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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, December 13, 1894, Image 9

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1894-12-13/ed-1/seq-9/

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FINaCIAI..
PACIFC LOAN~OOMANY,
(IN CO yo RATED),
Loans mors* in any amount on all
kinds of -/lateral securities, dia
monds, wcl.y, sealskins, mer
chandise, etc. Also on pianos,
iron ant'steel aale«, without re
moval, Partial payments re
ceived. Monoy quick. Business
confidstial. I'rivato otlleo for
ladies.
. n„ , „ Duo ROOT, Manager,
9-29 ly RQQtS 2, 3and 4, 114 S. Spring at.
EfOXKY TO LOAN ON DIAMONDS.
I*l watcnes, jwelry sealskins, etc.; also on
pianos, merchodlse, Iron and steel sales fur
niture In lodglg houses, hoarding houses and
hote.s wlthouremoval; alsoon city and coun
try proporty; ow interest; can have money at
once; busineS confidential: private office for
ladiss. GEO 8. ROBINSON, 233 W. First St..
rooms 2 and i. 12.2'j
UNION L<AN
on all kinds of collateral security,
watches, dassonds. jewelry, sealskins, and
lurolture D lo 'ging snd bearding housos, and
tv: Pianos rithout removal; orivato officef or
ladles r »om 112; business confidential.
CLARE a, MAW, manager, rooms 111 and
112 Stimson block. 11-lm
TO LOAN
SI,OOOILow rates.
2 000 1 Small expanses,
3,000 fNo delay.
10,000 J
30,000, more or less.
_12-ittf M. F. ODEA, 103 S. Broadway.
CITIZENS' INVESTMENT CO.,
224 S. Broadway,
Block and bond brokers; loans, mortgages, se
curltleH and Divestments; collections made,
taxetpiid and property managed lor nou-rrsi
dents orothers. 11-29tf
IJOINJIENTER ,t WADSWORTH,
JT 305 W. Second St., buy and sell mortgages
stocks, bonds and any good securities; ii you
wish to lond or borrow or Invest ill real estate,
cull on us; collections made and property
managed for non-residents. 28tf
ONEY To LOAN ON DIAMONDS, JKW
elry, watches, pianos, sealskins, live stock,
carriages, bicycles, and ull kinds of personal
and eollateralsccurlty. LEE BROS..
2-18 ly 402 8. Spring st,
T\yf ON E Y;TO LOAN—SEVERAL SUMS; LA ROE
jvs 0-i.u small amounts to lean on city prop
erty at lowest ratea, aud quickly. M. F.
ODEA, 103 8. Broadway. 12-8 tf
"THO LOAN — $00,000 ON REAL ESTATE
L saourtty, and low rates of interest, city or
country. Come and see us. ERASER ft JEN
KINS, 132 S. Broadway. 11-20 tf
tpO LOAN— UNLIMITED AMOUNT FOR
L small loans; no commissions; light ex
pense. SECURITY LOAN AND TRUST CO.,
223 fi. Spring st. 2-11-95
ONEY TO LOAN ON ~ MORTGAGE] IN
sums of $1000 lo $'00,000; no charge for
examine! on of property or title. 426 S. Main
St. MAIN Bl'ltifET SAVINGS BANK. 11-13tf
WANTED— 935,000 WORTH OF CHATTEL,
crop and small mortgages. SNEDEKER,
room 1. German American Bank building, cor.
Eirst and Main sts.
MONEY TO LOAN ATti PER CENT: RENT
ers' Co-operative Investment Co., F. 11.
TRUE, general agent, 205 W. Third st. lm
rpo I.OAN-fSO.OOO ON CITY PROPERTY
J. In amounts from $350 up RENFRO,
REEVES A CO., 213 a Spring. 24
rpO LOA>L—MONEY IN SUMS TO BDIT AT
J ressonalde rates. WM. F. ROSBYSIIELL,
116 8. Broadway tf
T~^d~LoA N—MONKV ON PERSONAL SECU
rity. JOHN L. PAVKOVICII, 220 West
First. --■ 28 tf
ONEY TO LOAN—LOWEST RATES. BAR
LOW A SHERWOOD, 123 South Broad
way. 11-25 tf
MONEY TO LOAN IN SUMS TO SUIT-SEE
F. A. HUTCHINSON, 213 W. First streeb
12-17
ON EY TO LOAN IN SUMS TO SUIT.
SMITH A O'BRIEN, 147 S, Broadway.
tf
rpo LOAN—S2O,OOO IN SUMS TO SUIT - OF
1 9500 and up. L. C. COOK, 353 S. Main. 25
rpo LOAN—9IOO ~rO~9100AH>0; "ii TO 8
I net. 320 W. First St. 6 5 tf
M'~ONEY TO LOAN IN SUMS TO SUIT.
22D W. First sU
rpo LOAN—MONEY ON PERSONAL NOTES.
J. 220 West First. 28 tf
A TTO ON UTS. AT-I. A vv.
6i«rvvriiiT ; cirELL-^
California courts. Entrance, room 9, Herman
American Bank bldg, cor. First and Main sts.
HENEY A CRONIN—N. W. COR FRANk"
lin and New High sts., Ix>s Angeles. Rooms
12, 111, 14, Abstract and Title Insurance block.
ECK A Fo 1 .!•:V, ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
8 and 9 Moore M L. 110 Court at. 521 95
JV. lIANNON,"ATTORNEY-AT-I.AW, i'ARM
• ers A Merchants hnk bid. rooms 4-5. 16
1* js E. BACON, ROOM
\% 1, 310bj N. Main st. 13
WW. HOLCOMB—ADVICE FREE ON ALL
• legal matters. 211 West First street.
\\T h7sHINN, LAWYER, ROOMS 205 TO
II ■ 208, Wilson block, cor. First and Spring.
CIARTER A PIERCE, LAWYERS, OFFICES
I 35 lo 38 Bryson block, Los Angeles. 8-10-tf
U~~ s7II6uSE7XTT6RWY7Af-LAW'. 115 W.
• First st. Collections promptly attended to.
hTMARTInTCaWYER AND
• 189 N. Spring st , Los Angeles, Cal. 16
f! HE NMI NG, ATTORNEY AT LAW"
« Rooms 00 and 67, Bryson block.
PROF. J. H. SMITH'S PATENT HORSE
shoes are doing great work on horses; we
guarantee to cine all lameness in horses' feet
or ask no pay; we have treated a large number
of horses that were thought incurable, and in
every case were successful; this patent is for
sale ac shop, county cud state rights; any
horse shoer can operate thesn shoes as well as
f can, when they buy the right; bring your
lame horses aud have thcin examined irce; re
member, it costs you nothing where no benefit
ts received. PROF. J. 11. SMITH, specialist of
horses fcct,74S & Main St., or P. O. box 700.
]^OFOOfrN6 _ "HORSE-lIO"RsFs SHOD AC-
Isl cording to nature nnd agreeable to nr'.
Shoes made for all diseasos of the feet. GOOD
WIN'S SHOEING SHOP, 261 S. Los Angeles
street. 11-17 tf
TKNTH, OOPYKIGUTN. ETC,
1} A TENTS FOR IN VENTIONBINALL COvS
. trios obtained, bought and sold. Trade
marks copyrights, etc., by S. J. DAY A CO.,
patent attorneys, rooms 333-338 Bradbury
building, Los Angeles Established 1849. 1.2811
HAZARD St TOWNSEND, 9 DOWNEY
block. Tel 347, Los Angelea 11-21 tf
KN IGHtTjR OS., I'A T BNT LA WYE R8 AN I)
jo I Icitort. HQS Stlni son block. Est. 1843. 1
DKK-IMMAKIISn.
i^XiiTTcs^LiATTiKrr^
JLf ilt'.ing dresses call at 134 8. Main st.
