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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, May 31, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-05-31/ed-1/seq-1/

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TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 243.
SPECIAL NOTICES
HOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oclock
a.m. and 6 and 8 oclock p.m. For a vio
lation of tho above regulations the water
will be shut off and a fine of 82 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again.
MAGNETIC INSTITUTE — REMOVED
from 481% S. Spring st. to N. E. cor. of
Spring and Sixth sts; entrance 126 W.
Sixth St.; seven years' successful work
ln Los Angeles: send for testimonials;
diseases diagnosed without asking ques
tions. ESTHER DTE. Magnetic Healer.
6-3
THE DAILY JJOURNAL, PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, Hens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 208 New High St. 2
GOOD QUALITY WALL PAPER TO COV
er 12-foot room, $1: ingrain, $3, border In
. eluded. WALTER, 218 W. Sixth st. 8-12
TO EXTON'S FOR NEW MUSIC, 327 S.
Spring st. 6-7
HELP WANTED—MALE
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building,
800-302 W. Second street, ln basement.
Telephone 609.
WANTED—BOY TO LEARN BAKERS'
trade, from 16 to 18 years old. EBIN
GER'S BAKERY. Third and Spring. 1
HELP WANTED—FEMALE
WANTED—6 COOKS. 4 SECOND GIRLS.
9 general houseworkers, 2 housekeepers.
623 W. Washington st. Telephone
West 91. tf
WANTED—EGAN'S RESTAURANT, 126
-128 E. Second St., serves the best 10c meal
ln the city: try It and be convinced. 8-11
SITUATIONS WANTED-MALE
WANTED—BY EXPERIENCED SALES
man, steady position ln store at very
moderate wages; experienced ln cutlery,
silverware and sporting goods; best of
references. Address Box 42, Station 3,
city. 31
WANTED—SOME KIND OF EMPLOY
ment; have had several years' experi
ence In grocery business; anything. J.
W. GURRETT, 606 Mozart St., city. 81
SITUATIONS WANTED — FEMALE
WANTED — ORDERS FOR HOUSE
girls, ORLIN THURSTON, Employ
ment, 219% W. First St. 8-16
WANTED—TO BORROW
.WANTED—TO BORROW FOR CLIENT.
8260 loan on 480 acres eastern land, worth
at least $1600; have refused 31200 for It In
last sixty days. C. A. RUNELS & CO..
132 S. Broadway. 31
WANTED-MONEY; I HAVE SEVERAL
small applications for loans in small
amounts on the best of securities. E. I.
BRYANT, 204% S. Broadway, room 218. 21
WANT E D-3* O N EY; $1000 ON GlLT
edge property near Santa Monica. E. I.
BRYANT, 204% S. Broadway, room 213.31
SSSSSSSSS I SSSSSSSSSSSI
WANTED—PARTNERS
WANTED—PARTNER WITH $10,000 TO
take half Interest In and work developed
mine; ten-stamp mill on property; fullest
investigation Invited; principals only;
references given and required. Address
GOOD MINE, box 56, San Diego, Cal. 6-6
WANTED-REAL BSTATB
WANTED—FOR CASH, BARGAINS IN
real estate. PAVKOVICH, 220 W. First
st. 31
WANTED—MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED—CHILD TO CARE FOR;
good home and care. 514 W. Twelfth St. 31
PERSONAL
PAST READ. FUTURE REVEALED—
ONLY ORTHODOX PALMIST AND
CLAIRVOYANT MEDIUM, •>
PROF. J. B. WYCKOFF,
427 S. MAIN ST.
His readings will cause you to look upon
the past ln a different light and lead you
to a brighter future. This gifted oracle
of occult force may be consulted upon all
affairs ot life.
DO YOU WISH TO KNOW FACTS YOU
SHOULD KNOW?
If you will succeed ln your undertaking?
If you wll make a change ln business?
If you will win your law suit?
If your domestic troubles will soon end?
If you will obtain your ambition?
If your land contains minerals, oil, gas?
If you are loved?
If you will succeed ln a profession?
What business you should follow?
Where to invest in business?
If you will succeed in love affairs?
If lucky In mining speculations?
If absent friends will return?
If past troubles will torment in future?
HOURS OF CONSULTATION,
9 a. m. to 6 p. m.
His parlors are always filled with anx
ious people seeking reliable Information.
His sittings cost practically nothing
ladles, 60 cents; gentlemen, $1 Is his
price at present; no more than you would
pay an unknown clairvoyant or a par
tially developed medium; his readings
astonish the most skeptical: all are sat
isfied; the professor gives advice on all
matters that are of interest to mankind.
