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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, March 03, 1894, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1894-03-03/ed-1/seq-2/

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of New Englrnd and New York, as no
New England states are represented by
Democratic senators. In acme cases oi
minor importance duties were fixed, but
in the large majority of cases decision
was reserved.
A large chare of the day wae given to
a discussion oi income tax and changes
made by the committee from specific to
ad valorem duties. The committee say
tbey have no constitutional right to di
vide a bill originated in the house of
representatives, and contend tbat the ad
valorem system is in accordance with
tbe Democratic policy, and that the
duty can be collected nnder this system
as»> ell as under a specific duty, ii com
petent officials are chosen.
Senator White of California was ad
mitted to make a brief statement con
cerning the wine and fruit duties, and
when be concluded the committee went
Into eecret session and began the formu
lation of the bill.
THE SILVER OUTLOOK.
Promising Signs Despite the Unfriendly
Attitude of Ulna-land.
Washington, March 2.—None ol the
silver men in the bouse expressed any
■urpriee when informed of the discour
aging remarks of the British chancellor
of the exchequer, on the outlook of the
reassembling of the monetary confer
ence. McCreary of Kentucky, a dele
gate from the United States to the con
ference, eaid:
"The outlook does not indicate that
an international monetary conference
will be held this year. There ie, how
ever, growing feeling in Europe in favor
of the enlarged use of silver. England
has been in tavor of gold monometallism
a number of years, but there are many
able men who favor international bi
metallism. England haa blockaded
the way mora than any other nation,
and prevented an international agree
ment many years, but I believe there
will be, after while, such a demand for
international bimetallism that another
conference must be held. But it is
probably imposssible that it can assem
ble until several leading countries of
Europe indicate a desire for a confer
ence."
Newlands of Nevada said he had no
expectation tbat England would move
for tbe reassembling of the conference
while tha Liberals remain in power. If
tbe Conservatives could secure control
he would consider the prospect
brighter for an international agree
ment, since Balfour and other
prominent men of that party are favor
able to silver. He was confident that
under this administration the initiative
would not be taken by the United
States.
Senator Allison, another delegate to
tbe last conference, read the dispatch
with the comment tbat he had known
all tbe time that the United Kingdom
would not propose another conference.
Bland eaid the action was immaterial.
He believed tbe United States should
stand on its own feet. "I never took
any stock in tbis international busi
ness," be added. "I believe it is all
humbug."
DEFECTIVE ARMOR PLATE.
Tlie Carnegie Steel Company Turning
Out Some Foor Work,
Washington, March 2.—For some
time it haa been known that the Car
negie Steel company has been in tronbie
with the navy department, respecting
an irregularity in the quality oi plate
supplied ior the armor oi new battle
ships and monitors. Secretary Herbert
niade the following statement today:
Last September the navy department
ascertained that illegal practices were
being resorted to by employees of the
Carnegie Steel company in manufacture
of armor ior the government. It was
ascertained that while ail tbe armor
manufactured was good, portions of it
were not up to tbe contract. The steel
company appealed from the secretary of
tbe navy to the president, wbo, on
January 10th, assessed tbe damages
against tbe company at $140,434, and
the company settled. There is no evi
dence tending to show that any of the
officers above those immediately super
intending the tempering and heating,
were cognizant pi these irregularities.
REORGANIZATION OF THE NAVY.
secretary Herbert Submits a Bill to the
senate Cuimnltteu.
Washington, March 2. —Secretary
Herbert has submitted to the senate
committee on naval affairs a bill for the
reorganization of the navy. It provides
tbat the active liet of the line eball con
sist of 20 rear-admirals, 60 captains, 100
commanders, 74 lieutenant-commanders,
76 lientenanta of tbe junior grade and a
number of ensigns sufficient to maintain
the total number of officers of the active
list of the line, including officers ap
pointed for volunteer service, as now
fixed by law. Provision is made that
officers now on the active list appointed
from the volunteer service shall coutiuuu
on that list. Promotions shall be madu
in tbe regular order, and there eball be
graduated irom tbe naval academy no
more than 35 cadets each year to till
vacancies.
