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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, October 26, 1893, Image 1

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TODAY'S FORECAST.
FOR THE DISTRICT OF SOUTH
ERN CALIFORNIA: FAIR WEATH
ER; COOLER; NORTH TO WEST
WINDS.
VOL. XLI. NO J5.
TO make our Liberal Gift Sale most interesting, we are
offering extra values in
MEN'S ALL-WOOL $10 1 $12 SUITS
Children's Suits in Large Variety from $4 Up.
Cur Velvet Kilt and 3-piece Suits are the finest
ever offered in this city.
Mullen, Bluett & Co.,
COR. SPRING AND FIRST STS.
JAPANESE mm
T*?T LARGEST VARIETY AND
XV V>TvJ NEWEST STYLES IN
Turkish, Persian, Indian and Daghestan Streets
MANY NEW THINGS IN WHITE AND BLUE.
APT «51s'"iTT AT? TP *J2 r " *" siz es. th e Newest Patterns and Many
Xi.J\. X OVj/ KJ AJ\£iO Qualities. Get o:tr Prices and Examine
1 11 Our Handsome Patterns Before Buying.
LOS ANGELES FURNITURE GOffIPAKY,
225-7-1) S. BROADWAY, OPP. CITY HALL.
CRYSTAL PALACE,
138, 140, 142 SOUTH MAIN STREET.
We Have Made Arrangements -with Several of the Largest
Manufacturers of
GAS FIXTURES
To act as their acents. We offer their goods at a
DISCOUNT OF 50 PBR CENT FROM
THEIR PRICE LIST. We are just in receipt of
an elegant assortment, selected personally from
manufacturers, which we sell at a discount of 30
per cent.
MEYBERG BROS.
TWO GOLD MEDALS
Two First Prizes for Large and Small Photographs
-EWORLD'S FAIR&-
Convention of the Photographic Association of America over toma of the mo t eminent nho
to<r.pr,ers o' th» East (snd the Pacific OoMtl. Thi* complies the largo iUi. ol EIGHT MBU
AlS.iit' TrN DIPLOMAS for excellence and superiority.
Cloudy Weather Pre j 920 SOUTH SPRING STRFFT (Opposite Io; Angles
laired for sittings. \ Jtn '" B OIAEd. jrneaier A Holienbecx
BARKER BROS.,
SUCCESSORS TO BAII.BV & KAKKKK BROS.,
IT / —v H »" Moved Into Thalr New Quarters In
I tne Stimson Block, Corner
11 Vsffll' Third and Sprlns; St..
\b\ W b * rk B sQ>wiMa a risjt link of
I JpflL/Xik % Halt and ReejpUoa Chairs, In polished
7*'J» I fl wools nnd cobble sms of leither. Furniture
• ' ' I ') ttat isnot pleislng In lh; eye l< lit f)r li jthing
C i-■— letabain. a leg mro is one thing and sirtngta
\ % c=—another, but there is not the laait reason in
jAyi\7 1 " f iTTTS tnf world wty the two should not go togothar
\ / / I /n == H\j\ iv furi>lta:e To v thing is cheap does not
V' IH V | Ul l'fetli necesstrily make It cheip, but to fay our fur-
A. ' ' I n rZZZjSjA ultLrj li cheap scarcely does it ju nice. Ojme
J I _ ill VM.V ttU ' l * <c ,ar J 0 "" An<l tv looking see
r^^^S*^* 5 " // •" \[ these Hall Chars. Also take a peop inio ihtt
i*i*,<,*i^^ J ~ if V- j pretties' of all departments—DttAPEkY
"_' " i> DEPARTMENT. In the CARPiT DEPART
IT TTOAK/'P CimnnnT kKUT you *1 I muy new slTnti. O uno
C/f O I IVUIIII CjUiTuK L whetUHjouOTut 10 buy oraoi And again
t we say COMB.
WILLIAMSON'S MUSIC STORE
HENRY F. MILLER, f-J I yv fv I /—>v MATHUSIIKK.
BEHR BROTHERS. lA\I >l V_-» vT3 BRA 11M LT.XR,
B. BHONINGER, ' ■ SMITH & BARNE3.
HjtWMiN BlOi, ORQANS NEEDHAM.
Air Circulating Heed Cells. _ _SiUor Tongued.
A FULL LINK OF MUSIC AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENT*.
SEWING MACHINES
Standard, Rotaiy Sjuttle, White and Other I.on.'t shuttle Machines, Supplies, e'c.
