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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, October 23, 1893, Image 5

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THEY DID THE CORNER STONE
The Turn Verein Germania's
Big Celebration.
A Gala Day That Was Interrupted
by the Elements.
Tory Successful Ceremonies Attending
the Laying- of the Corner
Stone or the New
Turner Ball.
Yesterday was a gala day with the
German-Americans and all wbo are
associated with tbem in tbe erection of
their new Turn Verein hall on South
Main, between Third and Fourth streets.
Tbe occasion was the laying of the
, corner-stone of tbe new edifice, which is
now well under way in all of its metro
politan proportions.
The programme was a most interest
ing one, but unluckily it was interrupted
by tbe ominous clouds that burst forth
with brisk showers that put a premium
on overcoats and umbrellas, and thus
hastened a discontinuance of tome of
tbe best featnree of the day.
President Kuhrts speaks.
Tbe street parade waa a splendid
one, both in numbers and tbe popular
associations represented. The two
bands of music played soma very choice
■elections, and tbe streets along tbe line
of march were thronged with enthusi
astic crowds wbo liberally applauded
every feature of tbe parade.
There were a large number of the
city's most representative citizens pres
ent to felicitate the thrifty Germane on
their enterprise in bsbalf of the city, to
whose material growth they have so
liberally and readily contributed.
TUB I'AKADH.
Tbe procession was formed in front of
the old Turner hall on South Spring
street. The following was tbe order of
the parade:
FIRST DIVISION.
Mounted Police.
Grand Marshal and Aids,
Riverside Baud.
Sailors Uutou of Sun Pedro,
Council ot Labor.
White Walters Union.
Cigarmakers Union.
Plumbers and G ituuert Unlou.
Swedish and Denial* societies.
A. O. Hibernians.
Irish-American Social Club.
Los Angeles Sjotlon Boclallst Libor Patty.
Italian Benevolent Society.
Gariba'dl Society.
SECOND DIVISION.
Assistant Marshal and Aids,
Police on {pot.
Boishard Band,
Joancii and Officers ot the Day inCarritges.
Fire Department.
San Diego Turners.
Anaheim Turners.
San Bernardino Turners.
Schwabs v and Swiss S'jcieuei.
Herman Sous.
German Odd Fellows.
Germsn Ctliseu".
Pupils of T. V. 14,
Active feet ion T. V G.
German Order of Red Men.
Turuvereln Germania.
Citizens in Osrriages.
Grand Marshal E. C. Schnabel wan
assisted by the following aides: Mar
shal second division, Simon Maier; J.
G. S-baefer, Theo. Friese, H. Kohl,
Robert Ma6sbacher, O. Uvelta, Paul
Korkow, E. H. Theobald and John
lliich.
LINE OF MARCH.
All societies formed quickly into line
and at 2 o'clock the procession, consist
ing of over 2000 persons, moved off*. The
line of march was down Spring street
to Fifth, on Fifth to Broadway, on
Broadway to Second, down Second to
Spring, on Spring to Temple block and
thsnce south on Main to the scene of
the ceremonies.
TUB DECORATIONS.
The decorations were excellent. The
Turners and tbeir ladies had been busy
tbe previous afternoon in making floral
designs for the ceremonies.
Ex-Mayor Hazard defies the rain.
Extending Irom the street back toe
length of tbe new building was an arch
way of evergreens, artistically over
spread with roses and chrysanthemums.
TUB CEREMONIES.
Arrived at the scene of the corner
stone laying, the officers took their
places on the platform beneath the
beautifully decorated archway. Tbe
officers of the society and members of
the city council were prominent among
the assemblage on tbe platform. The
Riverside band, which discoursed ex
tremely fine music during the occasion,
alto occupied a place on tbe plarform.
PRESIDENT KTJHRTa's SPEECH.
President J. Kuhrta made the opening
address in German. He epoka a word of
welcome in Engliin. saying tbat when
the day dawned a bad day was expected,
but old col came out and gave us a t un
shiny day. Ho asked the indulgence of
all when be was saying his "little
speech" in German, hut was satisfied
that the speaker they had in the person
of Hon. ex-Mayor Hitftrd would more
than compensate for tbe time loet in
his address.
HIS GERMAN ADDItESS.
President Kuhrta' address in German
was as fnllowo:
TITIINKBM AND FIttKNDS OF TURNERS : It
affords me a great pleasure to be able to
greet such n great number of my fellow
citizens. The great number iv which
they turned ont is a BtiHir.ieiit proof that
the inhabitants of tbe fbwn and its
surroundings are in full sympathy with
our aeeociation at this festival mid on
this occasion, when we weeuriblo here to
lay tbe corner stone ol our new hail.