PERSONAL—ONE HAND READ FREE;
life read from cradle to grave; advice on
business matters, family affairs. 111% W.
Third St.
MUSICAL
FOR SALE—HANDSOME UPRIGHT
Grand Bass piano at a great sacrifice.
Room No. 31, The Savoy, Fourth and
HIU sts.; call mornings. tf
THE WONDERFUL GRAMAPHONEB
for sale at A. G. GARDNER'S. 118 Wln
ston st.: also pianos for sale and rent, tf
MINING AND ASSAYING
MORGAN * CO.. ASSAYERS AND RE
flners and ore testers; bullion purchased;
consulting metallurgists; mines examined
and dealt ln. Office, 261 Wilson block. Los
Angeles. Cal. 26-tf
THE BIMETALLIC ABSAY OFFICE
and Chemical Laboratory, 124 8. Main st
R. A. PEREZ, E. M., manager. U-4tf
FOlf SALE—REAL ESTATE
House* mad Lots
FOR SALE—THE PRETTIEST T-ROOM
house In town; No. 33 In the beautiful St.
James park. Inquire on premises or at
421 W. Adams st. 6-29
City LOU
for sale-
No. 6-8400, lot 50x180 south side Twenty
fourth st, west of Central.
$450, lot 60x180 south side Twenty-fifth
St., west of Central.
No. B—s3ooo, 6-room house, lot 80x150,
highly Improved, Beaudry aye.
No. 20—5650, 4-room house, Glendale.
2 lots 50x150 each, set to fruit trees.
No. A—slsoo, furniture, fixtures and
lease of a 23-room lodging house on
Broadway, full and paying a good In
come.
No. S3—slo,ooo, 15-acre fruit ranch, Onta
rio; good buildings; or would exchange.
No. 42—515,000, 23-acre fruit ranch at Glen
dale; 7 acres navels, 7 acres lemons, 9
acres deciduous; 9-room house, large
barn, etc.; abundance of water; might
take part ln Los Angeles property.
M. MACDONALD,
81 825 Byrne Block.
FOR SALE-C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots In his Third addition on easy Install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Office, 213 W. First st. tf
FOR SALE—WE SELL THE EARTH.
BASSETT & SMITH, Pomona, Cal. 6-26tf
Country Property
FOR SALE—S AND 10-ACRE TRACTS
near South Santa Monica; don't fall to
Invstlgate before buying elsewhere. E.
I. BRYANT. 204% S. Broadway, room
213. 31
FOR SALE—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE—TYPEWRITERS CHEAP-
Smtth Premier, $40; Remington. $35;
Densmore, $85; Yost, $25; Callgraph, $26.
All rented. ALEXANDER. 301 S. B'dway.
6-18
in i ,
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR BALE—B6 BUSINESS, 75 HOUSES,
rooms, furnished, unfurnished, for rent;
collections; wanted, help free and work.
EDW. NITTINGER. 236% S. Spring St. tf
A—sl7s; BAKERY ROUTE: GOOD
horse and wagon; clearing $65 a month
above all expenses. See BEN WHITE,
235 W. First St. 1
I SELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS
for cash. I. D. BARNARD, 111 North
Broadway, opposite Times building, tt
FOR SALE—SALOONS AT VERY RKA
sonable terms. Apply at 440 Aliso St. tf
FOR RENT—HOUSES
FOR RENT—FIRST FLOOR FLAT,
furnished; 6 large sunny rooms; close ln.
Apply at 115 S. Olive st. 31
FOR RENT—HOUSE, 6 ROOMS. NO. 913
San Julian st., $13. Inquire 107% S. Broad-
FOR RENT—ROOMS
FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS,
from $1.50 up per week; single rooms 26c
and 60c per night; baths free. Russ House,
cor. First and Los Angeles sts. 7-21
FOR RENT—ROOMS, $1. $1.25 AND $1.50
per week; close tn; housekeeping. OR
LANDO. 311 W. Third st. 6
FOR RENT—COOL FRONT ROOMS. $10
and $11. at HOTEL BALTIMORE, cor
ner Seventh and Olive. 6-27
FOR RENT—B NEW -4-ROOM FLATS,
only 9 blooks from center of town, $9 to
$11. 624 Towne aye. 81
FOR RENT-UNFURNISHED] ONE
room; nice location. 583 S. Hope st, cor.