Dressea made from $4 up. MRS. STOLTEN
HEKG-WOLTER.
tea 'j
HOOKS.
TjA oiiß
Al and rare bpokj. Stationery and school
s,lpplics FoWLKR St COLWJ'II.L. IISW. 2d.
MINTILs.
WOOD. IRON AND (SLATE MANTELS: FINE
cabinet ware to order; hard wood Dim
ber. M. BOURMAN, 514 S. Spring St.; Tel
368. lm
NCIIHKKIIiS.
IpRIOD~HYNER HAsToRNAMENTAL AND
1 deciduous fruit trees, large variety. 213 W.
Fourth at Fall or write,
Stockholders' Meetiuir,
NOTICE 18 HEBE BY GIVEN THAT TIIE
regular annual meeting oi the stockhold
ers of'ihe National Bank of California, at Los
Angeles, will bo held at the banking oilico of
saiil corporation, on the northeast corner of
Second and Spring stroets, in tho city of Los
Angoios. on Tuesday, the Bth day of January,
lfcOo, between tho hours of 1 and :i o'clock
P In. o[ said day, for the purpose of electing a
boa rd of directors for the ensuing year and tho
trailsnction of such other business as may be
brought beloie the meeting.
A. HADLEY, Cashier.
D'eeraber 7, 1894. 1-8
Notice to Creditors.
TESTATE OF MAP.IIi BEGON. DECEASED.
<A 3 Noilce is hereby given by the undersigned,
Jeanne L, tleantltl executrix of the estate of
Mario B'gon, deceased, to thecroditors of and
all persins having claims against said de
ceased, U exhibit the same, with the necessary
vouchers within four months aitci tho tirst
publieathu <,f n,| fl notice, to the said eXCCtI-
L rlX uJ.{ J-' v lh<J office of Cole & Cole, room 0,
No. 23- N.Main Ot- in the city of Los Angeles,
en mty of ,os Angeles, state of California, the
same boll* the place for the transaction of
business okuid estate:
Dated thiiim, day oi December, A. D. 1894.
JEANNE OEANTIT,
Execuirlx o tbe estate o! Marie Bogon, de
ceased.
CCL» * C|>4 x12 . 1a , auti 4l
tJOUTHERN CALI/OKNIA RAILWAY—
O (Santa Fa Rout*).
IN EFFECT NOV2HBKR 4, 1894.
Trains leave and are d ah to arrive at Los An
geles (La Grande gtatlon) {first street
ana Santa Fe avtuuj.
Leave fori LOB ANtjlOLSrl - , Arr. from
0:00 pm' Chicago Limited 9:35 am
7:()0aml Overland Express o:3opm
8:16 am . .Ssn Diego Coast Line.. *' :18 pin
•4 ISO pm . .Ban Diego Coast Line.. 0 :48 pm
7:ooam .....San Bernardino 0:35 am
fl :00 am , *9 :55 am
•4:00 pm v ' a '1:85 pm
5:00 pm Pasadena 0:30 pm
7:00 am Riverside I *1:35 pm
!) :00 am via San Bernardino... 0:30 pm
•n:ihi am Riverside & Ran Bernar-I 10:15 am
4;2opm BUM via Orange \ 6 :15 pm
•11:00 am Redlands & Mentone via 10:15 am
4:2opm ..Orangeaud Riverside..| *6:4spia
7:ooam ...Redlands, Mentone...] fl*:3sam
9:00 am and *0:55 am
•4:00 pm Highlands 1 •1:35 pm
5:00 pm via Pasadena I 0:30 pm
7:ooam Monrovia, Azusa '7:35 am
0:00 am B :50 am
1:35 pm f0:35 am
•4:00 pra and *9:55 am
f5:00 pm •1:35 pm
5:30 pm 3:55 pm
0:50pm,.. In termed late Station!.. 0: 30 pm
7:00 am Paaadena I *7:35 am
0:00 am Pasadeua 8:50 am
1:35 pm Pasadeua 9:35 am
•4:00 pm Pasadena *9:55 am
5:00 pm • Pasadena *1:35 pm
•s:3opm Pasadena 3:55pm
0:50 pm Pasadena 6:30 pm
S:lsam Santa Ana 8:48 am
•2:oopm Santa Ana 'I:lspm
4:2opm SautiAna 8:45 pm
7:52 am Santa Monica I 0:45 am
10:15 am| Santa Monica 3:45 pm
4:4spm| SantaMonlca \ B:34pm
10:00 ami Redondo I B:29am
■1.15 pm Redondo..- 3:45 pm
*7:00 am Ban Jacinto,via Pasadena •! :35 pm
•9 :00 am San Jacinto,via Pasadena '0:30 pm
•11:00amiHan Jacinto, via orange -0:45 pm
"9:ooam Temeoula, via Pasadena 'I:3spm
•11:00 am ...Temecula, via Orange
*S.TS am, gscoudldo.vla Coast Line 1:10 pm
$4 :20pm lEsoondldo.vla Coast Line
* Daily except Sunday, t Sunday oniy. v)3at
urdsy only. All other trains daily.
Trains via Pasadeua line arrive at Downey
avenue station seveu minutes earlier and leave
seven minutes later.
Palace vestlbuled sleepers, unholstered tour
ist cars, through to Kansas City and Chicago
daily. Personally conducted excursions to
Boston svery Thursday. For rates, sloeping-cu
reservations, etc., call on or address
E. W. M'''EE.
City Passenger snd Ticket Agent. 129 North
Spring street, and Ls Orande station, Los
Augeies.
H. G. THOMPSON, General Passenger Agent
gOUTHERN PACIFIO COMPANY.
TIMK TABLE-NOVEMBER 1. 1894.
Leave lor Destination. Arrive.
