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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, December 16, 1894, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1894-12-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XLIII. NO. G6.
BOYS,
FREE
DOLLARS!
/■ a CM tmas gift to all the boys from 3 to 18 years, we wi 1 give ONE
Dvi LAX all thu coining and Christmas f* ye. You oniy have to
buy for cash a Suic or Ov rcoat to the amount of $5 00 or upwards — the
boy gets the dollar. Cur stock is complete and safe and nothing has been
marked up to meet this gift. Jo accommodate Christmas shoppers we
will »e-p open every evening this week uutil NINE; Saturday and
Christinas hve till • 1 •.' N. felt congratulatory gifts for males of all ages,
in our Furnishing Departm nt. What's more pleasing than a silk umbrella?
A WAV Ai_l_ NIGHT-UN DERWEAR!
Mill IFN RIIIFTT I PS)
JtIULLLiI, DLUiwi i a uu.,
101 NORTH SPRfNG STREET.
201-203-205-207 St, 209 W. FIRST ST.
| """""* m-"— ——nair
SI E GEL
+ + HEADQUARTERS FOR +-+ t
Latest
Holiday
Novelties
CORRECT STYLES LOWEST PRICES I
SEE OUR WINDOWS. jjj
J UNDER NADEAU HOTEL.. |
AMUBEMKMS.
LAR QE R MATINEE THIS EVENING
THAN TOOA.Y AND DURINia
EVER I AT 2. TMfcl WEEK.
DIRECT FROM NEW YORK
p r os E iTivlL L v The Ma y° s Tr °«Pc
APPEAR. BOWAN AND WALTERS
"CAPOLLO"
FOSTER AND EVANB
IiONZAI.AZ KiSTE'hS'J
tiAMOHT "BROTH ERS ~
RUSSELL ANU KYDKR
LAST APPEARANCE
THIS EVENING
SISTERS "SANBONI TONER AND FROBKL
QfJIOLKY BROTHERS WAlill AND MARTEN
GEO. II A RRISI )N "MAY DKVKLLiOU ~"
Prices, 10, 20, 25 and 50 cents.
week or Sunday, dec. 23,
GALA HOLIDAY ATTRACTIONS
SPECIAL BARGAINS IN PIANOS
TH IS WEIEIK A -r
Bartlett's Music House, 103 North Spring St.
LAST DSC KONTBKI RECITAL WEDNESDAY EVENING,
♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦%♦♦♦♦
j CRYSTAL PALACE —I
♦ 138-140-142 8. MAIN ST. CROCKERY J
♦ __— .
5 Our Mammoth Store is crowded with an STORE ♦
♦ endless variety of new and beautiful goods. 0 f sontaern California %
| -?i CHRISTMAS PRESENTS j$- |
♦ FOR ALL ♦
♦ ♦
% FINE BARGAINS From Today $
| % OUR ill Until Christßlas |
i |co C iSisl! We wlu Give Away |
♦ $ lio ° $1.001 . nA ,, ♦
A nice DOLL FREE j
♦ With every purchase of ♦
♦ Magnificent Display 50 cents or over. t
Z ♦
I In Our I
I A Large Toy Animal {
It ART ROOMS with every 25 cent t
I J purchase. |
|| MEYBER(S BROTHERS. |i
. J ♦
The Herald
LOS ANGELES, SUNDAY MORNING. DECEMBER 10, 1894.
THE END NOT YET.
Republican Bosses Decide to
Go Behind the Re
turns.
A RECOUNT DEMANDED.
The Gubernatorial Contest to
Be Carried to the Leg
islature.
MR. ESTEE'S TALE OF WOE;
Ha Doei Mot Want th« Offloa, Bat In
• lati Upon an HoMt Ballot and
a Fair Count, a in Dan
Burnt.
By the AuoclatSil Preit,
San Francisco, Deo. 15.—The Repub
lican state central committee has decided
to contest the election of James H. Bndd
as governor and to demand of tbe legis
lature a reoount of tbe votes cast in the
state, particularly in this city. The
committee charges that fraud has been
i oommltted, and by a unanimous vote it
asks for the right to show that its
obarges are based on facta.
The meeting today was an interesting
one. There were few debates, but M.
M. Estee delivered an address which
created general comment and discus
sion.
The stats oommittee was called to or
der by Chairman Cornwall. Tbe meet
ing was organized without delay, and
by • unanimous vote it was decided not
to allow proxies. The committee then
went into executive session, bat thsre
was no debate among its members on
any question of importance.
When the executive committee Issued
a call for a special meeting a few days
ago it also appointed a subcommittee
to look into the charges and rumors of
fraud in connection with the election
and report tbe result of its labors to the
general oommittee,
THE COMMITTBK'S RBPORT.
