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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, November 06, 1894, Image 5

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CLOSING OF THE CAMPAIGN.
Eloquent Democratic Addresses
at Turner Hall Last Night.
Hon. Will A. Harris and Hon. R. F.
Del Valle.
Labor Representatives Repudiate O. I .
Heertt's Attempt to Pose ea Their
Bote—Pettun's Vine Iteeepl
lea at Asuea.
Tbe Democrat! held • meeting Uit
night et Turner hall, whioh was attend
ed by an interested audience. The
meeting was presided over by lion. K.
F. Del Valle.
K. J. Adcock aummed up the work of
tbe campaign and prsdicted a solid
Democratic vote at the polls today
wbloh would, he believed, result in
victory. The meetings of the campaign
had been well attended aud the audi
ences showed an interest in the real
ttsuee of the campaign which demon
strated that they were alive to the ne
cessity of better men ia office. Mr.
Adcock gave a brief review of the atti
tude of the Democratic party upon
national and local issues, and his re
marks were well received.
Will A. Harris addressed the audience
briefly, relerring to tho close of the
campaign and characterizing it as a re
markable campaign. One of tbe re
markable things that had come under
his notice wsb that which had hap
pened last week at a Republican meet
ing. Henry T. Gage presided at the
meeting. It was only a lew weeks
before that Mr. Gage had
been defeated ior chairman of
tbe county convention, and had
attempted to bave a resolution passed
almost in the language of the constitu
tion pledging the convention to civil
and religious liberty. He wondered at
Mr. Gage's language in presiding at
the meeting, and if civil aud religious
liberty was one of tbe grand principles
of the Republican party.
He referred to Mr. (ieorge Knight's
reference in his speech to Kngland, in
which he said he could take San Ber
nardino county and wipe out the little
devil, and wondered if that was one of
the principles of the Republican party.
Mr. Harris made bright and witty
allusions to the inconsistencies of tbe
position of tbe Republican party on
the great issusa before the country,
and the wide differences betweeu tfieir
promises and perlormsncss. lie be
lieved the depression through which
the couutry bad passed, but from which
it was emerging, was due to unnatural
trade laws and the insatUte greed for
wealth. An unsellish policy was better
for the masses.
Major Mckinley had said recently
that cargoes of wooi were coming from
Australia and Mr. Harris saw in this a
hopsfnl amn. Instead of ruining the
woolen industry he believed tbis meant
tbat we would manufacture woolen
goods we now buy from England, and
give employment to American laborers.
Tbe speaker referred to Mr. McLach
lan's statement that McKinley was the
best hated man in Kurope. because his
act had pat out their furnace fires. He
said that ha did not believe in the doc
trine of bate thus expressed, and neith
er did he believe that the polioy that
bad thus resulted was one tbat benefited
this country.
Mr. Harris referred to Mr. Hunting
ton's deadly grip on San Francisco, and
said he did not b have in sympathy for
people tbat allow themselves to be
crused to the earth. But Mr. Hnnting
ton is trying to get his grip on Los An
geles and its commerce. If the people
of this section allow themselves to be
gripped they will have themselves to
blame. Tbe great commerciul question
for Los Angeles is the harbor question.
The Democratic party has had the cour
age to challenge these great corporations,
and the Kepublican party is dominated
by the Southern Pacific railroad. He
hoped the people wouid vote for George
8 Patton. [AppHtUßel In doing so
they would be laying the foundation ol
one of the big cities of the world.
Mr. Harriß had hoped that the cam
paign wonld be passed through without
slander, but he had not couuted on the
depths to which Dan Burns would go.
He believed the manliness and chivalry
of the people oi California wonld for
ever stamp out the siimy tricks and
slander which had been resorted to iv
tbe effort of Dan Burns to defeat Mr.
Budd.
The speaker made pleasant and genial
references to the county candidates, be
ginning with Col. & E. Hewitt, who was
on tbe etage, saying ot him tbat it would
be one oi tho plsosontest acts of his life
when he went up to the po'.ls today and
voted for him. These remarks elicited
Hie warmest kind of applause.
In a glowing peroration upon the prin
ciples of tbe party Mr. Harris said that
tbe Democratic party never stood upon
a prouder platform than it does in this
year. It was battling for the grand old
republic along tho same lines as Jefler
■on and .Jackson. Before cloning he re
ferred in scathing terms to tbe unmanly
and cowardly attacks which had been
made on Mrs. Kate T. Galpin.
