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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, October 07, 1893, Image 4

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LOS ANGELES HERALD
naTI.Y A«il> WKKTtI.Y.
THE OFFICIAL CITY PAPER.
Joseph D. Lynch. JAMS J. aysp.s.
AVERS &, LYNCH,
VUBLUUKR9,
M> AKD S?5 WEST SECOND STKISET.
TBI KPIIONS 150.
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BY CAB, HEP:
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Daily Hera il, one vest !?H 00
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Dstly Heiairi, three in.) ill- - '-'A
TJally H**ralrt, one nntiuh Hi*
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Weekly KciaUl, thtee months. f'o
Illustistcd tierslil, per copy -'>
Enured at the I'ostorace al Lcs Anseles as
•etond-i lsss matl matter.
ANNOUNCEMENTS.
The papers of all delluqtient matt subscribers
to th» Daily Hkiui.d will bn promptly d s -on
tlnucd horeftlter. No papTR will b-.: nem-to
•übs.rlbers by in*il un'cts the hsv * been
paid lot In aovanos. Tbis rub) ts inllextb c.
1.. ¥ Fi-her, newspaper fldvriisin* a«'iir, 21
Merchant.'Fxchttune, San Francisco. liPniiu
thoriztd agent. This paper 1' kejt on file In
his office
Thk Hkrai.d l« Fold tt tha Oecltlonts.l noto'.
n*.wsst*nd. Ssn Francisc-', for 3c. a copy.
No contributions teturned.
BATKUUIV, OCTOIIKit 7, I SOU.
AN INDEX TO YESTERDAY.
BY HCT.KGRArn-At*ctmarth of tho Brest
atorm in the south ' •...mil declares war
agtinu tho Matabeles C.>n;re'Rlonsl pro
ceeding ami oiher doings at Washington
The New York De - ocratlc aud Hcyui.ll
can state convention! World's fair notes
Sporting event*....Paeifle eoa*t happa- :
ings Execution of Anarchist Pallas .. Tho
lliasllisn rebellion ...Ths I.uc&ola breaks
tbe Trans-Allju.lc: record — 'Sene-al new*
gleanings.
LOCAL AND MISCBLMNKOUS-Jll'llC
Ko3B write! a strong let-, r 10 Attorney-Gen
eral Oiney about tho Chlnesu deportation
matter Wendell Esslon's views Amß
teur biseball The courts and n-.w cts-.-s
....Miss Kelso's traveling expenses to Chi
cago objected to by the ( It/ auditor . .Meet
ing of clmmbsr of ccmcnerce directors and
Irr gation congress commute James Pat
terson found guilty of assault Public
works board report .. .Char!ey Ah Him o-
dered departed... .Ohtldren arrested on a
charge of petit lareeay Justice court
Cases Major Powell to lecture The
water question to bo saitied today.
NEIGHBORING PLACES.
Fa SlOSfa— Reception to Eev. Clark.
Com tton —New a notes.
Panta Momca—A banquet on tbe wharf.
Eakta Asa—Lea Bins At the track.
Pomona—News notes.
The letter of Judge Erßkine M. Vtiss
to Attorney-General Olney will create a
great sensation throughout tbe United
States. The young aud able Judge of
the United States District Court for the
Southern District'of California is as
fearless as he is clear-headed, aud the
ehilly-Bhailying, evasive and illegal
course of the attorney-general properly
ecmes in forjudge Eoss'a scathing and
contemptuous criticism. If all the
high oGicials in the United
Statea had respected, and responded to
the clear letter of tbe law with the
proraptnesa and directness of Judge
Eoss, we should not have been treated
to the melancholy spectacle of laws re
maining a dead letter on our statute
books. In fact, it was the resolute and
unflinching attitude of onr Southern
California judge that made it possible to
obtain any recognition whatsoever for a
statute that ought to have settled the
Chinese question satisfactorily to every
one concerned.
The international irrigation conven
tion will meet in Los Angeles next Tues
day. Delegates are arriving already and
the prospects are bright for a large at
tendance. The reflex action cf this as
sembly will be very great for good. The
irrigation laws everywhere are in a
chaotic state, owing to the nb3urd at
tempt to bleed the civil and common
laws upon the eubject. Tha feeling of
the nation is one o! apathy, lethargy and
indifference towr-rds irrigation because
its necessity ia unknown and misunder
stood, aa the great and only factor in
the redemptidh of Uncle Sam's sole sur
viving public domain. While an an
cient art, like tbe others, it ia re-born
and is feeling the throbbing of its new
life. With a clearer understanding of
the difficulties to be overcome in the
march of progress in irrigation lineß,
together with a combination of forces,
the cause of irrigation will receive a
wonderful impulse, and wil! go forward
with confidence to success.