Friday, ) "Bunaet Limited". I Saturday,
4:ooam . ..New Orleans.... I 6:10p.m
Saturday, j j Friday,
6:4op.tn San Francisco... i _ 3:20 a. m
2:00 p. nij sau Fran A Sacram'to 7 :30 im
7:4sp.mBau Frau A SecramTo 1 1:48 p.m
2:00 p.m Ogden A East, 2d class 7:30 a.m
7:45 p. m Ogden A East, Ist class 1 :48 pm
7:45 p.ml Portland, Ore 7:30 a.m
S:Boa.in .. .El Paso aud East... 7:00 p.m
8:30 a.m.. .Demlng and East.., "no p.m
8:30 a, m Banning 7:00p.m
Redlands 19)23 a.m
8:30a.m Redlands Al0:10a.m
10:30 a.m Redlands 4:58 p.m
4.1)0 p.m Redlands 7:00 p.m
Colton 59:23 a.m
8:30 a.m Colton Al0:10a.m
10:30 a.m Colton 4:58 p.m
4:30 p.m Colton 7:00 p.m
Riverrlde 89:23a.m
8:30 a.m Riverside Al0:10am
10:30a.m Riverside 4:58p.m
4:30 p.m Riverside I 7:0(1 p.m
Ban Bernardino.... i 59:23 a.m
8:30 a.m San Bernardino.... AlOUOs.in
10:30 a.m San Bernardino 4:58 p.m
4:30 p.m San Bernardino. . 7:00 p.m
Chino AS:soa.m
8:B0a.m Chino 59:23 a.m
4:30 p.m Chino AlO-.10a.m
A5:25p.m Chiuu 4:58 p.m
8:50 a.m Monrovia 8:20 a.m
A2:lspm Monrovia .tl2.tsa.iu
5:15p.m Monrovia 4:45 p.m
7:30a.m Santa Barbara 1:48p.m
2;O0 p.m Santa Barbara 8;35p.m
A9:52a.m Santa Ana A Anaheim 9:05 a.m
5:10 pm Santa Ana A Anaheim A4:osp m
4:52 p.ml Tuuln 8:43 a m
A9:4oa.m Whittier B:43am
4:52 p.m Whittier Al:4sp.m
9:25 a.m Long B'ch £ S»u Pedro 8:15 a m
12:50 p.n. Long B'ch A Ban Pedro 11:54a.m
5:00 p.m l.oug B'ch A San Pedro 4:15 p.m
9:30 a.m Santa Monica 8:00 a.m
ltlop.n, SantaMonlca 8:51 a.m
5:15 p.m! ... Santa Monica 12:12 pm
(125 p.in Santa Monica 4:2lpm
9:30 a.mi Soldiers' Home [ B:slam
0:35 p.m Soldiers' Home 4:21 p.m
9:30 a.m i Fort Los Angeles) 12:12 p.m
< and S 4:21 p.m
1:10pm (North, Beach Stat'n)
{Chats worth Park. 1
Trains start from I As:3op.m
River station (San [
Fernando nt.) only. J
sSundays only. ASundays excepted. All other
trains dally.
U ATA LIN A ISLAND.
Leave. Arcade Depot! Arrive.
Monday 11:54 a. m
9:25 a.m Wednefcday
Thursday 11:54 o.m
9:25 a.m Baturday
All of the seaside and local Interior trains
stop at the new Btation. corner of Fltit and
Alameda streets. Take Boyle Heights cable
cars.
pACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO.
Qoodall, Perkins & Co., General Agents, Ban
Frauoisco.
Northern routes embrace lines for Portland,
Ore., Victoria, B. C, and Puget Sound; Alaska
and all coast points.
SOUTHERN ROUTES.
TIME TABLE FOR DECEMBER, 1894,
LEAVE SAN FRANCISCO.
' Foe
Port Harford S. 8. Pomona, Dec. S, 17, 26;
Santa Barbara Jan. 4,
Redondo
l'ort Los Angeles . 8. 8. Santa Rosa, Dec, 4, 13,
Newport 22, 31; Jan. 9.
San Diego
' Foi— 8. 8. Coos Bay, Dec. 6, 15
East Son Pedro,... 24; Jan. 2.
San Pcdroaud way S. S. Eureka, Dec. 2, 11, 20,
ports 29: Jan. 7.
LEAVE COST LOS ANQEI.KS AND REDONDO.
For- 8. s. SantiTßosaTileoTß, 15,
24; Jan. 2.
San Diego s. 8. Pomona, Deo. 1,10, 19,
28: Jan. 8.
For- 18. S. Santa ttosa7Dec7"B,"T7^
San Francisco | 26: Jan. 4.
PortHarlord 3. S. Pomona, Dec. 3,12, 21,
Santa Barbara 1 30; Jan. 8.
LEAVE SAN PKDKO ANO EAST SAN PEDBQ.
For— iS S. ttureka, Deo. 5, 14, 23;
San Francisco Jan. 1.
and 18, 8. Coos Bay, Dec, 9, 18,
way ports. ..... ) 37: Jan. 5.
Oars to eenneet with steamers via Sam Pedro
leave 8. P. B, R. (Aroade depot) at 5 p. m., and
Terminal R R. depot at 5:15 p. m.
Cars to connect via Redondo leave Santa Fa
depot at 10 a.tja,, or from Kedondo railway
depot at 9 am.
Cars to counect via Port Los Angeles leave 8.
P. R. R. depot at 1:10 p. m. for steamers north
faiin.fi
Plans of steamers' cabins at agent's office,
Where berths may be secured.
Tho company reserves the rlcht to change
the steamer or their days of sailing.
JEflF~For passage or freight as above or lot
Sckeis to and from all important points in
arena, apply to
W. PARRIB, Agent
(Mac, No. 134 W, Bscoud St., Los Angelas.
Compignie Gonerale Transatlantic
FRENCH LINE TO HAVRE,
CtOMPANY'S PIER (NEW) NO. 42 NORTH
' river, foot of Morton n., New York.
Travelers by this line avoid both travel by
EngllHh railway and the discomfortoof. f cross
ing the channel lv a small boat.
La "retsgne. December 1.
La Bourgogne, December 8.
La.Champagne, December 15.
La Nortuaudic, December 22.
La Bretagne, December 29.
Latiascogne, January 6.
New York to Alexandria, Kgypt, via Paris,
first-class $100, second-class $110.
For Irelght or passage apply lo
A. FORGET, Agent,
No. 2 Bowling Green, New York.
J. F. FUOA/.I & CO., agents, 5 Montgomery
aye., San Francisco. Branch office, 19 Mont
gomery st. Tickets are, for sale by all ralfeoad
and steamship oiaeei, t
LOS ANGELES ITERALITj THTTKSPAY MOR-NTNT?, DECEMBER 13. 1894.
Los Aogeles Terminal R'y
IN EFFECT MONDAY, SEPT. 24, 1894.
Los Angeles depots: Bast end First st. aud
Downey avo. bridges.
Leave Los Auiceiesior Leave Pasadena lor
Pasadeua. Los Angeles.
1 0:35 am t 7:15 a,m
• 7:10 a.m • 8:05 a.m
• 8:00 a.m ■ 0:05 a.m
• 9:00 a.m •10:38 a.m
•10: HO a.rn •12:80 p.m
•12:25 p.in * 1:45 p.m
• 1:40 p.m * 3:05 p.m
• 3:00 p.m * 4;05 p.m
• 4:00 p.m • 5:25 p.m
• 5:20 p.m • 7:05 p.m
• 0:20 p.m * 8:05 p.m
111:30 p m 112:18 a.m
I 9 :30 p.m 110:15 p.m
Downey aveu ue leaving time. 7 minute- tat^r.
Leave Loa Angeles foi Leave Altadena June-
Altadena Junction. tion for Loa Augeies.
• 9:00 a.m *10:10 a.m
110:30 a.m 112:00 m
• 1:40 p.m • 2:40 p.m
. 4:00 p.m « 8:00 p.m
All trains siart Irom Kirn st. ueriot
Leave Los Augeies foi Leave Glendaie for Lob
Glendale. Angeles.
f 0:40 a.m I t 7:26 a.m
) 8:15 a.m I 9:12 a.m
112:30 p.m I 1:30 p. m
• 8:25 p m ) ♦ 0:13 cm
Leave Los Angeles for Leaves East Ban I'edro
Long Beach and East for
Ban Pedro. Los Augeies.
t 7:25 a.m
• 9:55 a.m 1 7:50 am
J 1:05 p.m 112:20 a.m
t 5:15 p.m t 3:40 p.m
i 6:00 p.m 1 4:15 p.m
Between Eait Han Pedro and Long Beach 10
minutes.