The German ladiee especially have
consecrated this festival by their pres
ence and tbe abundant gilts of flowers
which adorn it.
Everything concurs to show ue what
a cordial sympathy all tbe citizens of the
town feol lor us, and alto tbat the Tur
ncr-band (Turners' association) and its
institutions and principles stand high
in tbe heart and estimation of tbe Ger-
man people.
Afloiv me on this occasion to give you
a short sketch of the development ol
German life, which arose irom the foun
dation originally laid by the pioneers of
the German population of tbe city ol
Los Angeles.
The first German association was
founded in 1859 in the old Hound house,
which stood on tbe very place where the
new hall is to be constructed. The aeso
ciation was called Teutonia, and its pur
pose waß to further encial intercourse in
general and the German eon? in particu
l»r. In 1870 two association! were
formed, tbe one called tho I oe Angeles
Turnverein, and which becamo the pio
neer of the tirst Turners' association.
The other was named Concordia Turn
Verein. So it happened that Lis An
geles had at this time three German
clubs, for tile old Teutonia Singing club
always continued to assemble in Hen
ne's brewery. Ac that place was not a
desirable one for the singers, they
united with the Concordia and the new
club was baptized Teur.onia-Ooncordia
Turn and Sinning society.
In June, 1872, at last tbe consolidation
of all the German clubs took piece and
gave rise to tbe actual 'iurn Verein
Germanin. I truet that this name has
only brought honor to the Germans
who joinsjjj it.
At tbe same time some German citi
zens, especially Turners, founded a
(Jerman School association. This Gor
man school stood at this .spot, and it
seems providential that the new hall
will be built on the same site where the
first German association was fonnded
and where the first German school waa
established.
In 1871 the Turn Verein Germania
built its first hall; this hall answered
all purposes for 15 years, but then we
found out that it would do no logger
and we built a new hall. Now, after
cix yeare, we again found that it became
too small for our aspirations and it was
resolved to sell it and build us a new
home, and so we are assembled here
today to lay tbe corner stone for our new
ball.
Editor O Vogel reading his poem.
Turners and friends, from the orig
inal email number of our members our
association has increased nearly 300,
undoubtedly a splendid progress.
Let us hope and trust tbat on enter
ing into tbis new hall a new era of work
and joyous effort begins for our associa
tion ; may it become stronger and
stronger, may it develop in body and
soul, so thai our efforts and endeavors
will bring to maturity lbs fruita of our
labors.
The Turn Verein Germania has always
been at the head of the German popula
tion of the city, and thereby has hon
ored itself.
May it always remember this, then
tbe day will not be restricted only to the
laying of the corner atone of the new
hall, but the corner stone and building
will become also the expression of the
national feelings of all who love the Ger
man fatherland, and also for keeping
high tbe standard for all free institu
tions.
If tbe old Turners of this town have
been able to create in course of time
almost out of nothing auch a great asso
ciation, lam positive in my belief that
in a few years, with all the modern im
provements which thia now hail wil!
allow ns to introduce will largely con
tribute to increase our association in its
number and its useful activity.
For today's layin;< of the corner stone
will be a proof that henceforth the
spirit of the Turner association will en
deavor to stand strong and steady in its
principles, just as the foundations upon
which we erect this building.
It will always do ita beat to further
develop its activity, and for this purpose
we erect this building aa a temple to art,
to joyful eocinbility, as a school for the
instruction and education for tne coming
generations.
May this building be 'an ornament to
thin city, tho pride of the Turners and
Ihe German population ; this ia my moat
sincere wish.
OTHER EXEKCISKS.J
At the conclusion of President Kuhrta'
address heKannouneed the inability of
Mayor Rowan to be present.
A Bong waa then rendered by the sing
ing section of the Turn Verein, with ac
companiment by the Riverside baud.
Mr. O. Vogel then recited an original
poem in German which elicited loud ap
plause.
KX-MAYOR HAZARD'S ADDRESS.
President Kuhrta then introduced
Ex-Mayor Hazard by facetiously re
marking that the "rain would hold off
until the honorable gentleman bad
made hia speech."
But the c!oud3 grew heavier. The sun
soon disappeared behind them, and
occasional drops of water told that a
shower waa coming sooner or later.
The ex-mayor began by promising to
not delay the other exercises loner.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING. OCTOBER 2\ 1893.