Hope and Sixth. 81
FOR RENT—CHEAPEST AND FINEST
offices In the city; 206% S. Broadway,
room 17. 1
FOR RENT—ROOMS, $1 PER WEEK;
two persons, $1.50; housekeeping. 127 E.
Third. 81
FOR RENT—BEAUTIFUL FURNISHED
room at the WOODI.AWN, 2415. Main.6-11
FOR RENT—FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
housekeeping. 821% W. Seventh st. tf
FOR RENT—HOUSEKEEPING ROOMS,
fine location. 827% S. Spring st. 6-12
' POR RENT—PASTURE
FOR RENT-1400 ACRES, 9 MILES FROM
Los Angeles, with running water; 200
acres of barly stubble; balance wild oats,
alflllerla and burr clover; horses
brought and delivered; no responsibility
for accidents or escapes. Address SAN
BORN HOWARD, Burbank, Cal., or 150
S. Main st. 6-27
FOR EXCHANGE—REAL BSTATB
for exchange
no. 10—$80,000, 7EO-acre ranch near Re
dondo; clear; want clear Income east
ern property.
No. 11—$80,000, hotel; clear and income
paying; Minneapolis; want Improved
ranch.
No. 12—815,000, 40 acres. 24 to lemons; bal
ance hay; good buildings; Fallbrook;
clear; want clear Income business prop
erty ln Los Angeles, or cash and mtg.
No. 14—56500, 15-room house, lot 125x177,
center of Riverside; rents $50; all sdt to
orange trees; want house and tot in
Los Angeles.
No. 8—54500, 320 acres ln Lake county; 8
mineral springs; 100 acres ln pine tim
ber; mostly level, tillable, fine fruit
land, In the center of the various health
resorts; clear; want Los Angeles clear.
M. MACDONALD,
825 Byrne Block.
FOR EXCHANGE—(-ROOM COTTAGE.
1721 New Jersey st; mortgage, $650; make
offer.
8-room residence, southwest; mortgage,
$1800; equity, $2000; make offer of small
ranch.
10-room house, southwest, for 12 or 14
-room house. C. A. RUNELS & CO.,
*1 182 S. Broadway.
FOR EXCHANGE—REAL ESTATE FOR
grocery stock or big heavy horses suit
able for street grading. See E. I. BRY
ANT. 204% S. Broadway, room 218. 31
EXCURSIONS
PHILLIPS' PERSONALLY CONDJJCT
ed excursions, Denver & Rio Grande and
Rock Island route, leave Los Angeles
every Tuesday. Office, 114 8. Spring st.
4-stf
(For. additional ciassined see Page Two.)
THE HERALD
PROMISING
PROGRESS
Is Made With the Tariff
Schedule Bills
THERE ARE BREAKERS AHEAD
SUGAR AND WOOL WILL CAUSE
DEBATE
In the House—Simpson Will Continue
to Embarrass the Speaker—Pos
tal Policy Announced
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON. May SO— The Impres
sion was general about the senate at the
cflose of the first week's discussion of the
tariff yesterday, that the sugar schedule
would be reached toward the close of the
present week. The progress so far
made, while it was much less marked
yesterday than on previous days, is gen
erally regarded as little less than phe
nomenal, as modern tariff rebates go.
Senator Vest declares that the present
bill is as far advanced now as was the
Wilson bill after five weeks of discus
sion, while Senator Jones of Arkansas
asserts that much of the present bill was
passed over on the first day of considera
tion as was disposed In the Wilson
bill in three weeks. The Republicans
generally concede that good progresshae
been made, but they are not inclined to
felicitate themselves too much until
they see what policy Is to be pursued
when questions of more general Interest
are reached than have yet been
broached.
The sugar schedule, ln all probability,
will excite more prolonged and animated
debate than any other ln the bill. The
Democrats are making very extensive
preparations for the discussion of this
schedule, and several set speeches will
be made upon It The indications are
that various other questions of general
interest will be considered in connection
with the sugar duty. Senator Pettigrew
is contemplating presenting his amend
ment against trusts In this connection,
and It Is certain that the Hawaiian ques
tion will come to the front ln an amend
ment providing for the continuance of
the reciprocity treaty with the Hawaiian
islands. With reference to the Hawaiian
treaty there is no longer much room for
doubt that provision will be made to con
tinue the present treaty in effect. It it
probable that this will be done by a di
rect " "■""""t rTtnaTfJUG
shall be construed ~c> abrogating the
treaty. The Republican members of the
committee are contemplating this
change. If Senator Pettigrew insists
upon offering the trust amendment to
this schedule he will precipitate one of
the most Interesting debates of the ses
sion. The Republicans are not yet de
cided whether they will caucus on the
sugar schedule, but there is more or less
talk to this effect.