The report was presented and read. It
said:
"Thsre are 293 voting preoinots in San
Franoisoo. The total vote oast there at
the recent election was 61,649. The
number of election officers on each pre
cinct board of election at the date of the
eleotion was supposed to be 15, amount
ing in the aggregate for the 293 pre
cincts to 3512. The board of eleotion
commissioners of San Franolico is oom<
THE BE A ITT V AND THE BEAST.
poted of L. K. Ellert, mayor; J.N'
Block, tax collector; William Broderick.
auditor; T. H. Creewell, city and county
attorney, and William Fitzhugh, city
and county surveyor. All are Democrats
except, possibly, one. That commiaeion
appoints the precinct boards of election
officers, and it appointed those of this
year.
"This election was nnder the control
of the Democratic party. Thus, the
original inspector of election in each
precinct of this city and county was a
Democrat and by virtue of his office,
practically controlied the entire board of
election of his precinct, and in 66 pre
cincts of the city and county such Dem
ocratic inspector appointed officers of
his own selection in place of Republican
officers on the opening of the polls. In
many of these instances this was done,
as wa are informed, before the time for
opening the polls and before the arrival
of some of the officers selected by the
commission to act as officers of the
election.
"The law requires a poll list to be
made. This poll list is supposed to con
tain the name, address and number of
eaoh voter, which address and number
is entered at the time the vote ia cast
It also requires a tally liet to be made by
the officers of such precinct. This tally
list should contain the correct number
of votes which each candidate receives,
and it is not possible for it to honestly
contain a larger number of votes than
there are names on the poll list.
"In that part of the city where Mr.
Estee either carried the precinct or re
ceived a large vote, the returns were
generally regular and signed in due
form.
"In alleging that great frauds were
onmmitted at the recent election held
in this city, the people are not depend
ent npon the opinions of this commit
tee. The non-partisan society knoivn
as the Union of Progress society, in this
city, at a meriting held on the 28th of
November, at 16 Post street, received
reports from different members of that
association who visited the various elec
tion booths of the city during the count
ing of the ballots, and who reported at
the meeting that in many precincts
during the counting of the vote, drunk
enness prevailed among the election
officers; that in some instances the offi
cers oalled the numbers on the tickets
and not the names of the candidates.
All of the reports agreed that a major
ity of the election officers of the city
and county of San Francisco were from
the roughest element in thie city."
The report was signed by P. B. Corn
wall, chairman; H. L. Dodge, A. Hay
ward, W. W. Montague, W. H. Chick
ering, Isaac Upbam, J. C. Daley, A, B.
Lemmon, committee.
MR. KSTKK'B TALE OF WOK.
The report of the committee was unani
mously adopted, the meeting was de
clared open and M. M. Estee waa invited
to address the members. He spoke at
some length. In opening he said that
be was inclined to congratulate the Re
publican party upon its generul success
in this Btate in the last election. The
splendid victory which had been won,
he said, showed that the Republican
party is in the line of progress/and that
here in California we nre in favor of the
policy which means protection to Amer
ican industries.
"I would be less a man than I am,"
he said, "if I were not impressed by the
occasion. In the battle which has just
ended I alone was defeated, but I am
not ashamed of my defeat. I can say
that I am an honest man.
|»"I came to this city with a majority
of over 11,000 votes, but I was defeated.
I was sold oat by my own party. I was
sold out by the Republican party or
oome oi iti members 'because I would
not make the promises which an honest
man could not make, because I could
not eel! my honor aud myself.
''A da; before the election a commit
tee came to me and promised that I
I wonld bo elected ii 1 would give certain
I intereets the control of my appoint
i mentß. Thut committee also asked me
to discharge a trusted employee on ac
count of religion. I refused to do either.
"I thought that I web a pretty good
American. My great grandfather
fought in the revolution. My grand
father was a ciptain in the war of 1812;
one of my brothers was killed at Vicks
burg and nnother was wounded at Get
tyeburg, but I was not American
enough for the American Protective As
sociation. I was defeated becaure I was
not afraid to say what I think, but it
that be a fault I have never trailed the
Republican banner in the dust.
"So much for myself. I ask nothing
for myself; forget me; forget the per
sonnel of those interested, and remem
ber the duty you owe to the people oi
this state, the dnty which commends
you to support the government, an hon
est election and a fair count. We inußt
preserve protection at the polls and
honesty in the county. As the repre
sentatives of a great party we owe this
to the state.
'*! am informed and I believe that
there was a miscount in this city, and
that the votes Bhonld be recounted. The
Democrats had absolute control of the
election machinery, and made it as
perfect as it is possible for human inge
nuity to do. They had the lowest ele
ments of the city represented in the
election booths as officers, and I believe
that frauds were commited.
