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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, June 14, 1894, Image 1

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KANSAS POPULISTS.
THEY COMPLETB THBIR LA
BOWS UV BNDORSINO f HriAl H
SUFPRAOB AND NoniNAIINO A
PULL St ATE TICKET.
VOL. XL!I. NO. 04.
TRUTHFUL ADVERTISING ~°
WE ALWAYS TELL THE PLAIN TRUTH
AND BACK IT TO THE LAST LETTER.
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Why not have a stylish business suit ? All-wool cassimere
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How abouc a bathing suit ? Just the thing for the seashore.
All-wool knit suits from $2.25 to $8.
Mullen, Bluett i Go.
LEADING ONE-PRICE CLOTHIERS AND FURNISHERS,
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I CRYSTAL "PALACE.
t 138, 140 and 142 South Main Street. ~
X y
TIB CHEAPB3T PLACB FOR -.
1 MASON'S FRUIT JARS 8
PACKED ONB DOZEN IN A BOX.
« JELLY GLASSES CF ALL KINDS *
«c >
*~ We have now on sale for the season: sr
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i* JEWETTS' WATER-COOLERS and WATER -
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j M EIVBERG BROS.
k THE BOLLENBECK
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| 10-7 Cm PgOpglWOM
mCERRILLOS COALS
BEST EVER OFFERED IN THIS MARKET.
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MUSTANG LINIMENT
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The Herald
LOS ANGELES, THURSDAY MORNING, JUNE 14, 1894
THE KANSAS POPULISTS.
Their Convention Completes
Its Labors.
Hilarity Over the Female Suf
frage Bill.
Susanß. Anthony Now a Full Fledged
Populist.
The ■■ffrag* Plank Mot to Be Made a
Test of Party Fealty—State Con
trol of belooAS Tabled.
The Tteket.
By the Associated Press.
Topeka, Kan., June 13.—A minority
report of the resolutions committee,
advocating tbe pending constitutional
amendment for women suffrage, was re
ceived with a storm of applause in the
Populist convention today. Tbe report
was signed by eight members of the
committee. Tbe convention decided to
debate the subject till noon.
Tbe Populist convention was in con
tinuous seeeion from 8 o'clock until after
1. It was one long drawn oat terriiia
debate for and against tbe insertion of
the woman's suffrage plank in tbe plat
form. The speeches were limited to
five minutes. Anna Diggs led the dis
cussion for tbe suffragists and P. P.
Elder for the antis. Elder almost broke
down in tbe end, and appeared to be
convinced tbat tbe pressure was too
great, and tbat tbe women would carry
tbe day.
Ex-Congressman Otis eeerced to voice
tbe prevailing sentiment when he said :
"This question has been simmered
down to this: Shall tbe people control
tbe People's party, or shall the politi
cians? On one side stand* the scheming
politician, who says we mast bid for the
Democratic vote, the ignorant foreign
vote. On the other side it is tbe edu
cated, thinking people of tbe party, the
true reformers. It is now a qnestion of
right or wrong, and I am for equal rightß
to all and special privileges to none."
Alter a preliminary vote was taken,
tbe final one was sailed and resulted 337
for tbe suffrage plank and i!ti!» against it.
Tbe scene which followed beggars de
scription. The delegates and visitors
gave cheer after cheer, rose to their feet
and burled hats to tbe high ceilinz.
Banners and flags were seized and waved
amid a snowstorm of handkerohiefe.
Laura Johns, tbe Republican suffragist
seized a Populist badge and pinned it to
her shoulder.
joy, and using both her hands, wrung the
outstretched palms of tne delegates
right and left.
'"You will be a Popnlist now ?" cried
Borne one to Susan B. Anthony. Her
reply was lost in the uproar, but she
had practically taken this stand yester
day.
"Now let Rev. Anna Shaw 'whoop it
up,' " shouted a delegate near the stage.
"I am not good at 'whooping,' " said
Mibb bhaw, " but I ask the convention
to sing: 'Praise Ood Prom Whom All
Blessings Flow.' "
Tbe audience joined in the doxology.
Alonzo Warjell, who stood on the ros
trum, i limited, "Amen I" and every del
egate joined iv. It was about 3 o'clock
before "Speaker" Dunemore called tbe
coav. vviion to order. Haml.n Carl, tbe
Boston author, was invited to speak. Ue
said:
'T am glad yon put in that suffrage
plank. If you had not, 1 would not have
been before you, as you would have
taken the heaitout of me."