There are two schedules to be consid
ered after the conclusion of that under
present discussion before the sugar
schedule can be reached. There are the
metal and wool schedules. The metal
schedule is not especially objectionable
to the Democrats, containing, as it does,
many of the Wilson law rates, but It is
more or less complicated, and will
necessarily consume time. The wool
schedule will develop no little antago
nism on account of the duty on lumber.
There will be quite l a determined effort
to restore white pine lumber to the free
list.
The Tillman resolution for a sugar in
vestigation probably will be reported to
the senate Tuesday. It will be passed
without difficulty when taken up, ac
cording to the present outlook, but Sen
ator Tillman will find opportunity to
make another speech if there is any ap
parent effort at delay. The senate will
not be ln session tomorrow, having ad
journed over on account of Decoration
day.
IN THE HOTJSE
WASHINGTON, May 30.—The attempt
to embarrass Speaker Reed for the pro
gram of inaction pursued by the major
ity has become the settled policy of Rep
resentative Simpson and other mem
bers of the minority, and the sessions o<
the house this week will witness a con
tinuation of these tactics. The confer
ence reports on the sundry civil and In
dian appropriation bills are ready for
consideration, and the leaders would like
to dispose of them. But the difficulty
now is that many of the members have
gone home, and at present there is no
quorum ln the city. This will Interfere
with the desire ot the members to re
cess until Thursday, when the house
meets tomorrow, and compel an adjorun
ment until Thursday. On that day if a
quorum lo present the house will pro
ceed with these two conference reports
and also the bill carrying appropriatlor
for the government printing office.
POSTAL POLICY
WASHINGTON, May SO.—The polio
of the postoffice department as to th<
appointment of minors ln the postofncei
has been definitely fixed, and they wll
be debarred from chief clerkships ant
deputy postmasterships except in a few
of the third class offices, where circum
stances urge their peculiar fitness. Ever
then they will not be allowed to become
acting postmasters on account of the le
gal declaration that contracts made bj
minors are vlolable. This effectually
debars them from being even tempo
rarily postmasters, so far as the as
sumption of the responsibilities of thai
office is concerned. An instance Is a
Madison, Ind., where M. G. Garber ap
plied for the appointment of a persor
less than eight years old as chief cler)
and deputy postmaster. An Inquiry
from the postmaster had deduced thi
statement that It Is inadvisable for i
town the size of Madison, having a pop
ulation of about 12,000, to' take sue)
action. The department regards it a:
against public policy and the Interest!
of the service to appoint minors, thoug)
except as to too acting duties of post
LOS ANGELES, MONDAY MORNING, MAY 31, 1897
masterships, no legal Inhibition on mi
nors generally Is cited. It was only a
short time ago that a name was sub
mitted for postmaster at Oxford, Ohio,
a first class office, and the recommenda
tions are of the strongest character, but
it was found that the candidate was only
twenty years old, and the name was
withdrawn from consideration.
The Convention Promises to Be a
Success
DENVER, Col., May 30—The corres
pondence at headquarters of the Intei
natlonal Gold Mining convention, to be
held in Denver on July 7, 8 and 9, shows
that great interest has been awakened
throughout the entire United States,
particularly among practical mining
people and those Interested in mining
enterprise's. The delegations thus far
presented from the states are composed
of representative- men of business and in
dustries. Delegates named in New
York city represent mining and financial
organization. Georgia makes enquiry
•regarding space for an exhibit from her
gold fields. California's delegations will
embrace many of the noted mining mag
nates of the country, and that state has
under consideration an extensive'exhibit
of Its mineral products, while inquiries
and applications for space are coming
in from many mining centers of the
west.
It is now assured that the gathering
will be an aggregate representation of
the geniua and wealth devoted to the
production, of the precious metals in
North America, while representatives of
the South American republics have given
assurance of their attendance.
The exceedingly low railway rates as
sure an Immense gathering from the
east and west. Rates to the convention
have been fixed as follows: From Chi
cago $12.50, from St. Louis $10. and'cor
responding rates for Intermediate
points. Returning, to Chicago $15, to St.
Louis, $12.50. Ample time is allowed for
excursions to all parts of the west.
