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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, May 27, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-05-27/ed-1/seq-1/

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Double Sheet
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 239.
TO THB UNEMPLOYED
•"REE FOR THE UNEMPLOYED—
Recognising the faot that wora on the
Park boulevard Is drawing to a close,
and desiring to
ASSIST WORTHY MEN
To obtain other employment. The Herald
makes the following offer:
DURING THIS WEEK
And continuing until next Sunday morn
ing, we will publish for any man bring
ing credentials from the relief commit
tee, showing that he Is working or has
worked faithfully on the boulevard
A WANT ADVERTISEMENT
FREE OF CHARGE
FREE OF CHARGE
FREE OF CHARGE
Each advertisement Is limited to four
lines, and It may be published for the
entire time or any part of the period
named.
Advertisements and credentials should
be brought to The Herald business office,
122 W. Third St.
SPECIAL NOTICES
NOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oclock
o.m. and 6 and 8 oclock p.m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut off and a fine of $2 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
THE DAILt YJJOURNAL, PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 206 New High St. 2
NOTICE—THIS IS TO WARN THE PUB
11c not to trust my wife on my account,
as I will not be responsible for her in
debtedness. B. F. JOHNSON. 27
GOOD QUALITY WALL PAPER TO COV
er 12-foot room. $1; ingrain, $3, border in
cluded. WALTER. 218 W. Sixth St. 8-12
DO NOT FAIL TO ATTEND THE MlLK
malds festival and dance tonight given
by Stanton W. R. C, 610% S. Spring st. 27
DR. JOHN C. M'COY, DENTIST. LATE
of Orange, now No. 1919 8. Grand aye. 27
TO EXTON'S FOR NEW MUSIC, 827 8.
Spring st. 6-7
r ■ 11
HELP WANTED—MALB
HUMMEL BROS. A CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS
California Bank Building.
WO-302 W. Second street. In basement.
Telephone 609.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Header loader, $1.50; laundry wagon
driver, 25 per cent; ranch hands, $20, etc.;
wood turner, $2; butcher, $40. etc.; man
and wife, $40. etc.: milker. $30. etc.: boy.
chores, $8, etc., $10, etc.; 2 men. sawmill.
$26, etc.; man, trim trees, $25. etc., nur
sery; orchard hand, 80 cents per day; or
chard foreman, references; ranch hands,
$15, etc.; harvest help call and register.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Cake baker, $10, etc.; all-round cook,
$10, etc.; all-round cook, $35, or man and
wife, $50; pastry cook and baker, eGr
man, $60, etc.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
House girl, Ontario, Elsinore, San
Diego, Claremont, San Pedro, South
Riverside, $15, $20 and $26. employers here
today; house girl, good cook, no laundry
work, $25; 4 young girls, assist house
work and children. $8, $10 and $12; colored
house girl, $15 and $20, cltyj__ German
house girl, city, $25; 2 Swedish house girls,
city, $25 and $20; house girl, East Los
Angeles, $5 per week; house girl, family
of 4, ranch, $25.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
First-class starch lroner, $1.60 per day;
first-class waitress. Arizona, $25; wo
man, day work, $1.50 per day; hotel laun
dress, country, $20 and $25.
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
WANTED—AGENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL
Insurance: experience not necessary
New and desirable contract. Apply room
9, German-American bank building, tf
WANTED—MAN FOR LIGHT OUT
door work. Apply 254 8. Broadway, room
84, 27
11 11
HELP WANTED—FEMALE
WANTED—A LADY CLERK. GOOD
salary, steady position to right party:
state age, experience and reference. Ad
dress C, box 9, Herald. 27
WANTED—S COOKS. 4 SECOND GIRLS,
9 general houseworkers, 2 housekeepers.
623 W. Washington st. Telephone
West 91. t f
WANTED-EGAN'S RESTAURANT. 126
-128 E. Second st., serves the best 10c meal
ln the city; try It and be convinced. 8-11
SITUATIONS WANTED—MALB
WANTED—BY EXPERIENCED SALES
man, steady position In store at very
moderate wages; experienced In cutlery
silverware and sporting goods; best of
references. Address Box 42, Station 3,
city. a
WANTED—DAY OR NIGHT WATCH
man, gardens, lawns, poultry, house
work lodging-house, care of horses, any
thing; good work for cheap pay; refer
ences the best. H„ box 8, Herald. 29
WANTED-YOUNG GERMAN WANTS
work to tend horses or driver or general
work; Is a good worker; best references:
willing to work for small wages. 809
Wilmington st. 80
WANTEL -SITUATION BY MAN COM
petent as law clerk, stenographer, typist,
abstractor, real estate olerk or assistant
bookkeeper; Al references. Addres M.,
box 8, Herald. 30
WANTED—SOME KIND OF EMPLOY
ment; have had several years' experi
ence in grocery business; anything. J.