REARMING THE ARMY.
New Maga/.ino Rlttes and Sinukelt- ■
Faffdgr fur the Kegularn.
Washington, March 2. —Tbe general
in-chief of ordnance will issue the tiro',
installment oi the new Krag-Jorgensen
magazine riiles to tbe Second infantry
Btatioaed at Omaha; the secoud lot ti
tbe Fourth infantry at Fort Sherman,
Idaho. For months the national
armory at Springfield, Macs., has been
working ou the rides, and the parts (oi
nearly a thousand have been completed
and are vow being assembled. The
tirst issue is expected to be made thie
month; after that, the armory will be
able to equip two regiments monthly,
thus retiring ail the old Springfleldt
from army use in about a year from date.
With the new rifles will go a supply oi
smokeless powder as ammunition.
HERBERT VETOED IT.
California Will Not Gat a New Naval
Station.
Washington, March 2.— The secretary
of the uavy has practically vetoed the
movement to secure a new naval station
for Caliiornia. Tbe representatives of
that state have been urging the appoint
ment of a commission to look over tin
c iaat for the purpose of selecting a suit
able site south of tbe thirty-fifth par
allel, but tbe naval committee received
a letter from Secretary Herbert etf ing
that Ibe uavy has ample docking facili
ties on the coast already. Consequent!)
the committee laid on the table the reso
lution ior the appointment of a commit
eion.
Dou't'-If a dealer ofleri you a bottle of Sal
vatiunOt! without wrapper or labels, or In *
mutilated condition, don't touch It—don't buy
It at any price, there Is somethluit wrong—:t
may be a dangerous or worthless counterfeit.
Insist upon getting a perfect, unbroken, genu
ine package. Be ou your gu»td!
ONE OF THE ROSCOE ROBBERS.
An Important Arrest Made at
Fresuo.
The Prisoner a Fugitive From Texas
Justice.
It Is Believed Ha Had a Rand in the
Train Robbery at Koscoe—An
Oregon Boy's Crime.
Coast Notes.
Br the Associated Press.
Fresno, March 2. —J. A. Jones,
wanted in Texas for grand larceny and
for whose arrest a reward of $1000 is
offered, was arrested here today. He
has been in California Bix years and
came here from Los Angeles two days
ago. The police believe he is either im
plicated in the Roscoe train robbery or
else knows who did it. Jones says he
sold mortgaged property in Bosqui
county, Texas, several years ago.
A WEBFOOT TRAGEDY.
An Oregon Youth Shoots Three People
aud Tbeu Suicides.
Ei'gene, Ore., March 2.—A revolting
tragedy occurred here late last night.
Albert Moss, a youth of 20 years, in a
fremy of rage attempted to assasinate
the entire Coleman family. After shoot
ing and killing one woman," badly injur
ing another and fatally wounding an old
man, tbe young maniac sent a ballet
through his own heart and died.
Young Moss, it appears, bad a bitter
quarrel with his father over some family
matter. Ia the beat of his passion he
learned that the Colemans were in
sympathy with his father in the trouble.
The youth purchased a revolver and
went direct to the Coleman residence.
In tbe parlor he was received by Miss
Belle Coleman and Mrs. Emma Osborne,
Coleman's daughters. Alter talking
with them a few minutes he pulled tbe
pistol out and without warning began
shooting at the women. Mrs. Osborne
fell to the floor dead, shot tbrougb the
breast. Mies Coleman was shot through
tbe arm, but managed to escape. Moss
then rushed into old man Coleman's
bed room and began firing at him. Two
shots took effect, one tbrougb eitber
lung. Coleman cannot recover. Moss
then ran out into a vacant lot and fired
a bullet through hie own heart.
A letter found on Mobs says he shot
Miss Coleman because she failed to keep
her promise of marrying him. He shot
ber sister, Mrs. Osborne, because she in
terfered in his plan.
WELCOME RAIN.
Southern California Farmers made (Had
by the Showers.
Riverside, March 2.—A steady rain
storm set in here today at noon and con
tinued throughout the day. The indi
cations are favorable for a long storm.