AN ANARCHIST PICNIC
Homestead. Riot Inciters Have Served
Their Terms
PITTSBURG, May 30.—An Anarchist
picnic at a grove near Glenwooji today
was raided by the police and forty
seven men taken prisoners. The charge
against the prisoners is disorderly con
duct and breaking the city ordinance
prohibiting the sale of beer on a picnic
ground. It is claimed lotteries were
also in operation and several rifles and
a large amount of bullets were cap
tured, which the men said were to be
used in a shooting gallery which had
not been erected at the time of the
raid.
The picnic was held in celebration of
the release a few days ago of Henry
Bauer and Carl Nold from the peniten
tiary, where they had served four yearsi
for inciting a riot at Homestead at the
time of the big strike at that place.
Bauer and Nold, who were among
those arrested, say the action of the
police is an outrage and somebody will
be made to suffer for It.
Old Manuscripts Found ln Egyptian
Rubbish Heaps
I LONDON, May 30.—A great find of
ancient papyri in Egypt has been made
by Grenfell and Hunt, who are working
in behalf of the Egyptian exploration
fund. At Behnesa many ancient rub
bish mounds yielded rich stores.
Among the papyri is a leaf from a
third century papyrus book, containing
a collection of the sayings of Christ.
Some of the saying are not in the Gos
pels, and others exhibit divergences
from the text of the Gospels.
One hundred and fifty rolls, In many
cases several feet long, have been re
tained at the Glzeh museum and the
rest are on the way to England. Be
sides the papyri a number of coins, 200
inscribed tiles, bronze and Ivory orna
ments and other objects of the Roman
and Byzantine periods have been re
covered.
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., May 30.—1t was
discovered this morning that the John
Harvard statue, located in the delta
of Memorial hall, ln the college yard at
Harvard university had been besmeared
with red paint during the night, proba
bly by students ln celebration of Har
vard's victory over Prinoetown yester
day. The paint was daubed ln patches,
chiefly on the base of the granite found
ation, and steps were promptly taken
to remove It. This Is the second time
within five years that the statue has
been similarly treated;
The Students' Conference
PACIFIC GROVE, May 30—The last
day of the Paciflc coast students' con
ference began its session with a Joint
meeting of the heads of committees and
departments of the work which was
held in executive session. At 10 a. m.,
a platform was given to the delegates
by Rev. Dr. McClean of San Francisco,
and final conferences were held behind
closed doors. This ended the morning
session.
WEST POINT, N. V., May 30.—Many
distinguished officers of the United
States army and other invited guests
have arrived to attend the dedication
ceremonies of the battle monument to
mororw. Among the number are Sec
retary Alger of Washington, Adjutant-
General Ruggles, Brigadier-General
John M. Wilson and General George S.
Greene, the eldest living graduate of the
Military academy.
NASHILLE. Ten., May 30.—Yesterday
ln the criminal court at Lebanon, in the
case of the State vs. W. Hall, the jury
found him guilty of unlawfully receiv
ing deposits, and fixed sentence
at five years ln the penitentiary.
The casst will be appealed. Hall was the
cashier for the bank at Watertown,
which failed about a year ago.
CHRISTIANIA, May 30.—The town of
Namsos, province of North Trendhjem
near the mouth of the Namsen river, on
the Namsen Fjord, west coast of Nor
way, has been entirely destroyed by
fire. The flames, fanned by a fierce
wind, spread so rapidly that the 1800
inhabitants were unable to save even
their furniture. . j
GOLD MINERS
ANCIENT PAPYRI
Cheap and Nasty
Committee meeting's
A Battle Monument
Hall's Sentence
A Whole Town Burned
DURRANT
WILL HANG
For the Murder of Blanche
Lamont
THE GOVERNOR HAS DECIDED
HALE IS ORDERED TO SET THE
DEATH WATCH
Durrant Declares He Will Die Game
and Will Invite His Mother
to Attend
Associated Press Special Wire.
SACRAMENTO, May 30.—Theodore
Durrant will hang on Jane Uth, one
week from next Friday.
Governor Budd this evening tele
phoned that much in effect to Warder.
Hale of San Quentln, at the same time
ordering the death watch placed upon
the prisoner.
Immediately after telephoning this
message to Warden Hale, the govern
or was driven in a closed hack back to
the depot, where he took the train for
San Francisco.
Notwithstanding the fact that the
governor has made known his decision
and that the telephone message has
leaked out, the same secrecy Is being
maintained regarding the statement
which the governor has prepared, and
this statement will not be given out un
til tomorrow.