Chairman Del Valie addressed him
■elf briefly and very eloquently to the
aspersions which had been cast upon
Mr. George S. Patton. He could speak
from more intimate knowledge as chair
man of tbe Democratic Btate convention
than almost any one else.
There never had been an act as noble
or as manly as tbe vote of the man who
gave Haa Luis Obispo's vote iv the con
vention.
That gentleman was the attorney for
the Southern Pacific Railroad company
at San Luis Obispo. The influence of
tbe corporation was brought to bear to
make him vote against Mr. Patton. He
told them that they could get any one
else they wanted for attorney, but he
would be true to his pledges, and he did
it. [Applause.]
Mr. Dal Valle went on in a ringing ad
dress upon the further effort of the rail
road to defeat Mr. Phillips for railroad
commissioner, Mr. Patton and Mr.
Meagher, and said that the corporation
had already sent money to Los Angeles
to me in defeating them.
He would not attack a railroad cor
poration as a railroad, because the city
owed its life and prosperity to railroads,
but he attacked an Institution that ex
isted to debauch American manhood
and prostitute the American voter. It
was a surprise to him that the American
people were so forgetful. There was only
one way for them to freo themselves
from this thrslldcm, and that was the
ballot box.
Then \an American king should
arise and say the privilege of his vote
was bis. and guaranteed to him by the
constitution.
Speaking with reference to the gnber
aatoriai caudidatu, tie referred to the
vile slanders upon Mr. Budd, which had
baen proved to he lies. Mr. Del Valle
also referred to Mr. Budd's record while
in tne state senate, where he personally
saw htm oppose all the forces of tbe rail
road influence with independence, man
hood and true courage.
He contrasted his record with tbat of
Mr. Estee, calling attention to bis
office-seeking proclivities of 35 years'
stauding aud his inconsistent political
record, in which he bad gone out of tbe
Republican party and burned bis bridges
behind bim. How be got back, except
through Dan Burns, Mr. Del Valle did
not know.
After indulging in a brilliant criticism
of Mr. Estas's position upon public
questions and tbe questions of peculiar
interest to the citizens of Los Angeles,
Mr. Del Valle closed with a most forci -
ble appeal to tbe people to weigh well
the real issues in the campaign aud vote
with the party that had declared itself
bo dearly, so independently and so
earnestly upon lines that wero to the
best interests of the section —tbe Demo
cratic party. Senator Del Valle also
castigated, before closing, the cowards
who had cast rsfiections upon Mrs. Gal
pin, a noble and able woman.
ROMMELL DENOUNCED.
A Uard From Dr. Howera ot Interest to
Prohibition!!.!.
Ebitor Herald:—Will you permit me
tooocupyalew lines in your valuable
journal to denounce the action of Wm.
Rommell, Prohibition candidate for
sheriff, who yesterday at Illinois hall, in
tbe presence of about 1000 people, with
drew in favor of Burr, the Republican
candidate for tbe same office. As a
Prohibitionist, I denounce such action,
and deny that Mr. Rommell baß any
authority to withdraw in favor of any
whisky caadidate, and in attempting to
do so he has outraged the feelings of his
supporters in the Prohibition party.
In the Voioe, and on ths stump, I
bave made an earnest, faithful and
conscientious fight for Mr. Rommell,
and so have Senator McComas and oth
ers, and without consulting any of ns,
kb far as I can learn, took upon himself
at tbe last moment to withdraw.
Lot every Prohibitionist who reads this
card see that neither Mr. Rommell nor
Mr. Burr gets a vote from our people.
Stephen Bowers,
Editor California Voice.
LABOR REPRESENTATIVES.
ThrT Kepudlata V. I» Ueartt's Attempt
to Control Tllfttr Votaa.
There waß a meeting hold last evening
at the rooms of tbe Jeffersonian club
which was truly representative of
tbe railroad employees of Los Angeles
city and county. There were also rep
resented the hotel and restaurant em
ployees. The gathering was called to
order by D. J. Carr, who was eleoted
chairman.
Upon motion a committee of three,
consisting of S. En Fulton, Thomas Mc-
Sweeney and L. J. Thomas, was ap
pointed to draw up suitable resolutions
regarding the effort of C. L. Heartt to
lead tbe public to believe tbat he had
thrown the vote of certain labor unions
to the Republican ticket.
The committee reported tbe following
resolutions, which were unanimously
adopted:
Resolved, That it is the ssnse of the
railway and hotel and restaurant em
ployees of the city and county of Los
Angeleß in meeting assembled:
First —That the endeavor of one Chas.