W. GURRETT, 506 Mosart St., city. 31
WANTED—SITUATION BY EXPE
rtenced nurse; references: will work at
anything. WM. M'GRATH, 910 Hem
lock st„ tel. main 1644, city. 10
SITUATIOHS WANTED-MALB
WANTED—SITUATION BT MAN TO DO
any kind of work ln city or country or
Job work; very handy. Address E., box
5. Herald. 30
WANTED—EMPLOYMENT ' BY Ex
perienced gardener; $1 a day; city refer
ences. Address 8., box 8, Herald. 30
SITVA TIONS WANTED — FEMALE
WANTED - ORDERS FOR HOUSE
girls. ORLIN THURSTON, Employ
ment, 219% W. First st. 8-10
WANTED—PARTNERS
WANTED—PARTNER WITH $10,000 TO
take half Interest in and work developed
mine; ten-stamp mill on property; fullest
Investigation Invited; principals only;
references given and required. Address
OOOD MINE, box 56, San Diego, Cal. 6-6
WANTED—MONEY; I HAVE SEVERAL
small applications for loans ln small
amounts on the best of securities. K. I.
BRYANT, 204% 8. Broadway, room 213. 31
WANTED—MONEY; $1000 ON GlLT
edge property near Santa Monica. E. I.
BRYANT, 204 V, 8. Broadway, room 218. 31
WANTED-$lOOO ON GILT-EDGE CITY
property. E. I. BRYANT, 204% 8. Broad
way. 313. mmmmmmt - mtl — ~ tm gSm
FOR SALE—REAL BSTATB
Houtes mad Lot*
FOR SALE—
$300 each-2 lots, 62 xl7o, 15 minutes' walk
from courthouse; close to car line.
$1050—One of those fine lots on Westlake
aye.; "Nob Hill"; 60x156 to alley.
Other good bargains In lots. See
30 8. K. LINDLEY. 106 S. Broadway.
FOR BALE—CHEAP; A NICE COTTAGE
of 6 rooms and bath; good-sized lot, all
fenced ln; near electric power house.
308 W. Twelfth st. 29
FOR SALE-RIGHT IN TOWN, 11-ROOM
house at a bargnln; $2300, $500 cash, bal
ance same as rent. Address J., box 9,
Herald. 27
City Lots
FOR SALE—WE CAN SELL YOU 95
feet on Olive St., close ln, for $6500; 6 and
3-room houses on said lots; we think It
will pay to buy. J. O. LOTBPEICH &
CO., removed to 129 8. Broadway. 27
FOR SALE-C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots in his Third addition on easy Install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Office, 213 W. First St. tf
FOR SALE—WE SELL THE EARTH.
BASSETT & SMITH, Pomona, Cal. 6-26tf
Country Property
FOR SALE—4O-ACRE RANCH, HALF
in alfalfa, remalnedr ln lemons and mis
cellaneous fruit trees; elegant modern
7-roomed house, with bath and pantry;
large barn; stable, with Aye stalls and
useful outbuildings.
20-acre olive orchard; trees ln fourth
year.
17-aore orchard; almonds, aprlocts and
prunes.
640 acres of elegant land in various
plots.
All above near Oceanslde on Southern
California railway. Creamery near by.
Property must be sold, owing to death
of late owner. Write for particulars and
prices to C. ISEARD. San Luis Rey, Cal..
or call at 27 German-American Bank
bldg. 19-21-23-25-27-29
FOR SALE—S AND 10-ACRE TRACTS
near South Santa Monica; don't fail to
invstigate before buying elsewhere. E.
1. BRYANT, 204% S. Broadway, room
218. 31

FOR RENT—HOUSES
FOR RENT-U-ROOM HOUSE, SUITA
bie for one or two families; Flower, be
tween First and Second. SILENT &
CO., 212 W. Second st. 30
FOR RENT—COMFORTABLY FUR
nished 6-room cottage; bath and gas;
fruit trees and lawn. J. B. MILLARD,
Spring-st. school. 27
FOR RENT—7-ROOM HOUSE. AT 1347 S.
