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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, January 16, 1895, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1895-01-16/ed-1/seq-4/

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THE HERfiLD PUBLISHING COMPANY
PUBLISHERS OF
LOS ANGELES H ER AID
DAILY, BUNDAY AND WEEKLY.
JOHN BRADBURY President
JOHN r. HUMPHREYS Vice-President
WM. LACY Secretary
JOHN T. OAF FEY Managing Editor
DOUGLAS WHITE. Business Manager
O.A STEVENS City Editor
OFFICE: HERALD BUILDING,
X 23 AMD X 25 WKRT SECOND STREET.
TELEPHONE 15ti.
MEMBBR associated press.
Fill Lb a sun Wikb Service.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16, 1895.
Mosx came, saw and went.
California has a governor at last,
Bi'Dd did it with his official Boot.
Now what is Dan Bnrns going to do
•bout it?
If didn't take a very bard kick, bnt
Hon struck heavily.
Mole waited for the kick, and Gov
ernor Budd administered it.
Salvador is going to revolute again,
a&d all Spanish America is happy.
Have you signed the Han Pedro har
bor memorial ? Why not ?
There are eptendid possibilities iv
the Valley railroad meeting tomorrow.
To H, Z. Osborne: M Wiiat page In
the last court grammar made you a
plural?"
Remember that 0. P. Huntington
thinks he has "a dead mortal cinch" on
Santa Monica. Sign tbe petition for
San Pedro.
Now if M. M. Estee could only be
that "dark horse" baoked by the South
ern Pacific!
Yellowstone park must look to its
geysers. A fionth Pacifio island turns
mp with a spouter tbat shoots to a height
oi 4000 feet.
The Saa Pedro harbor memorial is
Waiting only lor your signature. Sign
11 at once, and urge upon yonr neighbors
the importance of tbeir signing.
■Write to tha congressman yea are
bait acquainted with and urge him to
atand np for San Pedro. Tell him that
your personal interests aro at stake.
Governor Markham has ample
grounds for multifarious suite for libel.
Ths probability that bis complaints
wonld ba sustained by a jury is not so
' well grounded.
England and America are going to
dispute about a boundary line up in
Alaska and afford alleged diplomats
frem the respective countries an excuse
to take a summer jaunt through the
land of the midnight snn.
It's a question of now or never with
the San Pedro harbor appropriation.
Write to yenr congressman and sign
Thb Herald's San Pedro memorial.
Both are of the utmost importance. If
yon negleot either you have not done
yonr fall duty as a citizen.
Huntinoton has not yet eeenred
enough votea to deolare Santa Monloa
■ deep water harbor. If be was sure of
bia anohorage he would bave aeenred an
•ppropriation for hia storm-tossed road
etead long ago. There is every oppor
tunity for San Pedro, if the people of
Southern California will only bestir
themselves with proper energy.
Senator Mathews' bill permitting
eennties to bond themselves and con
■olidata as corporations for the purpose
of railroad building, is now on the
aenate file. The battle for emancipa
tion tias now fairly begun. Let every
honest advocate of the people's rights
rallr to the atandard wbich Senator
MarAeWa hae unfurled.
Ths legislature should submit an
amendment to the constitution abolish
ing tha mortgage tax. Instead of bene
fiting tba .borrower, as was intended, it
does bim injury. Parties may agree tv
pay any rata of interest not inequitable,
and tha courts have held tbat very high
rates are not inequitable. The lender,
therefore, adds what will cover the
mortgage tax above tbe rate he wishes
for tha use of his money, and generally
anare. It moreover causes a great deal
of trouble and no little expense in
of property and collection of
taxes. .California is quite alone in not
having Ihe conventional rate of interest
limited by lavr.
No one who Is not an idiot would attempt to
pull either of the pedal extremities of the
present day "lagoo," whatever that may be or
mean, a*erm which to us is much more mys
terious thitn "leg pulling."—[Express.
It wae not expected that the Singing
An Of Mono, who lies nneasy on tbe
tripod of thn atarveiing Express, noto
rious (or the misinformation it conveys
to iti limited constituency, would com
prehend the "myeterious term" "la
goo." Evidently the Monrning Dove of
Bodie, wbo boasts tbat be arrived in
Los Angeles wben the Band "came up"
to Hill street, imagines that "Iagoo" is
an error of ths Exprsae variety for
"lago." Bnt it Isn't. The crass igno
rance of the Pea Green Exhalation of
Esmeralda is thus flaunted in the view
of an intelligent community, competent
to understand an allusion from Long
fellow and not apt to confound it with
a character of Shakespeare, like a pen
nant on the poop of a Japanese junk.
Oo to, thou mellow sqnash of journal
ism 1 Get tbee to a kindergarten, and
there make effort to absorb knowledge
as a sponge. The less ths editor of the
BExnran knows, the mora bs strives to
m tba fact npon those afflicted
the babit of reading what ths
thinks be Is savin*.
JIM IS THERE.
