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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, September 16, 1895, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1895-09-16/ed-1/seq-7/

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The Herald
"Want" Ads
M% — a —-—
The popular advertising. Five cents
per line, or $1 per line per month.
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
Rales for advertisements under this classifi
cation -I time, 0 cents per hue: 1 week, 30
cents per line; 1 inotitli, #1 per line
se- ~- --.-r —,—_—. - , ■ -
houses anil Lots
FOR SALE -HOUSE 5 ROOMS, GOOD
barn, flowers and fruit dees, on Pico
St.; $1(100. COUTS .t SIMPSON, 400
Byrne blk.
for sale-nf:w 7-ROOM HOUSE ON
Westlakc aye., near car line; $2">00;
all modern. COUTS it SIMPSON, 400
Byrne blk.
FOR SALE-NEW 0-f.OOM HOUSE.
Santne St.; Al "snap;'' $4000;
"terms." COUTS ,t SIMPSON, 406
Byrne blk.
FOR SALE—IF YOU WANT SOME
thing nice - 10-room house, lawn,
flowers, cement walks, good cellar; lot
114xl«5. Call at room 406 Byrne blk.
COUTS ct SIMPSON.
FOR SALE WE HAVE A FINE |
place on Boyle Heights, 8 rooms and
closets; "corner;"' will trHdo for ranch.
Bee COUTS A SIMPSON, 406 Byrne blk.
FOR SALE WE HAVE A FINE LOT
on Wlnfleld st., near car line, nnlv
$800; lots in s-amn block sell for $000.
COUTS A SIMPSON, 100 Byrne bin. If
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE
ASK FOR PRICE, TERMS AND CON
DITIONS.
Fine improvod lands, Pomona: good,
Choico improved places, Ontario.
Beautiful piaeea, improved, Hermosa.
Fine, well-located, improved plaoe,
Gucamonga.
Good unimproved lands, South Cuca
monga.
Cheap and good lands, Beaumont and
Banning.
Choice fins improved homes, San Oftbr'l,
Ditto " " " Alhambra.
Also " " " Vernon.
And good alfalfa ranch, Compton.
f What do you want, to exchange for Chi
cago, Kansas and Nebraska property?
1 have new city residences <nd desir
able cheap lots in any part.of the city.
Sonic of them must be sold soon.
CHARLES C. LAMB,
213 W. First st.,opp. Nadeau House
FOR SALE—BARGAINS AT BOYI.E
Heights—Lot 52x176 on Soto st., near
First, $750.
■ Lot 50x135 on Third, near Mathow st.,
$550.
Lid 00x148 cor. First and Soto sts.,
$1050.
Lot 07x1511. cor. Michigan and Soto sts,,
$1200.
Housc'of 0 rooms, bath, etc., 1436 Pleas
ant aye.; $2100.
New modern 0-rootn house on First st.,
$27511.
House of 5 rooms and bath on First st.,
$1800.
Now 5-room nouso ana bath on Michi
gan aye, $1300.
House of s rooms, hall, bath, etc., on
Third st., $2500.
F. A. HUTCHINSON,
10 213 W, First St.
FOR SALE
SNAP
$1700--l''ive-room cottage, with all latest
improvements; new and built- by days'
work; trees and llowcrs; street improve
ments completed; beautiful place: 5
minutes' walk from pnstotfice; tornis
easy. Largo list of houses and vacant
lots in all parts of the city.
JOHN L. PAVKOVICH,
16 220 W. First.
FOR SALE—
The most complete 10-room house in
the city; large grounds; good barn,
grounds all nicely lain out all ready to
move into.
Al>o nice 8-room bouse witb all modern
conveniences; nicely decorated; Urge
barn; lot 73x137 to alley; this is now
ready for occupancy; southwest; only
$5000.
E. A. MILLER,
21 237 W. First st.
$1850-LOY ELY iToMFi; A MODERN
new 5-room cottage; has hot and cold
water, piped for gas, bath, pantry and
ciosets; marble washstaml, line mantel
and grate, double parlors and wide
porches; finished thnrugnout in yellow
pine; 'tis a gem for $185U, on easy pay
ments; located on Fourteenth st., close
to tho electric road; street graded. 18
FOR ' SALE-SISUO; .MODERN ..-ROOM
cottage, bath, hot and cold water,
pantry, fruit trees, lawn, dowers, electric
and cable cars, graded streets, sewer and
good location. For Ihis gilt-edged prop
osition see COYNE it CO., Los Angeles
Theater bldg. 0-4 tf
IF~ V OU - IIAVE A LOT WE WILL
build you a house on installments—
$8.50 a month on $500 or $17 ou v $1000
house. MECHANICS, SAVINGS MU
TUAL BUILDING it LOAN ASSN., 107
S. Brodaway. 10
FO~R SALE—BEaUtTf'UL NEW S-ROOM
house near Adams sheet and Univer
sity line: large lot; cheapest place in tho
city. POINDEXTER .t WADSWORTH
300 W. Second. 16
FOR SALE -EASY TERMS, ELEGANT
8-room house near Westlake park; sec
this before «0U buy. POINDEXTER ,t
WADSWORTH, 305 W. Second. 10
FOR SALE -6-ROOM COTTA GESOU TI I -
west near car line: investigate this;
will pay 10 pet cent net. POINDEXTER
<t WADSWORTH, 305 W. Second. 16
FOR SAI.E-5 TO 14 ROOMS: RESL
donees from $1000 to $7000; all parts
of city; very fine bargains; terms to suit.
MORRIS (t LEE, 328 S. Broadway. tf
FOR SALE—A SMALL MONTHLY In
vestment will soon enable you to buy
a bouse and lot. For full particulars see
the IMPERIAL LOAN ASSOCIATION,
room 20 Potomac blk. 10-2
FOR SALE—S TO 14 ROOMS; RESl
dencos from $1000 to $7000; all parts of
city: very line* bargains; terms to suit.