The Hekai.d has indulged in a little
persiflage anout the midwinter fair, and
all with the bast of intontion?. We
confess tbat wo were a little envious
that socio enterprising Angelefio had
not inaugurated the exposition. We
have conceded tha full measure of praise
accruing from such a masaißcant pro
ject mainly to tba enterprise and inde
iatigable industry of Mr. M. H. De
Young. As an amende honorable for
eomo of our playfulness, v,o reproduce
the following extracts from a personal
note from Mr. Da Young, which 6eoms
to state the cisc fairly: "£ notice iv a
"recent issue of the Herald an article
"in which you hold me personally re
sponsible for tbo action of the executive
"committee of the midwinter fair in the
"matter of establishing a charge for the
"space to be occupied in tbe exposition
"buildings. I think I can trust your
"sense of journalistic courtesy to mike
"an exolanarioii, which will correct an
"error into which you and a number ot
"other editors have fallen. In the lirst
"place, you are wrong in saying that i
"i\a> imposi.ng a bsrdi.-n on the counties
"aud iv assuming th::t a spe
"cial charge wiil be made for
"county exhibits. No each order has
"been made either by ma or tha exsou
"tive committee, but a rata has bean
infixed for floor spice which wiil be
I 'charged to all exhibitors, whether th|y
"come from Chicago, London, Mew York
"or California. This has been the prac
tice in all expositions in Europe and
"this country. The chargo is not made
"for the purpose of securing funds to
"erect the buildings, or put tho grounds
"in order, but simply to obtain funds
"for maintenance. The cost of running
"an exposition is necessarily very great.
"Largo numbers of persons mutt bo em
"ployed in various capacities. The
"buildings must be lighted. An effect
"ive fire department must be mam"
tamed. The exhibita must be closely
"watched by a corps of police. The
"cleaning of buildings and grounds must
"be thorough. These and uumcrous.ex
"penditures for all purposes will require
"a large sum of money, a portion only
"of which will be contributed by the ex
"hibitors. In fact the small amount ex
"acted for space can hardly be rogardsd
"as rent, it is merely a charge for care
"taking and insurance against tire and
"robbery."
WHY NOT INCREASE THE CIRCULATION?
It 13 natural, we confess, under the
circumstances, to take a deepjndent
view of the practicability of any meas
ures of reliof for the pcopla. The most
urgent need of the country just now is a
considerable expansion of the currency
The next is replacing the old national
domain by a better one, which the irri
gatod laoda cau readily be made by
proper expenditures upon the part o
the government of the United States
Soma time ago the lli:i;.u.i> suggested
editorially that an excellent plan to re
lieve the money stringency, at least in
part, would be to issue a special cur
rency to be used in developing the facil
ities for irrigation on the arid land*, this
currency to bs legal tendsr for all pur
poses, and to have the special property
of being receivable for these arid lands
when improved and in shape for settle
ment. Such a currency would have a!
thu ordinary legal tender qualities and
would, besides, become specially desir
able from its use in baying these lands.
When paid in, if thought advisable by
tho government, tbis currency could be
cancelled. Heie is a plan which would
add largely to tho per capita of our eir
dilation and through which the govern
ment would actually make money.
The Stockton Mail of tho 3d inst. had
tbe following remarks apropos of our
suggestion:
Tbe Loa Angelea HIRALU proposes
that tho government shall reclaim ite
arid lends by means of paper money
istued for the purpose, which money
shall be receivable in payment for the
lands subsequently by settlers. What
objection could there be to such a
sciiems? None. Nevertheless tbe gov
ernment will not do it. If the arid
lands are ever reclaimed it will be
through the sale of interest-bearing
bonds, which will be a burden upon the
people and a benefit to the moneyed
class. Meantime tho army cf the un
employed will continue, and there will
seem nowhere any bairn iv Giie.-.d.
Why will not tbe government reclaim
ita arid lands by tbe use of a special is
sue of paper money, setting the idle to
work and increasing its wealth, creat
ing an abundance where now a lamine
hjV Because the money interests ol the
ccuntry would oppose it, and tho gov
ernment does nothing tbat the money
interests are against. The project
would be opposed by the asses of the
presa on the ground that it would drive
uold out of the country. It it would
but drive themselves and the gold lords
With it, it would bo a good riddance.