A resolution favoring state control of
the liquor traffic by tbe dispensary sys
tem was tabled.
Immediately upon the adoption of the
woman suffrage plank the convention
adopted tbe entire platform, with a few
trifling corrections in phraseology, as
given in the Associated Press dispatohes
ibis morning.
A clause was added to tbe suffrage
plank tbat it should not be made a test
oi party fealty.
The delegates straggled in very slowly
after the noon recess, and it was 2:45
before tbe chairman could secure order.
The sensation of the day was sprung
on the convention in the shape of a res
olution denouncing the A. P. A. A mo
tion to table it was lost, 298 to 218, aud
it was passed by a viva voce vote.
Nominations for state officers followed.
Oeorae W. Clark, present attorney gen
eral, W. 0. Webb of Shawnee and M. B.
Nicholson of Council Grove were put in
nomination for associate justice of the
supreme court. Clark waa nominated
on the first ballot.
Governor Lewelling was renominated
by acclamation.
D. I. Furbeck, of Shawnee, was nomi
nated by acclamation for lieutenant
governor over Percy A.. Daniels, the
present incumbent, and J, B. Randolph
of Emporia.
J. W. Amis of Smith county was
nominated for secretary of state by ac
clamation ; W. H Birdie, for treasurer;
J. T. Little, tor attorney-general; Van
B. Prather. for auditor, and W. A. Har
ris for congressman-at-large, were all re
nominated by acclamation.
John Gray of Osage county was given
the floor by consent, and stated he had
a protest against tbe administration
from the miners of Kansas. Gray is the
man who has been fighting tbe admin
istration all along on account of tbe
mining disturbances.
"General" Bennett, commander of the
Commonwealers' forces in Kansas City,
addressed the convention, and collected
I Hi- for the use of bis army.
The convention then adjourned sine
die.
If unable to visit tbe beach use Turk's
island sea salt, tbe best substitute for a
sea bath at home. Two and a half pound
package for 10 cents. Off & Vaughn's
drug store, Fourth and Spring.
Tooth brushes. A complete line, and
we sell them at 10, 15, 20, 25, 35, 40 and
50 cts., and guarantee every brush. Lit
tleboy's pharmacy, 311 S. Spring st.
Latest music, Blanchard-Fitzgerald
Music Co., 113 & 115,' iB. Spring street.
A VILLAGE DESTROYED.
The Floods Mot Entirely Subsided In
Oregon..
Portland, Juos 13. — A telephone
message from the Dalles this morning
states that almost the entire village of
Grants, in Sherman county, haß been
swept away by the flood.
Only one elevator and a few buildings
on tbe highlands remain The distil
lery owned by Goodell, Walker & 00.
went out yesterday. Twelve men were
in tbe building when it was carried off
its foundations. All were saved; one
man after the buildings were well out in
tbe stream being rescued by boxtmen,
who saw him floating with tba build
ings.
Grants is a place of about 200 inhabi
tants, located on tbe Columbia river and
tbe Union Pacific railroad, 111 miles
east of Portland.
Tbe distillery at Grants was bnilt
about 18 months ago, and the plant was
worth about $15,000. Its capacity was
580 gallons of spirits per day.
THE KAHI.O DISASTER.
Late Particulars Olvlna; the Loss of Life
and Property.
Spokane, Jnne 13 —Particulars of the
Kaslo, B. C, disaster reached here to
day. The property loss, it is thought,
will reach $100,000, The Galena Trad
ing company's store. Brers Hardware
company's store, a fl>ating warehouse
holding a great deal of merchandise, the
government wharf, coating 1(8000, and
about 70 houses were swept away.
Tne only life lost was that of Mrs. D.
C. McGregor.
The storm came up between 4 and 5
o'clock. It was preceded by a number
of bot waves, then came a terrific gale
which filled the air with debris, churned
the lake into a mighty sea and blew
buildings into the water. Meanwhile
Kaslo river was dammed by a log jam
and scores of cabins along its banks
were ruined.
A BANKING SCHEME.
THE OUTLINES OP A PROPOSED
JSEW BILL.
Representative Walker of the Hosts
Committee on Ranking Makea
Pabllo * Plan tnr a Compre
hensive System.
Washington, Jnne 13.—Representa
tive Walker of Massachusetts, a veter
an member of the com an tee on banking
and tbe senior representative member
of the committee, says that in bis
opinion the question of banking and
currency about to be matured, in a eoui
lee ol five members, under a recent vote
of the banking committee, in the most
important scheme before congress, not
second to the tareff. Sealed ballots are
now being filed for the purpose of se
lecting the committee of five. Each
uiumber of the banking committee has
a vote and names five of his aceociates
on the committee. The seals will be
broken Friday, and the fire members
having the largest number of votes will
constitute tbe select committee.