WILL DIE GAME
SAN QUENTIN, May 30.—Theodore
Durrant has made the declaration that
if he must meet his fate on the gallows,
he will die like a man. The mere sug
gestion of suicide is repulsive to him, he
says. He also declares that he will die
in the presence of his parents, who will
insist on. attending the execution as his
invited guests. The elder Durrant says
that his wife is a woman of determina
tion and she will press her legal rights to
the limit.
Under the law Warden Hale cannot
deny her admission if she presents at
the prison gate an invitation of her son
requesting her presence at the hanging.
WORDEN'S CASE
For nearly four hours today Governor
Budd listened to so-called arguments
by Lawyer G. W. Monteith of San Ra
fael for the commutation of the death
sentence of S. Di Worden, the ring
leader in the crime of wrecking a train
in Yolo during the American Railway
unign strike in 1894, by which Engineer
Clark and four soldiers were killed.
Monteith made such wild statements
regarding Worden's innocence that he
was frequently called down by the gov
ernor. In concluding his remarks at the
close of the conference the governor
said:
"You are simply seeking another res
pite for the prisoner, which I will not
allow."
He had, he said, such astounding proof
of Worden's guilt that he doubted
whether forty affidavits to prove an
alibi or anything else could induce
him to change his mind. Only a few
days ago, he said, Worden had written
leters for relatives in the east, and these
leters he (the governor) now had. In
them Worden stated that he knew th?
governor would not take steps for the
commutation of his sentence and that
he would certainly be hanged.
In those letters, the governor explain
ed, Worden had asked forgiveness from
his family for the blot he had placed
upon their fair name, and had warned
his son not to follow ln his footsteps.
But nowhere did he make a denial of his
guilt. In fact he admitted guilt in eve
rything except words.
The governor would not give the let
ters he held to the press, but he pri
vately showed them to Monteith, Knox
and Crossley. What impression they
made is not known.
The hearing closed at 2:30 oclock, and
Judging from the attitude taken by the
governor, nothing can save Salter D.
Worden from the gallows.
He will give his decision tomorrow.
Turnfest Aftermath
ST. LOUIS, May 30.—The combined
Turners' organization in this city united
at the fair grounds today in the largest
festival in the history of the St. Louis
district. Fine weather brought out an
Immense crowd, which was enabled to
view some of {he postponed events of
the national turnfest held here during
the early part of the month. On the last
day of the fest rain interfered with the
program and the mass exercises, which
were to have been the finest ever seen,
had to be dispensed with. Today 6000
Turners, comprising men, women and
boys and girls, belonging to the St. Louis,
societies, joined ln mass exercises, with
a very pleasing effect.
The Italian Climbers
NEW YORK, May 30.—Prince Luigi
Amadeo of Savoy, duke ot Abruzzi and
nephew of the king of Italy, who
has come to America for the purpose of
ascending Mount St. Ellas, left this
morning on a special train, via the Penn
sylvania road for Chicago. He was ac
companied by his aide-de-camp. Chev
alier Umbesto Cagne, Chevaliers Vltto
rlo Sella and Francisco Gonjiella and
Dr. Fillip!. He also takes with him five
experienced Alpine mountain guides.
The Tailors' Strike
NEW YORK, May 30.—The big strike
of garment makers entered upon Its
third week today. About 2500 operators
whose employers have signed the new
agreement have returned to work, leav
ing about 22,400 still on strike in this
city and vicinity. Leader Meyer Scho
enfield today said there were many
omens of success for the strike and ex
pressed himself satisfied that the op-
I erators would not return to work un
[ der the old conditions.
INDEX
TO TELEGRAPH NEWS
Pandemonium still reigns at the
state prison at San Quentin.
Train Robber Parker lodged in his
old quarters in the Prescott jail.
Mexican soldiers join in strewing
flowers on the graves of soldiers of the
war of 1847.
Governor Budd said to have decided
that Durrant must hang for the mur
der of Blanche Lamont.
Jimmy Hope's big bank robbery re
called by an offer to return the bonds
stolen nineteen years ago.
Fancied security leads to neglect of
levees along the Mississippi. A big
crevasse near Baton Rouge.
Chess champions prepare for inter
national games; results on the turf
! and diamond; Sunday cycling at San
j Jose.
The tug Dauntless and schooner J.
D. Long reported to have landed a big
consignment of arms for the use of Cu
ban insurgents.