Wo are afraid tbat our contemporary
is more (ban half right, but we think
that the people are ripo for a wholesome
change. The idea of holding up the
United States, the youngest, strongest
and wealthiest of tbe great nations of
tho world as incapable of inaugurating a
policy of its own is so supremely ridicu
lous tbat even the snobs and monocrats
will come to realize it in time. Mean
while, Brother Mail, we can do our part
in insisting upon the salutary change by
the people, and American interests inal!
their vast significance shall count for
something.
THE CHINESE LAWYERS.
It is stated as a sort of excuse for the
Chinese tailing to register that they
were advissd by certain Ameiican law
yers of high standing uot to do so. It is
said that those lawyers advised the Six
Companies, and through tbem tbe Chin
ese generally, that the Geary act was
unconstitutional and therefore ot no ef
fect. The names of tbe aforesaid law
yers ore given as Choate, Carter ami
Asbton. It is incredible tbat an Amer
ican lawyer in good repute should ad
vise any person, or class of persons, to
disobey a solemn law of the United
Stater, and we decline to believe that
tbe learned attorneys named did so ad
vise in this instance. In doing so they
would certainly have violated their oath
of office and have disregarded their firat
obligations as attorneys, which is, to
uphold tbe law. If these lawyers have
vouchsafed the advice that is attributed
to tbem they ought to bo matily enough
to avow tbis fact and take the conse
quences, whatever they racy be. What
the attorneys mentioned piobably did
was to given an opinion - for a very large
fee —that they could have the Geary law
declared unconstitutional by tbe su
preme eoui't. It is not to be believed
that they etlvised a total dieregard ol
the law be.'ore it was passed upon by
tbe couit. Tha deportation of lawyers
guilty of imparting such advice would
hardly be adequate punishment, and
the giving o: such advice vt&uid consti
tute no excuse in law to persons violat
ing the law.
The great b?dy of Chinese laborers on
tbis coast, at the very beet, stand out as
open contemners of our laws and should
he treated as tuch, notwithstanding any
opinions that may have been rendered
by welt paid attorneys, against tne va
lidity cf Bitch laws.
The real advice in the case undoubt
edly came from the Chinese Six Compa
nies, who aiu the masters, and we may
add without much fear cf successful
contradiction, the owners of the Chi-
Leee laboring classes ia this country.
Kegistration would not have interfered
with the plans ot any lawyers, pAid or
unpaid, but registration wouldixiave
most seriously interfered with thelmug
LOS ANGELES TTERALD: SATURDAY MORNING, OCTOBER ?. 1&93
gling operation* cf the said Six Compa
nies, by which thousands upon thou
sands ol laborers have been brought
across onr borders in violation of the
cxclosion acts. There is tbe gall that
caused the jtde to wince. The Geary
act was intended to put a stop to this
smuggling buriness; hence tho hercu
lean efforts made to override it.
A statement of the case as it row
stands may be as follows : II Ihe ex
clusion actß were proper tbe Geary act
is equally so. If it is desirable lo keep
Chinese laborers away it is equally de
sirable to get rid ot those now here, g
to pet rid of them is desirable it is de
sirable to get rid of them lE a lawful
way, end that, way is provided in the
law as It now staudr. In doing this
now no law is violated, and no cow law
is required to accomplish a most desir
able objec'.
Tho secretary of the treasury reports
that there are 85 000 unregistered, who
wero subject to registration, and that it
will take $<i,000,<)00 to deport that num
ber. But it will not be necessary to
deport anything like lhat number to get
rid of all now in these states. Probably
tbe deportation of a thousand, or two
at the outside, with a manifest determi
nation on tbe part of the authorities
that tho rest ehall go, will be sufficient
notice for the whole flock to take wing
for some more congenial climate. The
cost in any event will be absolutely
trifling compared with the benefits.
TRYING TO DODGE THE ISSUE.
F otn an article published in another
column it will be seen that the auditor's
attack in yesterday's papers was with
out any justification whatever. The at
tack was not only in execrable taste but
nnverified by facts.
The auditor has failed to perceive tho
scope of his own writinea. lie attacks
the assessment cf a private citizen be
cause be is asked to do the public busi
ness ecoiiomijaUy. In doing thia he
says that many assessments are not
justly made, etc.
If this be tine, the assessor should be
at once called to account by tbe auditor.
