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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, January 05, 1894, Image 5

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CONSTRUCTION OF RAILWAY.
Small Amount of Building; the
Fast Year.
Some Coinnarative Statements of an
Instructive Nature,
The aClTect or the Panic on the Business.
Th* Destination of the
Koada—The Present
Mileage,
The Railway Age: The year now
closing baying been memorable as
a year of financial calamity bae natur
ally also been a period of comparatively
Bmall railway building. The country ie
not by any means yet supplied with all
needed railways. Many hundreds of
practicable lines have been projected
and will eventually be built, but capi
tal has learned tbat railway investments
are beset with many dangers and uncer
tainties, and so when hard times come
new enterprises of this kind are among
the first to suffer from inability to raise
money. Although it was evident be
fore 1893 opened tbat the pace of pre
ceding years would not be maintained
In railway building, yet work was soon
in progress on a sufficient number of
lines to make it probable that t he year's
total of new track would reach 3000 or
8600 miles. But the July panic put a
sudden Btop to a number of lines on
which work had been actively progress
ing and caused serious delay in others,
so that the end of the year linds tuany
unfinished lines on which much work
haß been done, and leaves the total of
new mileages less than for any twelve
months in the last I7years. Our records
show that the new main track laid in
the United States in 1893 aggregates
2630 milee on 222 linen in 43 of the states
and territories ; alsb that in Canada 461
miles have been built on 16 lines, and
in Mexico 99 miles on 5 lines. The
summary for me different states is as
. followi:
No.
State.'' Lines. Miles.
Alabama 5 40.
Ar zona 1 42.
Arkansas 6 116.51
California »!> 64.09
Colorado 4 26.65
Florida !t 2 1.70
U 7 173
Main- 1 ft.se
lulnoil i 7 7-i so
Indiaua Sit 2.60
ti.-.va 1 4
Ksusas...., 1 16.89
Kentucky 4 21. IS
l.oulsana S 39.80
Malue 4 115.40
Maryland 1 2.
Mu-sscliuaetta 1 1.88
si;<h:gau a ei.es
Minnesota s 86.46
Mississippi 2 9.50
M ssourl 7 1.19.99
Mootana 1 27.00
r ebraika 2 H i.70
New Hampshire I 1.
New Jersey 1 1.12
I w Mexico 1 2.5H
N. w York 8 34.14
N nh l.'aioiina 0 7-1.55
r>oritt Dakota 2 104.61
Ohio 9 llil.
(Logon 1 10.
Pennsylvania 45 59K.84
Rhode Island 1 .•>.-_ I
South Carolina 1 14.
S mill IMS" a 8 93.46
Teuuessee ft 18.60
Texas 10 166.47
Utah :t 111 57
Virginia 5 1(1.64
Washington 3 41.90
Y>ett Virginia ...15 98 nl
Wisconsin 4 27.50
Wyoming 1 3.90
Total in 42 states and ter
ritories 222 2,729.99
Uiie«. Miles.
Canada 16 461.17
Mexico 5 99 45
The wide distribution of these 2630
miles of new track is noteworthy. Only
live of our states and territories—Ver
mont, Connecticut, Delaware, Nevada
and Indian territory—show no addition
whatever, but several of the states
added from only one to five miles each,
and the entiye 222 miles give an aver
age of less than 12 miles to each road.
Pennsylvania leads with 399 miles on 45
lines, followed by Florida with 212
miles on nine lines, North Dakota 194,
milee on two lines. Georgia 173 miles on
seven lines, Texas 166 miles on 10 lines,
Ohio 146 miles on seven lines, etc. In
respect to greatest total mileage the or
der of tbe states is not materially
changed, Illinois still standing at the
bead, with 10,427 miles, Pennsylvania is
second with 9558 miles, and Texas third
with 9206 miles.
The new mileage of 1893 is lees by
about 2000 miles than either of the two
preceding years and is much smaller
than that of any year since 1878, when
the total was only 2679 milee. But in
the four bard years from 1874 to 1877
inclusive the additions were still less,
going as low as to 1111 in 1875. The
lowest point reached since 1878 was in
1885, when only 3131 mileß were built,
but in tbe following year the new mile
age leaped to 8128 miles, and in 1887 it
reached the extraordinary total of about
18,000 miles. Notwithstanding the great
falling off in activity in tbe last four or
live years, the past ten years have seen
an addition of 56,398 miles, or an aver
age of about 5640 miles a year, while in
the 20 years since 1873 no leaa than 107,
--685 miles were built, the average in
crease being 5379 miles per year.