Good progress has been made thus
far in the settlement of tariff sched
ules, but sugar and wool rates promise
to cause long debate. The house only
meets today, and Simpson will con
tinue to attempt to embarrass Speaker
Reed for failing to appoint commit
tees.
PARKER AT PRESCOTT
IRONED AND LODGED IN HIS
OLD QUARTERS
The Desperado Makes Promises Which
the Officers Will See Are
Not Kept
PRESCOTT, A. T., May SO.—A lit
tle after midnight Train Robber and
Murderer Jim Parker and Forger
L. C. Miller were lodged in the
Jail here, from which they escaped
three weeks ago today. They were
brought from Flagstaff by Sheriffs Ruff
ner of this county and Cameron of Co
conino. A big crowd, attracted by curi
osity, gathered at the depot to see the
desperadoes, but as a precaution against
trouble the train stopped near, Whipple,
where carriages were waiting, into
which the prisoners were hustled and
driven rapidly to the Jail. The crowd
became aware of the move, and a rush
was made to the Jail before they arrived.
Miller seemed badly frightened, antici
pating being taken by the crowd, when
Parker, with a volley of oaths and ob
scenity, upbraided him for cowardice.
Parker acted with great bravado, and
asked the officers to drive them around
town for a little fresh air. Parker mani
fests great hostility to Sheriff Ruffner,
and expressed regret at being unable to
kill him.
He told Cameron he would not hang,
nor would he be in court when It meets.
In the fight with the officers on the
evening of his escape Parker was shot in
the leg below the knee. The wound wae
slight, and is now healed. He says the
Mexican was shot through the fleshy
part of the thigh, and more seriously.
Both the returned escapes and Thomp
son and Rogery, charged with complicity
in the train robbery, were heavily ironed
this morning, and will be kept in this
county till the cases are disposed of in
court. Parker is more sullen and obsti
nate than before, and refuses to talk.
He boasts, however, that had Sheriff
Ruffner not found them when he did on
the way to Flagstaff that he would have
escaped from his captors within another
hour. Court meets a week from tomor
row, when the cases will be tried.
CREDIT MEN
Will Hold a Convention About Bad
Debts
KANSAS CITY, May 30.—Elaborate
preparations have already been made
by the local business men for the recep
tion of the 400 or more delegates ex
pected to be present at the second an
nual convention of the National Associ
ation of Credit Men, to be held here June
9, 10 and 11. The following named have
so far been assigned places on the pro
gram and have promised to attend: J.
G. Cannon, vice-president of the Fourth
National bank of New York, who will
deliver an address on "Individual
Credits;" John Field, president of the
Philadelphia Association of Credit Men;
Hon. J. L. Torrey, who will speak on
"Bankruptcy Legislation;" Gilbert S.
Mann of Portland, Ore.; V. B. G. Mc-
Mechen of Toledo; Jacob Furth of St.
Louis; O. L. Reddin and T. J. Ferguso:i
of New Orleans, and G. H. Hovey of
Chicago.
Unusual interest In the convention is
being manifested by credit men all over
the United States.
The Isthmus Railway
MANAGUA, Nicaragua, May 30.—
Charles Smith, the representative of an
English syndicate, who has been for
some time endeavoring to secure conces
sions for the construction of a freight
railway line across Nicaragua, terminat
ing at the best harbor on each ocean, in
opposition to the American company's
contract, left for London today. Charles
E. Nicoll, the British consul at Managua,
has given his Indorsement to a contract
with Nicaragua entered Into by an en
gineer to make a topographical survey
of the region of the Rio Coco, in Eastern
Nicaragua.
The Pisan Panic
PISA, Italy, May 30—The official re
port of the disaster in the cathedral
yeEterday upon the occasion of the un
veiling- of the Image of the Virgin, when
a candle fell, setting Are to the build
ing and causing a panic, shows that
nine persons were killed and twenty-one
others seriously injured. Most of the
victims are women and all of them res
, idents of Pisa.
Eight Pages
I
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
SUPPLIES
FOR CUBA
Dodge AH Dangers and
THE BIGGEST CARGO OF ARMS
YET DELIVERED TO THE IN<
SURGENTS
The Innocent Old Dauntless Was on
Hand and Rendered Some Very
Effective Service
Associated Press Special Wire.