"Unless the Republican party of this
state investigates these frauds and ex
poses their nature to the people of the
state, it will never carry another elec
tion in this state. I would rather be
beaten by fraud than elected by fraud,
and all I think this committee should
do is to ask for a recount. I do not
want to be governor now. I did wish
to be for I thought I might be able to
do something for the Republican party
and for the people of the stats, but now,
aa God ib my judgo, Ido not wish to be.
If I had my own way I would not take
the place.
"Never before in the history of the
state was there such fraud practiced in
this state as at the last election. Men
were counted out deliberately, fraudu
lently and wickedly, and we should
right the wrong."
A RECOUNT DECIDED UPON.
Mr. Kstoe left the room and the com
mittee again went into exeontive ses
sion. J. C. Daley of Ventura introduced
a resolution, which he moved be
adopted. His resolution wns brief and
to the point. It provided for a recount
of the votes cast in the gubernatorial
contest, and that stepa be taken at once
to prepare a contest before the legis
lature. The resolution was discus-eel
and it was decided to make it more ex
plicit in reference to the vote cast in
this city. It is here that the Republican
leaders believe that fraud was commit
ted.
A recess of half an hour was ordered,
and when the committee met again the
suggested change had been made. The
resolution provides particularly for a re
count of the votes cast in the oity. It
was adopted by a unanimous vote and
the chairman was authorized to ap
point a committee of seven to prepare
for the recount before the legislature.
Chairman Cornwall appointed the fol
lowing: A. Hay ward, chairman; A. R.
Wells, G. P. McLain, A. B. Lemrnon,
K. K. Taylor, G, 0. Robs and C. W.
Manwaring.
MR. CORNWALL EXPLAINS.
A motion was then made to adjourn,
but Cornwall declared that he had a
few wordo to Buy in explantiou of hia re
cent actions before tbe supremo court,
lie declared that the petition,which had
been to the supreme court in
his i.ame, was on behalf of the state
central committee. The purpose of the
TWENTY PAGES.
AN INDEX TO YESTERDAY.
BY TKLEGK A PH —The gubp-natnrlal con
test carried to the legislature Fatal ter
mination of the Bowen-Lavigne fight....
The Dempsey-Ryan mill declared 0ff....
Currency reform. *
LOCAL AND GENKKAI.-A Callfornlan In
tbo cast, by J. C. Pcabody Theatrical
comment aud news The power of the
council to atmndnn Figueroa street Re
port of the board of public works ...Novel
ties in book binding Throop celebration
at Pasadena... College boy* in session; an
nual convention of the Lyceum league
Crackerjacks; some noted ho ses at the
racetrack The police commission; the
chief scores the Senate saloon Defeated
Candidates' society Mayor Rowan vetoes
the schaol bond proposition E. J. Wool
ner purged of contempt.
NEIGHBORING PLACES.
Long Beach—Board of trade p.oceedlngs.
San Pkdro— Chosen Friends' entertainment
Shipping notes.
Compton—Cases of diphtheria Notes.
San Bernardino—The Sunday closing ordi
nance declared legal.
Pasadeda—Popular sentiment aroused over
the Southern Pacific franchise.
POINTERS FOR TODAY.
Athletic Park—Baseball 8:30 a.m. ..Schock
bicycle against hornet, 1 p. m.
Blanchard-Fiizgerald Hall—Sooctety As
sociative Interest 8(80.
Westlakk Pafe—Open air concert 2 p.m.
The Imperial—Vaudeville, matinee and
evening.
BuißANX—The Oorsicau Brothers.
petition, heaaid, had been misunder
stood. It was not to throw out the re
turns, but to secure a recount of the
ballots before taking the matter to Sac
ramento. A variety of ways had been
suggested, but the lawyers had deoided
that tne best way oi accomplishing
the obj sot was to petition for a writ of
mandate,
"I have done the best I could for my
party and the people," said Mr. Corn
wall. "I am satisfed with the medicine
I received from the newspapers, and ask
the committee to determine whether or
not my actions should be approved."
A resolution was introduced at once.
It gave unqualified approval to what Mr.
Cornwall had done, and was unani
mously adopted.
Some one asked if the resolution de
ciding npon a contest had relation to the
whole etate or to the oity. The answer
was that it certainly applied to the whole
state. The committee then adjourned,
to meet at the call of the chair.
The contest committee will meet and
organize in a few days.
Order your suit early. H. A. Getz is
crowded for fine tailoring at moderate
prices. 112 West Third street.
Wickstrom <k Person, tailors. Fit,
workmanship and goods guaranteed
first-class; prices moderate.. Room 1,
120.!» S. Spring street.
The new tariff on crude rubber has not
yet affected Off & Vaughn's prices on
hot water bottles and fountain syringes.