Il ths last official act of Governor
Jamea H. Bndd shall be aa praiiworthy
and thoroughly in aooora with the eea
'ti aft Etaand"conviction!)tr! ths lawabid-
Ing eitizsns ol the atate as his removal
ol Moses Gunat has been, then a very
different (ortnne from that which has
befallen ex-Governor Markham awaits
bis retirement from the gubernatorial
obair.
"Are you there, Jim?" Is no longer a
proper qnestion. Evidently bs is. He
has proven his presence most emphatic
ally and moat pleasingly to tho better
elements of society. Almost his first
official act haa been to revsrss
ths last act of an ex-governor
who will be chiefly reinembsrsd for
having had the audaoity to affront
a sovereign peopla by the appointment
of a professional sport and gambler to a
high end moat responsible offioe. Ex-
Govsrnor Markham will go down in
history ai the man wbo made Mo-ie
Gunst polios commissioner of San Frau
eicco. And whatever else Governor
Budd may or may not do dnring his
torrn of office, San Francisco, at leant,
owes him an undying debt of gratitude
for lifting from ita shonldrrrj ths unwel
come though justly deservad bttrd.-'i of
a Moses Gunst.
"Mose Gunst has went" shij tints
sure enough. And his going proves one
thing—the power of publio sentiment
when thoroughly aroused to united and
emphatic action. Who slull now say
that public opinion, rightly expressed,
is a doad Isttsr even in this corporation*
ridden commonwealth? It tiaeds only
the samo exhibition of rnnnly decision
and i ldignation, expressed in the same
determined ana united manner to rid
tbo state of California of a burden the
weight and sins of which is as a m-ma
lam to a molehill wben spoken of in tho
same breath with Moies Quoit. Even
tho publio spirit" i oitizana who de
nounced Mosos Gunst loudest, declared
him an honest man in his call
ing. Not even the most prejudiced
partisans and witrniei. admirers of
Collis P. Huntington would have the
tomeritv to spoak of him as au bonost
man, or deny thn be has and does bribo
legislatures, congress and tha court to
do his selfish bidding. But Collis P.
Huntington can hit back, whereas to
attack a man of Moses GuustV calibor
mesnt merely to trounce a potty offen
der against the social code.
It remains to be oeeu whether theso
same hold citizen* of Ban Franoiseo who
demanded, in thunder tonsv, the re
moval of a social pariah from tho head
of tbeir police department shall havo
enough of their boldness left to domand
the dethronement of a social leopard
wbo has never changed his spots; of n
political and financial tyrant who has
tbe power and the venom to strike bauk
when whipped.
But whether San Francisco shall be
bold again or not, the power of her
voice baa been proven. The ehiof
magistrate of tbe etate has heard
it, and heeded it, though until
the Los Angeles Herald pointed
out the fact that the governor
could undo such an appointment, not
even tbe bold ones of San Francisco
looked for assistance in the welcome
manner in which it hns come.
BOODLEISM.
The people generally may not be aware
how extensively b.iodle'.-ru prevails. It
includoß more than the payment of cash
down fur official favors. Boodleism is
tbe life and soul of bossism aud maobine
politics, for it inoludes parceling out
nominations and appointments in com
pensation for political work. The boas
Bays to Tom: You do this And you shall
liave auch an office, or ba nominated for
it; to Diok, if you will bring up a
dolsgation that wili support Tom, you
shall be his ohisf deputy ; and to Harry,
if yon will give na the delegates from
your ward and Tom is nominated and
elected, we will get enough money outo
him to pay you for your work, or you
shall be employed in such a position, or
have a fat contract.
Machine politic? is for no purpose but
to bave in office men wbo cao be used to
advantage in places where there is
patronage or money to be expended for
tbe benefit ol those who are cogs in the
machine. It is all for the purpose of
controlling natty nominations and plun
dering the people.
Boodleism goes farther. Tho machine
men aro suppoaod to have influence with
thoßO whom they have caused to be
nominated, and the unwary people hare
olected, aud can dictate the dispensation
of patronage. Thoae who are not sup*
potiod to have earned places by work
for the machine are expected to pat up
caAh for appointments, and the ward
bosses demand it an coolly as if it were
the pr.ct on a horse or cow, and the
seekers for places to an extent tbat
would be aatouiahing to tha unsophisti
cated, do from time to timo pay a per
centage from thoir salaries. No wonder
there ie not more economy and rigid
honesty in tbo discharge of public duties.
The boas could not run his machine
without patronage boodleor cash boodle,
Dan Burns wanted to have Moao Gunst
appointed police commissioner that his
police force could b& relied on to help
his machine.
The inacbino makes nominationa for
office and diotatea bow official duties
shall be performed aud what policie
shah be pnraned, and not tbe people,
wbo have to foot the bill). And this
Bystem will prevail just as long aa tho
people wiil not interfere. Wben the
people shall cast about for oandidataa of
their choioe and take care that they are
nominated, machine politics, bossism
and boodleism will disappear. Then tbe
people will have soma voioe in the ap
pointment of deputies and aaaistants,
and doing dirty work or putting up cash
for inflaenoe will disappear. Then
aspirants for popular favor will not first
seek the bass and his strikers for sup
port. It is for those who hold good gov
ernment in highest consideration to say
whether boodleism eball pass into
ignominons oblivion. !
