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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, June 01, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-06-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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I Double Sheet
i ________________
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 244.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
_OS ANGELES—
—SAN FRANCISCO—
A chance for advertisers to reach the
public of both cities on the most ad
vantageous terms ever ottered.
We have concluded arrangements
whereby classified advertising may be
Inserted simultaneously In the
XiOS ANGELES HERALD
And ln the
SAN FRANCISCO POST
For
I CENTS PER LINE,
8 CENTS PER LINE,
8 CENTS PER LINE,
8 CENTS PER LINE
Hers Is a rare opportunity for people
having bargains to offer or wants to be
known.
HERALD PUBLISHING CO.,
tf 822 W. Third St.
SPECIAL NOTICES
HOTICE— THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 8 and 8 oclock
a.m. and 6 and 8 oclock p.m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut off and a fine of 82 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
MAGNETIC INSTITUTE — REMOVED
from 43114 S. Spring st. to N. E. cor. of
Spring and Sixth sts; entrance 125 W.
Sixth St.: seven years' successful work
ln Los Angeles: send for testimonials;
diseases diagnosed without asking ques
tions. ESTHER DTE, Magnetic Healer.
6-3
THE DAI Li TJJOURNAL. PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, Hens. Building news; one
dollar monthly. 206 New High St. 2
GOOD QUALITY WALL PAPER TO COV
er 12-foot room, $1; Ingrain, 88, border in
cluded. WALTER, 218 W. Sixth St. 8-12
TO BXTON'S FOR NEW -fUSIC, 817 S.
Spring st. 8-7
HELP WANTED—MALE
HUMMEL BROS. A CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building,
100-802 W. Second street. In basement.
Telephone 608.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
German cook. $30, etc.: French cook,
$30, etc.; girls to assist. 86, etc., 88, etc.,
810, etc.; house girls, city, 812, etc., $16,
etc., $20, etc.; house girls, country, $15.
etc., $20, etc., $25, etc.; second girl, $12.
etc.; ranch cook, $20, etc.; Spanish house
girl, $15, etc.; German or French house
girl, $20, etc.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Cook for 30 people, $40 to $50, etc.; wo
man, general work for same, $30, etc.;
cook, boarding house, $20, etc.; second
girl, boarding house, $15, etc.; 2 wait
resses, Arizona, $25, etc., each.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Private place, $15, etc., month; ranch
hand. $17, etc.; shovelers, $1.60 per day,
10 days; hay pressman, $15. etc., per ton;
ranch hand and milk. $20. etc.; ranch
hands, $1, etc., per day; teamster, etc.,
$1, etc.; boy for ranch, $10. etc.; scraper
holder, $1, etc.; man and wife, dairy,
$35, etc.; orchard hand, 80c, etc.; chore
boy. $8, etc.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Hotel waiter, country, $20, etc., per
month; first-class French cook, $60 per
month.
N. B.—Hotel help call.
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
WANTED—A GOOD. EXPERIENCED
young man In clothing and furnishing
goods who has been employed ln this
city. Apply M'DONALD'S BUILDING.
182 N. Main. 1
WANTED—BOY TO LEARN BAKERS'
trade, from 16 to .18 years old. EBIN
OER'S BAKERY, Third and Spring, 1
HELP WANTED — FEMALE
•WANTED—6 COOKS. 4 SECOND GIRLS
8 general houseworkers, 2 housekeepers
™ yi\ Washington st. Telephone
west 91.
,1^« r i T = D ~ EaAN ' 8
K8 E. Second st., serves the best 10c meal
In the city; try It and be convinced. 8-11
SITUATIONS WANTED-FEMALE
WANTED - ORDERS FOR HOUSE '
girls. ORLIN THURSTON, Employ
ment. 219% W. First St. 8-16
" 1
WANTED—PARTNERS
WANTED-PARTNER WITH $10,000 TO
take half Interest ln and work developed ]
mine; ten-stamp mill on property; fullest
investigation Invited; principals only;
references given and required. Address J
GOOD MINE, box 56, San Diego. Cal. 6-8
a -5- " - . ■ . c
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
IiUDWIG & MATTHEWS, WHOLESALE 1
and retail fruits and vegetables. MOTT
MARKET, 136 S. Main St.. tel. 650. tf
BICYCLES
and evening. Main st. Bicycle Academy,
847 S. Main St. 6-1 =
HYPNOTISM ,
HYPNOTISM TAUGHT SCIENTIFCAL. 1
ly. HYPNOTIC INSTITUTE, 428* I. .
Spring St. . f-M 1
FOR SALE—REAL BSTATB
Houses ana Lota
FOR SALE-THE PRETTIEST 7-ROOM
house ln town; No. 83 In the beautiful St.
James park. Inquire on premises or at
421 W. Adams st. 6-28
City Lota
for bale
no. 6-8400, lot 60x180 south side Twenty
fourth St., west of Central.
1 8460, lot 60x130 south side Twenty-fifth
St., west of Central.
No. 8-83000, 8-room house, lot 60x160,
highly Improved, Beaudry aye.
No. 20—8650, 4-room house. Glendale.
2 lots 60x160 each, set to fruit trees.
No. A—sl6oo, furniture, fixtures and
lease of a 23-room lodging house on
Broadway, full and paying a good in
come.