"We meet here today," be said, "to
lay the corner-stone of a building not to
be dedicated to man's gain, hut to his
moral, physical and mental develop
ment. Nothing greater can be done for
our posterity than the development ot
its physical greatness.
"We are told that man ie imaged
after the image of the divine being.
What an appropriate occasion tbis is,
then, to meet here on this day and ded
icate n building which has at its aim
the development ol ail that is good.
"May the builders and those who con
trol its administration he strong, noble
men in love and character. As the
years go by let ua Btudy deeper tbe les
sons of the history of our country. Let
there he every expression of human
freedom consistent with a republican
form of government. Let us esteem and
reverence the originators of the order in
tbe fatherland, and when tho building
is erected let it be hallowed by all. All
honor due to tbe little band of German
Americant who in the early days of Loa
Angeles established the order amonget
us."
LAYING OF THE STONE.
A committee consisting of President
Knhrtß, J. P. Krempel, L. Winter, H.
Barhing, O. J. Knbach, C. Leonard and
August Dortcb, then proceeded to lay
the corner stone.
Tbe contractor of the edifice, Mr.
Kubach, presented President Kuhrts
with the trowell in a lew appropiate re
marks. Pretident Kuhrts responded by
saving:
"May tbis building be a monument
and tbe pride of every German in thia
city and to those wbo come after us."
The rites were carried out according
to the custom of the society.
WHAT THK BOX CONTAINS.
The iron box placed in tbe corner
Btone contains the following: List of
members of Pentalpha lodge No. 202,
Southern California lodge No. 278,
lodges of F. and E. Masons, A. and A.
Scotch Rite of Free Masonry; list of
members and the constitution and by
laws of tbe lurn Verein society, list of
officers of tbe day, copy of the Sunday
Herald, copy of the Times end Sunday
World, list of tbe Hermann Sons,
shekel by M. Polaski, business card of
J. Kubrts of 1804, copy of Snd Cali
fornier, souvenir by Maier & Zobelien,
programme of tbeceremonies, rules and
regulations of tbe fire department, copy
ot Southern California Practitioner by
Dr. Kurtz, book on Santa Monlca-by
the Sea by Dr. Rogers.
The following persons contributed
various articles and coins: Schroeder
Bro.s, Max. Harris, Henry Knief, 3, G.
Morachurtz, J. P. Kremble, John Han
erwaas. Eugene Wallace, Sintleg &
Berlz, Oderman Bro.s, Trieda Hellman,
H. W. Hellman, H. Sluhr, J. Adolff.
TUB ELEMENTS INTERFERE. «
Tbe light showers of rain had in
creased, and it waa found necessary to
discontinue the programme. According
ly President Kubrts announced that
Judge Gottechalk, who wae to deliver
the oration, would address the assem
blage at tbe hall in the evening. Then
the small crowd who had bravely stood
the elements to the last, quietly dis
persed.
THE EVENING'S FESTIVITIES.
The exercises were continued in the
evening at the old Turner's hall, where
a grand ball concluded tbe festivities.
It was with regret that the announce
ment was made that the oration of
Judge Gottichaik would be postponed
until tbe opening of the new building.
The hall was crowded with merry
dancers and enthusiastic spectators, and
the festivities were carried lar into tbe
night.
THE NEW HALL.
The new building has a frontage of 71
feet and is 168 feet deep, containing
basement and three stories.
The basement will be occupied by tbe
gymnasium, which ie 65x95 feet and is
30 feet high, with all modern improve
ments.
The first floor will contain stores.
The second will contain the banquet
hall, wh<ch will be 26x60 feet; tbe la
dies' and gentlemen's parlor, refresh
ment room and dancing hall, 64x86 feet,
and is 30 feet high. It will be laid
with hardwood maple flooring, and will
contain a large stage and fine scenery.
The third stoiy will be occupied by
billiard, card, club and reading rooms.
Tbe front of tbe first Goor will be of
Sespe sand stone, while Arizona sand
stone will face the two upper stories.
The building will be lighted through
out by electricity. John P. Kremble is
the architect for the building, and it is
a handsome specimen of tbe ability of
tbe gentleman.
GARD WAS SUBPOENAED.
Tbe Amiable Marahel Ilea a Ban Frun
el«c > Kxp«rlen<e.