Mr. Walker has agreed that no votes
be given to himself or to Messrs.
Springer, Warner or Sperry, as each of
them h*s a banking bill to which they
naturally will be inclined. The entire
purpose of tbe forming ef the select
committee is to break away from the
present bills and to get up a broad bank
ing system witb ench good features of
all bills as may recommend themselves.
The committee of five will sit contin
uously, s*id Mr. VValker, with a view of
reporting their work to the house on
the 27th mat., to insure positive results.
Recent dUcusaion in the house and in
committee has made the substantial
features of the system reasonably cer
tain. It is in the direction of nations 1
currency and national banking, and
away from state banking and based on
gold and silver instead of bonds. The
general desire is to create a system of
national banks which shall proceed
along lines parallel to the present na
tional bank bill. The latter will be
merged gradually into and absorbed by
tbe near system As tbe charters of the
old banks expire they will be given
charters under the new banking system.
Thus the old and new systems can pro
ceed in parallel lines without any disar
rangement of either system.
Mr. Walker was asked what the new
system of banks would have to do with
the issuance of money.
Tbe bill will undoubtedly provide for
doing away with the various forms of
currency now issued, and the substitu
tion therefor of a uniform paper mone>
issued by tbe government through
baukß. At present the government cir
culates the treasury notes, greenbacks,
silver certificates and various kinds of
currency, and the government under
takes to makegood this money ; but the
purpose will be to make tbe national
bank the sole source of issuing money
under government supervision and di
rection. The iiovernment thus will be
relieved of issuing, circulating and cur
rently redeeming these various forme of
currency, and the entire responsibility
will be placed on the banks. This na
tional bank currency would be sur
rounded by all tbe safeguards of the
present laws, and such other safeguards
as would insure its proper redemption.
In short, tbe federal government will
be relieved of direct attention to the
issuance of money and ail responsibility
for keeping it.
"It will be good money, and yet will
insure the public thai, every dollar is
sued by the national banks is good and
redeemable the country over."
Cau such a measure bsj passed at the
present session ? Mr. Walker was a^ked.
"Possibly not," said he, "bat it will
serve a valuable purpose to business.
The mere fact that such a comprehen
sive measure for ■> national currency
can be reported back on tbe calendar
will have a salutary effect in business
and banking circles. It will be in Bhape
also to be taken up at the next session
of congress. The recent debate on atate
banks has been one of the must benefi
cial from an educational point of view
we have had in 20 years. It has cleared
tbe way for a safe, sound and conserva
tive system of nationalized banks and
currency."
THE STRIKE IS STILL ON.
Miners Refuse to Return to
Work.
President Ifcßride Speaks on
the Situation.
He Thinks the Miners Will Change
Their Minds.
A Little Hint at the Cliff Mine In Penn
sylvania — Aceesslnns to tho
Kauka or Strikers In
Illinois
By the Associated Press.
Oolumbub, 0., June 13—President
John Mcßride of the United Mine
Workers stated tonight he believed
when the miners bad read aud consid
ered tbe circular letter sent out by the
national executive board explaining the
compromise, they would see it in • dif
ferent light and accept tne settlement.
He said the miners had forced tbe mat
ter of tbe strike last fall and be
would have resigned at tbat time if
they had permitted him to do so. He
bad done what be believed was for tbe
interests of the mihers when be agreed
to tbe compromise, and he could do no
more. He would relieve himself of the
responsibilities and the miners would
now have to assume it if they continued
the strike.
McCi.ainksvh.lb, 0., June 13.—While
Company X of the Eighth regiment
were guarding a deep cut near this plane
today the men were attacked by about
60 strikers, who were armed with stones
and clubs. The soldiers, seeing that
the attacking party had no firearms,
threw down their weapons and went at
the mob with their tiets. In lets than
two minutes the whole party of Poles
and Italians were put to flight without
bloodshed.
Pomeroy, 0., June 13 —A secret meet
ing of coal operators was held here to
day, and it was resolved to pay $1.85 per
100 bushels for mining.
A SMALL RIOT.