The aeeesaor ia chanted by tbe auditor
with a highly improper conduct of his
office, whereby great sums are held
back from the tax box. Moro than thie,
the board cf supervisors as a board of
equalization is, by implication, charged
by tbe auditor with a gross neglect of
duty iv allowing these things to con
tinue.
Let tbe auditor substantiate these
charges against public ollicera. These
things are proper if unusual in the
auditor. But we can cay to hira and
others that en attack upcn a private
pprson, whetter true or not, is no
blanket to cover tbe negiect oi public
dutiee.
We have always advocated a liberal
and progressive policy in tbe public af
fairs of this imperial county. Wo ere
firmly convinced tbat tbe Eurest way to
secure tbe popular support of the r.ec
cestary expense of such n policy it? by
demonstrating the honest and efficient
application of tbe pubiic money to the
i public business.
AMUSEMENTS
First Phehijvterian Cnrncii—Mr.
Cable, tho author of Creole Days, will
read irom an unpublished work of his
on Octobor 11th at Bp. m. The Denver
NswS speaks of Mr. Cable as follows:
Tbe lecturer told the Story of Grande
Pointe, or of Louisiana Acadia, and the
lecture was, in fact, a recital of portions
of tbis work. Ha used the conversa
tional style admirably, suiting his voice
to tbe place in which be was speaking
and apparently without effort. Hia
gestures were all graceful and natural,
and he carriod himself on the stage like
au actor while ha was dramatically de
picting tho various rcenes to his audi
ence ac they came up, and in tho dia
logues constantly chancing the tone of
hia voice as it was required. The whole
impersonation was admirable and could
not have been better. From the lirEt
word to tbe very end he held the closest
attention of his audience who appre
ciatively interrupted him all through his
lecture with uppiaui-.eand peala of laugh
ter.
Mr. Cable's works nreol just the char
acter suitable lor leading or recital by a
master of art. Inimitable drollery und
perfect wit on tbe ono baud and eubiimo
pathos on the other combine to please
both fun-loving and serious natures.
Mr. Cable spoke without ceasing or re
ferring to noteß or boons.
CosonnoATiosAL Chukcii—The second
conceit of the I.os Angeies Oratorio so
ciety was successfully given la6t evening
belore a large audience. The chorus of
nearly WO voices, with a full orchestra
of 25 pi . assisted by eomo of the best
local SO; < talent, was led 1)7 W, A. Bacon,
director. The programme was as fol
lows :
Chorus, Gipsy Life, Schumann— tos Angeles
Oratorio society.
Ar.a, Kcberto iv Che Odorn, Roberto Meyer
beer—.lira Minniu Hauce Owens.
Arts, Noll Ml Ml thou Qlranal) Mozart—Mis.
Jeasft Totbursi.
The Hymn Of Prahe, Mendelssohn—(a) Tho
flvnipbony. Malstorocon Molo, Allegro, Alle
gretto Agitato, Adagio BelliliSo; tb) Tho Lau
tat*,
Josefa Tolhurßt, eoprano; Mrs. Min
nie Hance Owens, contralto; Mr. H.
Barton, tenor, and the Lou Angeles Ora
torio society.
Ihe concert from beginning to end
seemed to pass off without nuy fl:sw.
The voice of Mrs. Tolhuret waa strong,
clear and bell-like in its richness. Mrs.
Owens sustained her time reputation.
The chorus of voices at times was grand,
and the instrumental music wus very
pleaeing. The society is to be congratu
lated on the very successful giving of its
concert.
Los Anoei.es Tiiuatkh—The perform
ance this alternoon mid this evening
will close tbe engagement of the boudau
company.
H. Arnhoid of thn Crown Distilleries
company, S.ui Francisco, who bus been
in Ljs Angelea for a fuw days past, left
for home last evening. .
LIKELY TO BE SETTLED TODAY.
The Water Question Assuming
Definite Shape.
No Reduction from the Price First
Asked.
A Sllrrht Ml snnciTstandlns In a Confer
ence Yeaterrtay—A bnut tha
Tending Lltl ra
tion.
The question as to whether tbe city
will own its water works will prob
ably aeenme some definite shape today.
This supposition is arrived at after a
series of rneotings bstweeu tbe water
committee of the council and the owners
of tbe City Wafer company, Messrs.
Pierce and Sbafer.
Over a week has been consumed in
conferences between theße gentlemen,
looking to tbo purchare by tbe city of
tbe plant. While nothing definite is
known, it is thought an early conclu
sion will result.