327 BOOTH BPHINQ STIjMKT, 413 ly
optician,
aod Jeweler
121 & 121! N. Sprinp; st,
COR. FRANKLIN.
Fin* Hismond Setting a Spec-laity.
Wiitch**, Ciuuhh and .jewelry care
fully Unpaired and Warranted. 07 ly
The Herald
CHA.S. VICTOR HALL TRACT
OF ADAM© STREET.
Large home Vula Ie ta for sale in thasouthwest;
avenues RO feet wide, lined with Palm,, .Mon
terey Pliws, GmrllUs, Peppers, the new Gum
of Algiers and Magnolias, Ho., which will give
a para like erleot to idx miles of streets. Lots
are 50x 150 to 14-toot alleyr.
$:il>o FOR INSIDE LOT*: iflO per month till
Oue-nslf is paid, or oue-thlru cash ami alsnce
In five yes,.; or if you bulls y„u can have rive
yeais Hire. Get one -vhlie you can. Apply to
i Mice, U2a West ffirst street. 7-Uorn
LOS ANGELES: THURSDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 2<i, 1893.
THE WHATTAN TRAGEDY.
A Full Confession of the
Awful Crime.
James Stone Says He Did It All
Himself.
The Culprit Tells the Story of His
Work of Blood.
Ha AnliUd at the Finnal or Hit
Victims—Ha Now I* Hapyy In
the Savior* Love and Not
Afraid to Hio.
By the Annotated Press.
Washington, lud., Oct. 25.—.Tames
Stone, who a day or two ago confessed
a share in the Wrattan tragedy, in
which six persons were horribly butch
ered, September 19th, implicating a
number of others, broke down com
pletely this morning and confessed that
he alone committed the crime, using a
corn-knife and hatchet.
Stone stated to Deputy Prosecutor
Hastings that his first confession was in
.be main untrue; he alone was guilty
ot tUe atrocious crime. He said that,
arming himself witii a "mail axe and a
corn knife, be proceeded to the house.
Calling Mrs. Wrattan to the door lie in
formed her be had toothache, and M.-s.
Wrattan brought some Wizard's oil.
As she brought it he struck her to the
floor with the corn knife. He then
rußhed into the room where Mr. Wrat-
tan and the children wore. Ellen
Wrattan, the 11-year-old-girl who sur
vived the horrible blow she received
that night for several days, first awoke
and recognizing Stone, exclaimed, "Mr.
Stone, what are you doing here?"
He atruck her, then turned to the
helpless patient, Mr. Wrattan, who was
sick with typhoid fever, and struck him
on the head. Next he killed both the
small children.
He tried the door to the room of old
Mrs. Wrattan, but could not force it,
so he forced the window by breaking it
with hie foot. Then a terrible fight en
sued, for the old lady wita strong. He
then passed through the rooms in which
the other victims lay. Mr. and Mrs.
Wrattan were both living, but doliri
ous. He gave them the final blow.
Stone did not get any money, and
eaid alter the tragedy he did not care for
money. Stone then hid bis clothes ar.d
bloody weapons. lie was the fiiut at
the Wrattan homestead when the alarm
of the murder was given. He was a
pall-bearer ot the iutieral and assisted
the undertaker in tlMr-b-.*iiea
for burial. He says he has been for
given by the Lard ond is a happy man.
He wrote the following to his wife and
children :
IJkak Cxcili.a, Sali.ie, Ezra and
Habuy: I don't think I will ever see
your faces again. Kiiae the children
to fear God. I will tell you today lam
happy in the Saviour'e love. I sought
Christ yesterday. Yesterday evening
and all last night I found Him precious
to my sonl and am now ready to die,
and am a happy man. Please meet me
in Heaven, all of yon. Tell Cecilia to
write me as soon as she gets this, and
that she did just right in telling the
truth on me to the grand jury. I am
saved. Pray for me, Cecilia. Good by.
James E. Stone.
It is reported that when the constable
went to arrest Stone be was invited by
Stone in to prayers, after which be said
be would go with him. His wife has
been brought to Washington for protec
tion, as she feared violence from the
murderous gang to which her husband
belonged.
FOSTER FEKLB BAD.
Calico Oharllo Is' Hrleved at His Cred
itors' Aotlons.