Pittsburg, June 13.—A small-sized
riot took place today at the Cliff mine of
the Imperial coat company. Ten or
twelve men were in the mine cleaning
up aud preparing to resume work next
week, wnen a mob of about 400 strik
ing miners came down on them, drove
the guards a<;ay and attacked the
workman Martin Bovnes was chased
to his home, where ne was badly beaten,
and a baby in a cradle was struck by a
stone. Tbestrikers threaten to kill the
foreman and burn the works if another
attempt is mada to start up.
A meeting of the miners of the entire
Pan Handle district has been called for
2 o'clock tomorrow to consider secession
from the order.
REINFORCEMENTS.
Pana, 111., June 13.—There were 250
accessions to the strikers' ranks tonight,
and tbey say they are coming into town.
The camp now numbers 600 men. Two
hundred are negroes, and many are
armed.
State President Crawford came bere
tonight to endeavor to bring about
recognition by the operators of the
Miners' union. Another large ship
ment of guns and ammunition was re
ceived from the state arsenal tonight.
Two train loads of coal went out tonight.
There are threats of bridge burning by
tbe strikers to prevent these shipments.
KTILI. stand firm.
Spring Valley, HI., June 13 —At a
delegate meeting of the Northern Illi
nois miners this afternoon at which at
least 1000 miners were represented, it
was unanimously decided to never dig a
ton of cial until the operators restore
last year's prices. From now on the
operators will have not ouly foreign
uiiuers to combat but English speaking
miners as well.
Washington. Ind., June 13—At a
gathering of 2000 miners today at White
Oak resolutions were adopted not to
return to work.
THE ' IVKALERS,
What fhe Day lii-ought Forth for the
lad ustrlals.
Omaha, Nob., June 13.—Judge Dnndy
telegraphed Attorney General Olney
this afternoon for troops to protect the
Union Pacific railroad from the Carter
Commonwealers at Julesburg and Ogal
lala. Tbe reply is expected every hour
from Mr. Olnev, notifying either Fort
Omaha or if rt Russell troops out. But
up to a late hour nothing had yet come
at the federal building.
A special train was made up this af
ternoon in the Union Pacific shops in
readiness fur a moment's notice. A
train has also been made up at Cheyenne
for Fort Russell, and the crews of both
trains are on board.
There is great excitement at Jules
burg. There are fully (>UO Coxeyitea at
Julesburg, who are part of the Carter
army which formed in Utah, and stole
a train. They are desperate, for they
cannot go to Denver, having been sent
from there with a farewell lot of pro
visions to last them for "keeps." Forty
of the army stole a Union Pacific stock
train this morning, and were side
tracked at Gtallala.
Washington, June 13.—Attorney-Gen
eral O iiey has received a dispatch from
Judge Dundy at Omaha, Neb., asking for
troops to protect Union Pacific property
from damage by Commonwealers at
Julesburg and Ojallale. Mr Olney has,
however, taken no action except to send
for further particulars. He will not re
fer the matter to the war department or
the president tonight.
HUNGRY AND IMPATIENT.
Omaha, June 13. — A special to the
Bee from Julesburg, Col., says: The
Coxey army is still here. They have
been reinforced until their number is
about 600. They made two unsuccessful
attempts to capture a train today,
but tbe railroad refnsed to pull
the trains, and they got off. Their
provisions are running low, aad they
are getting very impertinent. The
leader waited on tbe city council today
and informed them tbat unless they
were furnished means of transportation
in a few hours they would make trouble.
The citizens are all heavily armed, and
will protect their property to tbe very
last. One hundred and fifty are ex
pected tomorrow via the river oa boats.
BEPORK THE HOUSE COMMUTES.
Washington, June 13.—Morrison I.
Swift of the Boston Industrial army
spoke today to the house committee on
labor. Charity, he argued, weakened
tbe fibre of workingmen aud perhaps
added to the tramp army, In Boston
the policy bad been adopted of giving
alms to those out of work and
in need. It would be better to
furnish public work by which those in
want could be producers instead ot a
dead weight on the community. He
advocated public farms or factories, or
work on roads. Wages for government
work should be lower than the prevail
ing wages, so men would resort to them
only when private employment could
not be bad.
STOLE TRANSPORTATION.
Bismarck, N. D., June 13.—The Cox
eyites succeeded in getting oat of town
on stolen handcars, fitted up with plat
forms made of stolen lumber. Tbe cars
were found near Steele today, but the
' Wealers had fled.
An army of 400 is being mobilized
here and at Mandan. United States
Deputy Marshal Daggott has arrived
with a force of deputies, and trains are
being sent out under armed protection.