Party discipline it relied on by tbe
LOS ANGELES HERALD} WEDNESDAY MORNING. JANUARY Hi 6, 1895.
machine to eleot its nominees. This is
ths svil ol szcsisive partisantsm. If it
is necessary to secure the eleotion of
honest and capable man, let party go to
..the dogs. __ — _^______ <i _
Tv effort by tbe New Era association,
the members of which bays been drawn
from the ranks ol the unemployed,
should receive the hearty encourage
ment of every citizen of Los Angeles.
These people are making an honsst en
deavor to help themselves. They have
adopted the co-operativo plan, and they
ask tbe people to give them aa oppor
tunity to better their condition, offering
to perform any duty of wbich thoy
are capable for a reasonable compensa
tion. The members of tbe association
bave, in a measure, been oompelled to
organize on thia basis, aud it is unkind
to acouse them of interfering with the
opportunities of others equally deserv
ing. These people are trying to accom
plish in nnison something which tbey
found virtually impossible severally,
and they era willing to welcome
to their ranks as co-workers
all who are equally willing to perform
an honest day's work. It ia this effort
on the part of the laboring masses that
distinguishes tho honest workingmau
from the lazy, dissolute nnd criminal
tramp. If the workingman of this city
will all stand for thn principles practiced
by the New Era organization the
tramp probluta can bs easily settled, for
thero will no longer be difficulty in dis
criminating between the deserving and
tho vicious. Tbe former will
find encouragement forhensßt labor and
tbe latter can be mado to serve tbe com
munity invoiuntarily in the chain gang.
The tramp wbo will not work when it is
offered ii undeserving of sympathy or
assistance, but ou tbs othsr hand, the
man who tries to perform bis duty to
himself and his fellow man is worthy of
the moßt cordial encouragement.
Mr. Osborne is evidently nnder or
ders to divert publio attontion from the
main question ir. tbia ißsue by provoking
a personal quarrel between Tub Herald
and the Express. It ia au old trick of
the enemy. But Mr. Huntington, wily
fox that be ie, will ti ml thai, he has to
deal with men as adept in this fort of
warfare as he. Osborne of the Express
is but small game. Ho ia tbo dog in
leash. An occasional cut ol the whip
or c hick at intervals will send him
yolpitig to his kenuwl. It is not tbe
creature that Tub Hibald ie now con~
corned with, but the master. It is
Huntington and not Osborne that is
vow in evidence. Those who hunt
liona do not ntop to knock over jsckalß.
Altar the chase—when tho nobler game
has been bagged, The Herald may de
rive a brief amusement in acoyote drive.
AFTER THREE TERMS.
Mre. Helm RciuoTtd From a Kentuoky
Postofflo*.
Washington, Jan. 14.—Franklin W. Joplin
was Appointed postmaster today at Elisabeth*
town, Ky., vice Mrs. llenjamin Helm.
The circumstances surrounding the case
make i( one of unusual interest. General Hen
Hardin Helm, the husband of Mrs. Helm, was
one of tbe most gallant soldiers in the confed
erate army. He WSJ the commander of the
famous Orphans' brigade and was killed at the
battle of Chickamauga.
Mrs. Helm, the post in ist ress who wai re
moved today, was a younger sister of Mrs.
Abraham Lincoln, who was a Todd. Colonel
Robert Lincoln was her nephew, and when lie
was appointed secretary of war by President
Garfield lie secured bis aunt's appointment as
postmistress of Bllxabethtown. that position
She bas beld through three administrations—
Arthur's, Cleveland's ami Harrison's.
Although an effort was made to bave Mrs.
Helm removed during Mr. Cleveland's first
term, it tvui not urgently pressed and was un
successful. The appointment of Franklin w.
Joplin today was made on tbe recommendation
of Representative Montgomery.
MUSKY FOB NINKir.SIX,
How Unci* Sam Will Bp.tid a Few
atlllloaa.
Washington, Jan. 15.—Tbe sundry civil ap
propriation bill for 'Oil was completed by the
house committee today. It carries $38,540,
--021, being $7,843,733 less than estimated and
$4,28b,245 more than tlio appropriation for
the current year.
Among postaffloebuilding appropriations are
tbe following: Portland, tire., $lOi.,000; San
F'ranciseo, $500,0110. For San Francisco har
bor there is appropriated $50u,"00; recoinage
of silver coins, $100,000; enforcement of tbe
alfen contract labor law, $100,000, nnd for the
enforcement of the Chinese exclusion act,
$100,00.1.
M. COLD PROPOSITION.
Rerrla-trator Carl ta Be Built at Kanaka
Oity.
Kansas City, Jan. 15. —A local paper says: A
gigantic corporation is being formed for the
purpose of manufacturing refrigerator cars iv
Kansas City. The company will have a capital
of $11,500,000, and It is being backed by the
Adams of Boston and other eastern capitalists
The company will build an immense plant at
Ariuourdale.
a Lap-Bared Journalist.
Pomona Beacon.