~ KUBIO CAN YON AND ECHO MOUNTAIN
Traius leave Los Angeles at 9 a.m., 1:40 nnd
4 p.m. daily, and 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m., 1 .10 p.m.
and 4p.m. Sundays.
Flnp pavilion and hotel. Grand scenery.
•Dallr. tCally except Banders, (Sundays
Stages the a a. m. and 12:25 c. m. trains
alt Pasadena for Mt. Wilson on new trail.
Passengers lesvlng Loa Augeies on tbe 9a.
as. train for Mt. Wilson can return same dcv.
Special rates to excursion and picnic partiea
Depots cast end of First St. and Downey ays.
bridges.
City tloket office at A. B. Greenwald's etgsil
gtore, corner First and Spring sts.
Saasral offices: First st. depot.
T. B. BUB-NKTT, General Maaager. I
W. WINOtjP, Gen. Passsager Art
Mt. Lowe Railway
FOR TIME TABLE SEE LOi ANGELES
TERMINAL RAILWAY.
Kedondo Railway
NO. 13-IN EFFECT 5 A. M., FRIDAY
OCT. 12, 1894.
Lob Angeles Depot: corner Grand avenue
aud jsflerson street. Take Grand avenue cah'e
or Main street aud Agricultural Park horse csra
Traius leave Trains leave
Los Angeles Redondo
for Redondo. for Los Angelea
9:05 a.m. dally 7:30 a.m. daily
1:35 p.m. dally 10:30 a.m. dsily
0:30 p.m. dally 4:10 p.m. daily
•8:05 a.m. '0:45 a.m.
•Saturdays and Sundays only.
For rates on freight aud passengers apply at
room 432 Bradbury building, corner Third and
Broadway ('Pnone 1564), or at depot, corner
Grand avenue and Jefferson st. ('Phone No. 1
West).
D. MrFARLAND, President
J. N. BUTTON, Superlnteudect,
Proposals for Supplies for the Whit
tier State school.
In pursuance of the motion of tho board of
trustees of the Whittier State school, sealed
proposals will be received by tho superintend
ent of said school, at his ofliee, in Whittier,
Los Angeles county, California, up to 12
o'clock m., Saturday, December 15th, 1894, for
furnishing the following supplies to the said
school for the year 1895:
Said supplies to consist of
1. Co/fee; tea, syrup, lice, etc
2. Canmd goods.
3 (Irocerics.
4. Butt'T. eggs, cheese and yeast,
5. Salt fish, lard and pork.
0. Flour and inerl.
7. Barley, bran middlings, etc,
8. Beans, potatoes, etc,
0. Beef, mutton and pork.
10. Gasoline and coal oil.
11. Wood nnd coal.
12. Flannel, casslincre and blankets.
13. Crockery and Glassware.
14. Leather and shoe lindlngs,
15. Brooms and brushes.
10. Caps Hiul hats.
17. Furniture and mattresses.
18. Ice.
19. Drugs.
90. Stationery.
All parties or iirms desiring tn bid will ad
dress Superintendent of tho Whittier State
school, Wnittier, CaL, for terms and specifica
tions and blank forms.
In order to preserve uniformity and to facili
tate the award it has been resolved to receive
no bids unless made upon blank forms furn
ished by the superintendent.
The number of class bid for should he plainly
marked on outsido of envelope containing bid.
ANDREW MULLEN, President.
FRANCIS L. HAYNES,
W. 0. PATTERSON. 15
United Status Land office, j
Los Anuei.es. CaL, Nov. 27, 1894. j
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN :—NOTICE IS
hereby given that the Southern Pacific
Railroad company (Main Line), has filed in
this office a list of lands situated in the town
ships described below, and has applied for a
patent for said lands; that the list is open to
the public, for Inspection, and a copy ther. of,
by descriptive subdivisions, has been posted
in a convenient place in this office for the in
spection of all persons interested, and the
public geitrrally.
Within the next sixty days, following flic
date of this notice, protests or contests against
the claim of the company to any tract or sub
division described in the list, on tho ground
that the same is more valuable for mineral
than agricultural purposes, will bo received
and noted lor report to the General Land Office
at Washington, D. C.,to wit:
Supplemental List 22.
List No. 34. Selections made October 3,
1887.
Township 11 N., Range 23 W„ 8. B. M.
Township 12 N., Rauae 19 W., S. B. M.
Township 12 N., Range 23 W., S. B. M.
T. J. 801/ TON, Register.
S-lOt ENOCH KNIGHT, Receiver.
IJROPOSALS FOR FRAME HOSPITAL
. building—U. 8. Indian Industrial School,
Ferris, CaL, November 30, 1894. Scaled pro
posals, endorsed: "Propo«als for Building,"
and addressed to the undersigned at Perris,
Ont., will be received nt this school until 1
o'cluck p. m. of Friday, December 28, 1894, for
furnishing the necessary materials and labor
and erecting and completing on tho site se
lected, at this school, one two-story frame
hospital building, as per the pltns and specifi
cations, which may be examined at the ofliee
of the Herald of Los Angeles, CaL, and at this
school.
The attention of bidders Is invited to the
act of congress approved August 1, 1892, en
titled: ''An act relating to tho limitation of
the hours of daily service of laborers and me
chanics employed upon the public works ol
the United States and of the District of Co
lumbia;" also "An act for tho protection of
persons furnishing material and labor for the
construction of public worts," approved Au
gust 13, 1894.
The right is reserved to reject any or all bids
or any part of any bid if deemed for the best
interests of the service.
Bidders will state in their bids the length of
time required in tho construction of the
building.
CERTIFIED CHECKS.
Each bid must he accompanied by a certified
check or draft upon some United States de
pository or solvent national bank in the vi
cinity of tho residence of the bidder, made
payaDle to the order of the Commissioner of
Indian Affairs, for at least live per cent of the
amount of the proposal, which check or draft
will be forfeited lo the United States in case
a,ny bidder or bidders, receiving an award,
shall fail to promptly execute a contract with
good and sullicieiit sureties, otherwise to bo
returned to the bidder.
Bids accompanied by cash in lieu oi certi
fied checks will not bo considered.
For any further information apply to
12-1 21t WM. F. T. BRAY, Superintendent.
Examination of Teachers.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
semi-annual examination of teachers will
be held in t ho State Normal School building,
corner of Grand avenue and Filih streets, l.os
Angeles, beginning on Monday, December
24th, at 10o r clocl: a. m.
All applicants for certificates upon examina
tion must ho present ut the beginning of tho
examination.
Teachers desiring their certificates renewed
should file application ior renewal with the
secretary of the county board of education
(room 4/court house) on or before December
20th.
Tenchers holding valid primnry grade certif
icates issued in this county, and desiring to
take tho grammav grade examination, must
report on Thursday, December 27th, at Nor
linl School building.
By order of the board of education.
W, W. SEAMAN, Socretary.
Los Angelee, o«c6»t*r % 1894, 27
FINANCE AND TRADE.
Yssterday'« Bailout on th* New York
Stack Rxehange.
New Yobk, Dec. 12—The market opened
strong nnd active with conslnerable advance
In most shares. Sugar broke ,'„e, but soon re
covered the loss. At 2 o'clock the tone of spec
ulation became strong, and wfth few excep
tions prices continued at the advance to the
close.
Railroad bonds were firm.
Govern ment bonds wro firm.
State bonds were inactive.
STOCKS AMD BONDS.