The present railway mileage of the
United States, according to our record,
ie 177,853 milee. It will require only
an average increase of 3164 miles for the
next seven years to bring the total at
the beginning ol the year 1900 to 200,000
miles, while if the rate of the last 20
years is averaged, the total will then be
over 215,000 miles. In view of the im
mense area of our country which is still
to be supplied with railways, it seems
hardly possible that any year in the
near future will show bo small a con
struction record as 1893. There are en
terprises already under way sufficient to
greatly increase this figure for 1894, if
only ordinary commercial conditions
again prevail and legislative harass
ment of railway investments is sus
pended.
The Northern Pacific.
8. F. Chronicle: T. H. Goodman,
general paeeenger and ticket agent ol
the Southern Pacific, received a telegram
from Tacoma yesterday stating that the
Canadian Pacific had put in a new rate
of $40 first class end $36 second class
from Sound points to St. Paul, and a
first-class rate of $47 to Chicago. These
rates are applicable by way of the Cana
dian Pacific and the "Soo" line.
In speaking of (bis rate Mr. Goodman
declared chat it did not mean the be
ginning of a railroad war. The Union
Pacific, tbe Great Northern and North
ern Pacific bad agreed to go back to the
old figure, after which the Canadian Pa
cific announced that it would make a
rate. The restoration of the old figure
of $71.60 from Portland to Chicago made
it possible to go from San Francisco to
Chicago via Portland for less money, the
rate being on tbe limited first-class, $57
between San Francisco and Chicago.
The three northern lines, Mr. Goodman
thought, would probably make a rate of |
$50 from Portland and Bouud points to j
Chicago. This witb the present rate
would give the Canadian Pacific the
differential, which it has insisted upon
having.
As it is, if local rates were charged in
addition to the through rates now in
force between Portland and Chicago, the
fare from San Francisco would be $91.50
instead of $57. But the Southern Paoiiic
insists that tbe rate via its Shasta route
shall not exceed that on the Ogden or j
Sunset routes.
Notes.
Traffic Manager Leeds states tbat the
tirst bouue fur the North American Nav
igation company will certainly be made,
cays the San Francisco Chronicle. The
amount now subscribed is $92,000, and
a little time and effort will insure tbe
$8000 still needed. Tue North American
Navigation company is willing to allow
tbe Traffic association an extension of
time in which to secure the remaining
portion of the bonus needed. A meeting
was held yesterday for the election ol
the directors of tbe North American Nav
igation company, but it was decided to
defer the vote until Friday next.
Applications for annual passes are still
coming in at Fourth and Townsend
streets. Vice-President Crocker stated
yesterday that about one-half as many
passes would be issued this year aa weie
issued during 1893. Au application for
annuals came yesterday Irom four offi
cials of the Brownstone and Middietown
and Middietown Railroad company. This
is a Pennsylvania line, and the system
comprises two and a half miles of track.
The officials offered to exchange courte
sies with the Southern Pacific if the
passes were granted. There are applica
tions handed in, however, that exceed
tbe modesty of this one. Several rail
roads which exist only on paper have,
through tbeir officials, asked lor annual
passes.
General Superintendent Fillmore of
the Southern Paeiflc and Vice-President
Hurrahan of the Illinois Central left
yesterday for Monterey and Santa Cruz.
A canard was telegraphed day before
yesterday from San Francisco about A.
N. Towne resigning from the Bervice of
the Southern Pacific, and the conse
quent promotion of a number of the
other officials, including Division Super
intendent Muir. There is nothing in
the resignation story, but if anyone is
promoted it is more than liable to be
Mr. Muir.
The electric street railway company
have decided to issue transfers between
the electric and cable railways at Firet
and Spriug streets.
The electric road bas stopped issuing
free transportation,and in consequence a
I great many people are walking who
| walked very little last year. The cable
I and electric companies had together
! nearly 800 passes out last year. Each
i pass is estimated to mean a revenue of
I $50 a year if not issued, so that the
stoppage of the 800 passes means an in
creased revenue of $40,000. The nickels
count up very fast.
DEATHS AND BIRTHS.
Keoord for Los Angeles for the K.aat
Month.
The report of Health Officer Powers
for the month of December was based on
a population of 65,000, just as in the
past months of 1893.