MORRIS it LEE, 328 S. Broadway. tf
FOR SALE-BEAUTIFUL NEW Co
lonial cottage, fully furnished, ready
for occupancy. 11. 11. BIXBY it CO.,
147 S. Boadway. 8-25 tf
ox an
immediate sale of your property by
placing tho same with W. S. CARTER
.V, CO., 328 S. Broadway. 18
FOR SALE —7-ROOM NEW HOWE;
close in; low rent. Apply at 616 Ruth
aye., or BErs WHITE, 221 W. First st. 16
FOR SALE—ON - INSTALLMENTS—
Houses in all parts of the city.
CREASINGER, 116 S. Broadway. 10—1
City Lots
FOR SALE -WE SELL THE EARTH
BASSETT oi SMITH, Pomona, Cal.
0-26tf
FOR SALE-REAL
City Lots)
FOB SALE-
That beautiful oortiei oi Ninth and w.
Beacon, 180x170: this is one of the choice
Corners in the Bonnie Brae section ; sec
it and you will agreo with me.
Also, only 75 feet left on the west side
of Boacon St., which is 80 feet; $2100.
Also, beautiful lot 80 feet wide in the
Harper tract; tins is choice; want some
one to build at once; 1 will make price
right.
E. A. MILLER,
21 21)7 W. First st.
THE GREEN TRACT.
Located cornet of Ninth st. and Union
aye. This is choice residence property.
Lots are saoh 66x168 to alley. Price, $2000.
WALTER E. BROWN,
205 W. Third st. 16
DOUGLAS HEIGHTS.
Choice lots in Douglas Heights for sale
on easy terms.
WALTER E. BROWN,
205 W. Third st. 10
FOR SALE- BYPoTniTeXTER AWADS
wortb, 3Q5 W. Beecnd
$125, lot near Twenty-third and Maple
aye.
*:.i(jo, lot on Thirtv-lirst near Hoover,
.*6on, lot on Thirtieth near Hoover.
$801), lot or: union near Sixteenth.
$1000, lot on Ninth near Blame.
$1000, lot on Twenty-second near Grand.
$1000, lot on Thirtieth near I'igueroa.
$1250, lot in South Bonnie Praf.
$1250, lot on Adorns, near Main. 10
FOR ~SALE~ BE A U tTfPT BUII.D
-lng lots for homes on E. Nintli St., in
HlseoOß ct Smith's second addition;
prices, $201) to $880, on easy terms. Ap
ply on tract or to C. A. SMITH, 213 W.
First st. 8-20tf
FOR SALE—BY OWNER -A BARGAIN"
2 lots, 80 ft. front, close to business
center; only $880 each, l-.'i cash; call
early Monday or Tuesday; free convey
ance. W. G. BAYLIE, money loancr, 227
W. Second st. 17
FOR SA LE - - II6" ME B—HOMES—HOiI EH
on liistalliuents ; (in installments. You
can secure a homo with a small amount
of cash, balance monthly or quarterly,
in convenient and desirable localities,from
W.S. CAR TER ,V CO, .128 S. Broadway. 10
Business Property
FOR SALE—BUSINESS PROPERTY—
$8000— Cornor lot, 50x150, S. Broad
way, with house.
$11,000—Corner on X. Broodwav, 80x80.
$12,000—Lot 51x125, near First on
Broadway.
$13.000—Lot 45x125 near cor. Third and
Spring sts.; will pay 8 per cent net.
$41,500— Fine brick block on Broadway;
rent lor $280 per month.
$100 front foot, 40 feet near Seventh and
Hill.
Corner close in on Seventh St., S3 front
feet.
$7100 -Lot 50x125 with H-rDom house,
near Fourth aim Broadway.
LEE A. M'CONNELL,
16 113 S. Broadway.
FOR SALE—I7S FEET ON MAIN ST..
$75 per front foot; I am informed that
this is the cheapest properly now for
sale on Main st. WA.VTER E. BROWN,
205 W. Third St. 17
FOR SALE-FINE BUSINESS LOT, 1
block from Spring and Franklin sts. ;
61x01; only $ln,00li; will double in value
in short time. POINDEXTER it WADS
WORTII, 305 W. Second st. 20
FOR SALE — INCOME PROPJORTY
close in—Lot 45x120, with it 2-story
bouse ot 40 rooms, situate near Third
and Main st.. $13,000; will pay 10 per cent.
LEE A. M'CONNELL, 1188. liroudwuy. is
Country Property
FOR 1 BALE—BTJRBANK AND LANK
ersliim lands.
10 acres of alfalfa land, Burbank, $200
per acre.
15 acres, San F'crnando aye., Lanker
sbim. $s0 per acre.
4% or 5 acres, 2 houses of 4 and 2
rooms, well 10 feet water, $1500.
S 30 acres.wltb irrigating water,frostless,
Hollywood. $400 per acre.
14 acres, best of alfalfa hind, El Monte,
at $250 per aero.
23 saures, 2 miles of Wilmington, $1200.
18 acres in walnuts in walnut belt,
$3600.
6-room house, cellar, hot and cold wa
ter, lut 150x150, Buibank, $2200.
5-room house, bath, etc., Burbank,
$000.
8 acres on Second st. in town of Bur
bank, $7511.
100 acres 6 miles above Newhnll on S.
P. R. R. j Thompson station is on the
land; price, $1000.
10 acres of lund, Fruitland, 400 bearing
trees, $3000.
4-room house, well, barn, 5 acres of
fruit, 5 acres in alfalfa, $3000.
35 acre hoe ranch on Los Angeles rivor,
8 miles of city; price, $2200.
