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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, November 05, 1893, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1893-11-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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TODAY'S FORECAST.
FOR THE DISTRICT OF SOUTH
ERIN CALIFORNIA: FAIR WEATH
ER; COOLER SUNDAY; WEST
ERLY WINDS.
VOL. XLI. NO 25.
fiBAR IN MIND ODR BEADTIFDL GIFTS
With Every $5 Purchase You Get a Ticket.
THE BEST VALUES EVER OFFERED IN CLOTHING
Are to Be Had at Our House.
MEN'S, YOUTHS' and BOYS' SUITS
In Endless Variety—One Price to All.
Mullen, Bluett & Co.,
COR. SPRING AND FIRST STS.
CRYSTAL PALACE,
138, 140, 142 SOUTH MAIN STREET.
We Have Made Arrangements with Several of the Largest
Manufacturers of
GAS FIXTURES
To act as their agents. We offer their goods at a
DISCOUNT OF SO PKR CENT FROM
THEIR PRICE LIST. We are just in receipt of
an elegant assortment, selected personally from
manufacturers, which we sell at a discount of 30
per cent.
MEYBERG BROS.
JAPANESE" HHSSH
F*?T LARGEST VARIETY AND
1 V V-> NEWEST STYLES IN
Turkish, Persian, Indian and Daghestan Effects
MANY NEW THINGS IN WHITE AND BLUE.
V
APT QnTT A ,B aM Size9 > the Newast Patterns and Many
XS-IV A OyUAI\JJU Qualities. Get Our Prices and Examine
■• Gar Handsome Patterns Before Buying.
LOS ANGELES FDBNITDRE COMPANY,
j 225-7-9 S. BROADWAY, OPP. CITY HALL.
Hi ■■ 1 — l ■■'^ . BIBBOH *
TWO GOLD MEDALS
Two First Prizes for Large and Small Photographs
-EWORLD'S FA I R i(-
Convention ol the Photographic Association of America over Jotna of the mott eminent oho
tOKo-piers o'th« Pass (nnd the PaclUc Ooist]. Tul. corapiciei tk'i lurgd list ol EIGHT MSD
A. S»ud TkW DIPLOMAS for excellenca ana suojriorlty.
220 SOUTH SPRING STREET, iS^i^cl
BARKEI^EROS,
SUCCESSORS TO BAILEY * BARKER B UOS.
. Have Movfd Into Thnlr New Quarters In
J » A the i-'iin.ni Block, Corner
/\ AY Third and Spring ate.
$M .wy '- ' M m m 0F YoDli LIFE 0N km 1
lilSO Over fllty dlßerert kinds ol IIHDKOOM BETS
JIMK|I ' J from $13.50, (rom which to kelect. Two new
carß just received, ami "still there* more to
• V jfjfl follow." We .know wo havu what you want.
VijH.'S BIRCH won,*, is being used extensively. It has
SSfy «M4'-ty£SsV>''' «"oft, prttty tint. White Maple is very stylish
wPwlF^""" V&H&SSBPjf «nd wonderfully durable. Wo aUo show the
'fsfliT^" -1 ' o *****' r 'W&i! *l ' t,R * r . Kirns. Sycamores und Mahogany. Oh,
»|JW ~* WE'VE GOT THJttt. Also full lines of
CARPETS & DRAPERIES.
WILLIAMSON'S MUSIC STORE
BKHR BKOIHKRB. I A IN & BKAUJI I.LBK,
B. SHUNINOER, ' ' 1 11 1 1 mi 1 SMITH d BARNE3.
NEWMAN HBO 1., OF?QANS NEED HAM,
Air Circulating ±ie'd {Jena. , , 811 yeS Tonga*!
A POLL LINK OP MUSIC AND MUSICAL INSTRUMENT.'.
SEWING MACHINES
Standard, Rota'y S nttle. While ».nd other lons Shuttle Machines, Supplies, c c.
■■~r-:7 bouth bpking s'rijKK'r. *iBly
OPTICIAN,
Watchmaker and Jeweler
121 ft 128 N. Spring: st.
COE. FRANKLIN.
Fin* Mlam"nd Butting h S-p-claity.
Wntch'Hi Clock* uml <>*,vrelr.y care
«!!»• I'.epai til au«l Warranted. !)-7 ly
■ ' ' - ~ t ;i . ■ ~'
The Herald
CHAS. VICTOR HALL TRACT
OF ADA M; 3 STREET.
