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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, October 22, 1893, Image 1

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TODAY'S FORECAST.
FOR THE DISTRICT OFSOUTH
ERNCALIPORNIA: FAIR WEATH
ER; NEARLY STATIONARY TEII
TERATURE; WESTERLY WINDS.
VOL. XLI. NO 11.
In Connection With Our Liberal Gift Sale We Call Your
Attention to Our Fine Line of
OVERCOATS eEom $ 10 TO $15.
And Finer Grades Ranging from $iS to $30.
GRIPMEN AND MOTORNEERS'
Atttention is called in an especial manner to Our
fine assortment of Storm Overcoats and Ulsters.
Mullen, Bluett & Co.,
COR. SPRING AND FIRST STS.
CRYSTAL PALACE
138,140 AND 142 SOUTH MAIN STREET.
HEADQUARTERS
For Los Angeles and Southern California of
CROCKERY, GLASS AND CHINAWARE,
LAMPS, HOUSE-FURNISHING GOODS,
PLATEDWARE AND CUTLERY,
BABY BUGGIES, BASKETS, Etc.
GAS AND ELECTRIC FIXTURES.
We Arc the Leaders For New Styles and Wares. Variety and Assortment
and Low Prices. Give Us a Call and Be Convinced.
MEYBERG BROS.
JAPANESE HHSH
LARGEST VARIETY AND
J_V KU VJO NEWEST STYLES IN
Turkish, Persian, Indian and Baghestan Effects
jIA.NY NEW THINGS IN WHITE AND BLUE.
" v -' 'v ' „r. . 1 ~' 1 ass* mim 11 t: * -JUrr •
A PT QHTT A T?TTQ fn nil Sizes, the Newest Patterns and Many
£ML\. X Oy Qualities. Get Our Prices and Examine
Our Handsome Patterns Before Buying.
LOS ANGELES FURNITURE COMPANY,
225-7-9 S. BROADWAY, OPT. CITY HALL.
TWO GOLD MEDALS
Two First Prizes for Large and Small Photographs
-EWORLD'S FA I R j(-
Conventional the Photographic Association of America oyer lone of Iho mo-t emin»nt pho
gaa r «y«T f -| 220 south spring street, im.^^},^
BARKER BROS"
SUCCESSORS TO BAILEY * BAKKKR BBUS.,
( V H»tb Moved Into Xhelr Wew Quarters In
the Stlrason Block, Vomer
" \W\ Third and Spring ate.
. /T>v \m\ , W E ARE 81I0WINlJ A FISH LINE OF
\ I Hall and Rjc;ptiou Chalrj, in podshed
)]\ wools and cobble seats of loither. Furniture
' ') 'bat is not plowing to lh) eye U lit fjr nothing
pCST VI —' "A. tela barn. Hegince Is one thine; and strength
\ , £/**f f*l S t=— — 18 anulu '- r > bnt tQ oro is not the leant reaion in
iS\/H I \ 'JTTI th» world why tho two should not go together
f tIV'M I /r iv 1 ■ lv lumim o. Toiay a ihlng is cheap doci not
Vln V | I \m necesenly raaka It cheip, but tosay our tat
\. ' ' I /a//~ZZIIL-Ii nlturj is cheap aoarcilydoeiit Junius. Ojme
Z// and " €c I>r Jounuiv n. -Aud la looking sco
; V> '-// •-■ \1 • these Hall Cha rj. Alsota*., a ~oeo in<o ihat
- -w. ~." ' ' RiWH] rrt tties- of nil departmenti— ha DRAPERY
, T 1_ W, DEPARTMENT. In the CARPtfT HKPART
-7T CTPAN/P ' CnDDnrif BENT you win sea mauy new effect*. Gime
C/l ej I IYI/Jlb CJUriUMi. whether you want to buy oruot. Aadagalu
* • wo say COM ft
WILLIAMSON'S MUSIC STORE
"KSs,, PIANOS "«s!S!Sf torn
is. BHONINGER, >>-i>OTP>MMa<k| SMITH & BARNE3
N „Soe,,.. ORGANS ~. 4
A FULL LINK OF MUSIC AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENT*
SEWING MACHINES
Standard, Rotary Snuttle, While aud Other Long Shuttle Machines, Supplies, e'e
t a3? BOOTH SPHINQ STREET. 413 ly
Q
OPTICIAN,
and Jeweler
121 & 12a N. Spring; st.