The owners have never yet presented
a detailed statement of all properties of
tbe company. This is one of tbe rea
sons why the matter has been delayed,
although the most important, of coarse,
is the excessive price asked for tbe
plant.
Messrs. Pierce and Shaffer will today
present to the water committee a com
plete list of everything own u d by their
company. The gentlemen will meet the
wster committee at 2 o'clock, and it is
expected the matter will be so arranged
that—if the price ia settled satisfac
torily—negotiations in this respect will
be concluded.
Several .meetings between the commit
tee and Messrs. Pierce and Shaffer were
hold yesterday and alao last night.
One of the gentlemen became very
much agitated during afternoon meet
ing and a wordy war looked inevitable.
Matters wore amicably adjusted, and
have since been running smoothly.
"One argument advanced why the city
should o.fn tbe plant," Baid a gentle
i man yesterday, "is the litigation now
pending and future litigation. Tbe
pending tsuit of tne city against the com
pany, which was instituted about a year
ago, is one involving tbe rights to the
source and supply of the water of the
cut.ire city. It is probably the most im
portant action ever brought by the city.
In view of this fact, I think it would be
mote satisfactory to the owners of the
plant and to the people of Los Angeles
for tho gentlemen to sell it."
Should the question assume the shape
expected today, the water committee
will probably formulate a report in time
to be presented to the council at its ses
sion on Monday.
GRIFFITH HITS BACK.
He Makes a Statement Kpgirdlng Hts
As»<*a-ment.
The following communication is from
Mr. Griffith, and is self explanatory:
"In order to avoid attention being
I called to tbe fact that our county is ex
-1 trcmely extravagantly managed and
J conts 126 per cent more for government
I yearly tban Alameda connty, certain
county officials here are industriously
circulating a report that I am paying
t'ijres on but $25,000. amounting to only
$823. while the facta chow that I pay
137V1.11 in this city and county. Be
lieving tbat I am fairly and honestly as
sessed, I will produce trie proof, which
jis in tne shape of a memorandum from
the tax collector of this county end also
! one from tbecity tax collector:
"G. J. (inffith and uthers directly in
terested in his orooert ; «s paid Los Ange
les county $. : 535.2i for 18SI2.
"E, E. Hawfrr,
"County Tax Collector."
''G, J. Griffith and others immediate
ly inteiestPil in his prope||it« p .id city
taxes for 1592 amountinirlo $128(1.'JO.
• It U. Wad*,
"City Tax and Liceneo Collector."
As to whether the r.?6esementß were
fairly and honestly made by both the
city and connty assessors, or tbe re
spective parties who eat ac a board of
equalization 011 tho same, I prefer to
make no comment, but I believe that
they were conscientious tn their duties.
Trobably the auditor of Los Angeles
county may hear from the Citizens'
league on other matters later, and I
toneidar Mr. f'.lackman well able to take
care of binieelf. Respectfully,
G. J. Griffith.
A TREE CASE.
The Horticultural OlTloors Bun Across a
Law Suit.
Mention was mado yesterday of a suit
for $350 damages instituted by Michael
A. Cunningham against John Scott and
Wm. 0. McMiilin.
It appears from the complaint that the
plaintiff ia a nurseryman at Long Beach
and laßt March shipped a carioad of
ycung and healthy lemon trees to a pur
chaser in Colegrove. When the trees
reached this city the horticultural officer
pounced npon them and notified Mr.
Cunningham that they must be fumi
gated. Mr. Cunningham alleges tbat
the trees were in good and healthy con
dition, but in order to avoid any unnec
essary delay and trouble in this city he
submitted to the fumigation.
Mr. Scott and his deputy, Mr. McMil
lin, they allege, damaged and killed a
number of the irees to the eatcnt of
$350. They claim that between 12 and
14 ounces of the fumigating material is
sufficient to clear an entire carload of
fruit from all germs. Mr. Bcott, they
say, used five pounds of the material
upon Mr. Cunningham's trees, and suc
ceeded not only in killing tbe scale, but
a laife'o part of the trees.
SOCIETY.
Ths members of tho Star-Cre=cent
Literary society of tho High school ten
dered their president-elect, Mr. Wilson,
a reception at the High school building
last evening. A large number wero in
attendance and the evening was moat
eujoyably Bpent.
Mr. and Mrs. John F. Francis and
Mine G. M. Dominguez have returned
to their Moin-otreet residence from a
three mouths' sojourn at Kedondo
Beach.
Miss Edith Embody cf the Er.Gt Side
ie tho guest oi Miss Clara Mueller for v
week.