New York, Dec. 12.—The closing quotations
were; ,
U S ji, reg 11!» NorflA Wst pfd. 19
do ss, cou 119 N Amer Co ... 5" H
do'li.reg 114!j Northern Pac ... *'/s
do 4s, cou 11.V 3 dopfd 17'^
do2s.reg 97 i; ?, D & Gulf.... 3}4
Pacific tfs fSßU[Northwestern ... BB}2
Atchison 4'i dopfd 140,,
Adams Ex 189 M V Cent 99Vj
Alton,Terro Ute. 117 NY A N Kng 31W
dopfd (198 Ontario A Wcit . 19Jj
Amer Ex 11<» Oregon Juipt 11
BaltoAOhi" 07 Oregon Nay 20
f'anadaPaciflo.... 58 OregonßhortLiae
Canada Southern. 50' „ AIT Northn 0
Central Pacific... 14.. Pacitic Mall 22' i
ChesAOhio 18 ' B Peoria, Dec Si E.. 3^
Chicago Alton. ...145', Pittsburg flfJO
Burlington 72 1 * Pullman Palace. .155
Chicago Mas 72-; rt Keadlng 18%
Con Gas 130 Richmond Ter... I(>U
CCCAStL 38 dopfd 20
Col Coal ,t 1r0n... B'i Rio Or Westn 16,9
Cotton Oil 94M- dopfd 43
Del A Hudson . ...ViS'.j Rock Island 63
Dela, Lackawanna 8t Paul 59'il
A Western 160 V dopfd 119%
D A R G pfd. R4 <i 8t Paul A Omaha. 34'
Distillers loi-j dopfd 110
8a5tTenn......... Southeru Pacitic. 19
Erie 10?iSugar 90
dopfd |23 Term Coal Si Iron 1'- ,
Ft Wayne t'sß Texas Pacific 10
(U Northern pfd..lOOJi Tol Si O Cent pfd. 75
Chicago Si Eastern Union Pacliic.... ll! 8
Illinois pld 93 0 8 Express 42
Hocking Valley.. 17 Wabash, St Louis
Illinois Cent 89!s & Pacific (>'.»
BtPaul Si Dututn. 21 dopfd 14l a
Kan & Tex pfd.... 22J4 Wells Fargo 108
DakeErie A West. 10.,. Western Union .. 88%
dopfd 71 VVhee ingdi LE.. 11
Lakeßhore 136 , da old 40
Lead Truat 85 Minn" Si 8t Louis. 29
LAN 54,' i Denver A 8 8.... 11
LA New Albany.. ti) a Gen Electric BSK
Manhattan C0n....106 Nal'l Linseed 117'j,
Mem A Charlston flO Col Fuel A I 25*2
Mich Central 96 dopfd 70
Mo Pacific, BBJ4 H A Tex Cent.... 2lj
Mobile A Ohio ... 17' B rol, A A&N orth
Nashville Chatt... 05 Mich 2
Nat Cordage 9 iTol, St LAX C. 1
dopfd 15 | dopfd s>,i
N J Central 03 |
tßld.
Boston, Dec. 12,—The closirsg quotations
were:
Atchison 4>f Mexican Wi
BeilTelephono... 108 Sau Diego
Burlington 72J,|
MONEY yUOTATIONS.
New Yoke, Dec. 12.—Money on call easy at
T • percent; last loan at 1.. percent; closed
at l'n per cent.
Prime mercantile per cent.
Sterling exchange—Actual busiuets in bank
ers' bills at $4.8 l t(s4.S9 ior demand and
$4.57V<54.88 fortio days.
Posted rates-$4.N5,'..<5V1.89 and $1.89';,®
4.90.
Commercial bills—
Sllyer certificates—oo,'i.
Ban f rancisco. Dec. 12.—Sight drafts on New
Yorx, per $100. 5.
Telegraphic, 7>£c.
Sterling bills cv London, bankers' 60-day
bills, $4 86; 8 -
London, Dec. 12.—Bank of England discount
rate, 2 per cent.
Consols—lo2 11-16.
mini no shares.
San Francisco, Dec. 12.—The official closing
quotations for mining stocks today were asfol
lows;
Alta 17 Julia —
Alpha Con 12 Justice 20
Anden 37 Kentuck Con 01
Belcher. 65 Lady Wash Con —
Belle Isle Mexican 57
Ben .1 Belcher. 57 Mono —
Bodie Con (15 Mt Diablo 10
Bullion 15 Navajo
Bu'werCon — occidental Con 07
Caledonia — Ophlr 170
challenge Con S9 Overman 10
Chollar 50 Potosi 34
Confidence 95 ; Savage 30
Con Cal & Va 360 s-orplon
Con Imperial 01 Sieira Nevada 55
ConNewYork 01, Silver Bill 01
Crown Point 65jSllver King —
Exchecquer —-Union Con 34
Gould At Curry 40j(JtahCon 00
Grand Prize Yellow Jacket 39
Hale & Noreross 911
Silver Bullion.
BaN Francisco, Dec. 12.—Silver bars, 60?i®
60J B c per ounce.
Mexican dollars, 50' 2 @slc.
New Yore, Dec 12.—Silver ban, per
ounce.
London, Dec. 12.—Silver bullion, per ounce,
87X4.
Bank of England Bullion.
London, Dec. 12.—The amount of bullion
cone from the Bank of England on In lance, was
£120,000.
San Francisco Grain Market.
San Francisco, Dec. 12.—Net cash prices
wore as follows:
Flour Family extras, $::.40' ~l 55: Bakers'
extra, $3.3093.40; supertlne, $2.2092.55.
Wheat—Trade continues to be oi moderate
proportions No. 1 shipping, 90c; choice,
stock, 91!ic; milling, [email protected]; Walla
Walla, 80c ior choice.
Barley—The market drags and the demand Is
limited. Fair lo good, brewing,
00905 c; choice. 80183 c.
Oats—Shows weakness. * Quotations are as
follows: Milling, $1.0091.12.*: Surprise
$1.0591.15; fsncy.eed, $1.02>,-e)1.07'.i: goo
to choice, 90 *97'4c: poor to fair, 85987}*' c
black, f 1.1591.30; red, $1.07; ,91.15; gray,
92^c(851.00.
Chicago Grain and Provisions.
OhIOAOO, Dec. 12.—Wheat opened dull. The
bearish news was chiefly responsible for the
dead heaviness, but some ol it arose from the
principal shorts having covered yesterday and
left the open interests conliuod to those who
had sold.
May wheat closed at 59^@59J a o.
May corn closed Arm at bulge.
The tone of the markat for oats was firm.
The provision market was firm.
Leading futures closed as follows:
Wheat, No. 2—
December 55's
May 59\@50J„
July 60>s
Com, No. 2—
December t 1 ,
January 47^*^48
May 50',
Oatß. No. 2—
December 29s<
January 32V9327 8
Msy 33; 1 ,
Casn quotations wore as follows:
Flour—Steady; Winter patents, $2.5092 70;
straights, $2.2592.50; spring pateuts, $3.10*
3.20; straiguts, $2.25®2.75; bakers', $1,809
" wheat-No. 2 spring, 59®01! jc; No. 3, nom
inal; No. 2 red, 55»i9»5?i. »
Com—No. 2, 47'„.
Oats—No. 2,29&1 No. 2, 32<(,@3.}4; No. 3,
white, 31.
Eye—No. 2, 49c.
Barley—No. 2, [email protected]; No. 3, 45352H; No.
4, 48®49c.