COB. FRANKLIN.
Fine Mlamond Setting a Specialty.
Watches, Ulooka and Jewelry oars
folly Repaired and Warranted. 9-7 ly
The Herald
CHAS. VICTOR HALL TRACT
OF ADAMS SXREET.
Largehome Villa Icti lor tale »n the southwest
avenues 80 leet wide, lined with Paion, Mon
terey Hnei, Gr»»ill»», Foppers, the new Hunt
of Algiers and Magnolias, eta., which will kivo
a pa;* like ettcct to »ix miles ol streets, lots
an> nOxIBO t'> 14- toot «llev».
ipailO TO»INSIDE I.OTb": $10 per month till
one-halt is paid, or one-third gash ana ,alance
In Aye years; or If you build yY>u can have five
y £? lB '!, l l7, e - Get one while you can. Apply to
tfltce, SSB West First sttret. 7-14 6m
LOS ANGELES: V?UNDAY MfcftNlNG, OCTOBER 22, 1893.
GOTHAMITES AT THE FAIR.
Manhattan Day Was a Big
Success.
The New Yorkers Tamed Out
in Great Numbers.
A Tremendous Crush at the Centers
of Attraction.
The Barl of Aberdeen Llonlzsd by the
Exposition Ofttotals—A Magnin
r.ent Display of Fireworks
Last Night.
By the Astociated Press.
Chicago, Oct. 21.—The world's fair
Btill holds its grip on the clerk of the
weather aa a hostage for the good be
havior of the elements. No more
gracious autumn weather could have
been asked than that which greeted
Manhattan day. Not a cloud fleeced
the asure of the sky; the atmosphere
was crisp, with the temperature juet
right for outdoor exercise, while the
breeze from the west was jost strong
enough to set a fluttering myriad of
flags floating above the palaces j|| the
White city. Under snch condllfcup,
with train loads of visitors in numbers
to tax the utmost capacity of all the
lines between Chicago and the east,
pouring in for the past three days ; with
thousands of visitors from the south and
west taking ad van tageof the few remain
ing days to see the glories of the won
drous city of enchantment; with Chi
cago keeping holiday, it is not to be
wondered at that the intaking capacity
at tho gates wae taxed to the utmost
from early morning, or that the attend
ance eclipsed all records at this or any
other world's fair, save on Chicago day
itself.
The exeroisee of the day began at noon
In festival hall, which was packed with
spectators, and included an addresß of
welcome by Mayor - Harrison of Chicago,
a response by Mayor Gilroy of New
York, orations by General Horace
Porter, Hon. Ctiauncey M. Depew, Hon.
John U. Fellows, Hon. Keth Low, all of
New York ; a poem to Chicago by Jo
seph I. 0. Oltirko, a Now York journal
ist, read by Agnes Booth ; mosic br the
Thirteenth regiment hand of New York,
und a great Columbian chorus; prayor
and a benediction by Key. Dr. John
Brown of New York city and ArchbiFhop
'Corriganof the Catholic dioce>e of New
York. Wordaof praiso for Chicago by
the epeuturs end thy fftwpihftq.
'Skrtr Vr,At*SHft» JiW^y&fk_j)pd a f r ;; I«■ •••' '
At the conclusion of the exercises the
andienco made a rush nr the pavilion
at the southerly end of the fair, whore
a parade formvd. In the military iris
play was New York's famous Old Guard,
guealß of honor, escorted by the Chicago
hussars and the First regiment of the
Illinois national guard, followed by the
society of Sons of New York in Chicago.
The procession moved to the handsome
ly decorated New York building, where
it was met by Gen. Nelson A. Miles and
staff. Then the First regiment was
pn * nted a stand of colors and was aft
erward reviewed by tho mayors of the
two cities.
Later the Old Guard band gave a con
cert in the New York building. Alto
gether it was a memorable day at the
(air.
Great as the day was, the evening
waa greater: Toward night additions
crowda began to pour into the park, de
lot mined to see the illuminations ant
fireworks. AIL the exposition building
remained open until 10 o'clock in hono
of Manhattan day. In every nook ant
cornar blazed gleaming lights of man'
hues. The New York state buildinj
was especially resplendent. An elabo
rate display of fireworks wae provide!
far, and it was equal to any yet teen a
the fair. A procession of the floats
nsed on Chicago day wended its way
between the white buildings, ending
the jenrney at the lake front, where
the fireworks were displayed. Th
crush at this place was terrible, and
several people were slightly hurt in th
jam, but no serious casnalitiea are re
ported.