S. F. Wave : Police Judge Con
lan occasionally forgets his dig
nity and puts the machinery of
his court into operation for the pur
poses of practical joking. Two wools
ago United States Marshal Gard of Loa
Angelea waa in town, his business being
in connection with certain Chinese cases
in the federal courts. During hia stay
he met a number of friends, and one
afternoon they were chatting on the
street, when some one proposed that
they should all dine together on Ihe
following evening. The suggestion was
received with applause by all but Gard,
who said be regretted very much that
he would not he able to join his friends,
because he had to leave for Los Angeles
in the morning. While tbey were dis
cussing tho question and endeavoring
to induce the marshal to delay his de
parture, Judge Conlan passed. He was
greeted by eoveral of the gentlemen,
and, joining tbe group, was introduced
to Marshal Gard. Presently tbe Matter
said good-bye and went on up the
Btreet. The others then expressed again
their regret at his enforced departure,
when Judge Conlan came to the front
with a brilliant idea.
"I'll fix it," he aaid. "I'll subpoena
Gard to appear as a witness in a petty
case tomorrow in my court. Woman
charged with drunkenness, or some
thing like that."
"Great Bcheme! Great scheme!"
yelled the others, and hie honor, the
court, then gave them pointers about
practice at the bar. The next afternoon
the conspirators assembled at Judge
Conlan's court at the appointed hour.
Marshal Gard waa in the courtroom in
nnswer to tbe subptnna, wondering why
he was wanted. When he recognized
the judge on tbe bench aa the gentle
man he had met the previous day his
wonder increased; when he was sum
moned to tho witness stand to testify
about a defendant he had never eeen or
heard of before, and of whose offense be
knew nothing, tbe marshal began to
think tbat metropolitan ways were
somewhat peculiar. But when he left
the courtroom, only to walk into the
crowd of laughing friends who awaited
him, he acknowledged the corn, and in
bis peculiarly gracious Los Angeles
way "set'em up." He also stayed for
dinner. Of course it was a good Joke,
but I am curious to know just what
Judge Conlan thinks of himself.
YESTERDAY'S CHURCH SERIES.
Some of the Spirital Bill of Fare
Offered in the Pulpits.
Rev. A. C. Smlther'.s Sermin on
Christian Sacrifice.
Some Christian Doctrine Preached from
w Christian Church—Tho Services
Yesterday at Ymme; Woman's
Christian Association.
Rev. A. C. Smither of the Temple
Street Christian church preached to an
audience somewhat decimated by the
storm yesterday morning on Christian
sacrifice, as presented in Rom. 12:1-2.
In these verses tbe apostla exhorts that
our bodies should be presented as [sac
rifices as opposed to the sacrifices of
feasts by the Jews. Like ancient sacri
fices they are to be offered up, given up
by men and consecrated to God, and to
the accomplishment of bis purposes.
They are, furthermore, to be kept holy,
pure and undented. They are to be
come temples that are set apart for the
service of heaven. They are to be liv
ing sacrifices to bear evidence of life and
activity and not to be possessed with
Idleness and ueeleseness. All thiß is to
be acceptable unto Him. Implied obedi
ence secures acceptance with God.
Again, these ars reasonable, spiritual
services, as opposed to Jewish ritual
ism.
Such habits of life result in a refusal
to be fashioned according to this world,
in an unwillingness to conform to the
principle of evil that is dominant in
nearly all society where Christ is not
honored. Too often there ie no line of
demarkation between tbe church and
world and professed followers engage in
all tbe evil habits of men of the world.
Some nnfaitbful followers of Christ
should be excommunicated from all our
churches for their own good and for the
good of the church at large.
Again, ench actions result in tbe trans
formation of character, in the fashioning
of me-i and women for the perfect image
of the matchless Nuzarene. Aa Christ was
translitrured and His divinity burst
through His humanity, so hia teaching
changes tbe rough feati-.rea of human
nature and makes them radiant with the
divine life. Under His touch tbe pebble
is polished into the diamond, tbe rough
rock thrown ont of the quarry ia trans
muted into the sculpture to entrance all
nations. Silently, noiselessly, but no
less powerfully, tbia grand work goes on
and poor, erring humanity ia being fitted
for a place in the spiritual temple of our
God. Character ia to be tbe teat at the
judgment day, and it alone will be tbe
aurety of our entrance into the higher
and diviner life of God ac manifested in
and through Christ.
YOUNG WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION.
The Gospel meeting of the Y. W. C.
A. wae opened by tbe service of Bong,
led by an orchestra composed of Mias
Cnthbert, pianist, Miss Madge Badgers,
Miss Semorie and Miss Brown.