Spkingfield, 111., June 13. —Fifty
Commonwealers seized a freight train of
the Louisville, Evansville and St. Louis
Consolidated Railroad company, and
tbe road being in tbe hands of a receiver
Judge A lien, of tbe United States court,
issued orders for the United States Mar
shal to restore tbe train to the receivers.
Deputy marshals at once left for Ed
wardsville.
THE DECKS CLEARED.
REPUBLICAN GUBERNATORIAL
CANDIDATES WITHDRAWING.
Host of the San Franolseo Asplranta
Making the Path Smooth for Air.
Bstee — Colonel Preston
Will Contest.
Sam Francisco, Jnne 13.—Following
the announcement tbat Dan Burns and
the local delegation to the Republican
convention will support M. M. Knee for
the Republican gubernatorial nomina
tion, word comes tbat District Attorney
W. S. Barnes, Gen. W. H. Dimond, At-
torney-Ueneral W. H. H. Hart, Frank
Coombs and others have withdrawn
from the contest, and instructed their
supporters to fall in behind Mr. Estee
Mr. Barnes said today to a reporter:
"I wish that yon would announce that
I have withdrawn from the gubernato
rial fight.
"This morning I called my friends to
gether, und we talked over the situa
tion. I informed them tbat the situa
tion looked hopeless, and advised them
to go and work for Mr. 10 <tee, as he evi
dently would be the choice of the con
vention.
"I look that stand because I did not
wish to sacrifice those who had been
faithful to me, and wbo are interested
in other tights before the convention."
Shortly alter the news of Mr. Barnes'
withdrawal had reached Colonel Barns'
headquarters in the Baldwin, a messen
ger arrived from Gen. W. H. Dimond
with a letter notifying Colonel Burns of
tbat gentleman's withdrawal.
The news of Frank Coombs' intention
to retire in favor of Mr. Eatee was re
ceived by telegram.
Gen. vV. H. H. Hart took occasion to
draw out, and sent word to Bnrns' head
quarters that be had <iven up hopeß of
heading the Republican ticket.
Col. E. F. Preston has determined to
fight to a finish. He was at tbe Palace
at noon today, talking the gubernatorial
question over with his friends.
"I'm in the fight and in it to stay,"
he declared, "and I will go before the
convention, even if I am certain oi not
receiving over three votes."
FRESNO KEPUItLIOANB.
Progree* Made lv Nominating a County
Ticket.
Frkbno, June 13.—The Republican
county convention for the nomination of
county officers and the election of dele
gates to the state convention met in this
city today.
Resolutions were passed praising Sen
ator Perkins' couree in congress, and
recommending him for renominatioa.
Senator White was thanked for hie ef
forts in behalf of California fruit indus
tries, and Congressman W. W. Bowers
was also endorsod.
Resolu ions to the effect that Fresno
Republicans wished no help or interfer
ence from San Francisco bosees also
passed.
Governor Markham was praised for Lis
able and business-like administration.
Dr. A. J, Pedlar was nominated for
state senator by acclamation.
W. F. Rowull was nominated for the
assembly from tbe Sixty-second and W,
V. Ashbrook from the Sixty-tbird dis
trict.
J. R. Webb and Stanton L. Carter
were nominated for superior judgeships.
Jay Scott, present incumbent, for
sheriff.
A. E. Snow for district attorney.
The convention then adjourned nntil
10 o'clock tomorrow.
The K^.Koll,
New York. Juno 13. —Just previous
to his departure, Richard Croker re
signed his membership ot the Manhat
tan club. >io reason was given for this
action. It was eaid tonight that Mr.
Croker had also resigned from the Tam
many Hall association in the Twenty
first district.
A I. out.: I.ease.
Chicago, June 13 —Prendergast will
be brought before Judge Payne tomor
row morning and a date set for his trial
on insanity. The attorneys have agreed
to let it go over until November 12th.
THE ROSCOK HOLD-UP.
A SENSATION CAUSED BY THE
ARRBST OP A NO THEM SUSPECT.
1 HP. TESTIMONY NLARLY ALL
SUBMITTED.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
AT THE NATION'S CAPITAL.
More Set Speeches in the
Senate.
The Wool Schedule the Bone of
Contention.
The House Devotes a Day to the
Nation's Wards.
Senator Parkin* Defends the Memory af
Ills Predecessor —Aflsoellaneosul
Business Transacted In
Both Houses.
By the Associated Presa.