16 GANO HENRY, olticc Natick house.
FOirsXLE--IoXCHES, 2 MILES FROM
Downey ami io from Los Angeles;
good sandy land; half mile off from 2
public roads; 3 to young walnuts. 3 to al
falfa, 3 to corn and pumpkins, 1 to grapes,
raspberries, blackberries, strawberries and
vegetables; 4-room house, barn,crib,stables
and chicken house; horse and bugggy ; 2
milch cows, 1 mowing machine and hay
rake, 1 harrow. 2 plows, 2 sets of har
ness, all improvements in good condi
tion, and about 200 chickens; ownsr is
going east and will give possession at
once; everything goes, crop and all, for
$1500 cash. B. M. BLYTHE. Downey,
Cal.. or 132 S. Broadway. 0-stf
FOR SALE—DO YOU WANT~A FINE
country residence?
Do you want sto 100 acres in the San
Gabriel valley?
Do you want a city residence?
Have you got something to sell or
trade?
Have you got some capital to invest
where it pays big profits?
E. K. ALEXANDER. 146 S. Broadway.
7-25tf
FOlt SALE—A 10-A ORE OR AN OB
ranch at Dunrte, the blue ribbon or
ange section ; 10 shares of slock in the
bßst water company in Southern Califor
nia. Apply to A. STEVENS HAL
STED, room "117, Bryson blk.
FOR SALK-WE SELiTtHE EARTH—
BASSUITT & SMITH. Pomona. Cal.
THE PLACE TOll AYE YOUR WATCH
repuired—you get a guarantee worth
something. W. J. GETZ, 336 S. Broad
way; 11-20
LADIES. ATTENTION !—HOT, COLD
and shower baths, with lady attend
ants, 7 for ft; porcelain tubs. 252 E.
Fifth st. 10-3
, BUY—HOUSES
WAN TED—TO BUY 4~ROOM'IfdIISE
to more. Cull at 426 8. Broadway. 15
LOS ANGELES II ERALD: MONDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 16,1895.
FOR SALE — /- ODGING HOUSES
FOR SALE —SNA P—
$2500— Lodging house of thirty rooms,
nicely furnished, all rooms occupied : low
rent and long leas ( .; best central loca
tion in the city , owner going away. This
is the best thine in the city for (be
money asked; lease alone is worth $1000
at least. If you mean oushiess call at
my oflice at wnce.
Also large list of good paying lodging
houses of all aisea and prices; before
purchasing elsewbero call and see the
bargains that 1 have to offer you.
JOHN L. PAVKOVICH,
16 220 W. First.
FOR<SALE--11P20~07 LODGI Si HHO ÜBEj
central location on S. Spring st. ; all
rooms rented year round; clear income
$120 per month: reason for selling over
work aud poor health; terms cash; this
is a rare opportunity for investment; if
you have money ami mean business for
further pa rt lou lars call at JOHN L. I'AV
KO\ ICH. 220 W. First st. 10
FOR SALE-MISCELLANEOUS
FOR HALE ATA GREAT SACRIFICE,
the lurniturc of a 7-rocmt nouse; orig
inal cost nearly $3000; everything ele
gant; upright piano, fine ovor-stuli'e<Kpar
lor pieces, exquisite dining room uiiiht,
porcelain dishes and silver ware: A-l bed
room sets, hair mattresses, etc. : I.oust- 1
blocks trom city hall; cun he leased by
the party Inlying the furniture; extra hue
large yard, full of flowers; here is a de
cided bargain for some one wanting n
nice home just ready to stop into, com
plete in every way, line and cheap. Ad
dress for full Information and price, 8.,
box 00. Herald oflice. t(
FOR SALE—WHEELS FOR 1806. THE
new '00 model tde, the great bill
climber will be on exhibition at 223 W.
p'oiirth St., opp. chamber of commerce,
Tuesday and Wednesday. September 3d
and 4th. Be snro and see it. 10
FOR SALE -NEW AND
hand puiiios on easy terms; largest
renting stocK in tho city; tuning .-md re
pairing pnpmply attended to by compe
tent workmen. KOHLER & CHASE, 233
S. Spring st. OOtf
FOR SALE—CHEAP; Al PRINCE AL
oert suit, made to order of One Eng.
lish cloy diagonal; breast 38, leg 82J4;
will trade for bicycle. 700J-. S. Spring
St. lu-10
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE-FOR
good ranch or house mid lots—One of
the best United States patents on earth;
fully tested as to merits. 656 S. Olive si..,
room 5. 0 21
FOR SALE CHEAP — FIRST-CLASS
bnrglor-proaf sate; weight, 8000 lbs.,
suitable for bank or railroad safe. In
quire 207 w. Second at., Bryson 10k. 21
FOR SALE—FOR - THE~F INFI STTf N
ished photographs in the city call ou
M. V. SHAFF, photographer. 389k S,
Spring. 10-6
FOR SALE — FURNITURE OF "~7
-room cottage at a bargain. 530 S.
Broadway. Cottage being for rent. tf
FOR SALE—IOHORSE-POWER BOILER
and engine. 32 1 Aliso st. 1 1-11f
FOR EXCHANGE
FOR EXCHANGE—
$3000 equity
$2<>oo encumbrance-
1 17-VOom house
-50-foot front lot — ■
— 120 deep, sightly location
Convenient to car line and business, for
city or country property, improved or
unimproved. For further information
call on W. S. CARTER 6S CO, .".2S s. Broad
way. 16
FOR EXCHANGE—
Stock in a good water and laud com
pany for property. The company lias
a reputation and the slock a
true value. He will exchange for
property with some incumbrance, or
will pay cash difference. Come in and
see our statements. It is all right.
WALTER E. BROWN,
16 205 W. Third »t.
FOR - EXCHANGE - I NCOME " PROP-'
erty, principal city in New Mexico;
free of debt; renting Steady at $70 a
month; want Los Angeles cily or coun
try property: will assume small mort
gage: prios, $7000. Apply BEN WHITE,
221 W. First st. 10
FOR" SALE O R"EN C 1 iAM i E- 20-XcRE
orchard. Riverside; nice home place;
will exchange for Ens Angeles or Pasa
dena property. V. WANKOWSKI, 207 S.
