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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, May 28, 1897, Image 1

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TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 240.
TO THB UNEMPLOYED
sTREE FOR THE UNEMPLOYED—
Recognising the fact that wora on the
Park boulevard is drawing to a close,
and desiring to
ASSIST WORTHY MEM
To obtain other employment. The Herald
makes the following offer:
DURING THIS WEEK
And continuing until next Sunday morn- '
Ing, we will publish for any man bring
ing credentials from the relief commit
tee, showing that he Is working or has
worked faithfully on the boulevard
A WANT ADVERTISEMENT
FREE OP CHARGE
FREE OF CHARGE
FREE OF CHARGE
Each advertisement Is limited to four
lines, and It may be published for the
entire time or any part of the period
named.
Advertisements and credentials should
be brought to The Herald business office,
822 W. Third st.
SPECIAL NOTICES
KOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oclock
a.m. and 6 and 8 oclock p.m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut off and a fine of $2 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
THE DAILI YJJOURNAL, PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 205 New High St. 2
GOOD QUALITY WALL PAPER TO COV
er 12-foot room, $1; Ingrain, $3, border in
cluded. WALTER, 218 W. Sixth St. 8-12
TO EXTON'S FOR NEW MUSIC, 827 S.
Spring st. 6-7

HELP WANTED—MALB
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building,
800-301 W. Second street, in basement.
Telephone 509.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Ranch hands. $1. etc.; chore boy, $10.
etc.; man, saw mill, 826. etc.; orchard
hand. 80 cents, etc.; orchard foreman,
$35. etc.: wood turner. $2: butcher. $40,
etc.; milker, $30, etc.; man and wife, $40.
etc.; man and wife, $35, etc., employer
here.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
All-round cook, $10, etc.. Arizona; first
class baker and pastry cook, $60, etc.;
hotel help call.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
First-class family cook, city. $30 to $35;
also one at $30. etc.; house girl, city. 4
adults, $25, etc.; house girl, ranch, $20,
employer here; 4 girls, housework, city.
$25 and $20; house girls. Elslnore, Long
Beach, Pomona and Riverside, $20 and
$25; young girl, second work: woman,
light second work, country. $12 and fare
paid; woman for light housework, Santa
Monica, $10, etc., employer here.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Experienced starch ironer,sl.so per day;
waitress. Arizona, $25, etc.; pantry girl,
$20, etc., hotel.
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
WANTED—AGENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL
Insurance: experience not necessary
New and desirable contract. Apply room
9, German-American bank building, tf
WANTED—MAN FOR LIGHT OUT
door work. Apply 254 S. Broadway, room
84. 27
HELP WANTED—FEMALE
.WANTED—A LADY CLERK. GOOD
salary, steady position to right party;
state age. experience and reference. Ad
dress O, box 9, Herald. 28
WANTED—S COOKS, 4
9 general houseworkers, 2 housekeepers.
623 W. Washington st. Telephone
West 91. tf
WANTED—EGAN'S RESTAURANT. 126
-128 E. Second St., serves the best 10c meal
in the city: try it and be convinced. 8-11
SITUATIONS WANTED—MALB
WANTED-BY EXPERIENCED SALES
man, steady position In store at very
moderate wages; experienced ln cutlery.
Bllverware and sporting goods; best of
references. Address Box 42, Station 3,
city. Si
WANTED—DAY OR NIGHT WATCH
man, gardens, lawns, poultry, house
work lodging-house, care of horses, any
thing; good work for cheap pay; refer
ences the best. H., box 8, Herald. 29
WANTED—SITUATION TO DO ANY
kind of work; a good gardener and handy
at any kind of work. Address P. c
M'AULAY, Santa Rosa house, Fourth
and San Pedro sts. 30
WANTED—YOUNG GERMAN WANTS
work to tend horses or driver or general
work; is a good worker: best references:
willing to work for small wages. 309
Wilmington St. 30
WANTED—SITUATION BY. MAN COM
petent as law clerk, stenographer, typist,
abstractor, real estate clerk or assistant
bookkeeper; Al references. Addres M.,
box 8, Herald. 30
.WANTED—SOME KIND OF EMPLOY
ment; have had several years' experi
ence In grocery business; anything. J.