Cleveland, 0., Oct.-25.—Ex-Secretary
Foster makes the following statement
regarding the suit begun by his credit
ors: "Of course lam disappointed and
grieved at the action on the part of
my creditors. Ido not think the cred
itors will gain anything by this suit. 1
have done nothing either dishonest or
dishonorable. The sale of my busi
ness blocks to Mr. Harkness was bona
fide, and the books of the bank will snow
what wae done with tiie proceeds. The
sale of the homestead to my wife wrb
made 10 years ago and was perfectly
legal. This action on the part of the
creditors defers indefinitely the settle
ment of my affairs, as it Will mean a 10
years' lawtmit.
Stewart's Millions.
New York, Oct. 25.—The twelfth
juror in the suit of Alexander Stewart
ajtaiiißt ex-Judge Henry Uinton, in the
former's effort to get a share of A. T.
Stewart's millions, was obtained this
morning. The case adjourned until to
morrow before Judge Daley in the court
of common pleas.
Women Missionaries.
St. Paul. Minn., Oct. 25 —The an
nual meeting of the Women's Foreign
Mission society of the M. E. church
beiian a session here this morning. The
session was taken up with welcome ad
dressee and organization and reports
from various fields.
The Matabole Campaign.
Cape Town, Oct. 25. —Commissioner
Loch has perfected all his plans to hurry
forward men and stores in order that he
may have a strong body of imperial
troops around him when the final set
tlement of the Matabele question takes
place at Buluway.
Stop tbat cough by using Dr. St.
John's cough syrup. We refund your
money if it fails to cure. For sale by
Off & Vaughn, corner Fourth and
Spring streets.
For sunburn and freckles use only
Perfecta Face Cream; safe and sure,
For sale by A. E. EittleDoy, druggist.
311 South Spring street.
Conn band instruments. Agency at
FiUgerald's.cor." Spring and Franklin Bts.
FRENCH ENTHUSIASM.
Nothing; la Too Good for Russia and
Her Representatives.
Paris, Oct. 25.—The city will erect a
statue in honor of Ruesia near the Arch
of Triumph. It is reported the czar will
visit Paris next spring at a time coinci
dent with the grand naval review at
Genoa, in the presence of Emperor Wil
liam of Germany and King Humbert of
Italy.
Lyons, Oct. 25.—Over 200,000 strang
ers were in the city today to assist in
welcoming the Russian sailors on their
way 1,1 Toulon from Paris. The city wrb
gaily decorated and the municipality
expended large sums in providing enter
tainment for the visitors. It was with
the utmost difficulty that the police
kept the way clear for the Russians on
the way from the station to the town
hall. Many enthusiastic men and
women broke through the lines, and at
the risk of their necks rushed up to the
carriages and kissed the hands extended
by the Russian officers, while the multi
tude kept np a continual fire of cheers
for the czar and Russia. The visitors
were overwhelmed with presents, In
cluding 12 most exquisite silk dresses
for the czarina, quantitiowof French and
Russian flags ot the finest silk, and
?500 silk handkerchiefs to be distributed
among the Russian sailors.
Alter a day of feasting and enjoyment
the Russian office™ left hue tonight
for Marseilles. A large crowd was at
the station to ccc them off and the
cheers were remarkably fervid.
A VICTIM OF OVERWORK.
NATHAN STRUJHS PUTS A BULLET
IN HIS BRAIN.
He Wu a Prominent Dryeoodn Manager
and His Suicide Has Created a
Great Sensation In
New York.
New' York, Oct. 25.—Natfcan Strauss,
lock] managsr of the Levi Strauss dry
goods house of San Francisco, shot him
self in his private office this morning.
He was in good health, and as far as can
be learned, happy. He had a well
balanced disposition, was married and
lived in the Grenoble flats, Fifty-Beventh
street, where with several children and
wife he was always supposed to be
comfortable and happy. Tho ear.se of
the suicide, 30 far is wrapped in mystery.
In the office this morning there was the
greatest dismay end confusion.
"Can you assign atty cause for the
suicide?" was asked of the chief clerk.
"Ob ! well, no, I don't know of any."
"Was Strauss in any financial diffi
culties?"
"Not that I know of."
♦ "Was his married life a baprjy one?"
"[think co."
"And he wae in good health?"
"Oh. yes; excellent."
More than this the clerk would not
divulge. At the office of the attorney of
Strauss it was said there was every rea
son to believe the letter's financial af
fairs were in the soundeat and most
prosperous condition.