Broadway. 17
FOR EXCH ANGE—2 BELL OR EX-"
change your city property or ranches
go to MORRIS ,t LEE. 32S S. Broadway.
7-12H _
DENTISTS
DR. WflvTns, A. TO
opp. Los Angeles Theater bldg—Four
years in Los Angeles. Fine gold crowns
(small) $0: best silver tilling, $1; best set
teeth, $10; best gold plate, $35. Pain
less extracting. 11-211
ADAMS BROS. DE X T AI. PA RLORS
230!..' 8. Spring st.; painless extract
ing and hlling; plate, $6, $8, $10; all
work guaranteed; establisued 10 years.
Hours, 8-5, Sundays 10-12.
ALBANY " DEN TAI j PAR LOR S—G E R
man American Bank bldg, A set of
teeth JO; heal B. S. white teeth, $10 per
set.
W. IirMABSEUri)." i).".S.,"jIAS""ASr?O
-ciated himself with A. P. flays, D.
D. S., 115 W. First St. 2-32-6
F.~R. CUNIitNGTIAM, DENTIST, RH
moved to Htimaon blk., cor. Third
and Spring. Tel. 46.
FRANK STEVENS, 324}, B.BPHINU ST
Open Sundays and evenings, Elec
tric light.
DB. KENNEDY. 1 iENTIST, lose; n.
Spring et., rooms 2, ti rind 7. Painless
extraction.
WANTED—REAL ESTATE
WANTEI>~REAL [NG
succeeds like sin-cess 1 If you have
first-class property to dispose of, list it
with ns. Our sales today. Wednesday,
were $40,000. H. 11. BIXBY & CO., 147
S. Broadway. tf
WANTED—FOB CASH; VACANT LOTS,
houses and income property. If you
want to sell, I have cash hovers.
JOHN L. PAVKOVICH,
16 220 W. First. ~
WANTED-HOUSIiS-MOII E~~ HOUSJSS
to sell. If you have something cheap
wo have somo cash customer-. Bring
your property in. C. A. SUMNER A
CO., 134 S. Broadway. 9-24
WANTED—LOTS—SOME CHEAP LOTS
for cash customois. Bring in what
you have and we will sell It. C. A. SUM
NER At, CO.. 1,'!4 S. Broadway. h_i4
NURSER V
FOIf~BALE — NURSERY; REMOVAL
sale now on; bargains in plants;
prices cut one-third. L. A. NURSERY,
846 S. llioanway.
The court of queen's bench in Eng
land sat for the last time as a dißtinct
and separate court on October IjO, 1875,
but it is still continued as a branch of
tho judicature under tho old familiar
name, but only as a "division." When
it closed its long existence it had endured
for at least 1000 years.
A business firm on the third door of a
Market street building In Philadelphia in
wbicb there is no elevator rejoices in the
name of "Walkup Brothers."
WHAT YE SOW YE REAP
An Eloquent Sermon By
Rev. Bishop Mora
id »n in mi n!
A Discourse by the Rev. C. M.
Fisher
CHRIST GLORIFYING GOD
As Preached by Bishop Wilson at
Unity Church
Many Waysile Ministries Spoken of by
Mrs. Hax
An Interesting .Meeting of the l.os Angeles
Theoauphical Society Held Last liven
ing—An Ppitome
A large audience greeted Bishop Mora
in the cathedral yesterday morning and
listened to un eloquent sermon on the
text: "For what things a man shall sow
those also shall he reap."
In treating hi i subject the bishop said:
This greut truth expressed by the apos
tle is exemplified in al most all depart
ments ot life and knowledge. Tho Savior
before him had said: "You cannot gather
grapes from thorns nor ligs from this
tles." How necessary, thj::, in every
thing to sow good seed according to the
nature of the ca-e. How necessary to
sow good seed in the minds and hearts
of tbt young, nay, of the old as well;
seeds of virtue, seeds of truth, seeds of
Christian charity. Throughout this great
land today, s'» beautiful and so blessed
by Almighty God, there are being sowed
in the minds and hoarts of young and
old alike the seeds of falsehood, of un
truth and germs that poison I tic mind
and expel from the heart the scmpiithy
of i'hristiati charity.
In the cruel and unnatural warfare
waged against the church, against her
doctrines, her purposes and het proctloss,
11ioro is not one truth, on an average,
contained in every thousand assertions
against her. If it were a question merely
of finance, of political economy, or of a
branch Of the arts and sciences, it would
bo a sad thing to know that such pro
portions of truth and untruth were being
inciilcatou into the minds of the multi
tude.
But when it is a question that Is
dearer than all else, dearer than life,
when il Is a question of character, how
painful it ought to be to the fair minded
man, to tne conservative citizen who un
derstands that nothii.g good can come
from or rest upon falsehood, when he seos
millions misrepresented and mors mill
ions still being misled. How strange that
so nia'iy seem ready to accept tho wild
est assertion without one solitary fact in
evidence of its truth; for if facts are al
leged they are simply new assertions fol
lowing the others, and stranger still that
'many seem to accept and adhere to tho
assertions after they have been refuted
over and over, as if nothing had been
said in the matter.
Men hiie themselves out and arc paid
for this work. Vast sums are expended in
it. It is done in tne name of patriotism,
it is done in the name of humanity, it is
dona in the name of sweet charity, nay,
more, it is done in the name of God
whoso benediction is sometimes invoked
en tne one who is to bear false witness
against his neighbor. If it is true that
"what things a man shall sow,
those also shall he reap," what
is to be the harvest reaped from
this epidomic of falaehood? Can a na
tion,evon, afford to hazard such things in
the face of God. whoso providence lias
been ever with it? The apo.stle says: "Be
not deceived, God is not mocked. For
i what things a man shall sow those also
nhall he reap." But. ntVCrthe ess, so it
I goes on. Both contemporary events and
past fads ore so dealt with us to poison
I ttie minds and hearts of old an 1 young.