W. GURRETT, 506 Mozart St., city, 31
WANTED—SITUATION BY EXPE
rlenced nurse; references: will work at
anything. WM. M'GRATH, 910 Hem
lock St., tel. main 1044, city. 30
WANTED—SITUATION BY MAN TO DO
any kind of work ln city or country or
job wOrk: very handy. Address E., box
6, Herald, SO
WANTED—EMPLOYMENT BY Ex
perienced gardener; $1 a day; city refer
ences. Address B„ box 8, Herald. 10
SITUATIONS WANTED — FEMALE
WANTED — ORDERS FOR HOUSE
girls, ORLIN THURSTON, Employ
ment, 219% W. First at. 8-16
I
y_ VV
WANTED—MONEY; I HAVE SEVERAL
small applications for loans In small
amounts on the best of securities. E. I.
BRYANT, 204% S. Broadway, room 213. 31
WANTED—MONEY~ $1000 ON GlLT
edge property near Santa Monica. E. I.
BRYANT, 20414 S. Broadway, room 213. 31
WANTED-81000 ON GILT-EDGE CITY
property. E. I. BRYANT, 204% S. Broad
way, room 213. 30
WANTED—PARTNERS
WANTED—PARTNER WITH 810,000 TO
take half Interest ln and work developed
mine; ten-stamp mill on property; fullest
Investigation invited; principals only;
references given and required. Address
GOOD MINE, box 56, San Diego, Cal. 6-0
RENT ROOMS
WANTED— A LARGE ROOM AND
piano for music studio, centrally located;
part payment In vocal lessons. Address
A., box 9, Herald. 28
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
Houses and Lota
FOR SALE—
8300 each—2 lots, 52 xl7o, 15 minutes' walk
from courthouse; close to car line.
81050—One of those fine lots on Westlake
aye.; "Nob Hill"; 50x156 to alley.
Other good bargains in lots. See
30 S. K. LINDLEY. 106 S. Broadway.
FOR SALE—CHEAP: A NICE COTTAGE
of 6 rooms and bath: good-sized lot, all
fenced ln; near electric power house.
308 W. Twelfth st. 29
l
City Lota
FOR SALE—C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots In his Third addition on easy Install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Office, 213 W. First st. tf
FOR SALE—WE SELL THE EARTH.
BASSETT & SMITH, Pomona. Cal. 6-26tf
Country Property
FOR SALE—S AND 10-ACRE TRACTS
near South Santa Monica; don't fall to
invstlgate before buying elsewhere. E.
1. BRYANT, 204% S. Broadway, room
213. SI
FOR RENT—HOUSES
FOR RENT—BIS, WATER FREE, COT
tage, 6 rooms, bath, barn, 926 Towne aye.
$12—Cottage 5 rooms, bath, 649 Gladys
avenue.
830—Beautiful residence, 716 W. Bea
con St. WIESENDANGER CO..
30 431 S. Broadway.
FOR RENT—II-ROOM HOUSE. SUITA
bIe for one or two families; Flower, be
tween First and Second. SILENT &
CO., 212 W. Second st. SO
FOR RENT—S2O; HOUSE OF 5 ROOMS;
bath, barn, yard; Seventh and Pearl sts.
WIESENDANGER CO., 431 S. Broad
way. 23 25 2S 30
FOR RENT—ROOMS
FOR RENT - FURNISHED ROOMS,
from $1.50 up per week; single rooms 25c
and 50c per night; baths free. Russ House,
cor. First and Los Angeles sts. 7-21
FOR RENT-COOL FRONT ROOMS, $10
and $12, at HOTEL BALTIMORE, cor
ner Seventh and Olive. 6-27
FOR RENT—3 NEW 4-ROOM FLATS,
only 9 blocks from center of town, $9 to
$11. 624 Towne aye. 31
FOR RENT—BEAUTIFUL FURNISHED
room at the WOODLAWN, 2415. Ma!n.6-U
FOR RENT—FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
housekeeping. 321% W. Seventh st. tf
FOR RENT—HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS,
fine location. 827% S. Spring st. 6-12
FOR RENT-PASTURE
FOR RENT—I4OO ACRES, 9 MILES FROM
Los Angeles, with running water; 200
acres of barly stubble; balance wild oats,
alfillerla and burr clover; horses
brought and delivered; no responsibility
for accidents or escapes. Address SAN
BORN HOWARD, Burbank, Cal., or 150
S. Main st. 6-27
FOR RENT—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR RENT—ELEGANTLY FURNISH
ed hall, banquet, paraphernalia and ante
rooms; for lodges and religious societies.