L. Heartt to convey to tbe intelligent
voters of this county the impression tbat
he controls or influences, either directly
or indirectly, even one of their suffrages,
is both lal-e and misleading. Further
more, we take this as an insult to our in
telligence, our manhood aud our citizen
ship.
We wish it distinctly understood that
all appeals, circulars or documents put
forth by the said Heartt or any of his
allies er emissaries, in the name of any
organization of laboring men is a fraud
and utterly unauthorized.
We desire to state to tbe public that
the said person, Heartt, ie not now an
officer of the American Railway union,
nor is he authorized to speak in behalf
of the hotel and restaurant employees of
this city and county. The said Heartt
was, during the strike, chairman of the
board of mediation of the American
Railway union. With the close of the
strike Baid board and its officers censed
to exist.
Second —That a copy of those resolu
tions be presented to tbo HKitAi.D with a
request tbat they be published.
After the resolutions were adopted
the statement was made tbat Mr. Heartt
had been invited to be present, but had
failed to respond to the invitation.
Tbe ticket put forth by Heartt was
printed in the interest oi McLachlan,tbe
Southern Pacific nominee for congress.
Patton at Azusa.
George S. Patton, candidate for and
next congressman from this district,
spoke at Azusa last night to the largest
crowd tbat has ever turned out to greet
any candidate of any party at any time
in Azusa district. When W. C. Cullen
of Glendora called the meeting to order
in Slaußon's hall there was not even
standing room, and at least 150 farmers
were obliged to content themselves by
waiting until the conclusion of the
meeting to greet the champion of the
taxpayers in their fight against the
Southern Pacific Railroad company.
Mr. Patton made one cf the best
speeches ever delivered in this section
of the county and handled the issues
of the day in a masterly and
convincing manner. His arraignment
of ths Southern Pacific Railroad com
pany to control the policy of the Re
publican party through the medium of
tbe candidate for congress from this
district was clear, and its echo will be
found when the ballots are counted to
night.
It was a fitting close to a campaign
which has had no equal In the history
of this district, and resulted in making
bouts of fiiende and voters for the cham
pion of the people, George S. Patton,
At the conclusion of the meeting Mr.
Patton was serenaded by the Giendora
bund and was given a teccplion by the
Azuaa and Glendora clubs ;snvil tiring,
fire works and a general whoop up
wound up tho campaign in a blaze of
glory and enthusiasm.
For a good tabic wine order our Sonoma
Zinfandel at 50c per gal. T. VacheoiCo.,
Commercial and Alameda. Tel. 300.
If yon have poor appetite, bad taste,
fool breath, use Kamarne Bitters, 50
cents per bottle.
Drink Shasta Water, Woollacott agent.
TX)S ANGELES TTETiWtLDt TUESDAY MORNING, NOVEMBER fi, 1894.
SHORT STORIES OF THE DAY.
A Husband's Ghastly Sarprise.
George Cartwright met with a ghastly
surprise on returning to his home, 115
North Rio street, yesterday afternoon.
His wife, whom he had left a couple of
hours previously, was lying dead on the
floor of a bedroom behind a looked door.
Mr. Cartwright attributes his wife's
death to natural causes, and states that
she wsb subject to heart failure. An in
vestigation will, however, be made by
Coroner Cates, as tbe circumstances are
singular.
Mr. Cartwright, who in employed in
the Santa be rolling mills, came here
with his family Irom Miles, (>., in July
last, giving up regular employment and
a nice home in tbe Buckeye state for the
promise of regular work in tbe mills
here. This he did not get, and Mrs.
Cartwright has, to neighbors, given
voice to expressions showing that she
was despondent.
The family consists of four children,
the youngest of whom is only 18 months
old, and the woman was coon to become
a mother again.
Mr. Cartwright says he left his wife at
2:30 o'clock to go to the mills; at that
time she was in the best of spirits and
was making preparations to take the
children out for a etrest car ride.
The Historical Society.
The Historical eociety held its regular
monthly meeting for November last
evening. Mr. H. D. Barrows read a
valuable historical paper entitled A
Biographical and Character Sketch of
tbe Late ex-Governor, Don Pio Pico.
Don Pio Pico was born at the San
Gabriel mission May 5, 1801, and died
in this city September I. 1804. His
life extended almost through the nine
teenth century.