I The nooks our children read and study
| and the literary food served up to many
I are simply manufactured according to
j plans ami specifications that call for in
jury to the good name of millions.
Be it sain, however, to thecredit of the
great leading daily papers of tho land,
they do not become a party to this de
plorable crusade; it is carried on in other
ways.
An ogre of the present is built up from
tho past and is presented Io the young as
an objecl lesson in tho very sources and
means of information, wherein imagina
tion has taken the place ol unprejudiced
investigation, while the influence of the
real investigator who builus monuments
to truth, is not felt, but neglected and
counts for naught. Take an instance in
point. Dr. Maitlana, an Anglican cler
gyman, tells us how history is written,
and the example be gives may servo as a
key for the honest seeker of truth, by
which many strange and painful fact's
might seem to him in different light
from what he has usually.conceived them
to be. Dr Maitland in his Dark Ages
says: "I have said that tbe state of
things during the middle ages has been
misrepresented by some popular writers.
Few books Oiivo been more popular or
more generaMy read by thousands who
never thought of asking for authorities,
than iias besn Robertson's history of
Charles v\, and perhaps I cannot do
better than to take some proofs and illus
trations of What I have said Irom his
work. Sumo remarks on his statement
may tend to remove the prejudices which
have been raised by him and by others."
Then follow his remarks and comparison
of Robertson's work with the facts, show
ing that where a man pretending to write
history without consulting its sources, as
found in public, documents, etc., may
write a novel, but ought not to call it
history. But is this fair to Mr. Robert
son?
Let us consult another witness. Mr.
2ohn S. Hart, late principal of the nor
mal school in Jersey City, in his English
Literature, a toxt book used in many
schools, bears this testimony of Mr. Rob
ertson : "Tho modern school exacts of
historians certain fundamental qualities
without which no one can be accepted.
And these qualities are zeal and judg
ment ill tbe quest of orignal authorities
and fidelity and impartiality of state
ment. The absence of these qualities
cannot be compensated for by any grace
of style or depth of philosophy. Judged
by such a test then, Robertson must be
pronounced wanting. Like Hume, he
failed to consult state papers, wliich were
or might easily have been placed within
his reach." And yet these are tho men
whose writings,.more than those of any
other two men, color the popular his
tories aud literature of the times concern
ing which tboy write. Feeling in his
inmost soul that spleen and prejudice
had blinded men to the real truth of
those ages, Dr. Maitland. enumerating
the great achievements that marked tho
epoch, in everything that goes to elevate
man and mako him both better ana hap
pier, thus continues:
"This, I think, no man can deny. I
believe it is true, and I love to think of
it. I hope that 1 see the good band of
God in it, and the visible truce of His
mercy that is over all His work. But if
it is only a dream, however grateful, I
shall be glad to be awakened from it.
Not, indeed, by the yelling ot illiterate
agitators, but by a quiet, sober proof
that 1 have misundesrtood the matter.
"In the meantime let me thankfully
believe that tltousunds of those persons at
whom ltobertson ami Jorton aud other
such miserable second-hand writers have
sneered, were men of enlarged minds,
purified affections and holy lives; that
they wero justly revered by men, and,
above all, favorably accepted by God and
a istlngulsbed by the highest honor which
lie vouchsafes to those whom lie Pas
called into existence —that of being chan
nels of His love and mercy to their fel
low creatures.
"Such is the charity that la breathed
by an honest man who seeks truth and
the good of his neighbor. I sincerely
hop* that that same charity and love of
truth - hall characterize in the future as
it has in the past every utterance from
Catholic pen and Catholic pulpit.
"Lit these principle*, be ever instilled
into the Blinds of our children: A love
of truth; a love of honor and honesty: a
charity tor all men, and greater charity
where the need is greater, so as to say of
their very enemies, 'Father, forgive
them: they know not what they do:'
conceding to every man the same priv
ileges claimed for tnenisel res; teach
them gratitude to God for all His gilts,
among them that of a country whose
constitution in letter and spirit is in
tended to securo equal rights to all men.
Tcitch them these virtues by precept and
etample, 'Fur what things 'a man shall
sow, those also shall ho reap.'
"Let these things go forth to the world
as the lessons your church inculcates,
and tbe harvest shall one day l.c abund
ant, ami men will feel ashamed that in
the name of their cjuntry they had pro-
Sflrloed its best friends.'
AT TRINITY CHURCH
Bishop A. VV. Wilson of Baltimore Preaches
o Powerful Sermon
The services of Trinity onurch were
held in the Unitarian church yesterday
morning. Bishop A. \V. Wilson of Balti
more, who has come hare to preside at
tha annual conference to be held at Dow
ney on tbe 2ffth inst., delivered a sermon
upon the text, He shall glorify mo for H
shall receive of mine, and shall show it
unto y.m.
"All thing? that the Father hath are
mine; therefore said [.that lie shall take
of mine, and-shall show it unto you."—
John xvi: 1i• 15.
Bishop Wilson began by referring to the
time unci circumstances under Which the
Savior gave his admonitions to the dis
ciples. Said he: '"The, followers of
Christ were going out to begin a work of
revolutionizing the thought and action of
the time, to set Up doctrines directly op
posed to those prevailing and tread i:i
paths nntrod before. But in spite of all
these vicissitudes those eleven men were
to do what, their Muster Intended. It
beluneed to the divine order of things,
and there could therefore ho no possibil
ity of failure.