Inquire Foresters' temple, 129% W. First
st, from 9 a. m. to 12 m. and 2t05 p. m. 30
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE—36 BUSINESS, 75 HOUSES,
rooms, furnished, unfurnished, for rent;
collections: wanted, help free and work
EDW. NITTINGER, 236% S. Spring st. tf
FOR SALE—THE BEST BUSINESS
vestment ever made on Broadway for
quick turn and large profit. WIESEN
DANGER CO., 431 S. Broadway. 29
FOR SALE-s6ool LIVERY STABLE
well located; rare chance if you want a
livery business. BEN WHITE, 235 W.
First st. 28
I SELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS
for cash, t D. BARNARD, 111 North
Broadway, opposite Times building, tf
FOR SALE—RESTAURANT, ONLY $250;
location good; bargain this day; must
sell. BEN WHITE, 235 W. First st. 28
FOR SALE—SALOONS AT VERY REA
aonable terms. Apply at 440 Aliso st. tf
MUSICAL
FOR SALE—HANDSOME UPRIGHT
Grand Bass piano at a great sacrifice.
Room No. 81, The Savoy, Fourth and
Hill sts.; call mornings. tf
THE WONDERFUL GRAMAPHONES
for sale at A. G. GARDNER'S, 118 Win
aton st.; also pianos for sale and rent, tf
ATTORNEYS AT LAW :
LUCIEN EARLE. ATTORNEY AT LAW
office, Bullard building; entrance, room
420; telephone black 1445. 7-24-97
BROUSSEAU & MONTGOMERY, '
Attorneys-at-Law,
403 Bradbury block, Los Angeles. . tt
, (For additional classified sea Page Two.)
THE HERALD
HOMELESS
FAMILIES
Fleeing From the Flood at
El Paso
THE LEVEES ARE SWEPT AWAY
BUSINESS SECTIONS BEGIN TO
SUFFER
The Rio Grande Is Falling, But An
other Flood Is Rolling Down
From the North
Associated Press Special Wire.
EL PASO, Tex., May 27.—The Rio
Grande river rose two Inches last night.
The outlook today is more ominous than
ever. The riveT washed away a large
portion of the bank protecting the head
gate of the big irrigation canal last
night, and It seems impossible to pre
vent it going out altogether, thereby
letting the water rush through the
Santa Fe railroad yardsand the business
portion of the city. All residences in the
neighborhood have been vacated, and
families have gone to the high foothills.
The big levee protecting the southern
portion of the city isbeing strengthened,
but it is feared that windstorms, so
common this season, may come up ar.d
force the water over it. The situation at
Juarez, Mexico, opposite this city, is
even more precarious, the levee being
considerably weakened by the terrible
force of the current.
The headgate of the large canal run
ning through the southern part of the
city and the levee separating the canal
from the river gave way at 2:30 oclock
this afternoon and the water came
through in torrents, inundating the
Santa Fe freight yards, and a half mile
couth flowed in behind the-main tempo-
rary levee erected ln the past week to
hold back the water which had settled
Itself to a height of from six to ten feet
on the southern riverfront. A general
alarm was sent out by the Are depart-
ment, and all the assistance possible was'
given to those in the midst of the flood.
Some saventy-flve residences situated
between the Santa Fe freight yards and
the canal on the river front were Inun
dated within half an hour after the
break, but nearly everything movable
was carried to high ground. A new levee
Is now being constructed for a distance
of two miles along Fourth Street to hold
the water back and turn -it Into the river
again. A great many houses are filled
with refugees, but there are yet about
200 families shelterless. Their families
are encamped along the edge of the mesa
on the north side of the city. The outlook
tonight is by no means reassuring, and
there Is much anxiety that the water
may not be gotten under control.