The Express did not support Mr. Budd for
governor, but as a newspaper devoted to the
interests of California first, desiring the wel
fare of the state above everything, it trusts he
will make a good chief executive and discharge
the duties of the ollice with credit to himself
and the state.
From our esteemed Angelefio contemporary
come the foregoing conciliatory words, and it is
indeed refreshing to know that; the dear public
will have a rest from tho onslaught which that
erratic journal has been making on Mr. Itudd
because some lop-eared ward politician of
San Francisco said he was not honestly elected.
If the Express will go on "simply trustiog
every day," it will probably learn that James
H. Budd will make a good chief executive if he
has a chance.
He Hm Aotitrt.
Fresno Expositor.
The Los Angeles Herald publishes an ex
position of the law relating to Han Francisco's
eternal police commissioner to prove that Gov
ernor Budd has the power to remove Mose
(iunst from office and appoint a man in his
place who is "in touch" with the law-abiding,
order-loving and decent people of that city, in
place of the leader of the sporting element,
the gamblers, the keepers of houses and re
sorts ior the demi-monde and the "chippies."
It is hoped that Thb Herald's exposition is a
true one. If it is, Governor Budd will no
doubt act accordingly.
•'A «r«at Pepur.'*
Yreka Union.
The Los Angeles Herald is being male a
great paper under its new management and
its New Year's day issue was an astonisher and
contained 28 pages of illustrated and other
matter interesting to readers, being about
equal to a book. There must be much money,
the great moving power of a daily paper, and
also enterprise behind The Herald now. Our
friends who published The Herald formerly
made a highly creditable paper, but, of course,
the cash drawer could not allow a spread like
the present being made.
Dr. Price's Cream Baking Powder
World's Fair Highest Medal and Diploma.
THE VALLEY RAILROAD.
BOCTKERX PACIFIC RATES.
This is clearly a misnomer, but let it stand,
The Southern Pacific has no rates. What it
has are charges. And these charges are gov
erned—by what? By whit can be obtained, by
all the traffic will bear. And sometimes they
overestimate—they hare never yet made the
mis'akc of underestimating—the amount that
the traffic will bear and survive. Of course, it
isn't the intention of this philanthropic cor
poration to entirely crush out the fruit grow
er's business. That would be cruel and, inci
dentally, not good policy on the part of tho
octopus. Of course, fruit must be raised, else
there would bo nothing for thu southern Pa
cific to carry. But it need not be raised by
free men. Slaves can raise fruit. How to
properly subjugate the fruit growers and keep
them in a state of pervi'.uds has been the prob
lem. It wasn't very difficult to enslave the San
F: ancisco shippers. That did not even tax the
Ingenuity of the ptoua Mr. Huntington. To
bring the valley growers to a proper sense of
gratefulness for the privilege of Jiving and
growing fruit ou Mr. Huntington's plantation
has been a task that even the giant brain of
tho pious old man lias not been entirely equal
to up to the present writing.
True, the Southern Paeif'r; has succeeded in
many instances in reducing the valley grow
ers to the material condition of slaves. It has
impoverished them, but the deuce take their
stubborn spirit, tbey have declined to kiss the
hand that smiths them and steals the fruit of
their labor. Here they are today in Los An
geles streets walking upright liko free men
and—mark well their audacity- actually plot
ting to throw off the financial yoke that Oc
topus Huntington has iried all these years to
fasten upon them forever. Vassals plotting
against their lord I What stuff these valley
men must bo made of! Why are they not at
home working on the old man's plantation?
"During the A. R. U. strike in this state there
WM an endeavor to create public sentiment
against the strikers by stating that the fruit
growers near the line of road would be ruined
hy inability to get their products to market,"
says Barry's Star. "Meeting with an old ac
quaintance, who for several years had been en
gaged in the business near Colfax, we referred
to that view, lie said it was nousanse, for tiie
simple reason that thu fre ght rates charged
by the monopoly were so high that, in connec
tion with tbe speculations to which growers
are exposed from commission merchants, fruit
growing had become unprofitable, and but lit
tle would have been Shipped last summer had
there been no strike. And here are the figures
as to thu charge! from Colfax as he gavethem;
To Denver and Halt Lake, #250 per carload of
12 to 14 tons; to Chicago, l l i cents a pound,
or $300 to $3,50 a carload. To Buffalo, $396.47,
and to New York, #414.0<>.
"These rates are without refrigerators, for
which tho extra charge is $164.78 to Buf
falo, and .f 175 to New York.
"But there i s competition, as from Los An
geles to Chicago the charge is only L}2so< re
frigerators included. That is about what the
charges would be from Colfax, while theactual
charge is $300 t09350. without refrigerators,
Which would probably be $150 more—a differ
ence, of nearly two to one.
"But the comparison does not do the subject
full justice, as competition reslly increases the
expense of the name to the companies, wheieas
that expense would be very much decreased
under complete government ownership.