Prom early manhood he took an active
Dart in the important events of Califor
nia history. He was twice governor ol
California, from 1832 to 1833, and from
February, 1845, to August. 1846, when
he was driven out of California by the
Americans. Mr. Barrows vigorously de
feuded I'io Pico against tbe charge of
issuing fraudulent land grantß. There
was no proof that he did. The cslumi
nies against him were uttered lor the
purpose of making a case against him
and some of it arose from race preju
dices. Resolutions of respect to bis
memory were adopted by the eociety.
Court Notes.
In the Peroynel divorce suit yesterday
Judge Clark ordered Mr. Peroynel not
to interfere with the wife's possession
of a certain house and to pay her $50 a
month alimony.
Jeremiah Whelan, a native of Ireland,
was admitted to citizenship yesterday
by Judge Clark.
In the estate of Mary A. Lewis Jml.ro
Clark yesterday directed D. W. Field,
resident guardian, to pay $2,500 to
Charles A. Piereon, non-resident guar
dian.
Yesterday the divorce suit of Mrs.
Gertrude Hunter vs. W. T. Hunter was
tried before Judge York behind closed
doors.
Blue Monday for Beggars.
It was a blue Monday for beggars in
Police Judge Austin's court yesterday ,
half a dozen of the give-me-the-prlce-of
a-bsd fellows being sentenced to terms
varying from 20 to 30 days in the chain
gang. One of the unfortunates who
secured the extreme penalty is a young
fellow of robust appearance who was re
leased from serving a sentence for a
similar offense only last week.
BAD NIGHT FOR SPIRITS
LIVELY TIME AT A SEsMtCE ON
BROADWAY.
The materialization Wn Untattafaoto-
Tf, Fraud Was Charged, aud
the Mttdtuui Rsfuuded
the Coin.
There was • very lively time at a
spiritualistic seance given at 707 South
Broadway last evening. The operator
was a man calling himself "Rev. Prof."
Howten, who it is said recently came
here from San Francisco. The reveren d
professor first dawned upon the epirit
ualißtio world of Los Angeles last Sun
day evening, when he gave a seance at
235 1 a South Spring street.
The manifestations at that time, so
some, particularly one or two local me
diums, say, were not satisfactory, the
spirits failing to materialize to a con~
vincicg degree. Kx-Policeman C. S.
Boone was one of those who were
dissatisfied at Sunday's meeting
and concluded that he would investigate
tho reverend professor's materializing
abilities. With this end in view Mr.
Boone last evening organized a party
composed of C. W. Riley, 11. \V. Wat
son, Jonn W. Lester, John H. Stephen
son, F. M. Hazlett, Willis Chapman,
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Merithew and
Deputy Constable Jackson. The party
went to the residence of Mrs, Dr. Good
rich, at the number stated on South
Broadway, and what happened is best
told in Mr. Boone's own words.
"My objsct," said Mr. Boone, "was to
expose the man, for at Sunday's meeting
I made up my uaind that he
was a fraud. On entering the
parlor we scattered aud did not Bit
all together. There were probably 25 or
30 people there besides ourselves and
we mixed ia with them. I tock a Beat
on a sofa near the cabinet, which was
formed of black curtains in one corner
of the room. Noar me was a man Beated
on a raised chair, whom I think was an
assistant of the medium, as I could
hear bim telegraphing during tho so
called seatice. The professor made hia
appearance after tho lights were turned
down and prodnced what ho said was
the spirit ol a cbiht whoso name in
life was Millie. No one in the
audience recognized the spirit, but I
could Bee from where I sit that it was
nothing but a piece of white cloth, that
the professor had wrapped about his
right hand and was being pushed for
ward from behind tho black curtain. I
cried 'fraud,' and jerked the curtain
down, at the same time demanding the
return of my money.
"The room was in an uproar in a mo
ment, and when the lights were turned
up the professor be nn to expostulate
and call for an officer. Mr. Jackson re
sponded, and we all demanded a return
of our money. This amounted to several
dollars, the admission boint; 50 cents.
We then left."
Fitzgerald, house and sign painter, 222
Franklin; telphone HID. Low prices.
Go to Bckstrotn, 30!) S. Main street, tor good
wall paper at tne right prica.
Woman's Work Society.