At 10 oclock tonight the flood has
broken through the second levee on
Fourth street, and the waters had ad
vanced to Second street, causing several
hundred more poor families to flee from
their homes. There will be over 400
homeless families on the streets of El
Paso tonight, and a large number of
them are without food, as they are labor
ing people, who have been fighting the
flood instead of earning bread for the
past fifteen daysi The water is running
into the county Jail and around the
Texas and Pacific depot. The river is
reported falling.
At 10:30 oclock the water broke
through the reserve levee on Fourth
street, and now covers one-half of the
city. Destruction to property will be
immense. Every available man and ve
hicle is occupied in moving families and
household goods to high ground. The
business portion of the city may be in
vaded before morning.
MORECOMING
DENVER, Col., May 27.7—A special to
the News from Santa Fe, N. M., says:
A rise of eight inches in the Rio Grande
is reported from the Colorado line today,
and it has been runningcontlnually over
the Rio Grande watershed north of this
city all day. The prospects are that a
fresh flood, carrying from 1 to 2 feet more
water than is now flowing, has started
toward El Paso tonight. The rainfall
at Santa Fe for the past month has been
nearly four inches, or about three times
the normal supply. Dkepatches tonight
report fresh downpours all day along the
Colorado line. This will serve to in
crease the freshets already flowing in the
Rio Grande tributaries. At Chamita
the river has reached the highest point
known in ten years, and ln Efpanoia
valley the current is a quarter of a mile
wide.
IT CAUSED SICKNESS
The Old Milkman Is Suspected of
Crime
SAN FRANCISCO, May 27.—1n less
than one hour after they had finished
dinner at their summer home in San
Rafael Sunday evening, seven members
of the household of N. K. Mastem the
financial agent of the Southern Pacific
Company, were taken violently ill.
Symptoms of poisoning developed rap
idly, a physician was summoned and
under his treatment those afflicted, with
the exception of one child, were soon re
lieved.
W. A. Masten, son of N. K. Master.,
believes that the milk used at dinner
was poisoned and the authorities of
Marin county are at work Investigating
the facts in a case that at present looks
like an attempt at wholesale poisoning.
The Mastens recently changed their
milkmen and soon after received anony
mous letters warning them that the new
milk would cause sickness ln the fam
ily.
Free Market Wanted
SAN FRANCISCO. May meet
ing ot farmers from various parts of the-
State was held here this morning; for the
purpose ,of considering ways and means
to secure the establishment of a free
market on the city front. Tbe meeting
LOS ANGELES, FRIDAY MORNING, MAY 28, 1897
organized by the election of G. W. Wor
then of San Jose, President, and D. T.
Fowler of Fresno, Secretary. The lat
ter made a short address ln which he re
ferred to the bill passed by the last leg
islature for the establishment of such a
market. A. T. Dewey of Tulare moved
that permanent officers be elected, but
this motion led to a heated debate, the
Farmers' Club of this city, which took
the initiative in the matter, claiming
that such, action was unnecessary.
WILD FANATACISM
Russian Religious Enthusiasts Seek
Salvation by Martyrdom
LONDON, May 27.—Details have been
received from Odessa of the self-immo
lation of a number of fanatical followers
of Raskolinke, a report of which was
first received two weeks ago. More than
twenty-four bodies of persons who were
buried alive have been recovered from
a series of pits near Tlrespol.
The sect is a survival of the old Dis
senters, who were persecuted in Russia
for two centuries. Their treatment was
worse under Empress Sofia, when
thousands were knouted by the state
The result was that they became fiercely
fanatical and Invented the doctrine of
salvation by martyrdom. They are" now
practicing self-immolation.
Six bodies were accidentally discov
ered on the premises of Veodore Kova
leff, who confessed that he had walled
up in his cellar nine living persons, in
cluding his wife and two children. He
further admitted that he had buried six
others while they were still alive in a
specially excavated pit eight feet deep.
Kovaleff declares that all were volun
tary victims. In an adjoining garden be
longing to Matvei Sukula, four bodies
I were discovered in a pit. Sukula says
they were burled alive at their own re
quest.