Hill St.; rent $18 per month. Inquire of
LOHMAN BROS., plumbers, 111 E. Sec
ond st. 27
FOR RENT—FIRST STORY FLAT, 6
large sunny rooms; furnished; close in.
Apply 115 S. Olive st. 27
FoR~RENT-^-ROOM _ HOUSE: LARGE
yard and water; $6 per month; at 228 E.
Main. 27
FOR RENT—ROOMS
FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS,
from $1.50 up per week; single rooms 25c
and 50c per night; baths free. Russ House,
cor. First and Los Angeles sts. 7-21
FOR RENT-COOL FRONT ROOMS, $10
and $12. at HOTEL BALTIMORE; hot
and cold water; corner Seventh and
Olive. 6-27
FOR RENT—FURNISHED ROOMS;
summer rates; outside rooms. THE EL
LIS, 315 N. Broadway. 27 30
FOR RENT—BEAUTIFUL FURNISHED
room at the WOODLAWN. 2418. Main.6-11
FOR RENT—FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
housekeeping. 321% W. Seventh st. tt
FOR RENT-HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS,
fine location. 827% S. Spring St. 6-12
FOR RENT-PASTURE
FOR RENT-1400 ACRES. 9 MILES FROM
Los Angeles, with running water; 200
acres of barly stubble; balance wild oats,
alflllerta and burr clover; horses
brought and delivered; no responsibility
for accidents or escapes. Address SAN
BORN HOWARD, Burbank, Cal., or 150
S. Main st. 6-27
FOR RENT—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR RENT—ELEGANTLY FURNISH
ed hall, banquet, paraphernalia and ante
rooms; for lodges and religious societies.
Inquire Foresters' temple, 129% W. First
at. from 9 a. m. to 12 m. and 2t06 p. m. 30
ATTORNEYS AT LA W
IjUCIEN EARLE, ATTORNEY AT LAW
office, Bullard building; entrance, room
420; telephone black 1445. 7-24.J7
BROUSSEAU & MONTGOMERY.
Attorneys-at-Law,
403 Bradbury block, Los Angeles. tf
sea Pag* Twoy)
The herald
GERMANY
CONSENTS
To the Powers' Proposals
for Peace
ENGLAND GROWS STUBBORN
OVER TURKISH OCCUPATION OP
THESSALY
Greek Ministers Wall Provided With
Reasons for the the
Turkish War
Associated Press Special Wire.
CONSTANTINOPLE, May 26.—The
withdrawal of Germany's objections to
the collective note of the powers on the
subject of the terms of peace between
Turkey and Greece was due to the rep
resentations which the powers, especial
ly Russia, madeto Berlin. Germany, in
addition to objecting to signing the note
until Greece consented to abide by the
terms agreed upon, objected to the in
demnity clause, being opposed to the
principle of Indemnity being settled for
them, and on the basis ot the present
resources of Greece.
This attitude upon the part of Germany
Is attributed to a desire to rearrange the
Greek finances in a manner giving bet
ter security to the German bondholders.
The adhesion of Germany to the action
of the powers ln this respect has greatly
relieved the situation.
The collective note of the powers pre
sented yesterday to the Turkish govern
ment, besides proposing conditions for
permanent peace between Turkey and
Greece, concludes with inviting the
porte to negotiate with the ambassadors
with reference thereto. The reply of the
government of Turkey Is momentarily
expected.
ENGLISH DEMANDS
LONDON, May 26—A dispatch from
Athens says that Great Britain has de
clared her Intention to abandon the
concert of the Powers if it is determined
that the occupation of Thessaly by
Turkish troops is to be prolonged until
Greece shall have paid the war indem
nity demanded by Turkey.
The correspondent of the Times at
Athens says: The torrent of recrimi
nation, denunciation and bitter invec
tive which was checked by fear of the
Immediate Turkish advance to Athens,
has broken out afresh, now that this
danger has been removed by an armis
tice. The authors or the war policy,
equally with those who are held respon
sible for the disasters, are being drag
ged before the bar of public opinion.