The total deaths from all causes was
115, which made a rate per 1000 of 21.22.
During the month there were 72
birtbs, of which 69 were white and 3
colored.
The deaths in the public institutions
were as follows: County hospital, 9;
French hospital, 1; Sisters' hospital, 3;
St. Paul's hospital, 2; receiving hospi
tal, 2.
Of the deaths 24 were of people wbo
had been in the city, less than one year.
The coroner certified to 14 deaths.
During tbe month the following con
tagious diseases were reported: Diph
theria, 7; scarlet fever, 13; typhoid
fever, 3, making a total of 23.
The mortality of the city by wards was
as follows: First, 9; Second, 22; Third,
12; Fourth, 15; Fifth, 3; Sixth, 5; Sev
enth, 14; Eighth, 17.
NOT UP TO SPECIFICATIONS.
Union Avenue Property Owners Reclster
a Kick.
Prperty owners on Union avenue are
not at all eatisded with the street im
provement that haß been done en
Union avenue, between Eleventh and
Pico streets.
Several of them filed a document yes
terday to come before the council, ask
ing that the work be not accepted.
As reasons for their request, tbey Bay
tbat tbe work is not up to the specifi
cations. They claim that it has not
been leveled up and rolled; also tbat at
the intersection of Twelfth street and
Union avenue a sink has been left on
the west side which prevents the -water
from running off.
NEW YEAR'S HERALD.
A Splendid Gift Veiy Appropriate rpr
EastJ.'rn Friends.
The 48-page New Year's Herald ie
now on sale at tbe Herald office and
by all the principal news dealers. It is
he largest newspaper ever issued in
Southern California and, outside of San
Francisco, on the Pacific coast. Tbe in
formation contained in the New Year's
Hf.rald has been carefully compiled
and comprises everything that any one
can possibly want to know about thiß
favored section. The New Year's Her
ald can be had at the Herald business
office, wrapped ready for mailing, for 10
cents per copy. Be sure and mail a few
copies where they will do the most
good.
Kavlln Will Reply to Thomson.
Los Angeles, Cal., Jan. 1, 1894.
Dr. Ravlin—Dear Sir: We under
stand that you were present during the
services in Unity church last Sunday
morning, and heard the discourse of
Rev. J. 8. Thomson, in wbich we con
sider that he unjustly assailed modern
spiritualism.
Therefore we respectfully request that
you will reply to the same at your ear
liest convenience, fixing your own time
and place. Yours truly,
K. D. W lß e, M. D„
D. E. Mebiam,
F. J. Burgb,
D. W. Fortune,
Alfred R. Street,
And many others.
Los Angeles, Cal., Jan. 2, 1894.
Dr. Wise, D. E. Meriam, F. J. Burge and others;
Messrs : Yours of the Ist inst. Ie be
fore me, and in reply would say that it
will give me great pleasure to comply
with your request, and I would fix next
Sunday, January 7th, as the time, and
Burbank theater as the place, when 1
will reply to Rsv. J. S. Thomson in the
defense of modern spiritualism. I am,
gentlemen, yours truly,
N. F. Ravlin.
DONE BY A WATER PIPE.
MUCH LITIGATION WHICH IS NOW
ENDED.
The Supreme Court FlDda That the
Superior Court of Ban Diego
Has Exceeded Its Ju
risdiction.
The following opinion wp.s received
yeßterday, in which the supreme court
annuls the order of tbe superior court of
San Diego county, adjudging Julia V.
Stewart and W. B. Prentice guilty of
contempt for dieobedience of its judg
ment, in response to their application
for a writ of review, which was recently
heard in San Francisco:
It appears tbat tbe petitioners, Julia
V. Stewart and W. B, Prentice, entered
into a contract witb one Hill, whereby
they agreed to deliver to the latter or
hie executors, representatives and as
signs, at a certain point on the line of
their pipe, water, not to exceed 10
miner's inches, in perpetual flow, under
a four-inch pressure, lor a term of 20
years. Thereafter Hill sold and as
signed all bis rightß, under the contract,
to one J. VV. Sefton, who construced a
pipe line extending from tho point
mentioned in the contract to his
ranch, and thereupon demanded of
Stewart and Prentice that he be
allowed to make a direct connection be
tween his pipe and their pipe line, and
to divert from the flume two inches of
water. This demand was refused, it
being claimed that he had no right to
make such connection, whereupon Sef
ton instituted an action againßt Stewart
and Prentice, in which he prayed that
they be enjoined from interfering with
him in effecting a connection with his
pipe with their conduit, and for $1000
damages. Accordingly a temporary in
junction was issued, which was after
wards, upon motion of defendants, dis
solved, and Sefton was ordered to de
tach his pipe, which he had connected
with defendant's conduit during the
pendency of the temporary injunction.