The First regiment, Illinois nationa
gnard, was presented a new set of regi
mental colors today at the fair by the
ladies of Chicago. The colore were
burned with the armory last spring
Today the regiment was drawn up on
the administration plaza, and Col
Charles S. Diehl, founder of the regi
ment, on behalf of the veteran corps
presented the new colors to the organi
zation. Col. Diebl's presentation
speech was responded to by 001. Koch
after which the regiment was reviewet
by General Miles.
"The earl of Aberdeen held an infor
mal reception at the Canadian pavilion
this afternoon, at which the members oi
exhibitors' associations were present.
Later in the afternoon Director General
Dabiß tendered a reception to the ear]
at the administration building, at which
all the world's fair officials wera pres
ent. The earl in a brief speech warmly
praised the officials for all they had
accomplished and repeated the aienr
ance to his enjoyment of the exposition.
In conclusion the earl proposed a toast
to the president of the United States.
It was drunk amid great applause, as
was also one to Queen Victoria, pro
posed by Mrs. Potter Palmer. The earl
and countess then proceeded to the
New York state building, where they
were given a rousing reception. To
night Aberdeen was one of the guests of
honor at a banquet in the New York
state building.
The total admissions today were 318.
--283, of which 290,317 were paid.
It is important to know that a oorreot
fit in fine tailoring can be had at moder
ate prices from H. A. Getz, 112 West
Third street.
Ladies' bate cleaned, dyed, reshaped
and trimmed. California Straw Works,
264 South Main street, opposite Third.
Conn band instruments. Agency at
Fitrgerald's.cor. Spring and Franklin sti.
MURDER AT PHŒNIX.
Fatal Termination of Farnershlp Quar
rel.
Phosnix, Ariz., Oct. 21.—Lee Rine, a
brick manufacturer, was shot and in
stantly killed this afternoon by Lee
Burton, bis former partner. The kill
ing was the result of meeting on the
street and the renewal of a quarrel of
years' standing. The parties had form
erly been in the restaurant business
here and at Tucson. On account of a
disagreement the business was closed
ont and Rine soon afterward procured
the arrest of Burton for violation of the
Edmunds law. Burton married the
woman in the case and was released.
He caused the arrant of Rine on a simi
lar charge, but nothing came of it. He
is now in jail and claims the shooting
was in selt 'ie.enae, but witneßees have
been found to whom he made threats
last nisjht to kill Rine today. Rine has
a brother living somewhere in South
Dakota.
THE ST. PAUL SOLD.
A Steamer to Take the Place of the
Wrecked Mevrbnrn.
San Francisco, Oct. 21.—The steamer
St. Paul has been sold by the Alaska
Commercial company to the Pacific
Coast Steamship company. The price
paid lor the St. Pan! is as yet a secret,
but it is supposed that the steamer
brought at least $125,000 and is consid
ered cheap at that. The St. Paul will
go no in the place of the Newborn be
tween this port and Guaymas, Mexico.
It was the intention, so it is rumored, of
the North American Navigation com
uany to purchase or charter the St.
Paul and enter into the Mexican trade.
CHAS. FAIR IN CHICAGO.
A BIG REVOLVER STRAPPED TO
HIS VjjAIST.
HU Bride I* With Him and Seems to
Enjoy the Notoriety Thrnst Cpou
Her Husband and
Herself.
Chicago, Oct. 21.—Cherles Fair, son
of ex-Senator Fair, the California mil
lionaire, accompanied by his bride, ar
rived in Chicago today. Fair had a big
revolver strapped to his waist, but he
and his wife appeared in good spirits
and there seemed to be no cause for
armament, but Fair lugged it around
nevertheless.
An alternoon paper says: With o big
revolver in a wide bait and a
broad-brimmed cowboy hat. Charley
Kaoeaa City, where he created a great
eensation by his very queer actions.
His newly-made bride, formerly Maude
Nelson of Chicago, accompanies" him,
aud eeems to enjoy the notoriety thrust
upon her husband aud herself. The
couple started for Jackson park as soon
as they had breakfasted and removed
the stains of travel.