So far as the official culprits are con
cerned, it is believed that the govern
ment may appoint a'commission of in
quiry to punish the guilty. A thorough
Investigation into the hospital and com
missariat departments will probably en
tall scandalous disclosures.
SOME REASONS WHY
NEW YORK, May 26.—The Evening
World prints today a cablegram from its
correspondent at Athens giving signed
statements by members of the Greek
ministry regarding the failure of the war
against the Turks.
The prime minister, M. Ralll, says:
"Greece should not be censured for the
Inactivity of the navy, nor should the
great powers be blamed. They could
not restrain our ships. Christianity did.
Had we bombarded the seaports of Tur
key and the Aegean islands, the Turks
would have massacred the Christians as
they did the Armenians."
Skouloudls, minister of foreign af
fairs, writes: "Greece had no national
grievance against Turkey, and without
any outside interference tho Cretan af
fair should have been quietly settled by
the two Interested parties."
M. Thamadhos, minister of war, after
noting the inferiority of Greece In num
bers and resources, says: "Greece can
not yield Turkey the frontier strategic
points demanded. Brigands Would use
them to ravage Thessaly and new de
fenses cost much."
The minister of education, M. Eutax
is, writes: "The war has been one of the
Cross against the Crescent, with Eu
rope against Christ. The powers per
mitted our troops to land to protect
Christians in Crete, then blockaded us.
If the powers give Turkey one foot of
Greece, enlightenment will be so much
retarded and the Christians Imperilled."
RALLI WAS RILED
ATHENS, May 26.—An exciting scene
took place at the ministry of marine to
day. Slgnore Dl Felice, the Italian So
cialist leader, rudely accosted and In
sulted M. Ralll, the Greek premier. The
latter summoned the police and had
Dl Felice put on board an Italian Iron -
clad lying- off the Piraeus, with a re
quest that he be not allowed again to
set foot In Greece.
MILES' MOVEMENTS
CONSTANTINOPLE, May 28.—Gen.
Nelson A. Miles, U, S. A., who left the
United States with the Intention of ob
serving the Graeco-Turklsh war, start
ed yesterday for Athens with his suite.
The general has abandoned his pro
posed trip to Thessaly.
Captain G. S. Schrlven, U. S. A., the
United States military attache at Rome,
who was recently appointed to All the
post of military attache at Constanti
nople as well, leaves this city for Thes
saly tomorrow.
READY TO ADVANCE
LONDON, May 26.—A dispatch to the
Dally Mall from Vienna says that the
Turkish government has mobilised 5000
additional troops, which are- now ln
readiness to advance Into Thessaly, and
that the government Is making active
preparations for a Turkish administra
tion of the province.
The Constantinople correspondent of
the Standard says: The grand vizier on
Saturday presented a report to the sul
tan urging that the whole of Islam w as
fully determined to retain Thessaly.
II B4»W appears that the armistice was
LOS ANGELES, THURSDAY MORNING, MAY 27, 1897
originally for three days only, and
nothing but the energy of the powets
iccured an extension for a fortnight.
Surgery Does Not Help San Fran
cisco's Postmaster
SAN FRANCISCO, May 26—Post-
master Frank J. McCoppin of this city
died today at Mount Zion hospital as the
result of a surgical operation performed
last Sunday. The poftmas-ter-general
was Immediately notified of hi? death,
and the bondsmen of the deceased post
master promptly appointed his assist
ant, P. E. Doyle, as his? S'ucceseor, ad in
terim.
Frank J. McCopptn was born ln Ire
land in 1834, but came to thir country in
1853 with his-parents and settled in Illi
nois. Five years later he came to Cali
fornia, where he has had an active and
honorable career. He was elected em
pervisor from the eleventh ward in 18S0,
and after holding that office for seven
years was elected mayor. Under his
regime a number of permanent improve
ments were Inaugurated, notably the
laying out of Golden Gate park. In 1875
he was elected to the state senate. At
the expiration of his term he went to
Hawaii, where he engaged ln EUgar
planting. In 1888 he went to Australia
as commissioner to the Melbourne expo
sition. He was appointed postmaster in
June, 1894, and had still one year to
serve, but it is believed that under the
circumstances President McKinley will
fill the vacancy by appointing a post
master for the next four years immedi
ately.