This case was tried upon its merits
and judgment entered in favor of plaint
iff, awarding him $1 damages and the
right to make the connec
tion prayed for. It wae fur
ther decreed that defendants desist
and refrain from interfering witb plaint
iff in connecting his pipe with their pipe
line, and thereafter, for a period of 25
years, in any manner interfering or pre
venting the flow of two miner's inches
of water from their pipe. Immediately
after the entry of this judgment deferju
ants perfected an appeal, but plaintiff,
notwithstanding the fact that notice of
appeal had been served and an under
taking given, entered on defendants'
premises, cut into tbeir pipe and con
nected his own pipe therewith. Under
the advice of counsel that the perfecting
of tbe appeal stayed all proceedings, the
defendants severed tbe connection; but
plaintiff ajrain cut tbeir pipe and made
another connection, which was broken
by defendants, who were thereupon
cited to show cause before tbe superior
court, and after a hearing adjudged
guilty of contempt.
The supreme court holds, however,
that the appeal taken by defendants
operated as a supersedeas against the
judgment in co far as it authorized the
plaintiff to connect its pipe with that of
defendants, and that the court below ex
ceeded its jurisdiction in adjudging de
fendants guilty of contempt.
PERSONAL.
Dr. A. C. Stoddart of San Francisco
arrived yesterday from the north.
Stuart Kennedy, manager of the Flor
ence hotel, at San Diego, is in the city.
Mr. Wm. Ballister left yesterday for
San Francisco, where Mrs. Ballister is
very ill.
Lieutenant W. S. Hughes of the
United States navy is registered at the
Hollenbeck.
E. J. Davis, proprietor of the Rowell
hotel, Riverside, wits a guest of the
Hollenbeck yesterday.
J. C. Fisher, the smiling ownerof San
Diego's pretty opera house, is shaking
hands with his Angeleno friends.
The wife of Supervisor Francisco lies
dangerously ill at her home, 850 West
Ninth street. Her recovery is doubtful.
A. H. Pratt, proprietor of the Wind
sor, Redlands, was at the Hollenbeck
yesterday in the interest of the hotel
exhibits at the midwinter fair.
Mr. N. A. Baldwin and party of 15 ar
rived here yesterday via Southern Pa
cific from CHicago in a epecial car. This
is Mr. Baldwid's fourth winter in South
ern California.
United States Detective D. W. Cox,
who captured the Daggett robbers, an
account of which appeared in the col
umns of the Herald a few days ago, has
again left the city for parts unknown.
W. F. Deandorff of Chicago writes to
the Herald asking for information
about a Mrs. R. M. Duncan or Neilie
Duncan, who is supposed to have com
mitted suicide about here about a month
ago. |
A Boy Found Its.
A waitress in the Chicago Waffle
house on Second street, who lost a
pocket-book on the street the night be
fore Christmas, complained to the po
lice yesterday that a boy had found it
and would not return it. The book con
tained $26, and was picked up by the
boy early Christmas morning. He was
Bsen when he found it. The lady en
deavored to recover the money, but in
vain. She did not report the affair un
til yesterday, or no doubt it could have
been recovered.
The Annual Herald.
Bakersfield Californian: Tbe largest
special edition of a newspaper ever is
sued in this state outside of Sin Fran
cisco was tbe Los Angeles Herald of
Monday morning. It consisted of 48
pages, largely devoted to a review ot
tbe growth and prospects of the south
ern part of tbe state, and in addition
bad many features of greatest interest
to all. The Herald is a newspaper in
the fullest sense of the word, and it
would be a credit to a ciiy four times
the size of Los Angeles.
Awarded Highest Honors World's Fair.
U^JPowder
Theonly Pure Cream of Tartar *owrler.—No Amnonui; No Alum.
Used in Millions of Houses— 40 Years the Standard.
ROYAL ARCH MASONS.