Large home Villa lots for sale it tbe southwest;
avenues Ho feet wid , lined with Palms, Mon
terey Piue-, tiravlHas, Peppurs, the- now t,um
of Algiers and Ma.riolias, eic , which will g.V)
a park lik'j effect to six mil of of a tree St. Lois
are 50x150 ti 14-foot alleys.
;;:s iv POR INS I>B LOT-i; IHO per month till
one-half ii paid, or on j ttiird cash and balance
in fivo years; or 11 you b'iiid you can havo five
years'time. Gat K»e wlifts you can. Appiy to
office, ili West First street. 7-14 6m
LOS ANGELES: SUNDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER 5, 181)3.
DEATH-DEALING DYNAMITE
A Terrible Catastrophe at
Santander, Spain.
Hundreds ot Lives Lost by an
Explosion and Fire.
Great. Damage to Sliippincr, Wharves
and Other Property.
The Greater Portion of the City De
stioyed —The Gonrsor of the
Province and Many Other
Notables Killed.
By the Associated Pres».
Maduiu, Nov. 4.—From 800, a village
near Santander, tbe capital of the prov
ince of that name, comoH a frightful
story of an explosion, fire, havoc and
death. The British steamer Volo, with
a cargo of dynamite, arrived at Santan
der. The fact of the explosive
being on board was not known
to the authorities. Last evening
the vessel took fire. The fire depart
ment hurried to the ecene to prevent
tbe spread of the fteineg to other shi«jV
plog, to the docks and the adjoining
houses. The governor of the province,
the chief municipal officers and many
leading citizens were superintending the
work oi subduing the flame*.
Just as tbe news spread that the ves
sel contained dynamite and the people
started panic-stricken from the scene,
the flames reached the terrible cargo.
With a deafening roar it exploded, scat
tering death, fire and destruction on
every side. The wharves, shipping and
neighboring houses were torn to frag
ments. Tbe whole city was shaken as
if by an earthquake, and windows were
shattered in every house for miles
around.
Among the prominent people missing
is the governor of the province, who was
last seen on the dock fighting tbe flanvs
iv the front rank. Others supposed to
be dead include several representatives
of the muricipal and provincial govern
ments, besides many citizens.
Fire at once broke out in? the ruins of
the shattered buildings an.l spread to
those still standing with great rapidity.
The inhabitants were so dazed by the
shock of the explosion that thoy were
unable for a long time to do anything to
stay tbe spread of tbe fire, which, as
this dispatch wai sent, was eatinv.its ,
way from house to houße, threatecw/"
th« destruction ol the entire, cii.c.
The explosion threw down all the
wires, cutting off telegraphic com
munication with tbe city, hence
the tirst news came from 800.
Finally communication with the city
was restored, and tbe adjacent country
and all tbe villages in the neighborhood
sent fire apparatus to the scene, and a
strong, combined effort is being made to
save the rest of tbe city.
All sorts of reports are current as to
the lose of life, ranging from 100 down
to 50. The rapid spread of the fire pre
vented any systematic attempt at recov
ering bodies or learning the number of
tbe dead
It is reported that in addition to tbe
killed already mentioned the president
of tbe provincial council, a colonel and
chief officers of the civic guard were seri
ously wounded. It is also said that the
whole city is likely to be destroyed and
a population of over 80,000 rendered
homeless. A .dreadful panic prevailed
on all sides. Engines from many points
have arrived and are making a deter
mined stand againet tbe flames.
Private telegrams say over a thousand
people met their death by fire and an
explosion at Santander. In addition, a
transatlantic, steamer was burned and
40 of her crew perished.
All those on board or near the dyna
mite Bteamer, and all those on board a
tugboat alongside hnr, as well an the of
ficers find crew of the trans-Atlantic
liner Alphonso XII were killed by the
explosion. The body of jhe civil gover
nor was recovered, aa well as tbe
bodies of a number of other of
ficals. ; Among those reported killed is
the Marquis Pombo. It is ascertained
that the dynamite loaded steamer was
the Cabo Muchicaco, belonging to Bil
boa. and not a British steamer, as at that
reported.
Every possible assistance has been sent
to Santander, where hundreds of doc
tors are already at work. Troops Bent
to the epot are also rendering great ser
vice in blowing up buildings across the
pathway of the flames and the districts
still threatened with conflagration.