Flaxseed—No. 1 $1.50<£.
DeVAN & RUTLEDGE,
Bankers and Brokers,
146 NORTH SPRING ST.
TELEPHONE 157.
GKAIN, STOCKS AND BONDS bought and
sold, for cash or on margin.
Dai 1 v market circular sent free.
fHP-PRIVATE WIRE.
sTr. COOPER & CO.,
BANKERS AND BROKERS,
v : 1 v S. Main st. Telephone 14G9
Chicago Grain
New York Stocks
S. F. Wheat and Barley
Bought, sold and carried on martins. Daily
circular aud little books on speculation, or
HOW AO MAKE MONEY, mailed free.
Timothy—Prime, 95.65.
Mess pork -Per bol, $12 Oofa)l2.l2V{.
§Lard-$o B7Jf.
Shortribbs- sides, loose, $5.95(56.00.
Shoulders—Dry salted, 88.42V4«8.28.
Short clear sldei—Boxed, $0.25(<r,0..17 I <.
Whisky—Distillers'Hutsued goods, $1.23 per
gallon.
On the produce exchange today the butter
market was dull; creamery, [email protected]; dairy,
12f(S20c,
Eggs-Steady at 20^c.
OTHER GRAIN MARXRT".
Ltvißroor,, Dec. 12—Close: Wheat, quiet;
demand poo'; No. 2 red winter. Bl
do Spring, 5j 2d; No. 1 hard Manitoba, 3s
7d; No. 1 California, .'), B'.d. (Futures linn:
December, 4s lid; January, 4slll a d: Februa:
ry, 4s 1 March, Is Aprih 4s lU'id:
May, Bs 11' *d.
Corn—Spot steady and in moderate demand;
American mixed, ss: December, ss: January,
5s ;<d: February, 4s 0)„d; March, 4s 6d;
April, 4s Sd: May, 4s Od.
Flour—Dull; demand moderate; Bt. Louis
fancy winter, (Ss.
Hops—At London (Pacific coast) £2 10j.
CALL HOARD SALES.
San Francisco, Dec. 12.—Whest, easier;
December, 95' jc; May, $1.02.
Barley—Firm; December, 88c; May, 93;j0,
Corn—sl.2s.
Bran—sl3.so.
San Francisco Produce.
Sam Fbancisco, Doc. 12.—There are few
changes reported In fiesh fruits.
Grapes of all kinds are firm aud in goad de
mand.
Citrus fruits are weak.
The vegetable market is dull.
Ouions have a weaker tone.
Potatoes are still weak.
Tho market for dairy produce Is easy.
The poultry market is heavily stocked and
turkeys are cheaper.
Petroleum.
New York. Dec. 12.—Petroleum, steady:
Pennsylvania oil sales, none; January option
sales, uone; closed at 89%G bid; Lima oil sales,
nono.
LOS ANGELES LOCAL MARKETS.
Grain and Hay.
[Dealers' quotations.]
Bart, ey—Per cental. [email protected]
Corn'—Pet cental, yellow Sl.ooiai.os: white,
1,10.
Wheat—Per cental, No. 2, nocr4.fl.oo.
Hay—Per ton, alfalfa. IHO.OO'Dll.OO: bar
ley, $14.00ftoHi.OG; oat, $14.00(3)15.00; wheat
$13.00(3111.00.
lirl.d Fruits.
[Buyers quotations.]
Africotts—Per lb., choice, OijSO- ie; fair, s>»
(36 c
Fkaches—Per lb., fancy, [email protected](W£o: choice.
«HS«!aC; fair, 4L/d>sc.
Pears—Per lb., choice bleached, 4c; fair, 2
@3c.
Prunes—rer lb., graded,4;vS4)aCi ungraded,
4c
Mill Stuffs.
[Jobb'ris' quotations.]
Barley-Per cental, $1.00.
Corn—Per cental, $1.15.
Wheat—Per cental, No. 1,51.05.
Flour—Per barrel, local extra family, $3.40;
northern, $3.75.
Feed—ilran, per ton, $21.00; shorts, $23.00;
cracSed corn, per cwt., $1.20; mill feed, $1.25;
rolled carlej, $1.05.
Dairy Product*.
Butter—Fancy creamery, 2lb squares. 5.7
@57} ac; faucy dairy, 2Souuce squares, i<>&
45c; choice, 28-ounce squares, :Js®37. l^c.
Cheese—-California, half cream, perm, 10c;
do full cream, lßMci Young America, 14Uoi
small, (3 lb band) loJa'c: eastern,full cream,"ls
(d)l6c; domestic Swiss, old. 17(o,18e; new, 14da
18c; Imported Swiss. 28(ffl30e: blmburger, do
mestic, [email protected]>c; imported. 1 —v 20.
Poultry and Kegs.
Poultry—Per doz., bens, *4.005}4.25; old
roomers, 53.50154.00; young roosters, $H.70(5i
4.25; broilers, $3.50314.40; turkeys, 10,«&12o Der
lb.; duckß, per doz., geese, per
bead, 75c.
Egos—California ranch, [email protected] per doz.;
eastern, 23(fi>24e.
Farm snil Garden Produce,
Beans—Per 100 lbs.. Lady Washington, $3.00
Lima $4.50; navy, $3.00jj3.25; pink, $2.25©
2.50,
Beets—ler 100 lbs., 90c.
Cahiiaoe—Per 100 lbs. 50,965 c.
Carrots—Per 100 lbs., 90c.
Chm.es—Dry, per string, $1.00(<J1.25i green.
5c per lb.
Onions— Per 100 lb«„ 00c.
I'ARSNirs—Per 100 lbs., $1.
Potatoes—Per 100 lbs,, pinkeyes, 75c; Bur
baiiss, 85c; Salinas, $1.10.
Sweet Potatoes—Per 100 lbs., 80;:.
Tost/toes—Per box, 50c.
TußNii's-Per lOOlus., 90c
Nats.
Almonds—Per lb., paper shell, 13®15c; soft
shell, 119120) hardshell, B,'gj9c.
Bi'.AZiLs—Per lb., 10©12;^c.
FILHKRTs—Per Ib , 11®12>4C.
Peanuts —-Per lb., raw, s(ai7c; roasted, [email protected]
Walnuts—Per lb., first grade softsnell, 8c;
first grade hardshell, oi a c; second grade hard
shell. Oc*
I , Moats.
Butchers' print s for whole carcasses.
BEEF—First quality, 4'ic.
Veal—Ranee, heavy, 4;,96;gc; do light, [email protected]
5Sc; dairy,
Mutton—4>,tgsc; spring lamb, 6®7c.
Poek—7c,
Provisions.
Hams—Rex, local smoked, per lb, 1l%e; De
fiance, lie; Boneless, 9)401 Ficnic, 7;gc
Bacon—Rex, boneless breakfast, 11*401 Defi
ance, lie.
Dmsn Beef—Sets, 12Uc; inside, 14c
Pir, Pore—Half bbl., $9.50.
Lard—Tleriea, ivory comp, per Rex,
pnre leaf, B>ic.
Money and Beeswax.
Honey—Comb, per lb, 15c; extractel, Be,
Beeswax—Per lb, 20®25c.
Fresh Fruits.
Lemons—Fancy , $3.0094.00 per box; mixed
$1.50®2.50.
cranuerries—sl2.Oo®l2 50 per bbl.
Apples—Bellflower, $1.7592.
REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
Wednesday, Dee. 12.