The Wisconsin Shrine Visited by
Many Pilgrims
HARTFORD, Wis., May 26.—Sixty
Chicago people with over 2000 others
made the pilgrimage to Holy Hill. A
large delegation left Beaver Dam, Fond
dv Lac and Oshkosh and were conveyed
to the shrine. A delegation from Mil
waukee numbered 100. It was headed
by ex-Senator Krueger, who has made
the pilgrimage for the last nine years.
The distance up to the summit of the
hill is 1863 feet, and during the whole
morning and afternoon hundreds could
be seen in recumbent attitudes along the
path praying to and supplicating the
Blessed Virgin.
The services in the church lasted three
hours. Hundreds came to the altar to
receive the sacramental blessings, and
flowers and other Insignia were left at
the different stations. The stations are
being remodelled and a new grotto Is In
course of construction. The expense of
this monument Is being defrayed by a
Chicago man, who has been spiritually
and physically benefited by visits to the
hill. The grotto Is a representation of
the original grotto of Our Lady of
Lourdes, ln France. The grotto will be
dedicated some time next month, proba
bly on June 17, when the next feast oc
curs, known as the Feast of the Sacred
Heart of Jesus.
A Say Spent In Gumpel's Cross-
Examination
SAN FRANCISCO, May 26.—The
whole of today's session of the Angus-
Craven case was consumed in the cross
examination of the expert, Max Gumpel.
It was shown by the defense that the
witness had been at work upon the va
rious documents in controversy for the
past eighteen months, and that he had
reached the conclusion that the pencil
will was a forgery on November 16, 1896.
An effort was made by counsel for the
defense to show that Gumpel's employ
ers in the meantime had asked him to
testify that the will was a genuine one,
but the court promptly checked this
line of interrogation. Gumpel stated that
he had not examined any of the gen
uine Fair letters written ln the early
eightles, because they were too remote
from the date of the disputed writing.
Several undated letters were shown to
Gumpel, who stated that he had not ex
amined any documents which bore no
date, as there was nothing to show
when they were written.
Again Grow Hopeful of Effecting a
Capture
FLAGSTAFF, A. T., May 26.—At 10
oclock today an Indian courier arrived
from Campbell's trading post with a
note to the sheriff, which stated that
Parker, the escaped train robber, had
taken dinner there on Monday. Willow
Springs, where the post is located, is
ninety miles northeast of here, and near
the Navajo reservation. Sheriffs Cam
eron and Ruffner, with a force of depu
ties and Indian trailers, left this after
noon for that place. It Is thought that
Parker is on his way to Utah, and the
only place he can cross the Colorado
river is Dee's ferry, and his capture is
certain within a few days.
NEW YORK, May 26.—The indica
tions are that the backbone of the big
strike of the garment makers is broken.
Over thirty of the 100 contractors af
fected by the strike entered into peace
negotiations today with the United
Brotherhood of Tailors, through the set
tlement committee. These contractors
employ more than 3000 operators, all
of whom will resume work tomorrow,
and the number of strikers will then be
reduced to about 22,000.
WASHINGTON, May 26.—The Secre
tary of the Navy accepted the offer of
the owners of the American steamship
City of Everett, now at San Francisco,
to charter that vessel to the government
for the transportation of grain from
California to Bombay for the famine
sufferers, at $40,000.
NEW YORK, May 26.— Ten thousand
striking tailors resumed' work today,
having gained the concessions demanded
from the middlemen. Meyer Schoen
field, leader of the strikers, said he did
not look for a settlement of the tailors'
contest earlier than four weeks hence.
MONTREAL, Que.. May 2«.—Marquis
Ito, in an interview today, said that the
talk ln the United States about the de
sire of Japan to annex Hawaii is fool
ish.
"Japan would not have Hawaii," he
said, "if it couldi be had tor the asking."
M'COPPIN DEAD
THE NEW LOURDES
THE CRAVEN DEEDS
PARKER'S PURSUERS
Practically Settled
Grain for India
The Tailors' Strike
Doesn't Work Hawaii
SPANISH
FINANCES
To Be Improved by Issuing
Some Bonds
CUBA WILL NEVER BE SOLD
EVEN THOUGH SOMEBODY MAKE
AN OFFER
Consul General Lee Has Supplies Suf
ficient for the Needs of Destitute
American Citizena
Associated Press Special Wire.