MAKING MONEY
By Smuggling Liquor Across the
Alaskan Line
TACOMA, May 27. —News comes from
Alaska that liquor of doubtful quality
is being smuggled into the territory in
large quantities. The shipment of
liquor there is unlawful except where
special permits are granted, but many
saloons receive fresh consignments by
every steamer, though liquor is never
entered on the steamer's manifest. The
latest ruse for getting quantities of
whisky into the interior is to take it
through Alaska in bond for British ter
ritory beyond. Being prohibited there
a bond is given British customs officers
to take it out in a specified time. Means
are found for taking it across the line
Into Alaska at some point not watched
by American officers.
It is asserted that in this way 1200 gal
lone of high proof spirits were distribut
ed among Yukon mining camps last sea
son. By diluting the quantity was in
creased to 2400 gallons, which sold for
$25 per gallon, netting a profit to the
smugglers ot $45,000. Similar, though
smaller shipments, are being made this
year.
YOUTHFUL MORALITY
Demands That Seely's Dinner Be
Forgotten
NEW TORK, May 27.—1t is likely
that the persons indicted for participa
tion in the notorious Seely dinner last
January, that was raided by Police Cap
tain Chapman, will not be tried. The
District Attorney.according to the Jour
nal, has about come to the conclusion
that the best interests of the commun
ity demand that the details of the dinner
be allowed to remain buried instead of
being brought out in court.
He has lately received numerous let
ters signed by prominent people urging
him, in the interest of society, to allow
the indictments to remain where they
are. In this class are school principals
and teachers, who state that the pub
licity given the Seely dinner has dam
aged the youthful minds of the com
munity.
WORTH THE MONEY
And Mr. Springer Had His Boyish
Joke
SANTA CRUZ, May 27.— W. R. Spring
er, a highly respected citizen of this
place, was arrested today for playing
ball on the street. Mr. Springer was
merely throwing a ball to some boys,
when Ollicer Dougherty appeared and
informed him he must stop, as he was
violating a city ordinance.
"In that case, why don't you arrest
me?" replied Mr. Springer.
The policeman acted on the sugges
tion and put him under arrest, and Mr.
Springer was obliged to appear before
a Justice of the Peace and pay $1.50 fine
for his Joke. The ordinance forbidding
the playing of ball on the highway is an
antiquated one, dating back to 1876. It
has ntver Before been enforced.
FRESNO, May 27.— W. E. Gill, son of
W. M. Gill, Populist leader and editor,
had a marvelous escape from death
near Randsburg Saturday and was
brought to his home in this city this
morning. Both eyes were blown out
and his face horribly disfigured. Ho
•Will recover but will be totally blind.
The accident happened at the foot of a
seventy-foot shaft, and was caused by
a drill striking a dynamite load that
had not exploded.
The Sheriff's office claims to have lo
cated the two desperate characters who
broke jail here on Tuesday night, at
Los Banos, on the west side, and officials
are now concentrating on that point.
WASHINGTON, May 27.—The Secre
tary of Agriculture has designated the
Board, of which B. Killen of Oregon
City, Or., is chairman, the Board of Re
gents of the Oregon Agricultural Col
lege and Botanist Evans of this city,
are members, to go to Alaska to Inves-
tigate the needs of an agricultural ex
perimental station in that territory, and
secure data incident to the establish
ment of such an institution. The party
will fail from Alaska June Bth.
CHICAGO, May 27.—George M. Pull
man has received from Archduke Rain
er two magnificent medals and a richly
wrought diploma, a testimonial of honor
and merit in founding and building the
most perfect town in the world.
The distinction came as the result
of an exhibit in the international hygie
nic and pharmaceutical exposition in
Prague. (
Fired the Blast
Alaskan Agriculture
Pullman's Model Town
HAVEMEYER
ACQUITTED
Under Instructions by the
Trial Judge
IN THE MAGNATE'S OPINION
EVERY DECENT MAN SHOULD
BE PLEASED
Contrary to Expectation the Case
Against Secretary Searles Will
Not Be Dismissed
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, May 27—Interest in
the trial of Henry O. Havemeyer, Pre
sident of the American Sugar Refining
Company, for contumacy, before th?
Senate Sugar Investigation Committee
was greatly intensified this morning by
the pending motion of the defense to
Instruct the jury to bring in a verdict
of not guilty. It was understood, of
course, that if the Court should order
the acquittal, the case would come to
an abrupt close and the indictments
against John E. S?arles, Secretary of
the Sugar Refining Company, and Ed
wards and Schriever would be quashed.