The storm is hailed with delight by the
farmers, whose grain cropa were suffer
ing for lack of moisture. It is estimated
that tbe present etorm is worth thous
ands of dollars to the county. The rain
is widespread, extending over all the
western portion of the county.
Baku Ana, March 2.—The long dry
spell was broken here today by a
heavy rain, which has dons mnob t»
allay the anxiety for the barley crop and
stock feed, bnt more rain is needed,
San Francisco, March 2.—The weath
er is cloudy and rainy over California.
Snow is falling over Washington aud
Oregon. The rainfall has bean general
over the state, being the heaviest from
San Francisco northward.
BODY FOUND GUILTY.
First Conviction Under the Rlversid.
Prohibition Ordinance.
Riverside, March 2.—The first prose
cution under tbe recently passed pro
hibition ordinance of thia county ter
minated here today in a verdict of con
viction. The case waa prosecuted
against a man named Body, who ia pro
prietor of a hotel. Body was charged
with selling wine, contrary to law, and
the case was fought with vigor by both
eidea. The trial lasted three days. Tbe
evidence on which the conviction was
secured was given by private detectives
employed by the W. C. T. U. organiza
tion. Body will appeal the case to tue
higher court.
A Pioneer Firm Dissolved.
San Fbakoisco, March 2. —Tbe pioneer
hardware firm of Huntington, Hopkins
& Co. ceased to exiet this morning,
when the entire Btock and business oi
tbe old corporation was transferred to
Miller, Slous & bcott, the firm which
three years ago absorbed Huntington,
Hopkiua & Co.'s branch in Sacrament*.
tba bneiue.e of tbe two firms in tbis
city will be consolidated.
A Victoria Bank Closed.
Victokia, B. C, March 2.—Green
Woorlock's bank this morning closed its
doors aud posted a notice tbat tbe bank
bad assigned for tbe benefit of its cred
itors. Tbe assets are about $030,000 and
the liabilities about $400,000. Tbe rea
son aeßigned for tbe failure is tbe pres
ent financial stringency and inability to
[at assistance from local banking con
cerns.
A Heavy Sentence.
San Fbamoiboo, March 2.—Judge Wal
lace today sentenced Manuel Alvieo.
convicted ot highway robbery, to 24
yearo' imprisonment.
Hope for Entombed Miners Abandoned.
Allsntown, Pa., March 2.—Pritchard,
Bella, Balke and Nickulineo, the four
entombed miners in a slate quarry at
Williametown, are still buried in the
tuunel. The rescuing party was stopped
by a wall of rock. All hope of finding
the men alive is abandoned.
"Perhaps you would not think bo, but
a very large proportion of d.cease in
New York cornea irona carelessness about
catching cold." Bays Dr. Byrus Edeoo.
"It is such a simple thing and bo com
mon tbat very few people, unless it ie c
caße of pneumonia, pay any attention to
a cold. New York ie one oi the healthi
est places on the Altantic coast and yet
ihore are a great many cases of catarrh
and consumption which have their origin
in thie neglect of tbe simplest precaution
of everyday life. The most sensible ad
vice is, when you have one get rid of it
its coon as possible. By all means do
not neglect it." l)r. Edaon does not tell
how to cure a cold, but we will. Take
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy. It will
relieve the lungs, aid expectoration,
open the secretions and coon effect ■
permanent cure. Fifty-cent bottles for
dale by 0. F. Heinzeman, 222 North
Main, and Off & Vaughn, Fourth aud
Spring streets.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SATURDAY MORNTNO, MARCH 8, 1804.
poirn
gfl Find fault wi'* the cook if ■
Bfl the pastry docs not exactly -v
3 suit you. Nor with your wife £
4T3 cither —perhaps she is not to !»
I MM \
Pa It may be the lard she is ..
cm using for shortening. Lard
e3 is indigestible you know. But *
cM if you would always have £
YOUR
y-» Sj
9 Cakes, pies, rolls, and bread r
"5 palatable and perfectly di- f»
It gestible, order the new short- •
'I cuing,"COTTOL£NE," for your |
I WIFE 5
£<j SOLD BY ALL dROCERS. *
VJ Rbfusb All Substitutes, t
r- — S
f* i Mado only by •
L N. K. FAIRBANK & CO., |j
& ST. LOUIS and '.