The regular monthly all-day meeting
of tbe Woman's Church Work society of
the First Congregational church will be
held today in the church parlors, begin
ning with devotional exercises, at 10:30
a, m. Reports Irom the Home Mission
ary society before lunch. Immediately
after lunch tbe Foreign Missionary so
ciety will report also. Mrs. Crawford, a
returned missionary from Mexico, will
address the ladies. During the ladies'
aid hour, from 2to 3 o'clock, two im
portant papers will be read. First—
The Needs ol Our Sunday School, by
Mrs. Don A. Judd. Second —What Can
tbe Mother Do for the School? by Mrs.
W. S. Reddell. A cordial welcome will
bo given tv all ladies.
People's Party Parade.
The People's party closed its cam
paign in tbis county last night with a
torch-light parade and speech by E. V.
Webster, its candidate for governor. The
parade was of tbe usual campaign order,
and included delegations from Cabuen
ga, Whittier, Pasadena and other out
lying towne. The line of march was
from Fifth and Main streets around tbe
plaza; Spring Btreet to Fourth street, to
Los Angeles street, where the parade
disbanded, and E. V. Webster delivered
an address on thi issues of tbe day as
viewed from tbe Populist standpoint.
W. L. Wolfe acted as grand marshal
of the parade, which was in three di
visions of about 150 voters each.
Eloped by Herself.
Mrs. Lulu Wilner, who belongs in
San Diego, when at home, had a visit to
this oity interrupted by Detective Haw
ley yesterday. Mrs. Wilner, it appears,
left the city of Baynclimate surrepti
tiously with about in coin belonging
to her husband and a horse and buggy
belonging to a livery stable keeper.
Oceanside and various way pointß were
passed without interruption, and it was
not until this city wsb reached that a
telegraphic warrant overtook the woman.
The charge is grand larceny and Mrs.
Wilner will be taken back today.
Counterfeiters Sentenced.
In the United States court yesterday
C. K. Smith, who was found guilty of
counterfeiting, was sentenced by Judge
Ross to five years' imprisonment at Fol
som and $1 fine, while Garland Baker,
who pleaded guilty to a similar charge,
was sentenced to 10 years' imprison
ment at the same penitentiary and %'i
fine.
The federal grand jury yesterday re
turned three indictments, but tbe in
dicted persons not having been arrested
their names were withheld.
A Highbinder Mulcted.
Woon vvung, one of the highbinders
arrested in the recent round-up,squared
matters with justice yesterday by plead
ing gnilty to a charge of carrying con
cealed weapons and paying a fine of $10.
lie tried to convince Police Judge Austin
tbat he carried the revolver to protect
himself from another highbinder who
had threatened bis life.
Oil Men Organize.
The oil men in the Second Btreet dis
trict have organized for tbe purpose ol
defence against the eilorts of the people
who are attempting to stop the industry.
E. T. Doheney is chairman of tbe organi
zation.
THE PUBLIC LIBRARY.
TU. Book Uomralttaa Glvaa a Slap at
the Chauranqoans.
The regular monthly meeting of the
board of direotors of the public library
met yesterday at the usual hour.
Billß to the amount of $2319 wsre ap
proved and ordered paid.
The librarian reported tbe month's
business in every department the larg
est in the history of the library—3o,2l2
books for home use, 1734 new books
added, 3832 books repaired and relabeled
in the work room, 485 new members,
making 17,511 book borrowers.
The book committee reported in refer
ence to tbe communication of the man
bgers of the Chautauqua association re
garding the Decameron, McClintock's
Song and L°gend of the Middle Ages,
the "required literature" of the course,
that Boccaccio is praised and a selection
irom bis works given, and in the May
Cbautauquau, the journal of the associ
ation, attention is especially called to
the Boccaccio without a word ol caution
aa to its trend; tho committee therefore
submit that Decameron of Boccacoto
does appear in the Chautauqua course
of reading and that it is very natural
that demand should have been made for
th c book by Chautnuquans.
TURNER MARKSMEN.
The Tvisu.lt or the Annual and Monthly
Shootine Coutes a.
The Turnverein Shooting section held
their annual and monthly medal shoots
at their range on Sunday. In the an
nual shoot the score stood as follows:
Points.
Thoo. Meyers, first 200
Joo Singer, second 192
Louis Breer, third lit I
Win. Fries, fourth 187
Iv the monthly shoot the score was :
CHAMPIONSHIP (I.ass.
Thee. Meyers 213
FIKST CLASS.
Emil Hnrrl«, first 191
CUttH. MarkShAUSeu, second ltiti
rims. Go.liner, jr., third 105
SECOND CLASS,
Frank Th'dc. first 172
Oscir Freytag, tecond IliO
John C. Hartuack was scorer.