Mo definite estimate of the loss of life
was received ,up to the hour this dis
patch was sent, but there has yet been
no denial of the statements made in pri
vate and other dispatches to the effect
that tbe death list will be figured by
tboueande instead of by hundreds.
It is now officially estimated that the
dead will number over 300, The num
ber of missing and injured is enormous.
Many of tbe injured are dying, owing to
want of prompt medical aoeistance.
Pay for Extra Honra.
Martin's Ferry, 0., Nov. 4.—A suit
of great importance to railroads and
railroad employees has been decided in
the circuit court. A. E. Gil
more, a telegraph operator in
the employ of the Bridge and Terminal
company, who worked from 14 to 18
hours per day, sued the company for
extra compensation for ell time over 10
hours per day, under the Ohio law, and
tbe court gave him judgment for the
entire amount.
United Press Wires Ont.
Chicago, Nov, 4.—The Indianapolis
Journal, which has been taking the
United Press report ac a supplemental
service, cut out the wires on the termi
nation of the contract last night, and
aeveied all connection with that associa
tion.
Stop that cough by using J)i. St.
John's cough syrnp. We refund your
money if it fails to cure. For sale by
Off & Vaughn, corner Fourth and
Spring ote.
A BIG FLOWER SHOW.
The Finest Exhibition of the Kind Ever
Held.
Chicago, Nov. 4. —By far the largest
and most important show of flowers ever
exhibited in tbia country opened at the.
Art institute this afternoon. A crush
of fashionable people was pres
ent. While it ia called a chrys
anthemum show the exhibition is al
most equally rich in other flow
ers, and all parts of the country Bent
contributions. The music during the
exhibition, which will close November
14th, will be furnished by thelowa state
band. Medals of award of the judges
of the exhibition are offered by the
World's Columbian exposition, while
money premiums were given by the
Chicago Horticultural society and
a number of private citizana of
the country. The money prizes amount
to over tOOuO. There are over 1000 dif
ferent variety of chrysanthemums on ex
hibition, " Among the notable novelties
is a magnificent new type of the Mrp.
Alpheua Hardy variety which was intro
ducpd in thiij country four
yeais ago from Japan. This
magnificent amethyst pink flower has
been enmed Mr 9. H. N. Higinbotham.
Another exquisite novelty is a cream
white needling called Marie Louise,
which is eight inches iv dkimetar. An
other is the Richmond Beauty, bronza
in color, and is also eight inches in
| diameter. Yet another is the Chal
lenge ; that n hrigat yellow, and is said
!by the connoisseurs to be the finest
blossom in this color that has been de
veloped.
CAPSIZING OF A YAWL.
TEN MEN DROWSED IN NEW
YORK HARBOR.
Twenty-two Alan Were Koturnlni; from
Work in a Hoat When the Wavos
Upset It—Twelve Were
Rescued.
New Yohk, Nov. 4.—Ten lives were
lost by the capsizing of a yawl in the
lower bay at 1 o'clock this afternoon.
The drowned are: John Crosby of New
York, Charles Drudge of Brooklyn, Ed
ward Kenney of New York, Benjamin
McClrire of New York, Thomas Uoey of
Brooklyn, Cnarles Smith of Brooklyn,
James Malloy of Brooklyn, Albert Nor
man, Tompkinsville, S. 1., Leonard
Wanzer of Amity ville, L. I. John Bloom.
;Twenty-two laborers employed on a
new building on Hoffman island em
barked in a ?,0-foot yawl shortly after
jpooa K. return to their homeß. The sea
In/ thef bay was running v«ry high, but
tue yawl successfully battled with the
waves until within 400 feet of
the long dock at South beach,
where the men were to diß
embark. The sail had just been low
ered when v sudden eqnall struck the
boat. By quick work tbe yawl was kept
from overturning, but the sea washed
completely over the craft several times.
For a few minutes the men were suc
cessful in keeping the yawl afloat, but a
large wave struck the boat and filled her
completely. The yawl sank, leaving
the 22 men struggling in the water.
Small boats were hurriedly manned and
sent out. Before the rescuers could
reach the spot where the man were
struggling in the water ten had gone
down for the last time. One body was
recovered. Charles Ssvenwright, while
struggling, became unconscious and
was washed upon the beach. He was
soon revived. The other 11 men were
picked up and landed at South beach.