SUDDEN DHAIS.
Thomas J. Newby'g Untimely End at
Santa MonJca.
Santa Monica, Oct. 21.—[Special.]
Thomas J. Newby died here suddenly
Friday evening, at 9 o'clock. Coroner
Cates held an inquest over the remains
today. The result of the investigation
showed it to be heart failure. The
fnneral takes place tomorrow from his
late residence on Second street ac 3
o'clock.
Mr. Newby was at one time editor of
the Signal, the pioneer paper of Ven
tura,
WILL VUBK FULL, TIME.
Good News for SOOO Southern Pacific
Shopmen.
San Francisco, Oct. 21. —The South
ern Pacific shops are to be run on full
time. The change goes into effect Mon
day, and applies to all points on the sys
tem between Portland and £1 Paso.
During the time of the greatest strin
gency the working days in the company
shops were reduced to four a week. In
returning to the old schedule the men
will work six days a week of eight hours
each. This order will affect about 5000
men and will increase the payroll about
$100,000.
A DISASTROUS FIRE.
Burning of Hntne's Salmon Cannery at
Gold Beach, Ore,
Marbhfield, Ore., Oct. 21. —Word
reached here today of a disastrous fire
at Gold Beach last Wednesday, by which
R. D. Hume's salmon cannery, hatchery,
merchandise, store and several other
buildings were destroyed. The Are orig
inated in the cannery and the evidence
points strongly to an incendiary.
Hume's cannery was probably the best
equipped institution of the kind on the
coast. A reasonable estimate places the
loss at $75,000.
W. O. T. U. Convention.
Chicago, Oct. 21.—At the W. C. t.
U. convention today Mrs. Thurber, a
colored delegate from Jackson, Mich.,
moved that a department of colored
work be established with a colored
woman as superintendent. The motion
carried. Routine vtork occupied the
afternoon, aud Lady Henry Somerset
delivered an addresß in the evening.
Lemon Growers Organize.
Ontario, Cal., Oct. 21.—The lemon
growers of Ontario and Cucamonga voted
today to organize and incorporate for
co-operation in curing and marketing
the lemon crop. C. E. Harwood, E. M.
Hatch, J. W. Freeman, Ontario; G. R.
Thayer and W. L. Stroud, Cucamoaga,
were elected directors.
Speculated aud Lost*
New York, Oct. 21.—Freudenthal, an
insutance agent, was held in bail on the
charge of the larceny of ,87,000, while
acting as agent with a power of attorney
for Albert Wagner and wife, who were
in Europe. He sold houses belonging
to them and lost the money in specula
tion.
FLASHES FROM ABROAD
A Notable Gathering on Deck
in Dresden.

War Minister Yon Kaltenberg's
Retirement.
Dr. Miquel's Proposed Readjustment
of the Tobacco Tax.
The Graeco-Bulearlan Imbroglio—Bis
marck's Becoming Health—Busslan
Naval Officers Frightened by
a Crank In Farls.
By the Associated Press.
Berlin, Oct. 21.—There will be a not
able gathring at Dresden at the cele
bration of the jubilee of the service of
King Albert of Saxony in the army.
The fetes will extend several days, and
emperor William and the archduke of
Austria, representing Francis Joeeph,
will be among those present at the cere
monies.
The fact that General Shallendorf has
succeeded General Kaltenberg-Stachu
as minisier of war does not excite any
surprise, reports to the contrary not
withstanding. It now appears that the
resignation of the minister of war was
due to his complete incompetency aa a
minister and parliamentary debater
and tactician regarding the army bills.
The Prussian minister of finance. Dr.
Miquel, is perfecting a Bcheme for abol
ishing altogether the existing tobocco
tax and to reduce by 45 markß per
hundred killograms the duty on im
ported tobacco. According to the plan
now taxes will be levied on home-grown
tobacco, when it leaves the factory in a
manufactured state, and on imported to
bacco at the same time as customs
dirties, the idea being to throw the chief
burdsn on the better clasp.
The foreign office at Berlin is cloßely
watching the interchange of notes be
tween the Bulgarian and Greek govern
ments regarding the action of a sergeant
of Bulgarian river police, who fired on
the crew of a Greek vessel in the Dan
ube. The Greek government demanded
indemnity for the wounding of the cap
tain of the vessel, and also asks for the
punishment of the Bulgarian sergeant.