When Strauss reached his office at the
usual hour this morning he greeted the
clerks pleasantly as usual. After glanc
ing at his mail be walked back to a room
in the rear. Several porters who were
working near the room found Straußß in
an unconscious condition. There wan a
terrible wound in his temple. In the
aigbt band he firmly grasped a pistol.
Strauss was of an extremely nervous
temperament. It is said be had no bus
iness trouble but had been more than
usnally busy during the last five months.
The only reason hiß friends assign ia
that his mind became unbalanced from
overwork. He was prominent in the
dry goods district and soon after the
shooting the offices of the firm were
crowded with inquiring merchants. The
domestic life of Strauss is said to have
been happy. He leaves two children.
Strauss wae removed from hie office to
the hospital where he died shortly after
noon.
I'ONsKI. AT AMOY.
The Office Not Exactly In Charge of a
Chinaman.
Chicago, Oct. 25. —Dr. Bedloe, former
ly consul at Amoy, speaking today of
the story that he left in charge of the
consulate a Chinese who was making
himself ridiculous by various arbitrary
rulings, Baid: "Colonel Iloue of Vir
ginia wae appointed ir.v successor May
10th, and niter waiting two mon'hs for
him I obtained leave of absence to come
home in time to Bee the exposition.
Why Hone is not at Amoy 1 do not know.
I placed the consulate in charge ot Dr.
Greenwald, the German consul.
Chung wae one of my deputies and in
terpreter. He is ft gentleman, a gradu
ate of Yale, and would never think of
calling himself consul."
An ludlan Uprising.
New York, Oct. 25.—The Herald's
Lima, Peru, dispatch says: News of
serious importance is just received from
Huancayo. It is stated the Indians are
rising in revolt against the government.
Tbey are in favor of ex-President Ca
ceree, whose rights of citizenship were
recently taken away from him by the
Peruvian congress.
Slight Rain at Fresno.
Fresno, Oct. 25. — The threatened
rain oi yesterday passed off with a trace
of .02 of an inch, and the raisin men
are scattering trays this morning.
Another week of fair weather will place
the entire frnit crop safely in the pack
ing house. Very few are attempting to
cure any second crop.
Batolll's Domicile.
Washington, Oct. 25. —The question
of a legation home for Monsignor Sat
olli ia definitely settled by the formal
transfer of the old home of Senator
Stephen A. Douglas and the late Justice
Bradley to the papal legate having been
made. ' The price is $25,000.
An Embezzling Cashier.
Lansing, Mich., Oct. 25.—CaBhier
Nelson Bradley of the failed central
Michigan Savings bank, has been ar
rested on the charge of embezzling $52,-
COO and making lalse reports.
TRAMPS IN HARD LUCK.
A Disastrous Day for Brake
Beam Tourists.
Five Killed in a Wreck at
Trenton, N. J.
Several Killed in a Disaster at
Harrisburgr, Pa.
A Similar Accident at Stella, Texas—A
Number of Trainmen and Fas
aensers Also Among the
Victims.
j By the Associated Press.
Thenton, N. J., Oct. 25.—The Becond
' section of the Chicago limited on the
! Pennsylvania railroad whb wrecked near
| Lawrence station shortly after 6 o'clock
i tonight by running into a derailed
: freight train. Three unknown tramps,
< who were stealing a ride on the freight
] train, and another, named Ward Mc-
Conigle of Pittsburg, was badly injured.
Daniel Mahoney, engineer, aud Henry
Matthews, fireman oi the limited, were
1 badly injured, l'llia Greon, a passenger,
I cud J. C. Carter, William Willis and
James T. Gray, porters, were slightly
injured,
Five tramps are believed to hove been
killed in tbe wreck. One of the sur
vivors says thero were at least 15 on the
train, but the cars are bo badly piled up
it will take another day to get at the
correct number of killed. Three passen
ger coaches are in the ditch, and how
the passengers escaped ie a myetery.
On board the train are said to have
been Archbishop Corrigan, Comptroller
Meyers and General Horace Porter.
They and a great number of passengers
were taken back to Philadelphia.
At I a. m. four dead tramps were
hauled out of the wreck, and crewa are
still at work.
HORRIBLY MANGLED.
Four Men Killed In a Train Wreck at
ilarrlsbnrg, Fa.
Harrisbuko, Pa., Oct. 25.—Four men
were killed in a wreck on the Pennsyl
vania road in this city thia evening. A
loaded freight train going east was
boarded at Market street by five men.