UNPAID TAILOR HILLS.
Consul Hnge's I>«p»rture for His New
Post Rudely Deluyed.
Chicago, Nov. 4.—A Daily News
Washington special says: It transpires
that two unpaid tailor bills which inter
vened to detain J. Hampton Hoge of
Virginia, the new consul to Amoy, at
San Francisco on tbe eve of ins embar
kation, will also necessitate bis return
to Washington and an explanation to
the president and tbe state department.
Just before Hoga left for San Francisco
he went to a fashionable tailor here, or
dered several euits of clothes and left
without settling for them. The matter
was brought to the attention of Presi
dent Cleveland, who is diplomatic
enough to believe that even an Amer
ican consul ought to pay promptly for
his wea'ing apparel. Whilo there are
other charges pending against Hoge at
tbe state department, these are not re
garded seriously, and it is semi-officinllv
stated that when Hoge has made peace
with his tailors he will be permited to
pursue his j jurnov to Amoy.
A 810 CI.KAN-UP.
The TJtlca Mine Prodooed 8183,000
Bullion iv October.
Stockton, Nov. 4.—The famous Utica
quartz mine at Angela broke the record
of monthly yields in October, the clean
up amounting to $182,000. Today $111,
--000 of the treasure, in 100-pound bare,
passed through here to Sau Franciscp.
The three owners, Aiviaza Hayward,
Jamea Cross, representing the Hobart
eßtate, and C. D. Lane, were present at
the clean-up.
Amaut Marauders*
Belgrade:, Nov. 4. —It is reported
from Prieend that the diiector of the
sominary was murdered by the Arnauts,
who are in possession of the city, hav
ing driven the Turkish garrißon into the
! city and demanded autonomy of the
Bultan.
Expiation for an Awful Crime.
Brooicville, Ont., Nov. 4.—Charles
Lackey has been convicted of the mur
der of his fathor, sister and stepmother,
and b"*»'"" fi '" *" "he house to conceal
hia ci need to be hanged
Dccci
snt Fsilure.
Lot ,'ov.4. —Hess, Henlo
' & Co. alers in ladies' and
| men'i Dels, assigned today.
I Liabi! which are fully cov
ered I ud is charged by the
I credit
AN ALDERMANIC BRAWL.
Exciting Scenes in Chicago's
Council Chamber.
A. Shameful Scramble for a
Dead Man's Shoes.
The Memory of the Murdered Mayor
Deeply Disgraced.
Aldermen Engage In a Freo Fight Over
the Temporary Mayorship — The
Police Called Iv to Ouell
the How.
By the AFfoclated Press.
Chicago, Nov. 4.—Such scenes were
never beiore enacted in the city council
chamber of tbia city aa took placo to
day. Before the crepe-draped speaker's
desk stood two aldermen, political op
ponents, each declaring himself chair
man o! the body. Tbe reading clerk
leaped upon (he back of one contestant
and tried to eject him. Another clerk
tore up a resolution because it was not
in line with what his party desired.
Over the sombre-draped rail of the
speaker's stand leaped another alder
man upon the back of the clerk, and
his colleagues flocked to bia aid. Upon
him jumped an alderman of the oppos
ing faction, and, clutching the throat of
the man who by force was trying
to get before the council that which
should legally have been received.
Police officials ruebed into the enclosure
to separate the struggling aldermen,
and in the fight that ensued the crepe
hung about the desk of the dead mayor
waa rent, torn and trampled under foot.
Men, who, three days ago, spent money
and labor to honor Mayor Harrison, dis
graced his memory today by a disrepu
table brawl over tne right to sit for 20
minutes in his chair. Tonight the
council chamber is guarded by police
officers and no one is allowed to enter.
The rivalry for tbe chairmanship of
the meeting was co intense that a num
ber of fist fights occurred in the cham
ber almost as soon as the session
opened.
Matters finally quieted down, Alder
man McGilien, Democrat, with the ac-
Bistance of Alderman Swift, the Repub
lican caucus nominee for mayor, being
chosen chairman of the council, and a
resolution passed for holding a special
election tbe third Tuesday of this
month, for mayor. Pending that elec
tion, however, it was necessary to elect
a mayor pro tern, and this precipitated
another scene of disorder, in which the
police were called in to preserve order.