"Tne onal injunction which was given
by the Master is the most significant of
all, 'Ye shall glorify me.' Therein is a
complete exposition of the scripture. To
glorify Christ is to fulfill all toe require
ments of the blessed religion. No note
was taken of the philosophies and sci
ences of the time, whose tamo and
transtiory doctrines and principles Rive
way d> succeeding school* ol later ages.
All the knowledge of the earth, of its
origin and workings and its final end is
contained m Christ, the image of the God
who made it. And so it Is today. We do
not need to work our way laboriously np
to the heights, out to stand from the first
OH the mountain ot knowledge, which is
to undesrtand Kirn from whom every
thing emanates.''
"sod so it will never do for us to sub
stitute the petty sciences and philoso
phies of tho day for tbat which stands at
tbe apex of all knowledge and which is
all summed Op in the complete knowl
edge of Christ.
•'Sometimes our Christianity is chal
lenged because it takes this high ground.
The fact is totally overlooked that the
, first principle of man's life is divine,
Kqb him of thai and he is no better than
the beset* of the field,
i "Narrowness is often applied to reli
gions doctrines. Yet Christ wus not nar
row. If it is narrowness for one to go
about as He did in Palestine, healing the
sick, comforting the distressed, casting
out devils and raising the dead, then I
would that there were more narrowness
in the world. Narrowness indeed! Christ
is tho only one who embraces dll natures
and all principles and human experiences
within the range of Jlis own self.
"We are not now building thrones for
Christ or setting Up kingdoms for Him,
nor glorifying Him with outward »how
and symbols. Christ said: 'Vo shall not
be known as My followers by the systems
of religion ye build, or the power and
extent, of your works, but in this, that ye
Jove one another." The Lord Jest's is
not to oe found in great cathedrals or in
tbe places of greatest ostentation, but
before tbe cross on Calvary, among the
lowly and the poor. During His life yon
inignt have found Him at the home of
Mary, among the publicans and sin
ners, or with tho lowly fishermen, but
seldom in tho temple.
"When Jesus said: 'Ye snail take of
mine," thero was more expressed than
some conceive. Ail that was revealed
by Cod was Christ's. All tbat the Hible
teaches was His knowledge. And as for
me, I would rather have that good old
obsolete book than all tbe Literature on
earth.
"Geologists claim that millions of
years ago this gloho was covered with life
vastly more magniliccnt than that which
now prevails. I do not Itnow whether
they are tright, nor do 1 rare. Christ
expressed tho inlinito so feebly piciured
in our erring sciences, whon lie said:
'My Father worketh and 1 work."
"There is nothing that belungi to God
tbat is not Christ's, and He show-, it till
to us. When Cbrif-t shall come again it
will finish up this life, and Christ, is the
King and Lord, shall be supremo and
universal."
CENTRAL PRESBYTERIAN
The Services Yesterday Morning-"11 a Han
Die Shall He Live Again?"
The Rev. C. M. Fisher preached foi the
Centrul Presbyterian church yesterday
morning at Temperance temple, taking
for his text Job 14:14. If v man die shall
he live again? In part the gentleman
said :
These words were uttered by Job moie
than 3000 years ago. The old Testament
book, which is called by his mime, is an
historical drama. There" have been many
Jobs in the world's history and the words
of this one are the words of all. 1 shall
speak of this text under the simplest di
vision of tho thought possible—tho ques
tion as it lias been asked and answered
Tnis question does not come to us with
the surprise of a new thought. Is what
we call death a final period in the story
of existence or is it simply nn incident?
After life's fitful day, is it going to be
all night and nil obliviousness and sleep?
Is tne Nirvana of unconscious repose tne
highest heaven for a rational creature to
expect? So universally is the question
asKed.
Now it is not hard to discover the
causes that suggest and enforce this ques
tion.
If there were no other cause it would
yet be asked with intense interest in the
a"swer by reason ol the love uf life which
is inherent in all sentient creatures. There
I s something ineffably sweet in simply
living.
But there is in man a special reason for
wanting to live. It is because man is
capable of loving that life appears to him
what it is, the most precious of all pos
sessions. Love persists in gilding the
future. This is truo of affection even
where intellect wars against affection and
tries to stifle its hopes. The chasm be
tween life and doatli is biidged and the
angels of hope are the bright messengers
that affection sends from our shores to
the shore beyond.
And then there is ever coming up to
enforce tbis question the sense of tbe ap
preciation of the fitness of things. A
thing so essentially good as lifo in a ra-.
tlonal creature canuot cease so suddenly
and inexplicably as tbe hypothesis that
dc«th ends all would necessitate.
But the question lias been answered as
well as asli6d. Men have tiled to reach
finality and to escape trom doubt.
Poetry and philosophy have contributed
their "answers und this book of God
which iB poetry, pbilosonhy, reason and
revelation has come lorward with the
supreme answer.
In poetry there is an outreach of soul
Which spurns the hard limits of calcu
lating and severe reason. Poetry seems
to waft us into tbe direct presence of
God, while slow intellectual plodding
leaves us still upon the dusty road. The
great poets have been the great teachers.
In Wordsworth's simple little ballad
Wo are Seven, the iuborii faith and hope
of the child heart pictures those whom
death has taken as yet living.
In Tennyson's "immortal poem, In
Memoriam, we feel tbe throbbing of the
human heart in the presence of a death
severed friendship. LTp through the
shadows the heart struggles toward the
light. And bow true England's laia
laureate was to these hopes is seen in his
last poetic utterance when he stood an
aged man waiting to be borne out upon
the tide of the unseen future.
Twilight and evening bell,
And after that the dark 1
And may there he no sadness of farewell
Wiien 1 embark;
For though from cut our bourne of time
and place
The Hood may bear mc far,
I hope to sue my pilot face to face
When 1 have crossed the bar.
Sri hope sines its song in the hour of
death unit rises out of tne ashes of earth
ly tilings into ins immortal life.