Tbe subject fur the afternoon was
Prayer, and Mrs. Lucy D. More made
the principal address. She said we are
"children of a larger growth," and in
that spirit we should come to Christ.
When in sudden danger we are very apt
to pray whether we believe in prayer or
not, but it is better to be-always in a
prayerful spirit. Mrs. More eaid there
were seven ways in which we should
pray.
First, we must bave forgiveness.
Second, in Christ's name. John xiv.
14. If ye shall ask anything in My
name I will do it.
Third, we mußt come earnestly and
boldly.
Fourth, in faith believing.
Fifth, humbly, as little children.
Sixth, abiding in Christ.
Seventh, making our requests accord
ing to Hie will.
We may not always receive an appar
ent reply to our requests, but eometime,
or in Borne way, God will let ua know
tbat he heard the request.
If we asked for divine wisdom and
guidance Mrs. More thought there was
no question about our receiving it and
cited the case of Solomon, who asked for
wisdom and was granted that and much
other good.
James says if any man lack wisdom
let bim SBk of God, wbo givetb to ail
men liberally and upbraideth none.
Mies Morse followed with most appro
priate and encouraging remarks on the
same subject.
The regular Bible class of the associa
tion, led by Miss Morse, will meet Mon
day at the rooms. All women are in
vited to join thischies now.
The regular social will be heid Tues
day evening, and at tbat time will be
announced tbe arrangements for the
coming club.
Mies Bonnie Warren of the First Con
gregational church will lead the meet
ing next Sunday.
CHURCH OP THK NEW ERA.
In tbe morning there was a lively dis
cussion on What is tbe cause of pov
erty? led by Mr. G. Stewert. The sub
ject will be continued for discussion
nest Sunday. In the evening Prof.
Bowman spoke on Individualism, Stand
Out of My Sunshine. The true method
of human gtowth is spontaneous from
within, not forced from without.
The proper way to evolve that growth
is to furnish the conditions. Modern
thought looks upon man as horticultu
riets look upon plants, and total de
pravity hae been abandoned by the pro
gressive thinkers of the age. All the
past governments have been grounded
upon forca. The peopie have been com
pelled to submit to the despotism of all
kinds, educationally and otherwise.
Force is a poor substitute for wisdom.
It is a bad practice to stem knowledge
through the ears of a little one. Kind
ness and congeniality will evolve intelli
gence, not brutality. If the churches
would attack the devils around them,iu
their very midst, instead of aiming
their darts at fabled monsters, tbe
world would improve. The laws of
progrees are within the human heart,
and only should be read to see tho
'lile only Pure Crensn of Tartar Powder.—No Animoaia; No Al^».
tfsed in Millions of Hordes—4o Years the SterdwL
proper course to takesocially, politically
aud inornliy.
If the despota of the world would step
down and out nnd get out cf the sun
light, prosperity would be assured to all
humanity.
If superstition and cant and political
abominations would get nut of onr sun
shine we would not have euch a vast
army of trampo and bankrupts. When
you begin soul liberty and the declara
tion of independence, you must say to
all the powers, potentates and princes,
stand out o! my Bunshine.
The Church of the New Era has come
to tench people how to aholieh all kinds
of boseUin and establish the eolden rule
in tbeir conduct through life. Equal
opportunities, reciprocity and right
shall and must prevail. Life can be
made sweet by constant mutual interost
and affection. We must learn to stand
out of tbe way ol each other's sunshine
if we would eetablieb justice and liberty.
There are three essential elements
constituting civilization : Tbe individual,
the family and tbe state. If tbe indi
vidual rights be held sacred by the
authorities, tbe family and tbe Btate
will be preserved. A chaugo iB about to
take place; wrongs.in the shape of spe
cial privileges must be swept away. Tbe
privilege of living off the sweat of an
other man's brow will pass away. All
systems of iniquity will be made to
stand out of tbe sunshine of human hap
piness.
No man has a right to monopolize one
foot of ground tbat another man needs.
Corporation kinga muet be made to etep
out from between men and tbeir right
to life, liberty and the pursuit of happi
ness. Everybody has a right to all the
blessings and comforts of discovery and
invention.
THE THEOSOPHtSTB.
The Thoosophista held one of tbeir
usual interesting meetings laat evening
at Blavataky ball, 431}* South Spring
Btreet.
Mr. F. Neubauer addressed the au
dience upon Universal Adjustment—
Nature's Lew.
"At all times and in all countries peo
ple have eougbtto account for tbe vari
ous events of life, which befall mankind
individually and collectively in an un
forseen manner, and tbe agencies to
which these bave been attributed are
not oaly numerous, bnt serves to indi
cate the dominant mental calibre of tbe
people of any given period."