Mrs. Nettie Mueller is visiting friends
iv IViaona ior a few days.
Ed. Maxwell L'is retornod from a
uionth's Visit 10 Ctiicago, ai d saw all
that was to be sesa it tho world's fair.
THE WOMAN'S PARLIAMENT.
Its Second 8«i«lmi to He Held In Thia
City.
The second annual session of the
Woman's Parliament of Southern Cali
fornia will be held in the First M. E.
church, South Broadway, next Tuesday
and Wednesday. There will be three
sessions on the first, day. The morning
will bo occupied with receiving the vari
ous reports and the transaction of mis
cellaneous business. •
In the afternoon the following ad
dresses will be delivered:
The Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital,
by its president, Mra. Mary A. Ashley
of Santa Harbara. •
Tbe Health School for Women, Mrs.
E. J. Davis of Riverside.
Necessary Reforms in Public Schools,
Miss Georgia A. Matfield of San Diego.
The discussion on the latter paper will
be opened by Mrs. Margaret Hughes of
Los Angeles.
Mre. Kate Tapper Galpin of this city
will deliver tbe principal lecture of tbe
evening, which is' tbe only meeting to
which men are invited. The subject
will be: Woman as a Factor in
Economics.
'ihe address will be discussed by Mrs.
E. A. Lawrence and Mrs. Myron D.
Campbell of Los Angeles and Mrs. Flora
Haines Longhead of Santa Barbara.
On Wednesday the morning will be
occupied with an address by Mrs. Mary
Lynde McComas of Redlands, upon Do
Women Need Legislation ? Ten minute
speeches will also be made by the fol
lowing : Mrs. Alice Moore McComas,
Los Angeles: Mrs. Lizzie H. Meserve,
Pomona; Rev. Ruth B. Ridges. Mrs.
Martha S. F. Bent, Mrs. Sarah F. Jod
son. Rev. Floreece Kallock, Pasadena.
In tba afternoon Mrs. Grace Knepper
oi Santa Barbara will talk on Woman
for Woman, and Margaret Collier Gra
ham of Pasadena will discuss Reform in
Social Customs.
The addresses will also be discussed,
after which the unfinished business
will be arranged and the meeting will
adjourn.
niarrlago Lloanaea.
Marriage licenses were issued yester
day in tbe county, clerk's office to tbe
following persons:
William Edward Cookson, aged 46,
and Clara Thorton, aged 31, botb na
tives of England and residents of Los
Angeles.
" 8 had Typhoid Fever
Which le.'t mo With torpid liver and kldnoj
trouM?. I v/as a profit sufferer. I took a
I'O'.tbof Heed's Sttrssprirll'.a and was reslorcd
Cures
to hecllh and n>'ued over fan:' pounds In
weight. It It ill i ftett blood unriller," J). M.
FuAXDKaa, real estato arjont, l'oi ll.ind, Oregon.
HcO'l'."" rs'"-> r iT-thjailou. Tryabox.
CAMPBELL'S
ALIFORNIA
URIOS.
W* lead. Others Imitate.
fi/)/"~~N. Only Curio ftora oi the
fiKYsr l *! Coa-t carrying a large
d. "ilyiM \, </) itock of
r\y?y ri opa us,
%}f' "' a! " o^s 4 Precious Stones
1 Mounted and Unmounted.
IU I 20 Per Coat Discount
|&) STON ES
Ir ii FO.t 10 DAVri.
Only comp'.ete stock of In-
TBAbn mark, dlan Kehcs in Los Angeles.
See Our Rare and Curious Thiai;".
Fine Jewelry Made to Order.
Campbells Curiosity Store,
325 South Spring St.
9-8 ly BKT. THIRD Ai FOURTH.
THO^TaAM,
-REAL ESTATE AND GENERAL
AUCTIONEER.
DEALER IN NEW & SECOND-HAND
SAFES,
232 W. FIRST ST.
JOE POHEIM • ■
■ • THE TAILOR
Has just received first shipment of
WooUns, whicn wero bought d.rej;
from tbo mills at greatly reduced
prices.
Fine Eogish Diagonal, Piqus and
Beaver Suits Made to Order at a
Great Reduction. Also One of the
Finest Selec ions of Trouseringj
and Overcoatings.
Rett of Woikmanshio and Perfect
Fit Guaranteed or No S*'.e
JOE POHEIM, THE TAILOR,
1 A*» LVUTISn OIIDIHO U-ll
A-».» 01/UAII Ol •
CITIZENS' HANK,
btimsou Block, Third and Bp ing.