Tbe Officer! Installation on Lul Tuesday
KvenlnaT*
On Tuesday evening January 2d a
very interesting ceremony took place at
tbe Masonic temple, corner oi Spring
and Firet streets, in tbe joint installa
tion of officers elected and appointed for
tbe ensuing year of Los Angeles chapter
No. 33, aDd Signet chapter No. 57 of
Royal Arch Masons. Promptly at 7:89
p. in. the companions assembled and
the following named companions were
duly installed by Past High Priest
Julius Martin as installing officer, as
sisted by Past High Priest John Colds
worthy as grand marshal.
Officers elect of Los Angeles chapter
No. 33, R. A. M :
Edward A. Preuss, high priest; Wil
lirm H. Briggs, king; Thomas Strolnn,
scribe; Carl F. A. Last, treasurer; Wil
liam F. Griggs, secretary: Max Wass
man, captain of the host; Abraham W.
Edelman, principal eojourner; Moritz
Morris, Royal Arch captain; Samuel
Prager, master ol the third veil; Simon
Cahn, master of the second veil; John
E. Jackson, master of the first veil;
Charles B; J. White, guard.
Officers of Signet chapter No. 57, R.
A. M.: August Wackerbnrth, high
priest; Niles Pease, king; Wiiliam
Downie, scribe; William G. Cochran,
treasurer; FrC;i_M. Smith, secretary ; G.
W. Angleswonu, captain of tbe host;
Cornelius W. Pendleton, principal so
journer; Hampton V. Bard, royal arch
captain; Cyrus Willard, master of the
third veil; Henry Glass, master of tbe
second veil; Ira B. Mclntyre, master of
the first veil; Daniel Picket, chaplain ;
Milton 0. Fordhnm, guard.
The ceremony was performed in a very
imposing and impressive manner by
Past High Priests Martin and Golds
worthy, and was very entertaining to
the companions assembled. Quite a
lsrge number of resident and visiting
brothers were present, among them
Sumner H. Boynton, past high priest of
Maine; Albert H. Colby, past high
priest of Nebraska; C. W. Bush, P. H.
T., and Henry 8. Orme, P. H. P, and
present grand master of California.
After the conclusion of the ceremonies
tbe companions were invited to partake
of an elegant banquet prepared for the
occasion, and in tne course of the even
ing a number of toasts were given and
responded to. The whole meeting was
very interesting, and all present were
highly entertained and, much pleased
with the proceedings.
THE POLICE COURTS
Highwayman Kelly Hold—Vtmable Gets
ISO Daya.
Bernard Keiiy, the old inuu who at
tempted to rob a man named Liscom of
his watc'a, had his examination in Jus
tice Seaman's court yesterday.
He offered no evidence in hiß behalf,
and the court held bim for trial with
bail fixed at $2000.
Sam Venable, a colored man who Btole
some ivory billiard balls, wae fined $150
or as many dayß in tbe chaingang, by
Judge Austin.
Santiago Arguello's case on a charge
of disturbing the peace was dismissed
on motion ol the prosecuting attorney.
Yung Lum, who is accused of having
stoleu $75 and a razor from a country
man on the Lsguna ranch, was ar
raigned and the case set for next Mon
day.
VV. L. Bailey was arrested on a charge
of assault with a deadly weapon. His
examination was set for next Wednes
day.
THS COURTS.
Cases on Trial yesterday—J*ew Salts
Piled.
■vW.tJlja'nTjffa'io'ij, a native of "ngland,
wa»tadmjU};d to citizenship yesterday
toy.'Mclgfl, TfufePffre.
The suit MvMtf Kofoed and John C.
Kofeed vs.;. Attorney S.imuel B. Gordon,
came up (Or bearing yesterday before
Judge Vton Dyke, but was continued in
order that the plaintiffs might amend
their complaint.
MSIV SUITS FILED.
Preliminary papers in the following
new suits wore tiled yesterday with the
county clerk:
C. I. Doeeh vs. G. A. Brown et al. Ap
peal from justice v ourt
Briswalter Land and Water company
vs. Pio Pico. Suit to determine title.
FOR A LAHtiE AMOUNT.
A Rallrray Company Mulcted in a Large
811 in.
In the case of tbe Pacific Improve
ment company vs. the San Gabri jl Val
ley Rapid Transit Railway company,
the defendants having admitted the
facts alleged in plaintiff's complaint,
Judge Shaw yesterday ordered judgment
for the plaintiffs therein, upon the
pleadings, for the sum of $25,092.63.
Looking for New Quartern.
The building committee of tbe cham
ber of commerce met yesterday, there
being present Messrs. E. W. Jones, J.