Alter touching noon tbe central ideas
which govered religious belief at differ
ent periods, the speaker continued to
cay that "down througb these ages one
fails to trace any central idea or philo
sophical concept which bespeaks of a
recognition tbat the laws of nature and
of human life are based upon one eter
nal process of compensation and univer
se 1 adjustment."
Upon what philosophical basis, then,
do men proceed to plan tbeir lives or
govern tbeir actions? Let those answer
who can.
Here theoaophy, with tbe doctrine of
Karma, tbrowa light upon the problems
of lie and the concatenation of eventa
that befall ua all. Karma or tbe etbica
of causation deals with problems per
taining to the play of forces, whether in
pbsical or spiritual realms. Karma may
be said to be tbe sell-adjusting force of
nature, which restores harmony dis
turbed by action. Thus, according to
action and reaction or the law of Karma,
men learn to be reeponsible for their
thoughts and deeds, for Karma operates
upon mental as well aa physical planes.
Our livea are the result of tbe soul's
former action, and our sorrow and joys
are retributive justice which each man
haß wrought out for himself.
THE FALL RAINS.
A Glance at tbe Weather Record for
Sixteen Yeara Past.
Tho first appreciable rain of tbe sea
eon csme yesterday morning early.
It began after midnight aud continued
until about 10 o'clock. There waa a
slight sprinkle in the afternoon, but the
clouds cleared away before dark.
The rainfall was slight as measured
by Observer Franklin*of the weather
service. It amounted to .28 of an inch
in Lob Angeles.
It began raining in the city again laßt
night about 9 o'clock and continued dur
ing tbe night.
San Diego wbb the only other point
heard from during the day, and there
only .02 of an inch fell.
The prediction s.ent from San Fran
cisco for yesterday's weather in this
section waa clear weather.
The wind yesterday was from the
east, was variable, however, and blew
between 8 to 13 miies an hour.
The first rams in Los Angelea have
very generally been in October. There
have been come inappreciable rainfalls
earlier in the season, and Bometimea
quite a rainfall ea early as in August.
Hut tbe greater number of years tbe
rainy season has begun io October.
There havo also been yeara when the
firat rains did not occur until much
later.
In tbe winter of 1878-79 the first rain
did not fall until December 28, 1178, and
the storm continued until January 2,
1879. During that time 6.98 inches of
rain fell, .40 of an inch being tbe record
for December 28th, when rain first be
gan to fall.
. The first storms have seldom been of
euch duration since that time.
The following year, 1879, tbe first
fitorra occurred October 12th and waa
only of one day's duration. The rain
fall ior that day was only .93 of an inch.
In 1880 the first storm occurred
October Bth, lasting a portion of two
two days, and only .14 of an inch fell.
In 1881 there were showera from
October 25th to the 27th, and the rain
fall was .82 of an inch.'
The fall rains of 1882 and 1883 beznn
on October Ist nnd 4th, respectively.
In tbe etorm of 1882 only .01 of an inch
fell and there was very little more In
October. But in 1883 .05 of an inch fell
October 4th, and then during the last
days of the month the showers were
quite frequent.
Tho first rain of 1884 was October 9th,
.15 of an inch; in 1885, October 10th, .20
of an inch; and in 1880, October 10th,
.01 of an inch. Tbere waa very little
additional rain during those yeara in Oc
tober, and in October of 18S0 no more
at ail.
Beginning with the fall of 1887 the
rains began earlier, September 21st be
ing tbe date of tbe firat storm, when .15
of an inch fell, and no more during that
month.
The date of the first storm shifted
again to October in 1388, when .32 of an
inch fell October 17th p.nd 18th.
During the next three years the rains
began earlier. In 188'», August 31st, .61
ol an inch fell. There was no more dur
ing the month, neither in September,
but considerable rein fell in October.
In 1890 the phenomenal record was
made of rain on August 10th, when tbe
rainfall was .03 of an inch. The follow
ing year also had an early record for the
first storm, .06 of an inch falling Sep
tember 15tb.
Last year the first rain woa October
15'h, when tbe fall was .33 of an inch.
The first storm of this year has come
very near the date of last year.
Of course there is a record in tbe sig
nal service office of come very inappre
ciable ehowers earlier than some of the
dates mentioned, but the rainy soaeon is
registered as beginning on the dates
given.