When Court opened District Attorney
Davis entered upon a reply to the mo
tion of the defense to order an acquit
tal, which Havemeyer's counsel argued
yesterday. Davis took up six pro
positions upon which the defense based
the motion and met them seriatim, al
though not in the order laid down by
the defense. Johnson replied at some
length to the arguments of Davis, after
which the Court announced a recess
until one o'clock, during which inter
val he was to take the motion of defend
ant's counsel under advisement.
The court sustained the motion of the
defendant, and the caee against Have
meyer was dismissed.
The jury, in accordance with the in
structions of the court, returned a ver
dict of not guilty. District Attorney
Davis said the verdict would not affect
the case of John E. Searles, secretary of
the Sugar Refining Company, whose
trial would be proceeded with tomor
row. Davis said Searles directly re
fused to answer questions and his case
was in no way parallel with that of
Havemeyer. Havemeyer said: "The
verdict is satisfactory to me and to
every decent man in the community."
"Certainly I am satisfied with the ver
dict," said he to an Associated Press
reporter, a few minutes after the jury
had returned a verdict of not guilty.
"The verdict," he continued, "ought
to be satisfactory to every decent man
In this and every other community."
That was the only expression the
president of the American Sugar Refin
ing company would make upon the re
sult of his trial.
The conclusion of the trial was abrupt.
The defense produced no witnesses.
AVhen the government rested its case
yesterday the defense moved that the
court instruct the jury to order an ac
quittal on six grounds, the" principal
one of which was that the committee did
not have jurisdiction, and that the
questions asked were not pertinent.
The court held It was unnecessary to
rule on the main contention as to the
jurisdiction of the senate committee,
and he sustained the motion upon th::
single ground that the question (calling
for data as to state and local contribu
tions) demanded information not within
the know ledge of the witness, which he
had testified he had no personal know-l
edge of, and which, if given at all, must
have been procured from books, and of
which the books themselves were the
best testimony. Although the verdict cf
not guilty was given by the Jury, it was
a verdict returned under the court's
decision and amounted practically to
the judge's throwing the case out of
court.
The case of John S. Searles, the secre
tary of the sugar'trust, who was in
dicted with Mr. Havemeyer for occus
ancy, will be called tomorrow.
JOINED HIS MOTHER
Suicide of a Prominent Lawyer of
Kentucky
LEXINGTON, Ky., May 27.—Judge
Henry Marshall Buford, City Solicitor
of Lexington, committed suicide by
drowning in a pond near the home of
Matt Simpson, this county. He was 52
years old and unmarried. He was one
of the leading lawyers of Kentucky, had
been Judge of the Common Pleas Court,
Master Commissioner of Fayette county
and held many other positions of trust.
Through hie father, Henry Buford, he
was descended from the pioneers of that
name. Through his mother, Elizabeth
Marshall, he was related to Chief Jus
tice Marshall and other members of that
distinguished family. His mother, to
whom he was greatly devoted, died
about a year ago. She asked him to
cremate her body and not allow any
other person to touch it. He carried
out her wishes to the letter and brought
her ashes home with him from Cincin
nati.
Horses Poisoned
SAN FRANCISCO, May 27.—For the
last few days the What Cheer Stables
on Jackson street, near Davis, have re
sembled a veterinary hospital. Over
thirty horses have been sick for four
days and during that time Aye have
died. Not a horse escaped, and those
that are now alive were only saved by
unremitting attention. tils believed
that arsenic or some other poison was
mixed with their food.
Republican Accord
CHICAGO, May 27.—The National Re
publican League has served notice upon
the League of Western Silver States that
delegates to the National Republican
League convention at Detroit In. July
must be in accord with the party plat
form. The Executive Committee today
INDEX
TO TELEGRAPH NEWS
Lieutenant Peary, having secured
five years leave of absence, makes
plans for an expedition to the North
Pole.
Frohman wins the Eclipse stake at
Morris park; the race for the Hunt
cup marred by serious accidents; base
ball games.
The trial of Havemeyer, the sugar
magnate, results in a verdict of not
guilty under instructions given by
the trial judge.