MADRID, May 26.—1t Is understood
that Senor Sagasta, Liberal leader, will
soon publish an important political
statement, in which he will announce
his unalterable opposition to the'sale of
Cuba and unyielding support of the
maintenance of the integrity of Spanish
territory. Premier Canovats denies the
existence of a Cabinet crisis, and says
he is resolved to remain in office in spite
of the abstention of the opposition from
taking part ln the sessions of the Cor
tes. The Budget Committee reported in
favor of the adoption ot the projected
loan, with the Almaden quicksilver
mines for security; also on the financial
measures proposed to meet the ex
penses of the wars, and the chamber of
deputies this afternoon adopted them
en bloc, including the state monopoly
of explosives.
THE CABINET CRISIS
NEW YORK, May 26.—A dispatch to
the Herald from Madrid says: Extreme
tension exists between the political par
ties.
Last night's Heraldo, defending Senor
Sagasta against the insinuations of the
Conservatives, frankly exposes the de
plorable military situation ln Cuba.
The Heraldo says that the whole dis
trict of Camaguay is ln the power of the
rebels; that there is only one Spanish
column to operate over a district of
32,000 square miles, and that ln the whole
of the eastern region in Cuba Spanish
troops have never yet set foot. It calls
the alleged pacification of Cuba a com
edy.
The same paper further insinuates that
messages purporting to be from Senor
Dupuy de Lome, protesting against the
speeches of Senor Sagasta, the leader of
the Spanish dissident Liberals, be
cause ot the effect produced ln the
United States, were written by Conserva
tives in Madrid.
Premier Canovas' words in the Cortes
regarding the supreme necessities of
the fatherland were:
"I shall govern the country as it has
been governed before, and as I myself
governed It before now, without the aid
of minorities."
Both Liberals and SUvellstas have
stopped attending parliament.
Mr. Calhoun's attitude in regard to
the RUlz investigation Is causing un
easiness and resentment here.
Senor Pldal, on behalf of the majori
ty, begged Senor Sagasta to return with
his minority to parliament. Senor Sag
asta, while thanking Senor Pldal, refus
ed absolutely.
The ministerial organ, La Epoca, says
that the present situation In Spain is
the most difficult she has been in for at
least fifty years.
A PARISIAN VIEW
NEW YORK. May 26.—A dispatch to
the Herald from Paris says: The Temps,
in a leading article or. the Senate resolu
tion conceding belligerent rights to the
Cuban Insurgents, said: This resolu
tion would doubtless not be sufficient to
determine- the attitude of the American
government. The House of Representa
tives Is more conservative in regard to
foreign policy than the upper chamber.
"However, the Spanish government
should never lose sight of two essential
facts: The first is that in spite of funda
mental divergencies between the con
tending interests and rivalries at Wash
ington, there exists in the United States
a formidable, daily-increasing current
of opinion that is likely to drag the great
republic in the line of its aspirations, its
traditions and its manifest destinies—
that Is to say. toward intervention.
"The second is that it depends upon the
Spanish parties and upon their attitude
to utilize the advantage of these divis
ions in America, for Spain Is morally one
and undlvisible.
RELIEF SUPPLIES
WASHINGTON, May 26—Consul-
General Lee cabled the state depart
ment today from Havana that the
amount of supplies he has on hand there
row for the relief of American citizens
ia abundant and will last for some time.
GOMEZ WILL RESIGN
PHILADELPHIA. May 26.—Advices
from Cuba were received by the local
Junta today to the effecty that General
Gomez will temporarily resign as com
mander of the insurgent forces and
come to this l country as "secretary of
war pro tern." of the Cuban republic to
confer with President McKinley on the
Cuban question. During his absence
General Garcia will command.
GUNBOAT TRIALS
The Marietta Fulfills All Contract
Requirements
SAN FRANCISCO, May 26 —The gun
boat Marietta today proceeded to the
measured mile off Bluff point and sat
isfactorily finished her trials.
A series of four runs was first made
approximating a speed of 12 knots, with
the following result: Steam pressure,
180 pounds; revolutions (average), 236
per minute; speed, 12.8 knots per hour.
These runs completed the necessary
data for the speed regulation curve of
the vessel. ■
The Marietta then commenced her
four consecutive hours' trial over a
course extending from a range on Hun
ter's point to Red Rock, twelve miles,
INDEX
TO TELEGRAPH NEWS
Arizona officers again on the trail of
Parker, the escaped train robber.
Railroad rates to the ( coast promise
to rule low during the summer.
The Spanish chamber of deputies de
cides to borrow money to carry on her
wars.