•'The testimony ot Mr. Stubbs before the in
terstate commerce commission some years ago
and thu concurrent estimates of expertß, as
embodied in professional journals, are to the
effect thai tbe actual cost of moving freight
on roads varies but little from three mills per
ton per mile. Tbis, we presume, do.*s not in
clude the expenses of station and depot serv
ice. For these, however, a fixed allowance
of, say, $3.00 per carload, irrespective of diF
tance, would appear to be ample; but much
more might be allowed, and still the sum
would much less thou the rates now
charged
' Take, for instance, the following compari
son between the Btubbl figures of cost and the
tictunl charges: Colfax to Salt Lake, 72i miles,
$2.17 per ton, $i 0.78 per carload of 14 tons
(they are likely to be 12 to 13 tons ; add $3,
fixed charges; total, $33.78. The railroad now
charges sjt!lstf.
*■ We have no table of distances beyond Salt
Lake on that line, but Denver is about 300
miles father, and the actual cost of service to
that place would be, on the same basis of cal
culation, 00 cents per ton more.
"From Colfux to Chicago is very close to
222G miles, which, according to the estimate
again, would make the cost $6.68 per ton, or
$93.52 por carload of 14 tons, or, with fixed
charges added, $96.52. The actual present
charge is from $300 to $350.
"Buffalo is about 800 miles from Chicago by
the route south of Lake Brie, or about 250 by
the Canadian route. The movement cost would
therefore be about $7.tU per ton, or $106.54 for
a 14-tou car; add the $3 for fixed expenses,
and we have & cost of $109.54 per car, for
which the railroad charge*: 9895.47, the differ
ence representing what the people have to
pay for the luxury of having roads run by
private corporations with $50,000 salaries for
the managers, whole rafts ot lawyers, spies, de
tectives, lobbyists, politicians, etc.. as against
the rates that would be charged were the
roads owned and run by the government.
' New York is about 3.151 miles from Colfax
which on the same basis of calculation ns
above, would give a rate of $9.40 per ton, or
9183.80 per carload ; $185.80 including station
expenses, charges ou the plan of more than
'all the traffic will bear' now are $Ll4.o<i.
The cost to tho public for millionaire di
rectors, officials, and other business is $276.72,
or more than doublo the necessary total charge
under government ownership.
"These arc the kind of facts that the press
keep from the people. Yet fruit ra sing ii one
of the most important Industries of the state.
If fruit raisers had taken The Star for the last
ten years, they would not have to threaten the
railroad (as they didj that they would ship no
fruit next season unless the rates were lowered,
as they will be. As ii is, for the trifling de
ductions from the enormous overcharges ex
acted this season, the fruit growers will still
permit tho monopoly to charge them more
than double what tha service is worth."
coming still nearer home, there is the case
of Editor W. W. Karnes oi the Hanford Demo
crat who has had personal experience with the
octopus. He tella about It in the following
paragraph:
"The aouthern Pacific Railroad company
have numerous ways ot filching from the pub
lic. Not satisfied with 'all the Iraflic will
bear,' they overcharge. A short time since
the Democrat received a package of freight
weighing sixty-five pounds, but the octopus
collected for 110 pounds. On two other bills
of freight the overcharge exceeded 100 pounds.
If it treats all of its customers alike, it is no
wonder there is a general howl for a compet
ing railroad."
VUI RAILS B PRE AD.
A Bud Railroad Einiih-Dp Near Stock.
' •***•
SrocKTOx.Jan. 15.—Tho eastbound train from
lone on the narrow guage road was wrecked
this morning through the rails spreading. Two
passenger coaches were overturned and 75
passengers severely bruised. Several were
burned by being thrown against the stoves,
which were overthrown. Seats were torn from
their fastenings and hurled against the pros
trate passengers, Willinm Ire and, jr., ex
state mineralogist, has an ugly gash on the
head. After the wounded were cared for they
wore taken to (ialt on freight cars.
North Onrullna'A UtinloJ.
RALBtOH, N. C, Jan. 15.—Marion Ilutler was
unanimously nominated by the l'opulist
caucus to succeed General Ransom as united
States senator Tho Republicans were invited
to be present and they attended In force. The
Populists and Republicans then jointly rati
fied the nominations of J. C. Prltchurd nud
Marion Butler for United Stated senators from
North Carolina.
Ladies never have aay dyspepsia af'er a wine
glau of Aopoitura Biitera, tbe genuine of Dr. J.
0. B. Blegers & tfoct, Aiit your druggist.
THE TitO I* LEY TIE-UP.
Man and Oompioifi itoii. S land la g-
Pmt.
Brooklyn, Jan. 15 —Both sides in the elec
tric street railway strike show a determined
Iront Today. -On r*.ie» CourVe-twct line SOftarß.
are being run at irregular intervals, each
guarded by two to eight policemen. Tho
trikers or friends obvtructed the tracks by up
setting barrels of ashes. The rubbish wa
cleared away by laborejs, and a mail car was
sent out at 7:12 o'clock, preceded by six
mounted policemen, while eight unmounted
policemen rode in the car. It passed though
the district where the strikers are reported
inure reckless than elsewhere, but the manner
in which it was guarded overawed any
who .might have been inclined to
lawlessness. The United Mates mail car on
ihe I- lat bush avenue line was started out at
i> :2M o'clock and Die company announced it
was determined to run mail cars all day. The
strikers contemplate presenting a petition to
Mayor bhicren today asking him to end the
tie-up by virtue of his official jower and will
cite the act ion taken by Mayor Pingree of De
troit in 1891, when he said ttie railroad com
panies had violated tlie ten-hour law, and
warned them that if the strike then in progress
was not over in twenty-four liours he would
declare their charters forfeited. A meeting of
tin; strike committee of the surface lines was
held early todar. The members refused to tell
what action had be*u taken.