Meantime great crowds gathered
outside the city hall and special
details of police were necessary to keep
them back. The council finally got
down to business. Swift was nominated
for mayor pro tern by the Republicans,
McGilien by the Democrats. The vote
resulted 31 for Swift, 33 for McGilien,
and one blank. The chair ruled no
election. The Republicans protested
and left the chamber, but the Demo
crats, fearing a trick, remained in the
chamber. At the end oi an hour the
Itepublicans returned and the session
was regularly adjourned. Counsel was
called in but wr.s unable to decide
whether or not Swift was elected.
It now appears that when the Repub
licans withdrew from the meeting tbev
assembled in the ante-room with 38
members present, more than a quorum,
and voted solidly for Swift for Mayor,
and that he afterwards took the oath of
office.
The matter will now rest until tbe
regular meeting of the council Monday
night.
CHICAGO IIUHGLARS.
Patal Results of au Attempt to Rob a
Suburban Ilesldeuoe.
Chicago, Nov. 4. —Burglars early this
morning entered tbe house of Frank B
Wheeler of the suburban town of Will
mette and beat his mother-in-law, Mrs.
Cross, into insensibility. The noise
awakened Wheeler who secured two re
volvers and attacked the robbers. He
tired five shots into one, inflicting
woundß from which be soon died. He
pursued the others across the prairie,
firing till his revolver was empty, then
returned to find the houße on tire and
his mother-in-law burned to death. The
flames were extinguished before the
house was destroyed.
THE CONitAO DIVOKCM CASK.
A Humor That a Kiannolllatton Will Be
Kfincleu.
Chicago, Nov. 4.—1. Hi Conrad of
Helena, Mont,, whose sensational appli
cation for a divorce from his wife, who
is a daughter of Mrs. Barnaby, for whose
murder Dr. Graves was tried at Denver,
has been in the city several days. Mies
Barnaby, Mrs. Conrad's sister, and the
attorneys for both sides are now here,
and it is Baid a reconciliation will be
brought about. Conrad has not jet
been met, however, and all the parties
refuse to talk.
A JAUITOK'S IHKfT.
He Stole Idaho's Silver Brick and
Precious Stones*
Chiaago, Nov. 4.—A. T. Barker, jan
itor of the Idaho state building at the
world's fair, was arraigned in court to
day charged with complicity in stealing
the silver brick and gems of great value
from the state building. State Com
missioner Wells testified that a silver
brick, 300 opals and 30 rubies were
stolen. Part have been rocovered.
Barker was held to the grand jury.
Criminal Assault.
Sr. Louis, Nov. 4. —The Republic's
Cedar Rapids (fa.) special says; At
Sbueyville Benjamin Fordyce was held
10 the grand jury in the sum of $2000
on tho charge of criminally assaulting
an old Bohemian woman. Tbe Bohemi
ans are much excited and are making
"reparations to lynch Kordyce.
SIXTEEN PAGES.
QUADRUPLE LYNCHING.
A Family or Hnnae-lturnera Hanged In
Eut Tenneaaae.
Fayktikville, Term., Nov. 4.—Early
this morning on the farm of Jack Dan
iels, near Lynchburg, Ned Waggoner,
his son Will and daughter Mary, and
his son-in-law, Sam Motlow, were found
banging to a tree. All were colored, and
the only cause assigned for their lynch
ing is that they are supposed to have
been implicated in numerous barn burn
ings which have taken place recently in
Moore and Lincoln counties. There is no
clue as to tbe perpetrators.
Another account says a mob of over
200, all mounted and some masked, from
the west end of Moore county, did the
lynching, and gives the name of Mot
low's wife, Eliza, as one of the
victims, instead of Waggoner's daugh
ter. It says Waggoner's wife was terri
bly whipped and given three days to
leave the county. Henry Motlow and
Jeff Wise, a boy 12 yeara old, were in
the house at the time, but did not
recognize any of the lynchers. All the
negroeß hanged are said to be desperate
characters and the mob made sure of
their guilt, some of its members having
overheard them making plana to burn
barns and houses.
The trouble originated in the convic
tion of Ed. Waggoner and his sentence
to the penitentiary last year for stealing
wheat. Sam Motlow's wife last year
robbed tbe house of a man named
Hobbs and then burned it. Motlow was
a desperate character and recently tried
to kill a white man.
A SENSATIONAL SUICIDE.
HON. GEORGE SYMES OP DENVER
SHOOTS HIMSELF.