1 quart, 50 cents ; 2 quarts, 75 cent; 3
quarts, 85 cents ; 4 quarts, tl.
Names ol spirit friends given in fall at
New Music hall this afternoon and even
ing. Hoo church notice.
Cashmere Bouquet soap 20 cents a
cake at Off & Vaughn's, corner Fourth
and Spring streets.
Hollenbeck Hotel Caff, 214 Seoond
street. Oysters 50c a dozen, any style.
Florida oranges at Althouse Bros.'
Colombian Coal.
Try our Columbian lump coal, $3 per ton
delivered to any part of the city. Hancock
Banning, 130 West Second it.
Dr. Price's C-eam Baking Powder
World 1 * Fair-Highest Medal and Diploma.
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
BOWEN IS DEAD.
The Saginaw Kid Closed Lit
tle Andy's Earthly
Career.
PUT TO SLEEP FOREVER.
The Affair at New Orleans
Friday Night Proves
Fatal.
PARTICIPANTS ARRESTED.
Lavlfne Charged With Murdir-Tht Hi.
tU World Shrouded Id Gloom— The
Kysn-IJempicjr Mill De
cl»r«d Off.
By the AHonlated Frnn.
Nbw Orleans, Deo. 15. —On the eate
post of a modest little cottage on Thalia
street hange a streamer of crepe an
nouncing to the passera«by that some
one had been called by the angel of
death. Beyond ttie portal in a prettily
nrnished parlor lies oil that is mortal
of Andy Bowen, the best lightweight
the south hai ever produced, and one
of the pluckiest lighters who ever en
tered a ring. The itottage is removed
from the street by it pretty flower gar
den in front, and the interior is quietly
but neatly furnished. The dead pugil
st had been married for several years,
and, despite his calling, was domestic
in hit life and hi.bitt, and had sur
rounded himself wilth all the comforts of
life.
His wife was waiting for him to return
from the fight, hopeful that he would
come to her victorious, and some idea
may be formed of tbe shock to her
nerves when bo was borne into ths
house all but dead. But she bore up
bravely under tbe strain, and with the
devotion that had always marked her
conduct toward him, she helped the
physicians and the friends who came
from all sides, to make the sorely
wounded pugilist as comfortable as pos
sible nnder the circumstances. The
physicians who had been called into
Bowen's room at the club, acoompanted
him home and, reinforced by tbe familj
physician, remained with him till th(
end.
The coroner's nry declared the can«f
of death due to concussion of the brain
but failed to determine whether it wa»
produced by Lavigne'n blow or by Bow
en's head striking the floor of the ring.
The legal proceedings In connection
with the fatal fight have hardly termi
nated yet. The jury, it is thought, will
take the matten jp on Monday, and tbe
state's attorneys, for ther part, will press
to a conclusion tbe suit against the
Olympic club, against which the legality
of these glove contests is involved.
THE FATAL KNOCKOUT.
Andy Bowan died this morning at
7:15 o'clock while Father D.-ianey was
praying over him. He remaiaed uncon
scious from tbe time !.« received the
blow and was conveyed from his
dressing room at the club to hia home
on Taalia street, near Magazine.
When the men faced each other for
the eighteenth round it was apparent
that the end ot the fight was noar.
Bowen had received so many right
banders over the heart that ho was
weakened and groggy when be left his
corner. He wm game, however, and
walked mechanically toward his strong
adversary.
Lavigne opened with a left jab on the
neck, and though the blow was not a
paiticularly bard one it brought a loon
of anguish to the face of the thoroughly
beaten little man. Hie mouth was par*
tially open while his eyes wore a wild,
frightened look. His cneeka were
bruised and swollen and his lips were
puiied ont. The cut over the left eye
was the only color in his pallid face, and
bis breath was coming in short gaßps.
With wonderful gameness lie would not
flinch from the shower of blows rained
upon him, and, although hia strength
was going, be tried bravely to tight back
every lime the visitor was close enough.
Lavigne knew that he could dodge the
blows thus attempted, or let them land
harmlessly on him. He was landing on
the local man at will. Bowen was stag
gering to the ropes in a helpless condi
tion and trying to clinch. Lavignu
planted his left over the heart and,
crossing with bis right, lauded a
blow on tbe angle of the jaw. Bowen
fell back like a felled tree and his ber.il
struck the floor heavily. Lavigno
walked to his corner, wbile Duffy
counted tbe 10 seconds.
The beaten man was picked up limp
and so all appearances lifeless, by his
handlers and carried to his dreeeing
room.
THE FLOOR WAS NOT PAD DIED.
Concerning Bowen's injuries tbo
Times-Democrat says:
"The blow which sent Bowen down
; i — v» - n ■
IContlausd on V ourtli page.]

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