Washington, June 13.— Senator Per
kins in the senate today briefly defend
ed the memory of the late Letand Stan
ford from charges made by Representa
tive Geary tbat be founded tbe Stanford
university ont of revenge and resentment
because he was not elected a trastee of
the University of California. Perkins
said tbat when he was governor of Cali
fornia he appointed Stanford regent oi
tbe university, but at tbe latter's re
quest the legislature did sot confirm tbe
nomination. Governor Stoneinan wonld
have also made Stanford a regent, but
tbe honor was declined.
A resolution offered by Morgan was
passed, calling on tbe secretary of the
treasury for a statement of what amount
of gold coin was received by the treasury
department since November 1, 1593;
how much was received from the sale of
bonds and to what persons or banking
institutions such bonds were Bold; what
outstanding obligations were redeemed
in gold since tbat date.
Hoar offered a resolution calling on
the president to irjform the senate what,
if any, representation was made to the
governor by representatives of foreign
countries as to the contemplated re
taliation on account of the proposed
imposition of a discriminating dnty on
sugar, giving the facts as to the prob
able exclusion of our agricultural pro
ducts from Germany or Guatemala; any
information in bis possession relative to
proposed retaliatory legislation by the
cortes of Spain ou account of the abro
gation of the reciprocity treaty under
the tariff act of 1890. The resolution
was adopted.
On motion, Vilas' bill providing one
additional circuit judge in each lor the
Seventh, Eighth and Ninth judicial dis
tricts, was passed
The tariff debate was retnmed, tha
pending question being i'etier's amend
ment to restore 50 per cent of the duty
on raw wools. Suorman made a vigor
ous speech againot free wool.
The question of free wool, Mr. Sher
man said, vitally affected the people of
Ohio. He reiterated what he had said
in a previous speech that free wool was
tbe onlminating atrocity of this bill. He
appealed to the Democrats to put aside
politics and withhold this destructive
biow to this great industry. The sheep
raising and wool growing industry was
common to a greater or less extent to
every state and territory. It was certain,
be said, tbat the United States could not
compete in the production of wool with
Australia, Argentine ttepublio and other
countries where sheep raising was the
principal industry. Unless some gov
ernment aid was given the farmers of
the United States they must abandon
the field.
Mr. Da Bois followed Mr. Sherman.
Mr. Dv Bon made a strong protest
against placing wool on the free list as
disastrous to the great sheep-raising in
dustry oi his section. Although the bill
was not yet a law, he said tbat it was
not possible today to sell a ponnd of
wool in Idaho except at a discount from
the nominal market price, equal to the
present rate of duty on raw wool.
Ihe fleeces bad been under the sys
tem of protection and were now to be
sacrificed under ibis system of free
trade. If the bill carried[out logically
tbe demand of tbe Demucratie platform
for free raw materials he would not ask
a Democratic senate to make an excep
tion of it, but passing partially protec
tive duties on coal, iron ore, etc., under
the sham excuse of revenue, be de
nounced as discrimination against
American labor. I'he wool industry of
Idaho prospered under tbe McKinley
tariff. From 1890 to 1893 the flocks
doubled. The threat on tree wool fell
on 800,000 sheep, worth $2,000,000, and
including an annual clip of 6,000,000
pounds. Tbe deciine in tbe value of
sheep and clips since free wool was pro
claimed almost equalled the valne of tha
flocks before the threat was made.
Mr. Dußois then drifted into the dis
cussion of silver lead mining of the
Rocky mountains, section which had
(alien under the blight since the passage
of tbe bill repealing the purchasing
clause of tbe Sherman act and the
threat of free trade ores in the new tariff
bill.
He described at length tbe industrial
condition in the west, with mines closed
and thousands out of employment, aud
contrasted these conditions with those
existing tinder the MclCinley law. In
the course of his remarks he referred to
the political capital made out of the
Homeßtead strike in the compiagn of
1892 and presented alongside of it tbe
picture of etnkes, lockouts, riots and
bloodshed everywhere today, quoting as
be said at random from newspapers of
the past two months. In conclusion he
reiterated his appeal to tbe Republican
side to allow the bill to be promptly dis
posed of. Bad as existing conditions,
the present uncertainty should be set
at rest.
Wo en Da Foia finished, Mr. Stewart
of Nevada took the II or and made argu
ment against free wool.
Mr. Hansbroiigh (Republican) took
the floor and spoke at some length.
While favoring the principle of protec
tion and desiring that the policy be
perpetuated, he wag opposed to the pro
tective tariff bill nciw belore the senate.
He opposed it on hcc junt of its discrim
inations, its st clonal inequalities and
its false pietsnses. It discriminates
against the people of the west in placing
wool on the tree list, and it favora tha

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