B. Lankerahirn, C. Eisen, T. D. Stimson
and K. F. C. Klokke.
It was decided to receive offers for the
furnishing of a lot and the erection of a
building to be utilized as new quarters
by the chamber of commerce.
There must be an exhibit hall of 12,000
square feet, situated on the ground floor.
Offices with space of 6000 feet must be
contiuons to the ball, eitner on the same
floor or tbe one above.
The building must be situated within
tbe following bounds: Main and Hill
streets on tbe east and west and First
and Sixth streets on the north and
south.
Hie banquet committee also met yes
terday.
They May Wed.
Marriage licenses were issued yester
day to tbe following persons:
Charles F. Oliver, native of Utah, 33
years of age. and Lizzie Kerrigan, na
tive of Pennsylvania, 18 yeara of age,
both oi this city.
Reginald Tapia, native of California,
27 years of age, of Calabasas, to Felieita
Lazano, native of California, 16 years of
age, of this city.
THE MIDWINTER FAIR.
THREE CARLOADS OF EXHIBITS
TO LEAVE FOR THE NORTH.
Brother Wiggins and His Associates
to Leave This Afternoon—A
Big Corn cob—Other
Features.
Three solid carloads of exhibits were
sent to tiie packers yesterday for Mm
midwinter lair. They contained v fine
assortment of things that will compose
the county exhibit at San Francisco.
There yet remains a large otinutity ol
exhibits, wbich will be sent nr.rtu later
in the month. The Southern California
building is now in good condition and
resdy for occupancy. A laige number
of exhibits which were promised did not
materialize in time to be lent north with
yesterday's shipment, but will be for
warded with the next, wbich leaves on
the 10th inst.
Mr. Frank Wiggins and his efficient
corps of assistant* will leave for San
Francisco on today's afternoon train.
Tbjre will also be agents left behind
here to attend to collecting and forward
ing of additional exhibits.
The work of collecting material for
the citrus exhibit has been left in the
hands of Mr. J. W. Charters. All other
exhibits intended for the midwinter fair
should be sent to the chamber of com
merce.
It has been decided to change the wal
nut tower No. 2 into a dried fruit tower,
aud the work of decoration has been
left with W. W. Bliss of Duarto. It will
be done with a number of panels of fruit
arranged in attractive designs.
Tbe biggest corn cob ever shipped ont
of the county left yesterday with the
mid v, inter exhibits. It was 28 feet long
and was so big that it could not be
loaded in the car without being srwed
in two. Its compemon on the trip will
be a bottle of wine 30 feet long.
In the three carloads of exhibits that
comprise the first shipments to the
midwinter fair from here are the trees and
shrubs thrt will be used on the ground
ornamentation; these were donated by
Serrot & Stoval, 0 Jcquat trees; Geo.
Leaver, 2 ch:,muropsJr?uriuhi;; Redondo
Beach company, cVijfobor trees, 2 ferns
0 feet high and ljfttrge palm (e'ecta);
Louis Stengel, 25 eucalyptus robusta.
Tbe city park commissioners very gen
erously donated some 50 plants and
trees, and these together with a number
of orange, lenron and other distinctive
Southern C.trt\t>rnia trees will ornament
the grounds SStaids the Southern Ce.!i
fornia building.
One of the most striking exhibits re
ceived bo far for the exhibit up north
was a hill of potatoes from A. H. Walk
of Downey. The whole hill weighed 45
pounds, Vi largest one weighing 24
pounds, v
Norwaltf sent in some mammoth
beets, citrons or pie melons, corn and
fruit in glass.
PROTESTS.
Property Ownera I'roteat A gainst Cer
tain Improvements,
Yesterday property owners on First
Btreet filed a protest with the city clerk,
to be presented at the next meeting of
tbe city council, against the sidewalk
ing of the street from the river to Boyle
avenue.
The protest states that there is but
one cottage and a saloon on the line of
the proposed improvement.
A protest was also hied againßt the
construction of a sewer on Belmont av
enue, between Council street and Rock
wood avenue.
A special meeting of the Northwest
Los Angeles Improvement association
will be held at the ball, corner Sand
and Montreal streets at 7:30 this even
ing, to discuss important matters und
nominate officers for the ensuing cix
months. The election of officers will be
held next Tuesday evening.