Rosedale Cem Atsn to Mary Adams— lot
138, bik I, Rosedale Cem; $100.
Same to £ L Patterson—BJ* lot 142, bik-1.
same; $100.
Achsah English et con to A Dufflll—Und lnt
in trtof land in New River bottom; $250.
P B Rdgar to B A Hubbard—Lot 4, bik 51,
Pomona; $200.
Joseph Manning to E X Foster—Lot 20, Re
glna trt; $850.
James T Wilson, trustee, to Oliver Miller-
Lots 14 aud 19, sec 15, Farm, Field and Fire
side Col trt; $300.
John Zeus lo 0 J McDonald—Lot 31, bik 1,
Old Clapp Orchard trt: $225.
Susan Bartlett et cou to P W Dorsey—3E l ,
8E' t BW' i sec 1, TlB, RlO V/; $2200.
C M Winters to same—Lot 14, bik 2, William
son trt; $550.
Cline, sheriff to H W O'Melveney—Deed of
correction to deed dated Jan 10, 1894. 910—
117; $9000.
M £ church, south, to Kate 8 Herrick—Lots 2
and part lot 1, bik 29, Huber trt; $5000.
John Wallinschlager et ux to X B Williamson
—Lot 0, bik I, L A imp.CO sub part lots 0 and 7,
39, H 8: $000.
Fred A Duy et ux to H Malinow—Lot 8, bl 8,
Wolfskili Orchart trt; $612.50.
Rosedale Cemetery association to J J Kocher
—B!*j of lot 169, bl i, Rosdale cemetery; $100.
G L Denuison to H S Baldwin—ls.29 acres iv
subßW' 4 of SW'iOf sec 10, T 3 ti, R 12 W,
Rancho San Gertrudes: $1900.
Jennie Rutherford to Wm Guenther—Lot 58,
Daman &. Millard tit; $725.
Chas Shepherd to J W Macdonal—Lot 1, Ybar
ratrt; $300.
Frnuk c Bott et ux to Chas Hughes—Lot 10,
Goodwin & Lukens' Olivewood sub, lot 10, bl E,
Ban Fasquual trt; $600.
W H Tonkin et ux to L G Parker—Lot 15, bl
1, Ocean View trt: $2500.
Chas M Wills etux to W J A Smith—Lots 1
and 2, Strong & Baldwin's replat, lots 1, 2, 12,
18, 14, 15 and 16, A Thorton's sub, Pasadena;
$3400.
Thos Vigus et ux to Jessie C Andrews—Lot
36, bl B, Potter <fc West's sub of ThrooD trt;
$3500.
Thos Washburn et ux to D A McOmber—N 18
acres of lot 44, Watt 9 sub of Rancho San Ra
fael; $3500.
SUMMARY.
Deeds 47
Nominal 17
Total $38,015.00
SHIPPING NEWS.
Ban Pedro, Deo. 12,
ARRIVED,
Schooner YVitsmaiin, Peterson master, from
Tacoma, with 500 M lumber to W. H. Perry
Lumber company.
Steamer Westport, Jacobs master, from Eu
reka, with 270 M lumber, to (lanahl Lumber
company.
Schooner Cornet, Thornstrom master, from
Port Gamble, with 4SO M lumber, to .Southern
Pacific Lumber company.
Schooner u,ga, Ipsen master, from Tacom,
with UOO it lumber, to W. 11 Perry Lumber
company.
BAILED.
Schooner Norma, Hanßen master, for Gray's
Harbor, ballast.
Hchouner Helen B. Kimball, Hellingson,
master, for Eureka, ballast.
steamer Jewel, Madscn master, for Caspar.
Steamer Newsboy, Fosen master, for Sen
Franciaco,
Dr. Parker, dentist, MM West Hast street
THE BORGIAN AZTECS
DISCOVERY OF A POISON RING IN AN
ANCIENT MEXICAN TOMB.
A Queer Find Made by American Archie
..insists —Remains of the Priest Who
Probably Took llis Own Life by Means
of Poison Administered Through a Bine,
A correspondent of tho Philadelphia
Times in the City of Mexico writes as
follows:
Much has been written concerning
tho poison of the Borgias of Italy and
the many subtle ways of administering
it to thoso whom they wished to quietly
put out of thoir path, among theso ways
being that of rings with springs charged
with poison, which, entering liko a
needle point into tho victim's flesh, com
municated it to him as effectually as if
ho had swallowed it. But it seems from
a recent discovery made in this city
that this clever manner of administering
a fatal doso was not peculiar to tho
Italians, bnt was practiced by tho an
cient Mexicans, or Aztecs.
In clearing tho ground of an old ruin
of a church which had become too di
lapidated to render it salo for any ono
to enter its walls there wore found in
dications that beneath it was a forgotten
burial ground, or at least a tomb. Eager
American arclneologists requested and
received from the authorities permission
to examine into tho matter, and the
work of exbumiug began.
There was found to bo a vault con
structed with some caro of hewn blocks
of stone pttt together and settled into a
hollow squaro with no opening. It re
quired some difficulty to break through
this, tho work demanding caro lost somo
curious relic bo destroyed, but at last it
was uncovered only to show that tho
tomb had an inner casing.
This, however, was of masonry work
and moro easily removed. When this
was done, a long, prostrate object was
revealed wrapped in cloths of coarse
texture, which had been dipped in
pitch. These, in turn, being broken
through, liner cloths were found, and
theso wero wrapped about the well pro
served body of a man.
Ho had none of the dry and witherod
appearance of the Egyptian mummies,
but looked as though his embalming had
been the work of yesterday. Ho was be
yond doubt an Indian, as was shown by
tho high cheek bones and facial angle,
though of tho moro cultivated type of
tho peoplo who inhabited this country
beforo tho coming cf Cortez.
Ho was a man of about 00 or Go, with
a strong and even benevolent face mark
ed slightly with smallpox, and was
robed in what was evidently a priest's
dress. This was of white and of fine
texture, bordered with a still well pre
served band of humming bird's feathers
of that exquisite handiwork for which
this peoplo wero famous, and of which
they still jealously guard tho secrot.
In tho right hand of the man was held
a small idol of red sandstone, with opal
eyes, while in tho other a silver wand
or stick somowhat resembling a mar
shal's baton, no doubt tho insignia of
his office. Oa tho left hand was also a
ring of silver in the shape of a coiled
serpent, with the eyes of the green Mexi
can diamond obtained from mines tho
locality of which was never learned
from tho Aztecs even under torture by
their greedy Spanish conquerors, and
tho secret of which still defies tho ex
plorer of today.
In order to examine this ring moro
closely, one of the party of archaeologists
attempted to pull it from tho finger of
the dead man, but was surprised to find
that it was held there by a fine wire,
tho needlelike point of which was still
sunken into tho brown flesh. After
some manipulation this was finally re
moved, and it was soon that tho wire
was a most delicate hollow tube, from
which hung what looked like au in
finitesimal bubble of greenish gas.
Suspecting that this might have had
something of the character of the fa
mous Borgian rings, the gentleman
handled it carefully, and calling a Chi
huahua dog of the hairloss species,
which had attached itself to the party,
he pushed tho point of tho spring into
tbe tip of the animal's ear and awaited
results. For a time it seemed that the
ring had exhausted its deadly power,
but after half an hour tho dog was seen
to foam at tho mouth, his eyes grew
glassy, and in a fow minutes more he
fell over on ono side, and after a con
vulsion or two was found to be quito
dead.