Ha Was an ex-Congressman, a Lsayer
of High Standing and a Capitalist.
Physical Suffering Drove Him
to the Act.
Denver, Nov. 4.—The body of Hon.
George Symea, ex congressman, promin
ent attorney, one of Colorado's pioneers
and one cf Denver's prominent and
wealthy citizens, lies at tbe morgue.
Mr. Symes killed himself presumably
while his reason was temporarily affect
ed. Tbe Buicide occurred in room 70,
Symoß block, some time between 0
o'clock last evening and 12 o'clock to
day. It was discovered by a colored jan
itor, who found his employer Bitting in
a chair quite dead. On the floor, in a
pool of blood lay a revolver. The dead
man leaves a wile and daughter, who are
stopping in Massachusetts. He was
wounded in the spine during the war
and of late suffered greatly and was
much depressed. Before hia death he
wrote the following to hia wife:
My Dear Wife:—Have a terrible at
tack of congestion in back and brain. If
I don't live until morning Mr. Hart can
tell you all about assets and benelicies.
Consult Oscar Renter aa your attorney.
Have whole condition of my estate ex
plained to Mr. Cheeseman and he will
see that my family's little fortune is not
sacrificed tor want of a little money to
pay interest until times get better.
Your loving husband,
G. G. Symes.
George G. Symes was born in Ashta
bula county, Ohio, April 28, 1840. He
was a member of the Twenty-tilth regi
ment, Wisconsin infantry, of which the
ex-secretary of agriculture, Jerry Rusk,
was lieutenant-colonel. February 15,
1863, he was promoted to the colonelcy
of the Forty-fourth regiment, Wisconsin
infantry. In 1800 he was appointed by
General Grant associate justice for Mon
tana territory. In 1870 he resigned and
began the practice of law in Helena,
Mont. In 1874 Judge Symes came to
Denver for the benefit of his health. He
gained a good position in tbe practice of
law. lie was elected to congress in 1878
aB a Republican and served one term.
STOKB PARADED GUILTY.
The Murder, r or the W rattan Family
Sentenced to Be Hanged,
Washington, Ind.,Nov.4.—Today at 12
James E. Stone pleaded guilty to having
murdered sis members of the W rat tan
family September 18th. Tbe time con
sumed by the court in impaneling a
jury, hearing the evidence and passing
the death sentence was only three hours.
Upon being arraigned Stove pleaded, "I
am guilty, judge." The case was sub
mitted without argument and the judge
instructed the jury briefly, and 20 min
utes later they brought in a verdict of
guilty. The judge at once sentenced
Stone to be hanged on the 10th of Feb
ruary, 1894, at Jeffersonville prison, to
which piace he was taken this after
noon.
Stone made a statement to his attor
ney today that he was once eeized with
a desire to murder his own family, but
stumbling over tbe trundle bed in the
darkness, he was brought to his senses.
He also stated that after murdering the
Wrattans he went home with the blood
of his victims still fresh on his clothes
and knelt down by the bedsides of hia
family and caressed them.
An application for a new trial was
overruled.
The six men whom Stone implicated
were released on their own recognizance,
to appear at tbe January term of court.
CALIFORNIA. FIONEBK3.
They Are Indignant at the Marder of
Carter Harrison.
Chicago, Nov. 4. — The California
Pioneer association held its regular
monthly meeting at the Grand Pacific
hotel tonight. The secretary reported
the death of Samuel Suffsrn of Coal
City, which occurred a week ago. The
members then discussed the aßsassina"
tion of Mayor Harrison, and by a rising
vote expressed horror and indignation
at the dastardly assassination, and call
ing for tbe speedy punishment of the
assassin.
A lino of fine cut glass bottles and
manicure sets just received at Little
boy's pharmacy. Call and see them,
811 South Spring Btreet.
THE CITY'S POOR.
THE ASSOCIATED CHARITES
(JETTING; TO WORK-MEETINU
OP THE EXECUIIVECOnMITTKE
YESTERDAY.
PRICE FfVE CENTS.
GOING TO KILL GROVER.
A Dangerous Crank at Large
in Washington.
He Proposes to Murder the
President.
Officers in Citizen's Dress Guarding
the White House.