Oat of the 16 years for which the
record has been given the first etorms
occurred in October 11 times, in Septem
ber twice, in August twice aud December
once. This would seem to indicate tbat
the beginning of the rains in Southern
California may, as a rulo, be placed in
October, though they occasionally occur
earlier, and ia rare instances later. One
very peculiar circumstance is tbat No
vember has not yet been mentioned as
scoring a beginning of the rainy season,
i
|£m . • .. . . -;»u: etl.
A little 4-year-old boy said to his fa
ther, "Pa, can God do everything?"
"Yes, my son." "Could ho make mo a
2-year-old colt in two minutes?" "He
would not wish to do that, my son."
"But if he did wish to do it, could he?"
"Yes, in two minutes." "Well, then,
tho colt wouldn't be !J years old, would
he?" ' Tho father was kind of floored and
carried the younjjster to bed and made
him say his prayers.—Now York Re
corder. _
When Nature
Needs assistance, it may be best to ren
der it promptly, but one should remem
ber to use even tbe most perfect rem
edies only 'vhen needed. The best and
most simple and gentle remedy is the
Syrup of Figs, manufactured by the
California Fig Syrup Co.
" ! ''
S"l wm troubled with terrible pain lv my
back and had nlso kidney difficulty.
For 27 Yearo I Suffered.
I took Hood's Sarsaparllla and began to (jet
better. I have not had an attack since I be
fan to use It. I was also cured of catarrh in
tho head and am now In good health." I). M.
Robe, Denlson, lowa. 100 doses one dollar.
Hood's Cures
HOOD'S Pills cure Liver Ills, Jauuclco,
Biliousness Sick Headache aud Constipation.
AH departure
NOT A DOLLAR NEED BE PAID US
• UNTF CURE IS EFFECTED.
DR. k M
SPECIALISTS
Positively cure in from thirty to sixty
days ail kinds of
RUPTU RE
VARJdCEI X, HYDROCELE, PILES ami FIS
SURE, FISTULA, ULCERATIONS, etc., etc.,
without the us of knife, drawing blood or de
le ution from business.
CONSULTATION AND EXAMINATION FREE
Can refer interested parties to prominent Los
Angeles citizens who have been treatel by
tbem. Cure guaranteed.
6559. MAIN ST.,COR. SEVENTH,
3-7 IJUI LOS ANGELfS CAL.
THOS.B. CLARK,
-REAL ESTATE AND GENERAL—
AUCTIONEER.
DEALER IN NEW & S2COND-HAND
SAFES,
232 W. FIRST ST.
- -
- - THE TAILOR
II its jus', received first shipment of
Woolens, which wure bought diroo;
from the mills at greatly reduced
prices.
Fine English Diagonal, Pique and
Beaver Suits Made to Order at ,a
Great Reduction. Also One of the
Finest Selections of Trouserings
and Overcoatings.
Best of Worknianshio and Perfeot
Fit Guaranteed or No Halo.
JOE POHEIM, THE TAILOR,
I*B SOUTH SPRING ST.
Brings comfort and improvement and
tends to personal enjoyment when
rightly used. Tho many, who live bet
ter than others and enjoy life more, with
less expenditure, by more promptly
adapting the world's best products to
the needs of physical being, will attest
the value to health of the pure liquid
laxntive principles embraced in the
remedy, Syrup of Figs.
Its excellence is due to its presenting
in the form most acceptable and pleas
ant to the taste, the refreshing and truly
beneficial properties of a perfect lax
ative; effectually cleansing the system
dispelling colds, headaches and fevers
ana permanently curing constipation.
It has given satisfaction tomillions and
met with the approval of the medical
profession because it acts on tho Kid
neys, Liver and Bowels without weak
ening them and it is perfectly free from
every objectionable substance.
Syrup of Figa ie for sale by all drug
gists in 50c and SI bottles, but it is man
ufactured by the California Fig Syrup
Co.only, whoso name is printed on every
package, also the name, Syrup of Figs,
and being well informed, you will not
accept any substitute if offered.
AMUSEMKN'TS.
NEW LOS /tSOUI.I'.H THKtTBK.
(Under direction of Ai. Hayhan.)
H. U. WYAIT, MauagH.
THURSDAY, FRIDAY and SATURDAY,
SATURDAY MATINEE,
October 2(ith, 27th aud 28th, 1893.
Mr, Sutton Vane's realistic dramt,
THE SPAN OF LIFE!
WM. CALDER'S GREAT COMPANY,
Under the direction ol Mr. H. S. Taylor.