WILMINGTON, N. C, May 30.—The
Messenger today prints a detailed ac
count of the loading of the tug Alexan
der Jones and her departure with the
schooner John D. Long on a Cuban fili
bustering expedition. The facts were)
obtained from a member of the crew of
the Jones, who returned to port several
days ago. His story substantially is
as follows:
On Thursday night, May 13, the Jones
took on a cargo of rifles, machetes,
rapid-fire guns and ammunition at ths
wharf of the Wilmington, Newbern and
Norfolk railroad, in the southern limits
of the city. Before she had entirely fin
ished her cargo a rumor was started that
officers were approaching and that the
revenue cutter Morrill was getting up
steam. Taking alarm at this, the Jones
pulled out and started down the river
at 10:45 p. m., and in a few hours crossed
the bar and anchored outside. The
schooner John D. Long had meanwhile
been loaded with coal and other mate
rial at the Wilmington and Weldon rail*
road wharf, and was shortly afterward
towed out to sea by the tug Jacob Bran
don, going past the revenue cutter Col
fax. On the schooner were Gen. Nunez
and another officer of the Cuban army,
a Cuban pilot and Captain John O'Brien
of the filibustering tug Dauntless. At
the sea buoy they went on board tho
Jones anchored near by, and Captain
O'Brien took charge of the expedition.
A hawser was made fast from the Jones
to the schooner and early Friday morn
ing the tug steamed to the south with
her tow. The Jacob Brandon returned
to Southport. On the way down the
coast of Florida sixty-two Cubans were
taken aboard. The Jones then towed
the schooner to Bahamas and in the
vicinity anchored ln the open sea on
Tuesday, May 18. On Thursday morn
ing, May, 20, the filibuster Dauntless
hove in sight and came alongside the
Jones and the schooner. She coaled
from the schooner, took a cargo of arms
from the Jones and with Captain
O'Brien in command headed for the
Cuban coast, about sixty miles away.
She left the Jones between 8 and 9
oclock Tuesday night, made a successful
landing in Cuba near Matanzas and af
ter an absence of twenty-four hours re
turned to the Jones, took another cargo
of war material and started for Cuba
Friday night. On the last trip Gen.
Nunez and the sixty-two Cubans left
the Jones and went on board the Daunt
less and accompanied Captain O'Brien.
When the Dauntless left with her sec
ond cargo the Jones coaled from the
schooner, towed her off Canaveral, Fla.,
and turned her loose. She sailed back
and got into Southport yesterday morn
ing.
The cargo carried on her was valued
at $78,000, and is said to have been the
second largest ever landed in Cuba.
The member of the crew above re
ferred to says there is no truth in the
story that the Jones was chased and
fired upon by a Spanish war vessel. The
Jones never saw the smoke of such a
war vessel while on her trip.
CALHOUN CRITICISED
HAVANA, Cuba, May 30.—1n a lead
ing article this morning El Diarlo de 1*
Marina makes a scathing indirect at
tack on Commissioner Calhoun by crit
icising articles which have appeared in
a Washington newspaper over the sig
nature of Mr. Pepper, who, in the guise
of an intimate friend of President Mc-
Kinley and Mr. Calhoun, accompanied,
the latter to Cuba.
EI Diarlo de la Marina maintains that
many incidents of the interior working
of the mixed commission, which are
wholly private, have been divulged in
Mr. Pepper's letter, thus tending to
■tfbmpromise Mr. Calhoun. The paper
also resents Mr. Pepper's unfriendly
attitude toward Spain in his reports on
the Cuban question, expressing disgust
that, while he blames Spain for the na
tural result of the war, he has no word
of censure for the Cuban insurgents,
whose torches are destroying the wealth
of the island.
In closing its article El Diario de la
Marina calls attention to the fact that
two New York newspapers, whose Cu
ban representatives are scarcely favor
able to Spain, maintain bureaus in Ha
vana under the same roof with the
United States consul-general, Intimat
ing without much delicacy that the cor
respondents of these newspapers are
virtually under the wing of Gen. Fitz
hugh Lee, and draw most of their inspir
ation from him.
Mr. Fishback, accompanied by Mr.
Pepper, went into the interior today to
visit Guanajay. Mr. Calhoun spent the
day with General Lee at the American
consulate.
Captain-General Weyler went from
Tunas to Jucaro on Friday, but re
turned to Tunas today.
The insurgents dynamited a passen
ger train between Santa Clara and Es
peranza. The baggage car was cap
sized and the locomotive and three pas
senger cars were derailed, but no Uvea
were lost.
On Mt. McGregor
SARATOGA, N. Y. May 80.—Memorial
services were held today at the cottage at
Mount McGregor where General Grant
died. There was a large gathering from
this and surrounding towns and a lavish
/display of floral offerings.
Land Safe

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