■ ~
DIVORCEES INTERESTED.
Th* Rig-lit of Prob»«« Jarigaa to Alter
Mntrtmonlat Mlaftta.
GTJTHRIB, O, T., Jan. 15.—1n the supreme court
today a mot'on was granted for the hearing o
the celebrated Irwin divorce suit. This is the
case in which the question of the right of pro
bate judges to grant divorces was raised and
the decision of which invalidated over a thou
sand divorces granted uy such judges through
out the territory, involving hundreds of peo
ple from every state in the union. Rich divor
cees have contributed a large sum and
employed the most eminent lawyers in the
southwe.t to secure a re-hearing. If they lose
it is their intention to push a bill through the
legislature legalizing the divorces in question.
TDK GULDEN FLKECK.
Another Alining Itoom iv Oklahoma
T*rrlt«ry.
QUTHRIK, O. T., Jan. 15.—Hundreds of pros
pectors are swarming into the Wichita mount
ains, In the Kiowa and Comanche Indian res- \
ervations, caused by the discovery of rich de
posits of gold and silver. Troops have been >
ordered from J'ort Reno to eject them, and se- '
rious trouble is looked for, as the prospectors
declare they have a right iv the mountains
under the mining laws and will not leave.
Many samples ol rich ore have been brought
out for assay in the past tew days and a gen
eral btamt ode for the mines will likely ensue.
An Inrtnatrlal Convietrri.
Sacramento, Jan. 15.— H. Miller, the so
called captain of Kelly's industrials, was con
victed this evening of violating the city ordi
nance relating to meetings that obstruct thu
streets. He will be sentenced Thursday. To
night the city trustees accepted the offer of tlio
committee on safety to furnish 100 special po
licemen without pay to patrol the city and
keep It free from tramps and roughs.
Brings comfort nnd improvement and
tends to personal enjoyment when
rightly used. The many, who Jive bet
ter than others and enjoy life more, with
less expenditure, by more promptly
adapting tbe world's best products to
the needs of physical being, will attest
the value to health of the pure liquid
laxative principles embraced in the
remedy, Syrup of Figs.
Its excellence is due to its presenting
in tlio form most ncceptabl', and pleas
ant to the taste, the refreshing and truly
beneficial properties of a perfect lax
ative; effectually cleansing the system
dispelling colds, licadn.hes and fevers
and permanently curing constipation.
It lias given satisfaction to millions and
met with the approval of the medical
profession because it acts on the Kid
neys, Liver and Bowels without weak
;ning them and it, is perfectly free norn
every objectionable substance.
Syrup of Figs is for sale by all drug
gist's in 50c and 81 bottles, but it. is man*
ufnetored by the California Fig Syrup
?o.only, whose name is printed on every
oaekage, also the name, Syrup of Figs,
Ind being well informed, you will not
ICcept any substitute it' offered.
te 1
jj A Beaatifui |j
| j Hand _ jj
', > Presents a spectacle for universal adsal- I
<? ration. There's character In the hand, S
I > and the hand deserves attention for that < *
very reason. What the hand Is to a
< J large extent Is the result of care and J >
1 » attention. Medicines preserve Ihe <'
3 * health; manicure articles preserve the ' |
< | hand. All such requisites of pleasing 3'
S palm 9 that bespeak a character justify.
3 ' Ing pride ate shown In our stock ol tol- < J
< | let and manicure article]. It's most ' >
S unwise, judging by results, to neglect <'
J> either the hand, or tbe health, and our <!
<| stock ol drugs and medicines offers the ]>
' > bast of everything needful to preserve <'
!l H. GERMAIN, jj
< I -TIIK ORIGINAL- 3 '
II Cut-Rate Druggist, lj
|; 123 S. SPRING ST.
* Wholesale. Retail.
BABA & CO.,
JAPANESE GOODS.
Chlaaware, Bronze, Lac
quer Ware, Shells, Paper
Napkins, Bamboo Art. AU
latest style of hand work.
344 8, SPAING} BT.
A M IT SK H It NT*.
\| 08 ANGELES THEATBK. >
J> Li 0, M. WOOD, Leasee. <
< | H. a WYATr, Manager S
•' NEK T WE.f£K,- |
j I MATINEES I
j! WEDNESDAY AND SATURDAY |
j! BEATS NOW ON SALE.