<The Rr'd'<e of Human Bodies!
SEE 'rue L gntheu'edcene!
(The Greatest Novelty of the Age!
The cleverest, most exciting melodrama seen
here in many moons.—New York Herald.
Usual Prices—2sc, s»c. 75c. and $1.
•pIPTH SEASON-1893-4.
H3NRY J. KRAMER'S
—SCHOOL FOR—
DANCING AND DEPORTMENT.
HEW CLASSES.
Beginners' Class—Ladles, Misses and Masters,
opens Satutday, October 14th, 1:30 to 3:3u
p. m.
Advanced Class-Ladies, Misses aud Masters,
opeas Satntdsy, October 14th, 3.30 to 5:30 p.m.
infants' Class—For children 4 to 7 years old,
opens Monday, October lOth. 3:30 to i> p. m.
Beginners' tilaßS — Ladies and Gentieinsu,
Monday and Thursday levelling , opens laon
day, October Kith at 7:30 p. m.
Advanced Class — Lautes and Gentlemen,
opens Wedaoeday, October 18th am p. m.
For farther particulars, apply at the ollico,
3to 5 daily, 139 West Fifth Street. References
required from all applicants. . 10-1 lm
THIRST PRESBYTKKIANOHUKCH.
J? Corner Second and Broadway.
FIB ST GRAND CONCERT
LOS ANGELES SEXTETTE CLUB
MR. H. E. HAMILTON. Violin.
MR. A. J. STAMS, Viola.
MB, W. C. McQUILLKN, Flute.
Mil. B. UrKRLICH. 'Cello
MR. ELMER WACIITEL, Violin.
UK. JOHN MUSSO. Bass.
Assisted by MISS JENNY T. KEMPTON, So
prano.
Admission. 50c. Reserved seats, 73c.
Seats can In reierv,jl at church on and after
Wednesday 25th. 10-217t
XTNITY CHURCH,
J Corner Third and Hill streets.
FRANCISCO POPULAR CONCERT
SATURDAY AFTERNOON,
October 28tb, at 2:30 o'cloc't.
J. BOND FRANCISCO, violinist, assisted by
MiSS AtJGUsTISE BESGKK, pianist, MI -I
NAN ITT < GOITSCHALK,soprano,MIBSEL A
BIBRLICII, viola, MR.. BIRfcHARIT BIEK
LICH, 'cello; a : ompau'iu-nts rendered by
MISS MsRY L. O'PONOUGHUE and MIIS
BUATRICIt FRANUiCO.
10-22 Ot Admission, 00 Cents.
THU PALACE,
B.E. Cor. Spring and First sts.
Ladled Eulrauce ou First at.
TONIGHT-GRAND CONCERT
From 7:30 to 12 p.m., under the leadership ot
the celebrated violin player,
MISS JULIA DE BELTRAN,
ASSISTED BY
MIS 9 AUGUSTA VENDT,
MISS ANNA PAN HANS,
MISS AUGUSTA PANHANB,
MIS 3 LIZZIE TIMMINS,
MI9S PAULINA KLAUS,
MISS GERTRUDE KLAUS,
MISS NETTIE KLIUsL
AND OTHERS.
Every night and Wedno-day and Saturn**
matinee.
The finest Commercial Lunch Id the city.
Meals a la carte at all hours. 10-7 U
NKW VIKNNA BITFFBT.
Court St.. bet. Main and Sprlnini
F. KERKOW, PROPRIETOR,
Free It-lined Entertainment.
EVERY EVENING, from 7:30 until 13, aal
Saturday Matinee from 1 to 4 p. re.
Engagement of the Great nnd on'y
—:• DOLORES!*—
Iv Her Unrivaled Specialties.
Reappearance of the Favorites of Las Angeles,
MISS LIMA CREWS,
MISS ANTONIE GREVE
Aud the celebrated
BERTH FAMILY ORCHESTRA,
MISS MARGUERITE BERTH, Dtteotreii
Fine commercial lunch daily. Meals a la
carte at all hours 3-24 I v
KINGSLEY & BARNES,
ART PRINTERS
OPFER PLATE PRINTING,
WEDDING INVITATIONS. ETC.
VISITING CARDS, ITO
211 New High Street, Fulton Block,
Near Franklin St., ground floor. Tel. 417.
Baker Iron Worlca
990 TO 96S BUJKN.t VISTA el.,
LOS AMQEL.ES, CAL.
AoJeiiUii the SomUsrn raclflo rro trues, Tel*
••haa* lz*. 7-a*
5

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