A frightful wreck on the Short Line
railroad; nine men killed, eight
wounded, and engines and cars
smashed to pieces.
The Greco-Turkish peace negotia
tions are not progressing with re
markable speed and the powers' jeal
ousy makes agreement unlikely.
Indian Trader Preston, with the as
sistance of nine Navajo Indians, cap
tures Train Robber and Murderer Par
ker, and lands him safe in' the Flag
staff jail.
SS. Zaccario and Fourier added to
the Roman Catholic calendar; the
canonization attended with the most
impressive ceremonies since the aboli
tion of the pope's temporal power.
No progress made in the inquiry
into the Ruiz case; a Cuban confer
ence will be held in Philadelphia to
elaborate plans to meet the approval
of President McKinley and Secretary
Sherman.
The flood at El Paso assumes very
serious proportions; four hundred
families are homeless and the water is
invading the business sections of the
city; reports from the north promise
increase of damage and more water
coming.
The senate somewhat modifies the
harsh provisions of the sundry civil
bill relating to forest reserves and dis
poses of ten pages of the tariff bill by
upholding the senate amendments in
every case; the house declines to con
sider the Cuban question and adjourns
until Monday.
delegated to President Woodmansee and
Secretary Dowling the duty of appoint
ing a provisional organization in Colo
rado and any other State ln which it
might appear that the old organization
le no longer ln control of Republicans in
accord with the party.
THE CRAVEN CASE
A Famous Witness Says the Will Is
Forged
SAN FRANCISCO, May 27.—Another
famous expert, Daniel T. Ames, was
called upon by the plaintiff© in the An
gus-Craven case to testify as to the
handwriting upon the various docu
ment? already introduced today. In or
der to prove that the witness was quali
fied to testify in such matters it was
shown that he had been called upon to
pass upon handwriting some twelve
hundred times in twenty-two states,
Canada, Paris and London, and that he
was the expert of the United States
courts in New York, New Jersey and the
District of Columbia. After examining
the various exhibits in the case, he ex
pressed the opinion that the alleged Fair
pencil will was a forgery. He then pro
ceeded to give his reasons for this opin
ion, and the remainder of the day's ses
sion w as consumed by the witness in de
tailing the various discrepancies which
he had discovered between the admitted
ly genuine writings and those in evi
dence.
Want More Grub
SAN QUENTIN PRISON, May 27.—
Seven hundred convicts, comprising thd
Jute mill force, rebelled at the prison
fare today and refused to resume work
unless an improvement in the menu was
promised. The warden and Prison Di
rector Wllklns investigated the food
question and pronounced the complaint
to be without cause. The prisoners still
refusing to work, all of the rebellious
700 were ordered placed in solitary con
finement on bread and water until they
agreed to conform to prison rules.
The Virginia Election
RICHMOND, Va., May 27.—The vote
today was light all over the state. The
elections were for county officers and on
the question of calling a constitutional
convention. Returns up to midnight,
covering about three-fourths of the
country districts, render it certain that
the proposition to call a convention to
frame a new constitution is defeated by
an overwhelming majority. So far as
party lines were drawn in the election
for county, town and city officers, th 2
net result is a victory for the Democrats.
A Suit for Taxes
STOCKTON, May 27—The Stockton
Savings and Loan society this afternoon
brought suit against the county of San
Joaquin to recover the sum of $2569.51,
paid the county treasurer in taxes. The
money was paid by the bank under pro
test at the time and Is the tax arbi
trarily fixed by Assessor Orfman. The
bank claims that the assessor had no
legal authority to ignore the tax state
ment handed in by it, which was only c.
fifth as large as the one arbitrarily
made.
Oakland Footpads
OAKLAND, May 27.—The bold foot
pads who recently surprised a mounted
officer and relieved him of his gun and
handcuffs made a descent upon the little
town of Martinez last night and sig
nalized their arrival by holding up a
deputy constable, from whom they took
a gun, a pair of handcuffs and some
small change.
Stockton Footpads
STOCKTON, May 27.—Last evening
a gang of robbers were turned loose in
the outskirts of the city. Two roadside
houses were held" up, in each case by a
single man masked, and there were two
attempts to hold up citizens, both of
which were successful. Three men took
part in one ot the attempted hold-ups.