',"> The Fashionable Event I
I < J 01 the Year. >
'> Engagement of the Famous MAJ?IIO ?
|! j
j; Grand English I
j; Opera Co.,
< [ Under direction of MR. chas. I'Ratt. f
8 THE largest, strongest nnd most com- &
,' II plcte Operatic organic *tio:l iv <k
<[ A BRILLIANT ARRAY OF ARYISCi! >
. > I ■ Thorough Qraad Opera Orchc&tra £
]t eapßMToisn <
<> Tuesday—ll. TROVATORE. <
Wednesday Matinee- BOHKMIAN GIRL <
<> Vieduesday Evening — CAVaLLEKIA S
# RUSTICANA and I I'ACJLIACU. S
.> Saturday Mattn-je—MARTHA. %
,> Saturday Night—TaNN'HAUHEB. <
<I rRICE=-*1.50, $l.7scand !>oc. $
NKW LO* ANUKLKj TH HAT Kit.
C. M. Wood, Lessee....ll. C. Wvatt, Manager
Three Nights—Thursday, Friday and
Saturday, Jan. 17, 18, 19.
Matinee Saturday.
Return of the Supreme Favorites,
HAVERLY'S
MASTODONIC OPERATIC
MINSTRELS!
Directed Personally by Col. J. H. Haverly.
A comple'e Change of prosramme presented ly
all the old favorites and the specially added
Star Comedian of tha World, Mr. LARKY
DOOLEY. New r ongs, storiet, acts and spe
eia tie*. First production here of tbe oper
atic burlesque,
" BILL TROVATORE ! "
Introducing MISS ADDIK OABBIDY,
Prima Donna Soprano, and entiro
itrengLh of company
Prices 25, 50, 75c, $1. Seats now on Bale.
Tit A il \ CONCERT Hill,,
323-325 Downey blk, N. Main sU
ADMISSION FREE.
First Appearance of
CHARLES COLBURN,
Character Ariist.
Continued riuecess of
MISS GERTIE RAVEN,
BERT ROXIE, the Silver Tenor.— Also tuts 1.03
Angeles Favorite,
MISS GENEVA HAZELTON
The Eccentric Come- Tbe American Night
dian, Ingale,
BILLY MORTON. MISS BE Kill A (MOLE
Concert from 7:30 to Vi, Change of pro
gramme every week.
N. B,— Closed Sundays.
Next week—Reappearanca of Mulligan and
Lyntor.
THE JAP!
WHAT'S THE JAP ?
'Ti* the greatest conception of the moet
famous Japane.e artlu, who nosed lor and
catved bia oiru statue, life fize, in wood. No
equal iv tbe at woild. 20(1 S. Spring street,
opposite Ho 1 nbies. '2b cents.
UOIKLM AND KISOKIB.
TJi"i'T , Tj , r CTT A MTVT H CORNER GRaND ST., IS
Xl\/IHiL/ Cs±. JViM \TXuLd\ t vow open. Hish elevation. Superior lot
health. Rates reasonable. MRS. A. M. SMITH, Proprietor.
r PTIT7* T> A "IMF, "PAP'TITTO UEUM ASD WNIiST SONNY ROOIH
lxl Vj X iKXJX.Y' X\J in I.os Aueoie=, *3 to #10 pot week. A well
heated house. Meals at moderate rate*. 423-42f> y. SPKING H I'KEET.
TrHTUT Vf V CENTRALLY LOCATED. OLIVK ANU SECOND MT3.
ll\ X X XIiXJ /VXVVT J XjjZj Day boarder. Rooms elegantly lurnishert. All modern
conveniences. Table cannot be surpaawed. Term i reasoaable. D. E. BARTON, Prop.
iTf i'T , 'l7 , l TT"\rfVil TV second and hill-family hotel, appoint
lIV/ J. ljlj Xj I V. \ / ments perfect. Electric cars to all points.
THOS. PAHimm. Proprietor.
TTTTT' TT A TVyTTT TfIXT FIRST CLASS FAMILY HOTEL, OPP. SLXTH-BTRKRT
liljj XI I V Irl lij li' ll Park. Couvemsnt lo all street ear lines. Rates reason-
521 B. OLIVE BT. able. MBS. J. C. PHII.BROOKi-.
mITI/F W/ l|> r |'l 131 XT .JL AND BROADWAY, FI&iT GLABJ It) EVERY
) 1 VjXj Tr Vlllll particular. Hoard ami lodging, #1.50 per day ami up.
Suites lor ;<mill-» F. J. BPaUiDING, Prmiriotor.
p ~i r t rv> (~~* A T T T7T\T3 TvT T A second and hill sts. the
1 I I [ll WITXiN l-T-V- "'"y centrally located flr. t-c a«s
fumily hotel iv the city. American
plan: -ultes with bath. Rates, $2.50 per day nnd up. Bpocia. rates to families. Elegantly
furnish. 1. SMITH,Ac WYI.IK, Pniprletora,
r T T A XZ> A T~~\ T A SANTA MONICA, CAL.
■t* -*- -*—' '—' ***IV/1 150 rooms: steam heat; hot ocean
water baths. For information as to rates, etc., apply at Los Augelos office, 231 WE3T FIRST
6TRBET, opp'oslto Nadeau Hotel.