Awarded
Highest Honors—World's Fair.
•©R;
fii vff mwaJSm.
MOST PERFECT MADE.
A pyre Grape Cre3m of Tartar Powder. Free
from Ammonia, Alum or an' • other adulterant.
40 YEARS THE STANDARD.
JUDGMENT AFFIRMED.
The Supreme fleurt I>«el<lee a, Ben Dleao
Oaee.
An opinion by the supreme court in
the esse of the Savings Bank of San
DiegO county, respondent, vs. Ann
Burns, appellant, was rsceived yester
day for filing by Deputy Clerk Sesnon.
It was an action to foreclose a mortg
age. The defendant demurred to the
complaint on the ground that the plain
tiff bad not complied with the act of
April 1, 1870, and in making the loan
had violated section 578 of the civil
code, with reference to officers of c sav
ings or loan corporation loaning or bor
rowing for themselves or agent.
The supreme court holds that tbe
court below did not err in assuming
that the act of April Ist was effectually
repealed and In sustaining the demurrer.
Also that the case was within the well
recognized exceptions to the general
rule, in regard to the violation of tbe
civil code referred to. Tho judgment iB
therefore affirmed.
G. T. Schumier, with his wife and two
children and accompanied by Mrs. VV.
Lindnke and Miss A. Bennell, arrived
yesterday from St. Paul end are at the
Westminster.
Mayor Rowan haa signed tbe ordi
nance giving police officers a hearing
before the commission before they can
be discharged from the force.
Yesterday was Counoilman Strobm's
48th birthday, and cigars were plenty
around the city hall.
DIED.
BASLBR —November 5, 1891, Mamie Basier,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. Basier, 288
East Twenty ninth street, aged 8 years and
7 months.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
' THE Jft
MAKES THE TL:STrI,OTH'£S •ivy
IN THE STATE
ft?::PER GENT LESS IM
J'IAN ANY OTHER HOUSE.
rji'fS sase ta crder from §20 IpffP?
PANTS Me to order !rra $j WW|
F!NE TAILORiNQ Mil
r MODEItA TE VRICES BJj Kit.
jfcij-nnl.'s for Belf-Memßuremontw Mfl
and Samples of Cloth Bent free
for all orders. tyr-
No. 143 S. Spring St,
LOS ANfi^T.F.R
$100. $100. $100
1894.
RAMBLER
BICYCLES
REDUCEDTOSIOO
Now is your chance to get the best Bicycle
In the world for $100.
1804 Ramblers, guaranteed for one year
againnt Saws in material and imperfections in
workmanship.
$100. $100. $100.
This price applies to such stock aa I have 011
hand, and after these (resold you can get no
more.
THOS.H.B.VARNEY
RAMBLER BICYCLES,
427 SOUTH SPRING ST.
W. IC. COWAN, Mntmjar.
L.LQNGO,
Merchant
Tailor,
209 N. MAIN, TEMPLE BLOCK.
Fine Tailoring at moderate rates. A
perfect fit guaranteed. Elegaut new
stock to select from. Satisfaction war.
ranted.
Fine Workmanship.
Moderate Prices.
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
9-27 cod lim
AMUSKMNNTS. .w*<w.
GRANI) TOBUIitiAN MI.IDK,
131 8. Broadway, bet. first & Second sts.
SOMETHING NEW!
IHIB WEEK ONLY.
The Popular Military Band.
Celebrated Colored Quartette.
KenoAvued Trapeze Performers
Everybody invited. Admission free.
J O CENTS.
nIKBSNU THEATKIt.
13 Slain street, between Fifth and Sixth.
Fbkd A. Coupek, Manager.
"With malice toward none,with charity for all"
WEEK OF NOV. 5. MATINEE SATURDAY.
First time on the Pacific Coast of
ABRAHAM LINCOLN,
A National Historical P ! ay, replete with Tab
leuux and Allegorical Pictures.
-'.'OO PEOPLE ON THE STAGE.—
No Advance iv Prices:
13, 20 and 30 cents. Box teats, 50 and 75 cents
Next Week-
First appoarance this season of
JJARRKL VINTON AND DOT RO3BMOKE.
J. T. SHEWARD
TN LOOKING OVER the different stocks that are hav
ing a large trade we find a lot of goods that have been
neglected and are not selling as rapidly as they should.