In philosophy such minds as those of
Plato, Kant, Butler. Berkeley, Lctze,
Fcrrier.have not found it possible to stop
short ot the conclusion that Hie is a per
sistent entity.
Rut tha liible Btands at the crown and
summit of human thought. Where intel
lect dare not and cannot go there faith
may walk with all familiarity as a man
walks amid the flowers of his own gar
den. The classical passage is the fifteenth
diaper of Paul's lirst letter to tho Corin
thians. Hero we have a statement of fact,
a comparison of that fact with the denial
of it, which the Corinthian wise men
made, an J lastly a line of suggestion from
analogy.
Tbe great fact is Jesus Christ is risen
from the dead. Certainty is thus reached
in him and our minds are nuw free to
rove ami! the analogies in the groat
world about us.
Tiio resurrection of Jesus is the Christ
ian's resting place, tiie heaven where faith
casts anchor, Kver and ever the ques
tion of the text will ring through our
souls. May the sprit of God show us the
answer as it is in the divine Christ.
TIIEOSOPHICAL SOCIETY
An Instructive Lecture by Abbott B. Clark
Last Night
Abbott B. Clark gave the second ot his
series of Sunday evening lectures at
Royal Bakery hall yesterday evening.
His subject hut night was; Discontent
in Society, Politics and Religion; A
Theosophieal solution. Mr. Clark's at
titude toward tho subject was character
ized by a breadth of understanding anil
liberality seldom shown by speakers
upon such topic?.
Beginning with some of the causes of
social discontent, the speaker touched
upon the subject of the unemployed,
Showing that unhappiness comes not
alone to tho laborer who is unabl9 to
earn a livlelhooct, but to the idle among
the wealthy classes as well, on account of
the great unrest of modern civilization.
Continuing to another phase of the
question, the speaker said: "Mo:> are
discontented because they have not real
ized their possibilities. And from that
is deduced tho theosophieal belief in
man's spiritual nature. 'The man who
would grow must work. Water will run
down hill, but it has to bo forced up. So,
if man would rise, he must do his utmost
to assist tbe process of evolution.
"Conscience is another cause of discon
tent. There is a reason for the thing
culled conscience. Theosonhy says it is
1.0 more a creature of education than is
the north pole. It is that something
which vibrates between the polos of right
and wrong, whenever our course is down
ward.
"'Another cause Df discontent is intol
erance—or rather that forcing, by what
lam pleased to cull hypnotic power, of
one person to the nclnfs of another. The
craze for our individual power or rights
or personal wealth or gain, as oppposod
to that of everyone else, is wrong. The
only thine which enriches, a man's soul
is that which he has done for his fellow
man."
Speaking of what some terra the social
evil, Mr. Clark said: 'There is io the
moral world a correspondence to tne
physical. Just as wo have a sewer whicn
drains all the tilth of the city to the low
est point, there seems to be a tendency of
those who are morally weak to drift to
one plane. And to whatever extont that
exists in any city, to thai extent is the
whole place bad. But I would not be
understood as saying that one who has
sinned is any worse than sumo of us who
have never met the same conditions.
"Before we can solve the problem of
discont wo must gain as near a perfect
knowledge as possible of nature's laws;
wo must extend the knowledge uf human
life and broaden the sphere of human
kindness ami brotherhood."
ST. PAUL'S CHURCH
A New Phase of Activity and Development
Inaugurated
The church life of the city takes on a
new phase of activity and development
with the opening of th<> tall months, and
wnile this is true of every church in the
city in greater or less degree.it Is marked
ly so in the caso of St. Paul's church, the
mother Episcopalian church of Los An
geles. Today all tho departments of
church work in the Old parish tak-e a
new departure. The Sunday service
starts oiit with a new organization and
with new plans of work. The rector as
sumes tho suporintendency and an or
chestra is formed to lead the music tinder
tho direction of Professor Angelolti, and
the children are to bo asked to give their
offerings for the support of a free bed in
the hospital of the Good Samaritan. The
ohoir of the church has been reotganized
under 1 he able direction of Professor Dun*
star, with Madame Martinez, as solo so
prano. The Choral society, which is open
to tbe entire public, and which meets
on Monday evenings, is already largely
attended. 'For all the special musical ser
vices the artists of We Krauss String
quartette ba-e been engaged. St. Paul's
kindergarten is opening with a very large
attendance and a day nursery is soon to
bo established at the Mission of the
Helping Hand, on Ohio street. The guild
rooms are to be thrown open every
night to the public, provided with good
reading and interesting games. It is the
aim of the rector to make the church a
blessing and help to all men, without re
spect to creed, condition or station. It
may also be stated that tbe church is
open all day and every day in the week.
THE AMERICAN BAPTIST CHURCH
He Shall see of the Travail of His Soul and
Shall Be Satisfied
Yesterday morning a large congregation
gieetod Mr. T : nker after bis return from
his Arizona trip. The Suuday school
wis the hirgest yet, there being 107 in
attendance. The sermon was based on
the 53rd chapter of Isaiah, and was an
earnest uppeal to all to so Uva tbat at
the last Jesus would bo satisfied with
them. This being the speaker's interpre
tation of tbe passage, ;'He shall see the
travail of hie sonl and be satisfied." We
are the result of the labor and sacrifice of
the Saviour, and as He will iook upon
us at last and we prove ourselver: worthy
of tne effort that lias been made for our
redemption, or at least so far as it is pos
sible for us to he worthy of the grace of
God through Christ. The sermon was
listened to with deep interest.
V. W. C. A. Gospel fleeting
A gospel meeting was held at the roome
of tbe association yesterday afternoon.
The leader true Mrs. F. B. Hax of tbe
! Immanuel Presbyterian church. The sub*
I ject was Wayside Ministries.
The services opened by singing (lather
Them In. Prayer was offered by Mrs.
Hax and then she read from the sixth
chapter of Galatians, the hist ten versae
and from Luke.tenth chapter and twenty
liftti to the thirty-eighth errses.