KNOWLEDGE
Brings comfort and improvement and
tends to personal enjoyment when
rightly used. The many, who live bet
ter than others and enjoy life more, with
less expenditure, by more promptly
adapting the world's best products to
the needs of physical being, will attest
the value to health of the pure liquid
laxative principles embraced iv the
remedy, Syrup of Figs.
Its excellence is duo to its presenting
in the form most acceptable and pleas
ant to the taste, the refreshing and truly
beneficial properties of a perfect lax
ative; effectually cleansing the system
dispelling colds, headaches and fevers
and permanently curing constipation.
It has given satisfaction to millions and
met with the approval of the medical
profession because it acts on the Kid
neys, Liver and Bowels without weak
ening them and it is perfectly free from
every objectionable substance.
Syrup of Figs is for sale by all drug
gists in-50c and SI bottles, but it 13 man
ufactured by the California Fig Kyrup
Co. only, whose name is printed on every
package, also the name, Syrup of Figs,
and being well informed, you will not
accept any substitute if offered.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦<>
♦ f.
♦ Midwinter Fair I
I Suits X
*T0 OR Per [ pec Than Any X
X Order Cent tJEoJO other Tailor ♦
♦ *
Perfect Fit or No Sale. ♦
I JOE POHEIM
X THE TAILOR,
♦ 149 S. SPRING STREET. ♦
»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
A GLANCE at the SHOW WINDOW
of H. M. SALK & SON'S DRUG
STOKE will convince you that they
arc leaders in Holiday Novelties.
Watch for our display next week.
11-18 tl 1
San Fraiictnro.
Neic York, ~<* AryAet.
VILLE ■ PARIS
RRANCH OF SAN FKANCISCD HOUSE,
Potomac B oc.:,
223 SOUTH B-f.JA.OWAY.
W._ are oTcri our surplus stoclc of Novrlties at prices
which will enable us to close them our before the end of the sea
son, in accordance with our established custom.
COLORED DRESS GOODS.
if) ( > ALL-WOOL CHEVIOTS AQ O
AND VARIOUS OTHER FANCY WEAVES V
YARD Worth 5,, and 65c. YARD
fi;v> Fane y Armure Storm Serges fi^e
AND MIXED BASKET WEAVES
YARD Worth 85c and $1. YARD
7fo. CHANGEABLE WHIP CORDS 7fc
1 HOP SACKING AND BEIGE CHEVIOTS *
YARD Worth $1.10 and vi.25. YARD
BLACK DRESS GOODS.
nf PRIESTLY'S CELEBRATED nr
tdG BLACK NOVELTY SUITINGS ' 0c
YARD Extra Width, worth $1.00 and $1 25. YARD
%] All-Wool FRENCH BROCHE ftl
T J PARISIAN DESIGNS (ALL NEW) ™ X
YARD Worth $1 50 Yard. YARD
G. VERDIER & CO.,
TELEPHONE 893. 223 SOUTH BROADWAY
ACICbEMKN i s.
NEW I.OS ANUILKH TMKaVTBK.
(Under direction ot Al. Hivms.i
H. U. WYAf/r, Managar.
FltlllHY AND SATBRDAT /LSD
SA'! IT III) aY MATIMBK,
JANUARY sth and (Mb.
MR. AND anno.
M'KEE RANKIN
FRIDAY
-/ DAN ITEISic-
BATUT-DAY MATINEE
-2 DANITESK
SATURDAY NIGHT—
CANUCK
MATINEE PRICK ;—25 and 500.
Ni.V I.OS AMIKIUS THKATEIi.
Under direction of Al Hayman.
H. C. WYATT, Manager.
ONE WEEK - SATTJKIJAT MATINEE —
JANVAKT Bth to 13MU0K' »«
The Distinguished Irish Comedian and
Vocalist.
MR. JOSEPH MURPHY
Supported by an Excellent Company,
MONDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY—
shaUn rhue:
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY—
KERRY <3 O W
Regular Prlces-lfl, 75c, 50c and 25c. Beats
on sale Thursday, January 4tk, at 9 a.m.
BUKBANK Tsf EATRJE.
Main St., bet. Fifth and Sixth.
FRED A. COOPER, - - DIRECTOR.
WEEK COMMENCING
Monday Afternoon, Jan. Ist.
Every evening during the week and
Saturday Matinee—Grand fccenio
Production of the Greatest Dra
matic Spectacle ever written,
AROUND TH WORLD IN 80 DAYS
DARRELL VINTOS AS PHINEABFOGG,
tupporu-d by the Cooper Company of Players.