The Avowed Aaaaaalu la »n Unemployed
Miner from Idaho—A Boiae Res
taurant Keeper Puts the
Police Onto Him,
By the Associated Press,
Washington, Nov, 4. —A nnmhe- of
officers in citizen's dress have been dn
tailed to guavd the White Hottne and
protect the life of the president which
is supposed to be in danger from a mur
derous crank who is at large in the city.
List Wednesday the-e arrived in
Waßhi.igton a man who keeps a restau
rant in Boise City, Idaho. The name of
tbe man, the police for the present re
fuse to divulgs. Yesterday he went to
tbe chief of police and told his story.
He said about a week ago a miner, who
who was out of employment, came to hia
! restaurant and in tbe midst of a heated
discußsion about the silver question and
the effect of the repeal bill on the min
ing interests of the west, declared with,
em phasia that he was going to Wash*
ington, and if the repeal bill was paiseii
unconditionally, he would kill tbe man
whom he knew should be held respon
sibie.
The restaurant keeper did not know,
1 the man, bnt aa he disappeared from'
I Boise he concluded it was his duty to j
I come here and notify the authorities*'
He arrived on Wednesday and thatt.
afternoon strolled up to the White)
House promenade, and the first, person
he Baw was the miner with whom he
had tbe altercation. Aa soon as the man'
saw him he took to hie heels. Too res
taurant keeper thought possibly it waa
a case of mistaken identity, and he said
nothing to anybody until tbe next day,
when he again went to the White House
and saw the same man lurking there —
no mistake. He went to the chief of
i police, giving a full description of the
] man.
As a precautionary measure a number
jof officers have been detailed to guard ,
i tbe White House, and detectives are
I looking for the man who avows himself,
!to be the intended assassin. The police
| declare they do not believe there is any ,
; danger, but say precaution is being
| taken to guard against possible coutin
! genciea in the matter. The affair is be
j ing kept very quiei.
UNCONFIRMED APPOINTERS.
Cleveland Will Give Hum Temporary
Commissions.
Washington, Nov. 4. —Of the nomina
tions sent to the senate by the president
during the extra session, two were re
jected and 56 failed of confirmation,
among them the following:
W. B. Hornblower, associate justice of
tbe supreme court.
C. H. J. Taylor, minister to Bolivia.
R. E. Breston, director of the mint.
I. K. Wooten, ludian agent, Nevada
agency, Nevada.
George Harper, Umatilla agency, Ore
gon.
California debris commissioners, G. '
H. Mendell, Col. W. H. H. Benyaurd,
Major W. A. Heuer, all of the corps of
engineers.
It is said tbe president will issue
temporary commissions, good until the
next meeting of congress, to all hia
nominees who failed of confirmation by
the Benate.
THE MONETARY CONFERENCE.
No Prospect of Its Immediate Reas
sembling.
Washington, Nov. 4.—There appears
to he very little, if any, prospect for the
immediate reassembling of the interna
tional monetary conference. As the
conference was called at the suggestion
of the United States, its deliberations
will probably he resumed only at the
request of this government. So far as
can be ascertained, Secretaries Gresham
and Carlisle at present have no inten
tion of making the request.
GROVER GOES A GUNNING.
The President and a Pew Friends Baa;
Several Squirrels.
Washington, Nov. 4.—President Cleve
land, accompanied by Secretary of State
Greeham, Secretary of War Lamontand
one of the White Honse door-keepere
took their guns early this morning and
went into the wooda back of Woodiey,
tbe president's country home, for a few
days' shooting. When they returned
this evening it was reported the eoorts
men had fair luck and bagged "several"
squirrels.
Treasury Statement.
Washington, Nov. 4.—The net cash
balance in the treasury is about a quarter
of a million dollars less today than on
November Ist. The net gold reserve haß
decreased from $84,384,802 to $83 621,
--384. The currency balance Pas in
cieased from $17,909,42!) to $18,417,489.
A Retiring Officer.
Washington, Nov. 4. —Adjutant Wil
liams oi the army will retire tomorrow,
on account oi age. The appointment, of
his Buccossor lies between General Kug
cteß, who is next in rank, and (jeueral
Vincent.
Ladies' hats cleaned, dyed, reshaped
and trimmed. California Straw Works,
264 S. IVlain at., opposite Third.
All desiring a correct lit and first class
work in merchant tailoring call on H.
A. Getz, 112 W. Third st.
Conn hand instruments. Agency at
Fitzgerald's,cor.Spring and Franklin sis.

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