Very alow progress in arranging
terms of peace between Greece and
Turkey.
Postmaster McCoppin of San Fran
cisco dead from the effects of a surgi
cal operation.
News of Dr. G. Hamilton Griffin
comes from New York, but the man
himself is missing. .
Numerous murders at Butte, Mont.,
bring out an order to hobos to get out
of town and to get out quick.
The new state mining law has gone
into effect; hydraulickers want the
anti-debris men to cease their attacks.
Ornament wins the Latonia derby;
races at Sacramento and Morris park;
winners of league ball games; sport
ing notes.
There were several prizefights last
night. Sometimes the best man won
and sometimes the referee favored the
under dog.
Ambassador Porter received by
President Paure and makes his per
functory speech in French, because he
is obliged to.
The prosecution rests in the case
against Sugar Magnate Havemeyer,
and defendant moves to instruct the
jury to acquit.
The first vote in the senate on the
tariff bill comes up in an attempt to
reduce tho duty on borax, which at
tempt fails, largely through the ef
forts of Senator White who proposes,
if high protection rules, that Califor
nia shall not be deprived of her fair
share.
resulting as follows: Steam pressure.
180 pounds; revolutions, 231%; speed,
12.8 knots per hour.
It was expected that both the Marietta
and the Wheeling would attempt to
make the highest speed possible on. these
trials, but there being no premium of
fered for speed in excess of that named
in the contract, tt was decided to run
them only a little ln excess of that
tpeed, thereby saving much expense, as
it is understood the contracts for these
two vessels will cause the Union Iron
works some loss.
That the Marietta can do all that was
expected, of her was amply proved by a
run made over the measured mile at
full speed at the end of the four hours'
trial today, when, with 180 pounds of
steam, with 149 revolutions, she accom
plished the distance in 3 minutes 49 sec
onds, representing a speed-of 15.06 nau
tical miles. Throughout the trials eve
rything worked most satisfactorily, the
machinery working without fault, the
vessel proving so rigid that the vibra
tions were hardly perceptible, and .her
maneuvering qualities were most ex
cellent. The trial of the Wheeling Is
set for Friday.
A MISSING MINISTER
Accompanied by a Large Amount of
Money
WASHINGTON, May 26.—Rev. A.
G. Harrison, pastor of the People's tab
ernacle, and his family, disappeared
from their home yesterday, and it is
reported that the reverend gentleman
is $9000 short in his accounts. He was
given entire charge of the church funds
and, according to the charges, failed to
pay bills for furniture, carpets and a
church organ, for which the money was
given him.and also borrowed large sum?
from his parishioners. W. L. Bruen, the
builder of the tabernacle, Is a loser to
the extent of $7000. When. Mr. Harrison
learned that an investigation was to be
made by the church, he departed hasti
ly, leaving his household goods. He
came to this city from Texas three
years ago, engaged ln mission work, and
gained so large a following that the
tabernacle was built, chiefly through
the efforts of Mr. Bruen.
DIED ON THE TRAIN
Unknown Kan Passed Away Coming
In From. Pomona
An unknown man died on the local
passenger train from Pomona yesterday
afternoon. Death is supposed to have
resulted from heart disease. The man
is thought to be a sheepherder, and got
on the train at Bassett. He sat down
in a seat and leaned his head against
a window, remaining in that position
until he reached this city, when it was
learned that he was dead.
Deceased was about 35 years old and
of medium size. He wore a short black
beard and was well dressed. There was
nothing upon him by which to Identify
him. The body was taken to Orr &
nines' undertaking parlors, and an in
quest will be held at I oclock this after
noon,
Flood Victims Believed
WASHINGTON, May 26.—50 well has
the distribution of the relief to the flood
sufferers in the Mississippi and Red
river valleys been distributed that of
the total appropriation of $200,000 about
one-half now remains unexpended, al
though the field had been fully covered.
The Title Is Bad
SAN DIEGO, May 26.—A decision by
the Unlteu States Land Commissioner
Invalidates the title to the Morena reser
voir site, wanted for the city water sys
tem, and prevents the fulfillment of the
$1,500,000 contract between this city and
a water company.