This gave rise to tbo theory that tho
dead mau had probably killed himself,
or for some had, by tho rules
of his order or tho government, put
himself to death, as it was lawful for
one of tho priesthood to suffer capital
punishment. This also, in all probabil
ity, accounts for his being entombed
away from tho temple whoro ho served,
or othorwiso consecrated ground, an
item of religious ruling with the Aztoo
as with the Koman Catholics of today.
On exposure to tho air the body soon
showed signs of decay and fell away
almost as they watched it, but showing
in this that only the outer husk of the
flesh had been preserved, tho interior
being filled with lino sand, Tho ring,
idol and other relics were claimed by
the authorities and aro now on exhibi
tion at tho National museum.
IMourning.
Of late years the rigors of perfunctory
mourning havo beeu greatly modified.
There is littlo heard nowadays of how
long people should stay away from tho
theater after tho death of a relative or
at exactly what period it is again prop
er to dine with "a few friends." Even
c, widow need no longer count tho
threads of white in her collar and hand
kerchief in mortal terror lest there
should bo ono too many. On tho whole,
tho tendency is a sensible one, whioh,
in tho naturo of things, can hardly go
too far. Peoplo suffering real bereave
ment aro not likely to bo guilty of un
due lovity, while no sort of hypocrisy is
moro hideous than an affectation of sor
row. —-Exchange.
For rheumatism I have tuund nothing
equal to Chamberlain's I'aiu Bairn. It
relievea tbo pain aa soon as applied.—J.
VV. Young, Weal Liberty, W. Va. The
prompt roiief it atlorda ia alone worth
many times the cort, 50 cents. Its con
tinued use will effect a permanent cure.
Foraale by On'cc Vaughn, corner Fourth
and Spring streets, and 0. F. Heinze
mau, 222 North Main Btreet, druggiata.
SHE CAN SEE NO BEAUTY IN THEM.
A California Woman's Judgment Upon tho
New York Women of Faftliloo.
Tho horso show brings forcibly home
to us an unpleasant truth—north of
Mason and Dixon's lino wo havo not de
veloped an aristocratio type. Southern
women, by virtue of their descent from
English nticesiors of birth and breeding,
added to generations of luxury, aro in
dubitably aristocratio In outline and
bearing, but tho New York woman of
fashion is merely swagger, a combina
tion produced by an expensive dress
maker and her own unswerving deter
mination to acquire an "air." She is
swagger without being high bred, Belt
conscious whore she would bo haughty,
und her repose i 3 mero lounging.
I havo studied this typo for several
years, and last night I was struck anew
with two of its fatal deficiencies—its
lack of noso and of cheek modeling. It
is not too much to say that in all that
tier of boxes there was not ono good
noso. Only ono girl bad a noso of size,
and hers was a proboscis. She could
havo supplied throo of her meager sia>
tors. Tho others without exception had
littlo pugs or an irregular piece of flesh
and cartilage that cannot bo classed.
Ono Japanese looking little "beauty"
had a queer peaked aTfair that seemed
to point derisively at her bang. Anoth
er woman of middle age, who is never
spoken of except as "ono of tho most
beautiful and distinguished looking wo
men of Amorica," has a minute appli
cation so unfortunately constructed as to
givo her tho effect of ono whoso fate it
is to stand constantly on the edgo of a
sower. This woman is absolutely with
out beauty. Her faco is large and com
mon and colorless; her "languid eyes
with a wicked sparkle" aro as nearly
expressionless as eyes can bo got. Sho
is merely an astonishing newspaper pro
duction.
Ono of the women most frequently
extolled for beauty has the face of the
Parisian eocotto. Ono can sco it by the
dozen on a spring afternoon driving to
tho Bois, its other extremities banked
in flowers. Sho is tall and has a charm
ing grace, and two or three generations
havo dono much for her, but the cocotte
suggestion is paramount. Last night
she sat with her legs frankly crossed, a
model of elegance for tho gaping throng.
Another is as good a type of the
French soubrette as you will ever sco in
a Parisian theater — a small, dark,
bright, wicked littlo face, its owner as
smart as a great milliner could make
her. Another "beauty" has merely a '
bright, good, attractive face. Not a line
there conforms to any standard. Anoth
er has doveloped a Burgundy complex*
ion and largo knobs on her cheok bones.
This is merely a study and a truth
ful ono. I see no reason why the truth
should not bo written about this much
discussed typo for once. The newspa
pers aro responsible for the false im
pression regarding the fashionable wo
men of New York. To describe a beauty
makes interesting reading. But the so
cial phase of any country is part of ita
history, and current history should bo
treated with the same impartiality as
the moro easily focused past. As a mat
ter of bare fact, there is hardly a beau
tiful or a high bred woman in New
York society, hardly one that in profile
or modeling of cheek and chin or in
repose and dignity of bearing suggests
throe generations behind her. And it is
a groat pity, one to be regretted by any
good American, for the New York wo
man of fashion is today accepted abroad
as tho flower of American civilization.
Tho bluo blooded southern woman is
beautiful, tho cosmopolitan California
woman is beautiful, but tho New York
woman of fashion, without her bright
complexion and hair, her admirable
grooming, her superb gowns and no
quired "air," could only be described
by tho most damning of adjectives
commonplace.—Gertrude Atherton ia
New York Sun.
Dress Evolution*
Persons who have been expecting
dress reform somewhat as they aro ex
pecting tho millennium—rolling in on
a gold chariot in a cloud of fire or
something equally startling—will be
surprised some day to be told that it
dress reform, not tho millennium—is
here. Tho nnmber of women who wear
different clothes from those they were)
brought up to consider 'tho proper and
suitablo women's wear would amaze it
it could be accurately stated. Union un
derwear and hygienic waists, with no
corsots —these are in such common use)
as to bo no longer in any way unusual.
Tho bicyclo has pushed matters a littlo
further. In their attempts to design a
costumo for this exorcise many women,
havo worked out their own salvation in
a walking dress as woll. Scores of hi
oycling women shop, travel and w alls
in their wheel toilets, and nobody sas«
pects it.—New York Times.
Justifiable Sarcasm.
It is claimed, you know, that wom
en aro such emotional creatures, it
will not do to intrust them with the
ballot. Havo you ever noticed how calm
and thoughtful und deliberate a crowd
of men wero at an election celebration?
Havo you observed what strength of in
tellect, what capacity for government,
they showed as they cavorted around
tho burning pile and added all the head
covering they possessed to tho combus
tible material? Probably yon havo been
there yourself, aud maybo this argu
ment may have occurred to you—that f
man alono should bo intrusted with the j
ballot, ho is so much more calm and
unemotional than woman. — Kansas
Breeze.
Mrs. Esther T. Housh.
Mrs. Esther T. Housh bas been eleot
ed cc. .-responding secretary of the W. C. ,
T. U. of Massachusetts. She was for
years editor of Tho Woman at Work
and president of the Vermont White
Bibbonors. For srSme years Mrs. Housh;,
has been in Boston doing literary work
With her ready pen and thorough knowl- J
edge of methods Mis. Housh is sure toil
bo a helpful ally to tho leaders of the) i
Massachusetts W. C. T. C 71
When Ilaby wns sict, wo gava her Castorfav.
When she waa a Child, she cried for CaatoiiSk, . I
When sho became- Miss, she clung to Castoria, i
When she had Children, she gave them Cajtorta* J
sefsf

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