«ew specialties by the Vaudeville Compiny.
New and t c utliol scenery. Wonderful me
chanical efltois.
TWO MATINEE3 —New Yeat'a day at 2 and
regular Saturday Matinee.
Admission 15c, 20c and 30c. Box seats 50c
ai d 75c. Reserved seats on sale at box offloe
one week In advance.
Doors open 7:15. Curtain rises at 8.
GRAND OPERA HOUSK.
LEONARD GROVES, Manajer.
TO NIGHT
CAD THE TOMBOY!
Last Souvenir Matinee
Saturday - - -
CAD THE TOMBOY!
Popular prices—lsc, 23c. 35a andsoc. No
extra for secured seats. Luges 75c.
NEW VIENNA BUFFET,
Court St., tut. Main and Spring sts.
F. KERKOW, Proprietor ani Mgr.
Free Refined Entertainment Evsry Evening
irom 7:30 until 12, and Saturday
Matinee from 1 to 4 p.m.
First appearance in Los Angeles of Europe's
greatest novelty,
MISS LEONORA.
First appearance In Lea Angeles of the famous
little
MISS TRIXEDA.
One mote week of the favorite of Loi
Angeles,
MISS SfOSA CLEMENCE.
The graceful little beauty,
MISS ANTON I E QREVE.
Fine Commercial lunch dally. Mesls aU
carte at all hours. 3-14 ly
HENRY J. KRAMER'S SCHOOL FOR
DANCING.
Class for beginners. Ladles and Gentlemen,
will farm Thursday evenli-g. Jan. 4th.
Class for Misses and Masters, Saturday after
noons.
References required.
ACADEMY, 139 W. FIFTH STREET.
12-30 71
THOS. B.CLARK,
—REAL ESTATE AND GENERAL—
AUCTIONEER.
DEALER IN NEW & SECOND-HAND
SAFES,
232 W. FIRST ST.
MATLOCfC & REED,
AUCTIONEERS,
426 AND 428 S. SPRING STREET*
DEALERS IN
NEW and SECOND-HAND FDINITORB,
If yen want to sell Furniture,
If yon want to buy Furniture,
If yea want to exchange Furniture,
If you want a Folding Sed, call en
Matlock Sc Reed,
426 and 428 S. Sprint; St.
Telephone 62
AUCTION SALE
AT SALESROOMS, 413 S. SPRING ST.
FRIDAY, JAN. sth.
AT 10 A. M.
26 Bedroom Suits
Mattresses, Carpets, Etc., to Close*
Consignment.
STEVENS & BROWN,
AUCTIONEE Ft 8.
THE BASKET
—IMPORTED—
Wines, Lipors and Gip®
719 N. ALAMEDA ST.
JEAN RAPPET, Prop'r.
Telephone 187. 10-25
L T. MARTIN
M Dealer In NasMnd
Second-band"
FURNITURE
Carpets, Mattresse*
and Stoves.
Ash Bedroom Suits, 1115. Sewing Msvchlaes,
as, 910 and 9125.
451 S. SPRINQ STREET
The Newest Importations
CONTINUALLY ARRIVING.
CHOICE DESIGNS. VEST GOODS.
112 pc. Semi-Porcelain
Dinner Service, $10.50.
ALL GOODS EQUALLY LOW.
STAFFORDSHIRE CROCKERY CO.,
417 S. SPRINQ ST. 7-2S 8m
ciSHMH^^HHilHHeMHeie^H^^eßHsVgflgieili^^^HHl
ESSE D. s. rgcx. JAM IS IIOOTU.
PECK & CHASE CO.,
ROADWAY UNIgTAKERS
327 SOUrH BROADWAY.
Hie No. 81. \
FOR ■ LL KINDS OF
GUNS, RIFLES, PISTOLS,
Cutlery, Ammunition,
All Kinds of sporting- Ooo4«,
Fish'us Tackle, daubuo Rods, Haseballs, Mitts
and Gloves. R; iu:i .ug -nd Choke Boring of
Shotguns a Sptclaltv. Gnaraateed or money
refunded,
H. SLOTTEEBECK,
7-16 ly 211 N. Main St., Temple block
Baker Iron Works
9'jO TO 960 VIBTA ST.,
LOS ANQELEB, OAL.
Aejelwlsg the Southern Pacific erooaas, Taa
_•»■«?» I*4, V-ett jj

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