the statement made, "for I take it be
alluded to myself and the senator Irotn
Rhode Island."
Woloott was quickly on his feet. "We
have been advised," paid be, "that
there has bt-.n a consultation
of senators going on for somo
days; that the senator from
Rhode Island has been marshalling tne
forcea of the friends of repeal on to}*
side, and tbat the senator from Mary
laud has been marshalling the members
on tbat Bide who favor repeal wiUi a
view to agreeing upon some further
more rigorous measure:, which shall
compel the eenate to sit longer hours
in order, if possible, by that method to
force a vote. I shall be very glad if I
am misinlormed."
"1 have been a member of this body
12 years," said Gorman, "nnd tbis :»
tbe tirnt instance in tbat time that I
have ever known a senator, throSrsfc
himseli or his agents, to listen at com
mittee room doors or from information
received irom eavesdroppers, tell tne

xml | txt