Two squares away the cars jumped the
track and crashed into a west-bound
train of empty cars. The car in which
the men were sitting was held in the
middle of the grinding mass and four
were instantly killed and one injured,
tt I* almost irjepowible to identify three
of trra dead, owing to being crushed out
of recognition. The fourth is known to
be Richard Doyle of Pittsburg. Tbey
were well dressed and the man injured
Bays tbey came from Illinois and Ohio,
and had families. Frank Ward of Bur
lington was the only man who escaped.
Ho Bays Frederick Gimmell was one of
the men killed. Tne cars loaded with
oil and lumber were wrecked and the
contents destroyed, and six empty cara
smashed.
GRAND TRUNK VICTIMS.
Only Six of the Bnroed Bodies Kemalu
Unidentified.
Battle Creek, Mich., Oct. 24. —The
body of another victim of tbe Grand
Trunk has been identified as that of C.
Straub of New York. Robert Colegrove
of London, Ont., was also found among
tbe dead. This leaves six unidentified
still. At the inquest today Conductor
Scoct and Engineer Wooley refused to ans
wer questions,protesting that by so doing
they would incriminate themselves.
A DISASTER IN TEXAS.
Two Tramps Killed and Several others
Fatitlly Injared.
Houston, Tex., Oct. 25.—An east
bound local freight and a west-bound
California freight collided at Stella
today. Two unknown tramps were
killed outright. John Door, of Luling,
was also killed. G. Colbert also received
injuries which will result fatally. A
man who claims to be from Omaha, but
refused to divulge his name, wae also
badly injured.
tl'GiK TKUBT CASE.
Examiner lleck'rt Keport Ready to be
Filed.
Philadelphia, Oct. 25. —The report
of Jameß M. Beck, examiner in the fa
mous sugar trust case, is ready to tile in
tbe United States circuit court. The
proceedings were brought by tbe United
States to declare the trust invalid. The
proceedings were grounded on tbe pur
chase of tbe four Philadelphia refineries
and tbe increase of the capital of the
American Sugar Refining company by
$25,000,000 with which to secure the re
fineries. Tbe deiendants in tbe case in
cluded all tbe prominent sugar men in
the country. The examiner makes no
recommendations, but merely recites
tbe facte in tbe case. Among tbe wit
nesses examined were John E. Searles,
jr., X C. Knight, jr., and many otherß
prominent in the sugar trust. The most
important waa John E. Searles,
jr., who made the contract on benalf of
the trust. Tbe report will be taken up
in court in November.
THE BRAZILIAN REVOLT.
The Situation at Rio More Strained
Than Ever.
New York, Oct. 25.—The Herald's
Montevideo dispatch says: The situa
tion in Rio ia more strained than ever.
The latest advices confirm the news of
the escape of tbe Uranus, which boldly
steamed past Fort Santa Cruz. The
Tiradentea is still in port with steam up,
and the Repubiica is waiting for her to
come oat and fight. It is currently re
ported tonight that the Brazilian river
squadron has declared m favor of Mello.
Ail desiring a correct tit and first-class
work in merchant tailoring call on H.
A. Qetz, 112 West Third Btreet.
TWELVE PAGES.
LYNCHING TALKED OF.
Excitement Over an Unprovoked Har
der at Wlnflald, Kan.
Winfikld, Kan., Oct. 26.—-Much ex
citement prevails tonight over the un
provoked killing this afternoon of Capt.
H. H. Silvard, an old settler,well known
throughout the state, and a lynching is
not improbable. Captain Silvard, while
acting as a peace officer, undertook to
arrest Morgan Wright, a young tough,
and Kid Morton, a joint keeper. A gang
of toughs congregated and a general
fight ensned. During the melee some
body, supposed to have been Morton,
fired a shot at Silvard. The latter fell,
dying almost instantly from a wound in
the head. Other officer succeeded in
placing Morton and Wright in jail. Ex
citement runs high tonight, and lynch
ing ia openly talked of.
Wl 1.1. COMB OFF ANYHOW.
The Corbett-Mltchell Flaht to Take
Place Somewhere.
New York, Oct. 26. —It has been prac
tically decided that the Corbett-Mitch
ell fight will come off anyhow. Mitchell
held a conference with Brady, Corbett's
manager. It has not been decided where
the fight will take place, but it is
thought some southern city will be the
scene. It will probably be on the same
date as that decided on when it was
thought the contest would be held at
Coney Island. Mitchell left for Phila
delphia immediately after his talk with
Brady and will go into training at once.