Ten Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
SETTLERS
AND MINERS
Allowed to Cross Forest
Reserves
WHITE WELL SATISFIED
With Changes in the Sundry
Civil Bill
TEN PAGES OF TARIFF BILL
RETAIN ALL THE SENATE
AMENDMENTS
The House Declines to Consider the
Question of Recognizing Cuban
Belligerency and Adjourns /
Until Monday
Specinl to The Herald. -----
WASHINGTON, D.C., May 27.—When
the sundry civil service bill, in so tar
as it affected forest reservations, was
being considered today.Senator WJnlte
insisted that mining should be allowed
within the reservation, subject to regu
lations by the interior department, and
also that persons owning land wtfhin,
such reservations should be permitted
to go and come from their property
without obstruction. The conference
committee acquiesced in the'/e de
mands in so far as th/e min
ing interests are concerned :»nd also
with reference to actual settlers.
When the conference report, came up
today Senator White criticised tho
phraseology employed, claiming that
while miners and settlers were, protect
ed, owners of land who ha,d purchased
from those who had obtained govern
ment patents, will be denied a right to
cross . reservations in order to. obtain)
access to their property. Senator Al
lison disputed this proposition, but after
vigorous debate the defects of the con
ference report were practically con
ceded. In view, however, of the large
amounts of money involved in the bill
and the determination of parties inter-
ested in the appropriations to force the
measure through, the report was adopt
ed, notwithstanding the dissent of most
of the western senators. All admitted,
however, that much had been done to
soften the harsh features of the forest
reservation laws, and Senator White
and others expressed themselves as sat
isfied on the whole with the progress
made. No objection was urged to prop
er reservation, but the inhibition of
mining, the obstacles presented to en
joyment of property already acquired
and the indiscriminate withdrawal of
lands fitted only for mineral purposes
aroused unusual Interest.
TARIFF TALK
Good Progress Made With the Pend
ing Bill
WASHINGTON, Mlay 27.—(8y the.
Associated Press.) Only the front
rows of the galleries of the senate
were occupied when the session opened
today.
The senate made good progress on th*
tariff bill, disposing of about ten pages.
Several votes were taken, the finance
committee being sustained in each case
by majorities varying from six to fif
teen. The drug schedule was under
discussion and the debate was largely
technical. Occasionally, however, It
branched off to general phases of the
tariff, although at no time during this
day was there a speech of more than
five minutes' duration.
The final conference report on the
Sundry Civil bill was taken up, an agree
ment having been made to vote at 2 p.
m. The main questions involved in the
conference report related to the suspen
sion until March 1 next of ex-President
Cleveland's proclamation embracing;
large areas as forest reserves; making
Immediately available $2,933,333 for con
tract work on the Mississippi river, and
$10,000 for the improvement of Pearl
harbor, Hawaii. The question of forest
reserves was discussed at length. Sen
ators from the States affected by the
forest order urged the rejection of the
entire conference report and absolute
suspension of the President's order.
Senator Cannon of Utah referred to the
order as barbarous and inhuman.
Senator Stewart of Nevada character
ized it as a disgrace to American civili
zation and the worst outrage of the last
half-oer.tury.
Senator Pettigrew asserted that the
order was the result of the "ignorance
of Grover Cleveland." He said that in
South Dakota the area included as part
of the forest reserve contained 17 post
offices, 15,000 people and DO mile's of rail
road He also urged that the Academy
of Sciences, which recommended this
act, should be rebuked, and favored the
defeat of the Sundry Civil bill rather
than to have the order stand.
When Senator Allison said that this .
was the best arrangement that could
be made with the House, Senator Till
man ejaculated: "Oh, they have no
House over there, anyway. They have
one man running it."
Senator Berry (Ark.) said the Mlsele
sippl River item and other important
features of the bill would be jeopardizei
by the rejection of the report.
A vote was taken and the final con
ference report agreed to as follows:
Teas—Aldrich, Allison, Bate, Caffery,
Chandler, CuHom, Deboe, Fairbanks,
Faulkner, Gear, Gray, Hanna, HAlta
brough, Hawley, Kenney, Lindsay, Mc-

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