The Bulgarian government investigated
the matter, and upon the report of its
local officials, declined to pay the in
demnity demanded by the Greek gov
ernment. Ihe result was that the
Greek agent at Sofia, M. Argyopolona,
Btwiied to tiw> Tluaaiuu minister
vrorrinra ..iistrgt! oi i ne lDler^
usts of Greece in Koutnania, and a most
interesting eeriee of diplomatic negotia
tions is in progress.
Prince Bismarck continues to make
progress toward complete health.
PROTESTED WITH A PISTOL.
Russian Guests In Farls Badly Fright
ened.
Paris, Oct. 21.—A sensation was
created early this morning as the Rus
sian naval officers were entering the
Military clab by a man firing a revolver
in the midst of the crowd looking on.
The shot caused a panic, as it was at
first thought some German fanatic had
made an attempt on the life of Admiral
Avellant. The man who fired the shot
was at once arrested. He gave the name
of Willis, and gave as the reason for the
act that he became sick at seeing huge
sums squandered od foreigners while
many thousands oi Frenchmen in Paris
alone were suffering for bread. He
wanted to protest against such an out
rage, and took this means of doing it.
The czar has sent a command to the
Russian officers not to dance till after
the funeral of Marshal MacMahon.
THE WAR IN MOROCCO.
Spanish Fort) and Gunboats Fire on the
Moors.
Madrid, Oct. 21.—An official dispatch
from Melilla says the forts there opened
fire today on the Moors and the Spanish
warship Venadito is shelling the coast.
Shortly after the firing began the Moors
fled into their own territory. They
sustained a heavy loss, Melilla is
poorly prepared for defense pending the
arrival of their reinforcements.
There is great rejoicing in this city over
the news of the defeat of the Moors.
A REGULAR BATTLE.
Fighting on a Large scale In South
Africa.
London, Oct. 21.—The correspondent
oi a morning newspaper prints an ac
count of the late Matabeie fight. It
states the engagement was evidently
much more than a brush with the ad
vanced bands of King Lobengula's war
riors, and concludes that the tight was
indeed a regular battle on a large scale.
It is relatod here that the victorious
force must have engaged some of Loben
gula's crack tegiments.
Death or Lord Vivian.
Roms, Oct. 21. —The British ambassa
dor to Italy, Lord Vivian, died this
morning oi jmeumonir.
Death of Alex. P. More.
Santa Barbara, Oct. 21.—A telegram
received today from Chicago announces
the death at Engiewood of Alexander
P. More, one of the pioneers of Califor
nia, and owner of a large amount of
property, includihg Santa Rosa island,
the largeet oi the Santa Barbara group.
More was a batchelor.
The Pacific Cable.
Lonoon, Oct. 21.—Sidney Sanford
Fleming of Canada, who is visiting the
British colonies in the interest of the
proposed Pacific cable, suggests that the
governments interested should own the
cable and a shilling a word should be
the rate. ,
A sea bath at borne with Turk's Island
sea salt is exhilarating, Recommended
by all physicians. For sal* by all drug
gists; 15c a package.
f
A MYSTERIOUS ROBBERY.
Sensational Burglary of the Hoaldiburg
City Treasury.
Healdsburq, Cal., Oct. 21.—A very
mysterious robbery occurred here lost
night. City Marshal Benjamin Leard,
upon going to the city hall this morning,
found that the safe in which the funds
of the city were kept, was unlocked;
that the money had been taken out, and
that a bunch of keys belonging to Geo.
V. Mulligan were in the safe. Word was
immediately sent to Mulligan's house,
but he was not there. His wife said
that in the early part of the night,
some one bad called him to go to his
brother-in-law's house, as the latter was
sick. The town turned out to search
for Mulligan, who was finally found tied
to a tree in the cemetery. He soon be
came unconscious from the cold; when
revived he told the story that on being
called from the bouse, he was making
his way to his brother-in-laws when he
was stopped by two men at the point of
a pistol. He was taken to the city hall
and compelled to open the safe. After
the men had secured about $4500 from
the city treasury, they took him to the
cemetery and bound him to a tree.
Mulligan has been city treasurer for 20
yearß.