No Bodies Aboard
WASHINGTON, May 26.—The Secre
tary of the Treasury received a telegram
from Captain Phillips of the Revenue
Cutter Perry at Kitchik&u, Alaska, stat
ing that he has discovered the derelict
schooner Gen. Slglln ten miles west of
Graham Island. No Survivors or bodies
were found. ~
Ten Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS,
WELL BEGUN
HALF DONE
The First Vote Taken on
the Tariff
CALIFORNIA PRODUCTS
Find Stout Supporters in the
Senate
IF HIGH PROTECTION RULES
THE GOLDEN STATE WILL NOT
BE NEGLECTED
Senator White Draws First Blood by
Defeating an Attempt to Beduce
the Duty on Borax —Party
Lines Drawn *;
Special to The Herald.
WASHINGTON, D. C, May 26.—To
day the tariff bill was taken up in detail
in the senate, the Democratic side being
represented for the most part by Sena
tors Vest, Jones and White. The first
section dealt with the borax and boractc
acid industry, in which Nevada and
Southern California, particularly San
Bernardino county, are substantially
interested. Senator Vest attempted to
reduce the duty and a long and active
contest was the result. Senator White
claimed that if high protection must re
sult from tariff legislation he would not
permit California to be taxed for the
benefit of other parts of the United
States, but would demand the imposi
tion of taxes elsewhere for her benefit.
He pointed to the exceedingly low pries
of refined borax resulting principally
from California competition and indus
try, denied that any English syndicate
dominated the product and said that the
main foreign competitor was the Turk
of Asia Minor. Senator Jones of Ne
vada, who procured the present rate to
be Inserted in the bill, was absent until
the discussion had nearly closed. Sena
tors Stewart and Aldrich support! ri
Senator White and the duty was main
tained by a decisive vote.
Senator Allison, just before adjourn
ment, attempted to force considerate t.
of the conference report on the sundry
civil bill. Senator White insisted that
the matter should go over until tomor
row to enable him to investigate the
provisions with reference to forest res
ervations. Senator Allison declined to
make this concession, but was forced
to do so after half an hour's unprofit
able debate.
Senator White says that he has pro
cured the insertion of a provision in
the sundry civil bill allowing mining to
be conducted upon forest reservations
under the regulations of the interior de
partment. He criticises the report of
the conference mainly because persons
who own land within these reservar
tlons, other than actual settlers, are not
permitted the right of access to their
property.
THE FIRST VOTE
WASHINGTON, May 26.—(8y Asso
ciated Press.) The first vote on the
tariff bill was taken ln the senate to
day. It came after two hours' debate
on the item for boracic acid, which, al
though comparatively unimportant, af-
forded an opportunity for the first align
ment of the various elements. Mr. Vest
of Missouri, a Democratic member of
the finance committee, moved to makc
the rate on boracic acid 3 cents instead
of 4 cents per pound, as provided by the
committee. This presented a direct is
sue between the committee and the
opponents of the bill. The amendment
was defeated—2o to 34. The vote was
largely on party lines.
The approaching Victorian Jubilee
served as a theme for an eloquent In
vocation by Rev. Mr. Milburn. "The
services of Victoria have shrined her
in the hearts and reverence of true
hearted men and women the world
round," said he. "May her last days bo
her best and happiest. Guide the coun
sels of that realm and our own beloved!
country, that hand In hand, they may
tread the path of conservative progress
to the goal of Christian civilization."
Seven paragraphs of the tariff bill
were considered during the day, th*
committee being sustained ln each in
stance.
The resolution was agreed to author
izing the secretary ot the navy to em
ploy any suitable ship in forwarding
supplies to India.
Debate occurred over the chartering
of ships to carry relief supplies to India.
Chandler of New Hampshire endeav
ored to get a vote on his proposition to
send the supplies by any suitable ship.
Mr. Morgan of Alabama insisted that
American ships under the American flag
be employed. He favored naturalising
two foreign built ships, even tf It does
grind on some gentlemen who monopo
lize the coastwise trade in steamships.
After discussion by Senators Gray,
Stewart and Frye, a motion by Mr.
Morgan to table the Chandler proposi
tion was defeated, 18 to 40, and the Joint
resolution was then passed. Just as it
passed, Mr. Sewall of New Jersey made
a brief and vigorous statement that this
American benefaction should/ go under
the American flag, and Mr. Morgan ad
ded: "The American flag la now hauled
down."
The final conference report on th*
Indian bill was then agreed to
The tariff bill was taken up at 2 oclock;
Mr. White ot California, on behalf

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