A solo was sung by Miss K. H. Kim
ball, who presided a the piano during tha
meeting. Mrs. Hax spoke o! a ministry
that was lull every day of kindnesses, lit
tle commonplace things to soften the
hard paths of life fcr those around us.
She said there are note of us but have
some opportunity every day for doing
good. A bright smile and a cordial
handshke would cheer a downcast heart
through all tho day. Truly, not the
greatest things, but the little ones are oi"
the most importance. The speaker said,
too that in helping others we would
ourselves receive blessings, for it is im
possible to do a kindly deed withont feel
ing a glow of joy in our own hearts tbat
would repay the trouble it might have
caused. In (dosing the speaker reminded
the audience that even a cup of cold
water in His name would not bs un
known to our Muster.
A duet was sung by Misses White and
Cromwell, accompanied by Mis" Lie. A
short service of prayers and some short
addresses by various ladies followed.
The Christian Endeavor benediction
closed the meeting.
Church V'Lcs
Work on the construction of tho new
portion of the American Baptist church
has been delayed somewhat, owing to
a painful accident to tbe contractor, O.
W. Gregg, who fell and broke his leg
two weeks ago. Mr. Gregg is doing well
and will ue able to be about shortly.
P.cv. W. W. Tinker and his daughter
returned from their trip to Arizona on
Saturday morning. During their absence
they visited Jerome, a prosperous min
ing town, where Mr. Tinker is having a
church built. This is the first building
of the kind in the community, and there
is very considerable interest manifested
in it. He also spent a few days in Pres
cott and Phoenix.
Tho Baptist ministers of this part of
Southern California are to be entertained
today at lunch by the ladies of the Amer
ican Baptist church. They will have their
first meeting since the vacation, tbis
morn ing at that church. The eounc l of
recognition will meet there at 2 o'clock
this afternoon, at which timo the two
churches, Immanuel and American, will
he examined as to doctrine and polity
preparatory to being formally received
into the fellowship of tho Baptist church*
es of this vicinity. It will oe an interest*
ing service and will be free to all who
may desire to ateend.
Tbe Rev. Mr. Tinker is to leave on Fri
day for San Luis Obispo, where he will
endeavor to organize and establish a
Baptist church in tbat city. He has been
given the use of tbe chapel car lmraantiel
for the time of his visit and will "con
duct" it while there. This is the car that
was in charge of the Rev. K. G. Wheeler,
whoso molancholv death by accident on
the Atlantio and Paciiio railroad occurred
some weeks ago. Tbe American Baptist
Publication society will soon have some
one to take charge of tttis car permanent
ly. No appointment nas been made as
yet. They have kindly allowed Mr.
Tinker to use it in the establishment of
the work in San Luis Obispo. He will
be gone on this trip about ten days.
A TRAVESTY ON RELIGION
A Noisy Demonstration by -'God's
Regular Army"
The Rivals of the Salvationists .Take a Dis
graceful Exhibition of Themselves.
Pandemonium Reigned
One of tho most remarkable soenes ever
witnessed in a civilized community oc
curred yesterday afternoon ut the corner
of Spring and Second streets. For some
weeks past a small contingent, uniformed
in tbe same general mannnar as the Sal
vation Army, except that their colors are
yellow in place of red, have been march
ing about the streets,holding meetings on
the corners, and in a general way run
ning in opposition to the regulation Sal
vationists. This contingent calls itself
"God's Regular Army," and it is alleged
that it was organized as an American in
stitution, tbe headquarters to be in the
I tiited States, and the funds [to be kept
in this country, it being claimed that all
the surplus funds of the Salvationists are
sent to General Booth at general head
quarters In London. On the other and.the
Salvationists claim that tbe founder of
"God's Regular Army" and his wife were
expelled from their ranks in San Bernar
dino for some infraction ot the rules.
Be this us it may, there are two rival
armies, and there is evidently no love
lost between them. As a result, a deia*
onstration took place yesterday afternoon
that was simply a disgraceful travesty on
religion .md turned an orderly meeting
into a howling farce. Tho Sal7ationista
were conducting their usual Sunday after
noon meeting at the southwest corner of
Spring and Second streets. They num
bered about forty *nd were proceeding in
their usual manner, when the "God's
Regular Army" cjntiugent wheeled in
from Spring street and took up tneir po
sition on the northwest corner. The new
arrivals aid not number more than a
quarter as many as the Salvationists, but
what they lacked in number they inado
up in noiso anil energy. A female with
a powerful alto voice and a lusty bass
drummer with a stroke like a trip ham
mer were the star attractions of the op
position. No time was lost in prelim,
friaries, and soon pundemotiium reigned.
The rivals were only separated by tbe
street car track, ami as soon as the Salva
tionists started in the alto voice and the
big bass drum were started, and effectual
ly drowned everything else. There was
no attempt at singing; it was simply
howling and shouting. The Salvation
ists continue! in their usual orderly
manner, which secmod to enrage their
opponents, who increased their efforts
every moment. A large crowd soon gath
ered and the contest was watched with
the closest attention. The Salvationists
had a brass band, but they did not alow
it to play, and the opposition was eiven
full swing. After keeping up for ha an
hour or more the Salvationists qu ctly
moved off, leaving] tbe other crowo in
possession, who at once moderated their
demonstration and continued there ijt
some time longer.
During the noisy war the street was al
most completely blocKed, and nt times
even the curs' had difficulty in getting
throuah. It was generally conceded that
the demonstration was a disgraceful one,
and the opinion was universal that some
city oruinance snould at once be enacted
to prevent a recurrence of the sacrilege.
Buy Stoll A- Thsycr's ink and pencil
eraser, 5 cents.
A. A. Eckßtromof 324 s. Spring at., is where
you want to go looking lor good wall paper£at
tbe rlaht price.
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