KENNEDY'B RASH ACT.
A Wilmington Merchant Suicides at Ban
Bernardino.
San Bernardino, Oct. 21.—About noon
today John Kennedy, a hardware mer
chant of Wilmington, Cal., committed
suicide in the St. Charles hotel, this
city, by shooting himself in the head
with a revolver. He came to this city
on Thursday evening from Arrowhead
springs.
A THOUSAND MEN SLAIN.
A FIERCELY FOUGHT BATTLE IN
SOUTHERN BRiZIL.
Government Troopa Defeated by Rebel!
In a Conflict Lasting a Whole
Day—The Field Covered
With Dead.
Buenos Ayrss, Oct. 21.—The Rio
Grande do Sul rebels defeated the Loy
alists in a fiercely fought battle at
Ibiceli. A thousand persons were
killed.
New York, Oct. 21.—The Herald's
Montevideo dispatch from Rio de Ja
neiro says a fierce battle waa fought be-
I iween the rebels ond government troops
near Ibiceli. The revolutionary troops
commanded by Geaeral Sarvaiava, and
the government forces by l'inheiro Ma-
II ishniio- AJfcorkaaelai Jaqtisw
J the government force?, were routed. The
I fiield was covered with dead.
WBEKS SUKRENDEKED.
Slo Will be Returned to New York and
Prosecuted.
Washington. Oct. 21.—Francis H.
Weeks, the absconding New York law
yer, according to a message to the state
department, has been surrendered by
the government of Costa Rica to the
United States. He will leave for New
Orleans next week by steamer.
New York, Oct. 21.—District Attorney
Nichols, in an interview on the sur
render of F. H. Weeks by the
Costa Rican government said: "Weeks
will leave Costa Rica on Wednes
day. I expect him in this city
by the first week in November. He will
be arraigned at once; I cansot say yet
on which of the four or five indictments
found against him by the grand jury.
They all charge him with grand larceny
in the first degree. Ido not expect him
to plead guilty. The trial will come off
in November, We have several over
whelming cases against bim and have
the witnesses all ready. I will conduct
the prosecution myself."
arrhsiid for arson.
Sensational Developments Anent the
Recent Spokane Frle.
Spokane, Wash., Oct. 21.—Sensation
al developments have arisen in regard
to the recent fatal explosion and fire on
Howard street. The coroner's jury re
turned a verdict today charging Charles
Trotter, proprietor of the cleaning
works where the fire originated, with
arson, and he was immediately arrested.
The theory is that Trotter, out of
motives of gain and revenge, soaked
some old clothes in gasoline and applied
a match, not expecting the explosion
which followed. The evidence will show
that Trotter bought an unusually large
quantity of gasoline, bad recently taken
out an insurance on bis stock and fix
tures and threatened to get even with
his landlord.
MACKAY'S ASSAILANT,
Old Man Rlppey Gtvon a Very Light Son
t«noe.
San Francisco, Oci. 21.— W. C. Rip
pey, the decrepit old man who shot and
nearly killed millionaire John V 7.
Mackay several months ago, was today
sentenced in the superior court to pay a
fine of $150 or serve 125 days in jail.
The jury convicted niia of assault with
a deadly weapon, and urged a light sen -
tence. Rippey lost all his money in
mining stock s. It is said friends who
knew him when a prosperous speculator
will pay hie fine.
Interest Defaulted.
Louisville, Ky., Oct. 21.—The Amer
ican Association, limited, a British cor
poration which owns thousands of acres
of land in Kentucky, Tennessee and
Virginia, was thia afternoon plnued in
the hands of a receiver, on application
of the Central Trust company of New
York, which boldß first mortgage for
bonds in the sum of $1,459,950. The
interest on the bonds due August 1,
1893, was defaulted.
For sunburn and freckles use only
Perfecta Face Cream; safe and sure,
For sale by A. E. Llttleboy, druggist.
311 South Spring street.
TOOK CARBOLIC ACID.
MRS. ALBERT IIEniNQHOI'SE,
WHILE IN A STATE OP MENTAL
ABERRATION. SWALLOWS THE
FATAL PIERV LIDUID.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
THE SILVER COMPROMISE
The Term 9 Now Practically
Completed.
The Purchase Act Extended to
October, 1894.
All the Bullion in the Treasury to
Be Coined.