STANTOxN'S BAD BREAK
AN AMERICAN NAVAL OFFICER'S
U-N WARRANTED ACT.
The Admiral or the American Squadron
at Klo Relieved of HU Command
for Saluting the ltebel Ad
miral'! Flag;.
Washington, Oct. 25.—A cablegram
from Berlin printed this morning stated
that a dispatch to the N'ord Deutsche
Zeitung, from Rio de Janeiro, eaid the
American naval commander exchanged
visits and salutes with Admiral Meilo of
the insurgent fleet. Secretary Herbert
was loth to believe the statements are
correct and expressed his doubts. If
Admiral Stanton merely exchanged an
ordinary unofficial visit on business mat
ters with Admiral Mello, the secretary
would not have been surprised, nor
probably would he have :akeu any fur
ther notice of it, as it is eaid at the navy
department this would not be improper,
but tbe secretary saw at once tbe seri
ous and unfortunate nature of the re
ported action by Admiral Stanton, and
how it might be construed by the lawful
government of Brnzil. He, there!. "c,
lost no time in promprly cabling to Rio
de Janeiro for all the facts in the case.
He received a reply from Admiral Stan
ton etating this officer saluted the flag
-of Admiral Mello, commanding the in
surgent fleet.
The salute was unauthorized by any
instructions tbe admiral received. It ia
an unfriendly act to a friendly power,
and the secretary of th 9 navy, after con
sulting with the president and the sec
retary of Btats, issued an order detach
ing Admiral Stanton from the command
of his equadron, and turning it over to
Captain Picking, the next officer in
rank.
Secretary Herbert expresses surprise
that an officer of Admiral Stanton's ex
perience and standing should commit
eucb a blunder, and his prompt action
waa taken with the purpose of announc
ing to the world that the United States
government has taken no steps to refuse
recognition to the legally constituted
Brazilian government.
IN THK ASSOCIATION.
The New York World Forsakes the
United Press.
New York, Oat. 25.—The New York
World and the New York Evening
World have signed an agreement to join
the Associated Press and the service
began tonight. The retirement of these
papers from the United Press has
caused great ularm in the ranks of the
opposition, following as it does as closely
upon like action on the part of the
New York Staats Zeitung and the New
York Evening Post, and there is every
reason for expecting further important
acquisitions to the Associated Press in
the immediate future.
GROSS MISMANAGEMENT.
A Movement on Foot to Oast the Read
ing Receivers.
New York, Oct. 25. —Lawyer Isaac L.
Rice said this afternoon that at a secret
meeting of holders of Reading securi
ties last night he presented a bill of
complaint containing 75 counts against
the Reading receivers, charging gross
mismanagement, etc., and that efforts
are now being made to get the Reading
into the latest coal deal. It was the
unanimous opinion of the meeting that
this should form the basis for an applica
tion for the removal of the receivers.
KIMli A 1.1. NOLAN.
A Chicago Girl Wed* a Lieutenant In
the Army.
Chicago, Oct. 25. —Miss Hester Kim
ball, daughter of Mrs. H. Kimball and
niece of Mrs. George H. Dunlap, was
married this evening to Lieutenant Jas.
E. Nolan of the Fourth Cavalry, U. S.
A., at the residence of Dr. and Mrs.
Dunlap, 328 Dearborn avenue. Miss
Kimball is well known in society circles.
Tbe young couple leave tonight for an
eastern trip before returning to San
Francisco, where Lieutenant Nolan is
stationed.
Princeton Won.
Feinckton, N. J., Oct. 25.—Princeton
won the football game against Lehigh
this afternoon by a score of 28 to 6.
Ladies' hate cleaned, dyed, reshaped
and trimmed. California Straw Works,
264 South Main street, opposite Third.
W4M4 *********** **«-*-»*•■■■■ ■■■■■--
FIRED FIREnEN.
THE SUSPENDED FIRE LAD
| DIE5 HAILED OVER THECOALS
\ AT THE MEBriNU OP THE FIRE
J COMMISSION YESTERDAY.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
THE END DRAWING NEAR.
Repeal of the Sherman Act
Not Far Off,
Voting May Be Completed by
Saturday.
An Early Adjournment of Congress
Probable.
Action on the Chinese BUI Will Be Da%
ferred Till the lingular Ses
sion— G rover Greatly
Gratified.