I • CHICAGO. NEW YORK, BOSTON. H
f* Rend three oeutsin stamps to N. K. W
f*i Talrbank * Co.. CMcafo. for hand- •>
iv" BorneCottolene Cook Hook, contain- <3
t; ItiK six hundred recipos. prepared hy
C < vine eminent autLoriUeaou cooklug.
EAGLESON k GO.'S
GREAT
REDUCTION
SALE!
OF
Wool Underwear,
Hosiery,
Overshirts,
Neglige Shirts,
Etr_ Etc.
On account of large OVERSTOCK
and proposed changes in the United
States Tariff, all our Winter Gooda
MUST BE CLOSED OUT.
A Pew of the Reductions:
Heavy Merino Underwear 75c,
Reduced to 50c.
Heavy Merino Underwear $1 00,
Reduced to 65c.
Heavy Merino Underwear $1 50,
Reduced ti $1.15
Wool Underwear $1.00,
Reduced to 65c
Wool Underwear $1.25,
Reduced to 90c.
Wool Underwear $1.35,
Reduced to $1 00.
Wool Underwear $1.50,
Reduced to $1.20.
Wool Underwear $2.00,
Reduced to $1 50.
Hosiery, Overshirts, Neglige Shirts,
etc , at the same proportionate reduc
tions.
NO HUMBUG SALE
But genuine reductions. Call and see
our window display and prices.
EAGLESON & CO.,
112 South Spring St.
I. T. MARTI N
■gj"" I -j» — Dealer In New and
S / Eecond-hard
FURNITURE,
II 111 TT - . OABPKTS, MATTING,
fftfffl FOLDING BttDd, OK
>LU!J- \ rioK DESKS AND
li A -L. JJJJJU MOVES. Prices low
■~> — lor cash or will sell
\ >t r on installments.
451 S. SPRING STREET
WAGON MATERIAL,
BABD WOODS,
I RON, STEEL,
Horseshoes and Nails,
Blacksmith's Coal, Tools, Ett,
JOHN WIGMORB,
U7, 114 and 121 Beatk Los Aaev.es NsJ|
The Newest Importations
CONTINUALLY AKEIVING.
CHOICE DESIGNS. BEST GOODS.
112 pc. Semi-Porcelain
Dinner Service, $10.50.
ALL GOODS EQUALLY LOW.
STAFFOKD.SHIKE CROCKERY CO.
417 S. SPRING ST.
PERRY, MOTT & CO. S
LUMBER YARD 3
AND PLANING MILLS.
31S Commercial surest, Las Accclsa, CaL
D! W=-
EVERY MAN, WOMAN AND CHILD WHO HAS PURCHASED |
GOODS AT THE 1
CITY OK PARIS
DRY GOODS STORE
Is Satisfied, Not Only With the Goods and Prices, But Satis
fied that No Other Store in This City Has, Does, Will
or Can Sell as Cheaply as This Establishment.
: J
WHY? ==- i
Because the Business MUST Be Closed Out. The Goods MUST Bo Sold, I
and as Much Money Realized as the Public is Willing to I
Exchange for Goods. The Order is j I
"Sell! Sell! Sell! Close It Out'l
AND THAT IS WHAT IS BEING DONE. ' I
A PRICES TALK! A
Select your goods, and make money Irf I
by saving it. PAY NOBODY A h-| I
PROFIT. Any price that others ask f*w I
for their goods will be discounted here. I
f Everybody invited to attend this sale, I
which is v I
X A WAR ON PRICES!
Store crowded from 8 a.m. until 6 p.m. I
HH The only store in this city that is busy from 1
f j morning until night. L
Ask your neighbor about the wonderful bar-
gains at the
£ CITY of PARIS %
DRY GOODS STORE.
YA full and complete line in every department. \X
Goods are. going at a lively rate.
Attend this sale.
CITY OF PARIS, "
203-207 N. SPRING STREET.

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