Paper Currency Below Ten Dollars to
Be Betlred— The Bond Issue Pro
vided For—Congressional
Proceedings.
Washington, Oct. 21.—The democratic
steering committee virtually completed
its labors on the compromise silver re
peal bill today. It extends the provi
sions of the present silver purchase act
until October 1, 1896, provides for the
coinage of the silver now i«> the
treasury, and the retirementof all paper
currency, except silver certificates, be
low $10. There is no reference what
ever in the bill to the bond question.
Opinions, differ as to the time when
the bili will be presented in the senate.
It may be handed in Tuesday, even
earlier, if it shall prove acceptable to
the majority.
The bill alno provides for the coinage
of the silver to be purchased in the!
future.
The Republican silver men are dis
pleased with the short period for the,
Sherman law to continue in force, and!
will probably oppose the bill solidly.
The Populists are also displeased with!
the bill for the same reason. The bill
will take the form of an amendment to
the present law.
It is understood that up to 2:30 p.m.
36 Democratic senators had signed the
document. It will be necessary to. ob
tain the signatures of 41 members to in
sure its passage. Kven then filibustering
might prevent a vote, unless some sort
of a cloture ia presented.
The terms of the proposed compro
mise in the senate were subject to a
great deal of discussion in the house
this afternoon. The fact that an au
thorization for bonds is not a feature,
brought relief to a number of Repub
licans and western Democrats. The
Democratic leaders are in favor of the
, bill, and when it comes to the
bouse there will be a suspen
sion of other business in order to give
the compromise riijht of way. The Dem
ocratic leaders seem to feel certain that
it will find favor with both wings of tbo
party in the lower house. The prevail
ing opinion is that the ultra-silver Dem
ocrats, in view of the necessity lor a
show of party harmony, will content
themselves with voting against the
measure. A goodly portion of the silver
Democrats will probably, however, vote
for the compromise, if their votes are
needed to secure its passage. The Re
publicans will be governed largely by
what their political brethren in the sen
ate do. When the bill reaches the
bouse it will go to the committee on
coinage, weights and measures, unless
there is an indication that an attempt
will be made to hold it in that commit
tee for too long a period, in which case
a motion to concur in the senate amend
ments would be made without its refer
ence at all. The consensus of opinion,
however, is that it will be referred un
der the rules and returned to the bouse
within two days at most. Four days
after the bill reaches the house it is ex
pected it will have passed, and congress
will have taken a recesß for two or three
weeks.
When the committee completed its
sittings today, 37 Democratic senators
had pledged themselves to support the
measure, and the managers felt assured
of a sufficient number to bring the total
to 41, leaving only two more necessary
to ensure the passage of the bill by
Democratic votee. The senators holding
out against the bill are said to be Mills
and Vilas of the repeal side and Irby of
the silver side. Some of the silver men
have not yet actually attached their
names to the pledge, but the eteerers
expect to secure the names of all the
Democratic senators and to rush the'
bill through as a party measure and
without calling upon the Republicans
for help. Most of the Republicans hope
the Democrats will succeed in this, for
the bill is one which does not commend '
itself to either the repeal or silver fac
tion in the Republican ranks. The re
peal men are pleased only with the
clause limiting silver purchases to one
year, while the silver men find in this
reason to nope for a further extension
of Bilver purchases, and think it better
than unconditional repeal.
The committee's recommendation will
be put in the shape of an amendment
of the Voorhees bill, and will probably
receive the support of most of the pi'ver
Republicans an an amendment,' while
the bill as amended wilt be oppotbd by
them. This is probability against p.isi
ing the bill, but it seems more probable
that if the Democrats get the concur
rence of their entire parly in the senate,
the Republicans will make no effort at
united action. The silver men, if all ,
parties are pleased, will accept the bitl.
As at present arranged, tho bill will em
pire in the midst ol the next congress
ional election, and there probably will
be an effort to amend the amendment
extending the purchasing time a year, •
and the silver men think it postiblothnv
may get Republican support to put ibis
through, but all circumstances consul- ■
ered, this is hardly probable.
One of the advantages which the nil- I
ver men find in the committer's einenj- !
ment of the original bill is that it gives ,
them ground to stand on, while the eil-:
ver fight shall be waged in the intnre.
They say the entire silver fight ia reality
is only begun, that the pretext bill 13 1

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