T. W. Br.Hhertoti, l'fe-ldeut.
T. 8. C. Lowe, VifiuPre'.'t
F. D. Hall, Cashier.
EIBkCTJBs:
T. D. Stlmion, J . W. Bllnn,
Ai.drow Mul ea, J. M. Hale,
li. J. Watjrs, J. I'iiroival,
1 i'.ebert Hale. 10 7 tl
fair
OCTOBER IG, 17, 18, 19, 20 and 21, 1893.
Southern \ *—AX
California's AGRICULTURAL
Great Fair./ PARK.
$20,000 In pursei aud premium"-. The greatest trotll»|i stuiliou aud freu-lor-aU
races ever teen In Oallforrua. Admission, DO ceuts.
District Agricultural Association, i. 6.
L. THORNti, Secy. 10* M .T. 0. NEWTON, Pres't.
AMIJBKHKNTS.
NKW L.OS ANoi-bBiS i'HBATKjf"
(Under direction of Al Havraan.)
11. C. WYATr, - - MANAGER
FIRST TIME HERE.
THREE I ftpx rffi
MGIITB | THURSDAY VOX. 51".
Special Saturday Matluee.
C. B. Jefferson. Kiaw and Elangwr'j Graml
Spectacular Production
THE SOUDAN.
Presented with a superior coninany. and all
the orlgnal scenery. Don't fall to see tho
thrilling and faultless
BATTLE OF THE DESSERT CTiY
and the return ol tho war heroes to TRAFAL
GAR mw. peaple on the suute.
Brass baud?, drum coroa, horses, csnuons, eta
Regular prices—if I, 78c, 50c a-jd 25c.
Tickets now on sale.
NKW I.OS ANOSLS9 THKATKIt.
(Under dlroction of At. Hayman.)
11. O. WVAIT', Mauajor.
THURSDAY, > AP*T 10 i f f IA
FRIDAY AS" i OLI 1. XL It), 11
SATURDAY, ) * s
4WBATORDAY MATINEE.
The Peerless Comedienne,
KATIE EMMETT
Supported by tho Silver-voiced Tenor,
sNliBtW MACK, in tbe Ro
mantic Irish Play,
KILLARNEY.
Under the management of Mr. Harry Will
lams. The grandest of all Irish dramas.
A carload of special scenery. Elegant cos
tumes. Beautiful songs.
See the Great Leap for Lifu!
Regular prices—sl, 753, 50c and 25c.
NKW LUs AMOILKS THBATKK.
(Under direction of Al. Haywan.)
H. C. WYATT, Manager.
? TOESDAyT OCTOBER 10th
ONLY) '
De Kontski
°<THE GREAT PIBNIST.I*
The Celebrated Composer.
COURT PIANIST TO THE XMPEROK
OF GERMANY.
Under management of Mr. Albert Mirks.
Boats on gala Monday, Oot. Oth, at 0 a.m.
BilPfllLll
MUSIC SCHOOL,
V.M.C.A. B'lding, S. Broadway
PUBLIC CLASS FOR THE ANALYSI3 OF
Piano and Vocal Music
EVERY WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY
AFTE * NOON AT 2 O'CLOCK,
beginning September 30th.
ADMISSION, 50 CENT 2.
Freo to pupils of tbe school. 9-22 lm
T7MRST I'IIKSBYTBttIAN (MIUItCH,
J? Corner Second street aud Broadway.
GEORGE W. CABLE
Will Read From an Unpublished Work
of His Own—("Not Yet l-üblished, bat I
Engaged to Be Married."—Boston
Herald) —And will intersperse the read
ings with Creole Eortgs, Wednesday,
Oct. nth, at 8 p.m.
ADMISSION, 50 els. The entertainment is
for ths benefit of the Juucu room for young
women, conducted by the young women nf tho
church. 100 7t
ft q j \
• (Si Imt ®k
<:hol3o iot) B.W. par tot city from $280 to rlv ,, ~r »i X . toora houso-i on olvClr*.a ItUO, 8.
$10°0. TH.. ii .-' I■!> r luomh.
Houses from IfUttOO up, cither /or cash, or jmkiu-:oo:!» Lou.r o'. I'o.irl Mr-vO',. ?!.", ;>•>;
upou lLS'.HllmoiiiM. mot.rh; al o<>ieon w. vnu st.: very ittu.co to
_ _ , , ii - OAttcu, Modern, "tc.: tjMd por mo ill.