There is only one way to sell them and that is to reduce
the price to extreme low figures and make them sell. We
ran across a little lot of fine felt hats for ladies. The price
has been from $j to $3. The price to close is 25c. They
will all go in one or-two days. The styles are good. They
are odds and ends, and it is the odds and ends that make
other goods unsaleable. Every department is contributing
its quota of odd lots and there are at the present time great
bargains in store for everybody. We are closing out every
thing in odd lots and a great many of these articles are first
class in every respect. Cloakings that have been $3.50 a
yard now $2.50. Children's hats that have been $1 now
25c. Ladies' vests that are worth 50c now 33 Jyi c. Pou
pons, wash embroidery etching and filo silks at one-half the
usual price. The big sale of dress goods still continues.
There has been the largest dress goods trade in this house
this season we have ever done. We are closing the choice
of 300 pieces all wool dress goods for 75c a yard. The
former price was from $1 to $2 a yard. They are the best
dress goods bargains ever offered in this city. The laige
sales in the dress goods department continue to increase.
Special bargains are offered in tbe cloak department. We
are showing excellent goods and styles at about one half
the regular price. Just a few odd sizes that are good, sale
able goods, but too many of a kind in the sizes. We are
showing new goods in every department. As fast as the
old goes out the new comes in. The stocks throughout the
house are looking brighter and better in every way. Every
fur cape in the house is new this sessou. Every pair of kid
gloves is new. The goods are better for it. We are show
ing the best jersey ribbed fleeced lined vest you ever saw
for 50c. Drawers to match. Trade is on the increase. Each
week swells the total to big proportions. We cut, fit and
baste capes free. We sell the Royal Worcester corset. We
sell the Butterick patterns. We are doing the live business
of this city. We are largely increasing trade. One of the
few houses that does not complain of dull times. We have
no reason to complain. On the contrary we have reason to
feel good over the large increase in business.
HOTELS AMD KESOHTS.
C\ 420 s- maw st.. cob. winston. rooms by day
JIU 1 1 vfJ y\ llill Ij\J o; week. .Elegantly furnished. Baths free. First-class.
Prices reasonable. MRS. H. F. DAVIS, I'rop.
Ilf ITI 1 ! ADC VT Tj l CENTRALLY LOOATKD. OLIVE AND BBCON'I STS.
XX V_/ X Sid LA 1 \ 1 Vj Ij Day boarders. Rooms elegantly ftir.ilshed. Ail mod
ern'conveniences. Table cannot beßurpapsed. Terms reasonable. D. K. BARTON, Prop.
TX/"k r r , XT ( T T TXTf'/'lI "XT SECOND AND HILL—FAMILY HOTEL. APPOINT
Xl \t 1. I jLa \J\ /X->l> ments perfect; electric c .'s t j all oointss.
THO- 1 . PABCOE. Proprietor,
TJiITt , T (\T> I? *it> west sixth st., opp. central park.
JX V/A JI/Xj JVV^ioOifXV/ IXSIi First-duns family and tourist accommodations.
Board by day or week. Terms reasonable, ti. R. KELLY, Prop.
XXOTXT 1 T 1) A MIIV A r0& - S PRINU AND THIRD BTS,, LOS ANGELES, GAL
XiU 1 JViVIVI Ull 1\ European plan. Greatest frontage southeast. New
mniasement: renovated; refilled; refurnished. Rates mode-ate. F. B. MaLLQRY. Prop.
DTjT A/frtxrnr TJYVrLrT BBAUTIFOLLY FURNISHED X0 > M 4, SINGLH or
nPj I j "ifH fHI X XXV/X XL/lj eu suite; fall of light an<l sunshl'...; prices that suit
the hard times; no trouble to show room-; rooms with or without 425 Temple st.
A Pf' AHf A SANTA MONICA. SOOTHERS 0 tLIFORSIA'3
AIV/ Xijlj xAIIVjiVL/lil famous summer and winter resort. Offers BPBCtAf
reduced rates for the neyt GO days. The matchless reputation of tbe table will be main
talned. Snrf bathing, delightful Hot salt water baths a special feature. 35 minutes' ride front
Los Angeles. Visitors will ba shown over the house, and suitable rcdnc ion in rates quoted.