By the Associated Press.
Washington, Oct. 25.—The prospect
at the close of the session of the senate
this evening was favorable to voting on
the amendments to the repeal bill by
Friday. Senator Jones will conclude to
morrow, and Senators Teller, Martin,
Allen and Stewart each desire to talk.
So far as learned there will be no other
speeches, and when the last of these is
concluded, voting will be the next thine;
in order.
Later inquiry confirms tbe prediction
heretofore made that some of tbe amend
ments will receive a sufficient vote to
insure their adoption, but it is possible
that none of them will receive so large a
vote as will be recorded in opposition to
the bill. The reason for this is found in
the fact that the silver men do not ex
pect any of them to carry, and therefore
consider it unnecessary to attempt to
have any of them adopted. The major
ity of the free coinage men are of the
opinion that nothing can be agreed upon
that would be advantageous to silver,
and many of them announce their inten
tion of voting only for the free coinage
amendment, and of giving no counte
nance to any of tbe other amendments.
The Republicans have abandoned all
idea of introducing an amendment as a
party measure. Sherman thinks au
thority should be given for bonds, but
sees difficulty in getting such a provis
ion through at this time, and will in all
probability not attempt it.
AN EARLY ADJOURNMENT.
It is believed if the amendments can
be taken up early Friday, the final vote
can be reached Saturday and tbe bill
aeut to the lioubb for action. When the
house shah have acted upon the bill,
there is very little doubt now that an
adjournment will be taken. So general
is the desire on the pert of the members
to get «iwav that it would be next to im
possible to hold a quorum of either
house in Washington, even should it be
attempted.'
At one time it was believed that an
effort to pass the bill for tbe amendment
of the Chinese exclusion act would be
made, but the the probability is averted.
Senator Perkins of California asked tbe
members of the committee on foreign
relation,-; to postpone tbe report on the
bill until White of California waa able
to take part in the discussion, and he
is led to b»lieve the request will be
granted. White in detained in Califor
nia by important business. IVr'iins says
there is a Butficiant appropriation car
ried by tbe Geary law to Bend the high
binders and Chinese gamblers out of the
country, and he thinks there will be no
great injury to any one if they are ex
ported before the proposed change in
tbe law is made.
GROVER IS MUCH GRATIFIED.
President Cleveland is very much grat
ified at the turn affairs have taken in
the eenate, though be has believed all
along that the unconditional repal bill
would pass. The president will have no
suggestions to make as to adjournment
or recess after congress passes the repeal
bill, thoueh he ia anxious to have the
bill extending tbe time in which China
men could register pass before the disso
lution ol congresß. The impression at
the White House is that no message will
be cent in until the regular session in
December.
WHAT CAUSED TnE CAVE.
Tbe arguments advanced by the ad
ministration Democratic leaders which
cauaed such a sudden about-face in the
position of the anti-repeal Democrats
yesterday, were that, up to the present
time thpy bad by no act given counte
nance to filibustering; bad made no
speeches for delay, but had come to the
front and helped to make a quorum dur
ing the long night sesßious. To con
tinue the fight longer they must take
an active part in filibustering, which, it
was urged, with tbe record tbey had
made, they could not afford to do. Such
a course would only result in giving the
Democratic party a very black eye, as it
would appear their course was prompt*!
by a desire to defeat tbe administration
measure already indorsed by the Demo
cratic house. They were informed they
would not have a corporal's guard with
them in such a course, and that the
party could not be held responsible for
any such disgrace as it would bring on
the Benate. This had the desired effect.
TKOPOSED AMENDMENTS.
Some doubts are expressed as to
whether a-vote will be reached on the
bill as soon as expected, immediately
after the collapse of the filibuster, se it
is found more of the amendments of
which notice has been given will act
ually be introduced than was expected.
Some of these will doubtless give rise to
considerable debate. Tbe silver men
count on getting more votes for some of
theße amendments tban on the vote on
tbe bill itself.
The Faulkner, Squire and Quay
amendments met with moßt tuvjr.
The 20 to 1 and 1(3 to 1 coinage amend
ments, it is expected, will catch a num
ber of votes which will finally be cast
in favor of repeal, especially the 16 to 1
ratio, where the Populists are con
cerned.
There is some talk to the effect that
the Republican repealers will unite with
the silver men on some of the amend
ments and put them through, but in
euch cases it ie likely the* will lose as

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