S. RE! N HART. Proprietor.
THE REDONDO HOTEL l«r winter resort on the coast, Ace.es
siblo by trains of ihe SouUiem raiifornia ant] Red'mdo Railways; 4o minutus - ride from Lo-
Ange.es, Every room nn outside one, Hunny and bright. Exciieiit Üble. Billiard parlors*
Dancing room and tonm* court. Hot salt water swimming nnd plunge baths mar hotel. Kiua
ashing from the wharf. Free iraut-portntiou to and from Loh Augeles to weekly or mouthl*
guests. For description and illustrated books uud rates app yto
D. ONE".ILL.
_ R'jdondu Hotel, Redondo iiu-ieu, Lrsl
Or to CITY OFFICE REDONDO RAILWAY.
Bradbury Block, Loc Aneeles.
S, fci~77 DALDtfIN'B HOTEL OMWOOD,
£ U Arcadia. Los Anjj ;les Co., Cal.
CIXTEBN MILES FROM rOH ••, 7 miles fron\
Pasadoua, on tf J. Haldv.-iu i fun nn s.nta Amu
r mfa - ranch. B'eveu train: Inly Male diligent
il (RlfllHLil ' ■- inquiry conc.rninti this paradise fnr the weary traveler,
■' J ffi^gtrffi^ l,! i■ ■ beiorc declJiug upon your winter re-uiny pla. ; Uuesvi
v^V^m^M^^ '"■ at the Oak swooa hard fre ■■ access to "„ueky ' Baldwin.,
* ' ->■"' . < famous rauch—a beautiful pUvtrroinid of ftti 000 »c:bs,
-Tvj?i7™' — M. LAWRENCE, Mewucr,
Best Appointed Hotel in JH
Los Angeles. %f : '' ' •• a
American and European Plans, : :f
Central Location. c l
First-class service.
Bessonable Hates. I '^l^^kM^^&iC&^^'l,
Finest Cafe in the City *<EEr^
In Connection.
South Main Stroot, between Flrßt and Second
Formerly Urand Opera House.
LOS ANGELES'
SOCIETY : VAUDEY,LLE : THEftTER,
ta conjunction with Sin Francisco Orpieum.
Week Commencing: Mouday, Jan. ll>
An entiri" new company direct f'om
ths fan F.anclsco Orpheum, on thoir
return voyage to Europe and the east.
Tin Rrait: Bitten Hamzii Km,
Tbe Knsslc/s, John -McChariy Nellie.
Ceori;ius Cuiistaiiliac i Lyons.
Lattt weak of Las', week of
THE MORKLLOS UEO. EVANS.
i And the gecat dog Bob. Lone Star Minstrel.
Per 'or ma nee every evening, Including Bnn
da«. K-. ■■■ i.i.- prloet: Parqimte, 25 and 50c:
family olrdo, 23c; gallery, 10c; single box and
Inge seats 75c.
MATINEES BATUBDAY & SUNDAY.
MATINEE PRICES:
•2:>c to any part of the house; children 10c, any
a.al; gallery 10c; single box aud logcseats 50c
CilF-Coming—T.YDlA YEAMANB TITUS.
I> L 111* >N it th li UK ::.
) Main street, betweea Fifth and Sixth,
Fbeij A. Coui'kk, Manager.
Tho Evont of the Seiaoii—Week Commencing
Sunday, Jan. ill— Matinee Saturday.
Miss Jeffreys Lewis
In Her Masterpiece,
Forget Me Not!
Supported by tho entire Cooper Company,
auvmi-nted and airenvtnened for this occasion.
ADMISSION: Orchestra chairs, 50c: fam
ily ami dress circles, 30c; balcony, 20c; gallery,
15c; boxes, 50c ana 70c.
\ T EiV VIENNA ItPFFET,
IN 111-110 Court st.. Los Augeles.
F. KhKlvOW, Prop.
NONGRESCON AND LORNE,
From Australia.
MISS RETA QOUQH,
The Great Favorite of Los Angeles.
MISS EFFIE ADAMS,
The Charging Danseuse.
Berth Family Orchestra.
Concertevory evening from 7:30 until 12,
and Saturday matinee from 1 to 4 p. m.
jCfifT**Fiiio a .immercial luuch. Finest cuisine
and meals a la carte at all hours.
The True Route
DURING THIS SEASON OF THE YEAR
tho most pleasant, route to the uiitire east,
viih no high altitudes ot snovv blockades, U
via EL PAeO uud the
TEXAS & PACIFIO RY.
THROUGH PULLMAN PALACE
AND TOURIST OA 113 DAILY
Between California and Chicago, Ht. Louis and
Arkansas Hot Hpriogi wrfthout change. For in
formation apply to any agent of & P. Co., or to
T. D. CONNELLY,
Traveling Pa*flPu«er Auent. stim3on Block.
rJOrE ■ OHEIi^
THE TAILOR Mf
MAKES TIIE BEST CLOTHES - ify
At 25 PER CENT LESS JtLwk
4MAN ANY OTHER HOUSE.
SlTl'S Kais to order fiom
PANTS »ade to order from $5 Ima
FINE TAILORING I H
«t T XODJSJIATE PRICES I ffKal
for Belf-Meaaaremontw fl
sad Haiuplrs of Cloth bcut free
No. 143 S. Spring St.,
LOS ANGELES.

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