S. REIN HART, Proprietor.
rp Irl •< Tjr/T"ii'iXTrir. TXYITIVT REDONDO, CAL. THE MOiT POPU
JXI iJ IV I \ IJ' /X™ U\ I 11' / X Tjlj lnr winter resort on the cons'. Acces
sible by trains of ihe Southern California nnd Redundo Railwoyn 40 minutes' ride from LoS
A Dge : es. Every room an out-ide one, Sunny and bright. Excellent table. Billiard parlors-
Dancing room aud tenm-ooun. Hot salt water swimming and plunge baths near hotel. Fine
□shin? Irom the wharf. Free iran-.portation to aud from Los Angeles to weekly or monthly
guests. For description and illustrated books and rates appy to
D. O'NEILL,
Redondo Hotel, Bsautsao Beach, CaL
Or to CITY OFFICE REDONDO RAILWAY,
Bradbury Block, Loc Angeles.
KNIGHT'S HOTEL,
JL JsV. Bear Valley Summer Resort, San Bernardino Co., Cai
RATES SlO PER WEEK.
The finest trout fishing in the state. A fine trail has Just been completed from the
hotel to B fir Creek, the paradi.o for trout fishers. Bieva.ion 0700 feet. Boats, saddle
horses and bu-rt.s for hire st tbe hotel at reasonable rates. Coach leavei New St. Charles
Eotel, ban Bernardino, Tattdays and Fridays at 5 a.m. Fare S9 for tho round trip.
Tickets for tale at Santa Fe ticket orhoes, Loj Angeles and San Bernardino.
For full particulars address
§m *» GUS KNIGHT, Jr., Prop., Pine Lake, CaL
THE HOLLENBECK • 1
B st Appointed Hotel in --^S^^eto
Los Angeles. .«^^^^^^^^^^»|
American anil Kuropeau Plain, 'iN :-'r f- V.''tiii4io^S
Central Location. fs*l&r f&
First-class s< rviee. J
Reasonable Kates. "
Finest Gtfe in the City
A. C. BILiCKE & CO,
10-7 dm PROPRIETORS. *
NEW LOS ANOKLES THKATKK.
Under direction of Al ll.ivx.ts.
H. C. Wyatt Manager
THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY,
November Bth, 9th and 10th.
MATINEE SATURDAY.
The Queen ol Soubicttos, Swoet Oollcen,
KATIE ® ® ® ®
EM JM ETT, 1,1 lr
• : : : KITTIB
Iv Her Ever Green Urama,
%kiLLARNEY%
The Best Irish Drama of the Century.
An admixture of .
Genuine I'athcs, Quaint Irish Humor,
Devilish Villainy, Heroic Chivaliy.
cast. Scenicilly gorgeous.
Rpru! Unices- (1, 75, 50 aud 25c.
Seats i.uw* ou Ble.
Tll.H.iA I'nNCKiiT lIAI.Ii,
323 325 Downey blk, N. Main st.
ADMISSION FREE.
Come and Hear
JOHN MULLIGAN,
The IriHh cowed in v iv his tjreat specialties.
MISS CARRIE LINTON,
Tho clever aoubreUe —'I be Uonsless Wonder,
MILLIE EMORY.
The Eccentric Come- The American Nlght
aiau, lr>g%l#,
BILLY MORTON. Kiss GENEVA HAZELTCN
Concert from 7:30 to 12. Change of pro
grsmme every wees.
N. B.—Closed Sundays. tl
AMUSEMENTS).
UNIT*" CUUKOUr~ "
Cor. Third and Bill St!
TWO APPEARANCES ONLY.
LIEN.LEW WALLACE
Author ol "Ben Hur," "Prince of India"
and "Fair God."
FRIDAY EVENING, Nov. 9, 1894,
Subject:
The Army oftte Tennessee
SATURDAY EVENING, Nov. 10, 189*.
Subject:
How I CamcfW rite Beo Hur
Reserved s*>ats on Bale at the A. W, Berry*
Stationery Co., 120 S. spring street, from 9 a.m.
until 9 p.m.
Bubsui in ion tickets can now ba exchanged.
1 ti;:es sjil, To aud £.00.
NEW VIK JIN \ ItITKi'KT, - "
111-110 Court st.
F. KERKOW, Prop.
I.AST WEEK OF
MISS JULIA WINCHELL,
Formorly of tile Winchell Twin Sister
iv he! bouquet of i.ougs aud dances.
First Week and Great Succeis of
LONG AND ROSA,
German Sketch Artists, ami Warm Receptior ur
j A . W. H U L_ ME,
The Celebrated Baritone.
Berth Family Orchestra
Concert every evening from 7: JO until li,
aud Saturday matinee Irom 1 to 4 p.m.
£10?"°Fine 0 immercial lunch. Finest c» s*
auu meals a la OMt* atall horns.
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