Business propety on Sprinsr. Mtn or Broad- awn lurjl-i.eu c. is « out lower it. aid
way: a few ciro.o Investment. Eoccwuod »ye., s-jch ij'3o pr moult. . ur,;a
Call andaoe us. Hu<luoi« 1« «.*xt. Tourists luruts&nl, nou es. s w.. ai varlouapriuoi.
wiil find our ollice ail intelllsensie burjuu, i.'tt P«uv woiicrtv with m. TQO djm ma la
where .iiey aro al wsys weicoiuc. co fl. Eea'What we have. . ,
N.K. COM NICK. SECO.NU ST, IIItDAUWAj', Ll)j 4.NQELES.
AMUBKM lIS,
1h1.3-4.
USURY J. KRAMER'S
—r ItOOL FOB—
DANCING amD DEPORTMENT.
MKW r I.AHSJSS.
Beginners' ri*n—J.ai'.lcs, Misses and Masters,
opens Saturd r, Ociober lllh, 1:30 to 8:30
p. m.
Advanced Clasj-L»dtes, Mioses aud Masters,
opens Sal in day, Oclor.sr 14tli. 3::!0 to 3:30 p.m.
Infants Class-For ehtldruu 410 7 years old,
openn Monday, Octobar 10th 3:'" lo 5 p. m.
B-tinners' tilass — Ladieß and Gentlemen,
X■;.«'" uiid Thursday Eveniugj, opens Mon
o ij , October lOih at 7 30 p. m.
Advanced Class — La<itcs aad Gentlemen,
I v, ens Wodausday, ■ >ctober lstn at H p. m.
For further par'ioolni-s, apply at the oltlce.
3to 5 dally. 13!) W„ t Fllil- .Sired'- References
required lniw all applicants. 10-' lm
) KATOKIO CONCERT.
HYMN OF PRAISE Mendelssohn
—BY TIIS—
LOS ANGELES ORATOKIO SOCIETY,
First Congregational church,cor. H'll & 9th sts.
Friday Evening, October Oth.
P3OF. F. A. BACON Director
Cho.iiaof nearly 100 voices. Full orcbes'Va
ot 24 pieces. Soloists: Jowfa Tolhurt, sop:an<>;
Mrs. Minnie Hauco Owen?, coutraitu; Mr. 11.
' Burton, tenor.
Tlcktta: Admission, 50 cts.; reserved seal',
75 ots. Reserved feats can bj seputi .1 »'. II .r.
letl's muslo store alter l) o'clock a. n. October
4th. 10 li j
NKW VIKNNA BITKPKT.
Court st., bet. Main anlS?:iai m
F. KERKO «V, I'ROI
Free Roiiued Enter: I
EVERY EVENING, Irom 7
Saturday Matinco from
Engagement of the Great one i
-iIDOLOHE
i In Her Unrl
1 Rcappoaranco of tho Favorite
| MISS LINA CREWS,
MISS AN TO
And tho cclobrat
BERTH FAMILY ORt
miss marguerite bsrti
Flue commercial luucu dall;
carte at all hours
riIHK PAbACK,
X H.K. Cor. Spring and Fir,
LadieV Kntranco on Fl.
TONIGHT—GKAND CC
From 7:30 to 13 p.m., under the
the celebrated vlullu pli
MISS JULIA DE BE
ASSISTED BY
MI3B AUGUSTA VENDT,
MISS ANNA PANUANB,
MISS AUGUSTA PANHAN
MIS 3 LIZZIE TIMMINF
MISS PAULINA XL 1
MISSGffRTRUrj
MISS NETTIi ICS
' AND OTHERS.
Every night and Wednesday an
matinee.
Tho lluett Commercial Lunch I
Meals a lrcarte nt all hours. .
IF YOU HAVE DEFECTIVE
And valno t'uom consult us, No case 'i
tire vision where glassos are requir
complicated for us. Tbo corroct ac r
i.f frames Is quite as Important as th
fitting of lenses, and tbo scientific fl
making of glasses and frames is our c
ness (sro:i»lty.) Kvch examined an
free ot charge. Wo use olectrlo powot
the only bouse h. rethatgriuosglasses t
Established 1880.
8 G MARSHUTZ. Leading Scientific Optic
ian (specialist), IH7 Nurlh Spring street, opp.
old courthouse. Don't forget tbo number.
[ BLANK
BOOKS.
GLASS & LONG.
TEMPLE AND NEW niUH STS.
Tel. 535 |13 7 ly] LOB ANGELES.

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