No. 88—810,000, 16-acre fruit ranch, Onta
rio; good buildings; or would exchange.
No. 42—815,000, 28-acre fruit ranch at Glen
dale; 7 acres navels, 7 acres lemons, 9
acres deciduous; 9-room house, large
barn, etc.; abundance of water; might
take part ln Los Angeles property.
M. MACDONALD,
1 325 Byrne Block.
FOR SALE—
No. 21—8400, lot on Towne aye., 26x125.
- o. 25-82760, lot 80x166, Grand aye.
No. 38—815,000, 17-room house; rents for
$85 per month; lot 60x165; Grand aye.;
close In; clear.
No. 62—82700, 8-room 2-story house; bath;
Twenty-fifth st.. near Hoover; large
barn, fine grounds, etc.
No. 78—81100, lot 145x145, S. E. cor. Thirty
second and Royal.
No. 78—83000, 6-room cottage, modern, and
all walks, lawns, etc., complete; lot
81%xl00; want vacant lots for $2000 equi
ty; rents for $18 per month.
M. MACDONALD,
1 325 Byrne Block.
FOR SALE-$5OO EACH. YOUR CHOICE
of two full-sized lots on Fremont aye..
between Temple and First sts., graded
and sewered. BEAUDRY ESTATE, 217
New High st. 1
FOR SALE-C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots in his Third addition on easy install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Office, 213 W. First St. tf
FOR SALE—EVERYBODY WANTS A
home; elegant lots on the hills at the
lowest prices an* at easy terms. Call on
BEAUDRY ESTATE, 217 New High St. 1
FOR SALE—WE SELL THE EARTH
BASSETT & SMITH, Pomona. Cal. 6-26tf
Business Property
FOR SALE—A GREAT CORNER: TRADE
for a large district, centers at Sixteenth
and Main sts.; the fact Is daily becoming
more and more obvious; it is the man
ifest and Inevitable business center of
all the southern part of the city; now
here Is a chance for a speculation, a big
one; the southwest corner is for sale;
must be sold: think of it—l 29 feet on Main
st.; 190 feet on Sixteenth St., and a house
of 11 rooms, that Is now rented to a good
tenant for 840 a month; all this for 316,
-' 000; think of a block of stores on Main
1 st. and a block of flats on Sixteenth, and
the money it would bring on the invest
ment! la there a thing in Los Angeles
that would equal it? Main st. below
Tenth receives all the traffic of Spring
and Broadway; below Tenth it is a great
thoroughfare; Sixteenth and Main is the
center for all the car lines, the Main St.,
the Traction, the Santa' Monica, etc.;
these are some of the things that make
this point a business center; but there
are others; there's a chance here for a
great Investment; see about It at once.
See S. K. LINDLEY, 106 S. Broadway. 1
FOR SALE—CORNER NINTH AND
Grand aye.; 60x165; cheap.
Corner on W. Seventh, near Pearl; 60x
170: 86000; bargain.
Corner Flower and Ninth; lot 186x165;
good buy.
8100 to $75,000 to loan.
THREE BUSINESS LOTS
Corner lot on Main, south of Third,
north of Eighth; cheap; 500 front feet.
Lot on Spring, north of Eighth, south
of Fourth; $350 per front foot.
Lot south of Second, north of Sixth;
60x160; on Broadway; cheapest lot of
fered.
Money to loan.
LEE A. M'CONNELL,
1 118 S. Broadway.
Country Property
FOR SALE
NO. 53-$330, 5 acres, all level and culti
vated, on Western aye., or might ex
change.
No. G9—511,500, 11 acres, half set to or
anges and half to lemons, 5 and 6 years
old; large,6-room 1%-story house and
large IV4-story barti, etc.; fine water
right with the land; income this year
81600.
M. MACDONALD, ,
__ 325 Byrne Block. ,
FOR RENT—HOUSES I!
—■ 1
FOR RENT—COMMODIOUS HOUSE; $5
-823 Montreal st. 3 ' '
FOR RENT—ROOMS !
FOR RENT - FURNISHED ROOMS, 1
from $1.50 up per week; single rooms 25c ;
and 60c per night; baths free. Russ House, I
cor. First and Los Angeles sts. 7-21 J
FOR RENT-ROOMS, $1. $1.25 AND $1.50 1
per week; close In: housekeeping. OR- 1
LAN DO, 811 W. Third st. 6 I
FOR RENT—COOL FRONT ROOMS, $10 '
and $12, at HOTEL BALTIMORE, cor- '
ncr Seventh and Olive. 6-27 1
FOR RENT—CHEAPEST r AND FINEST !
offices In the city; 206% S. Broadway, ,
room 17. 1 1
FOR RENT—BEAUTIFUL FURNISHED c
room at the WOODLAWN, 2415. Main.6-11
FOR RENT—FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
housekeeping. 821% W. Seventh St. tf (
FOR RENT-HOUSEKEEPING - ROOMS, (
fine location. 827% S. Spring st. 6-12 8
FOR RENT—CLOSE w73-ROOM FLAT f
87.50. 212 Boyd gt. 3 ,
FOR RENT-PASTURE \
FOR RENT-1400 ACRES, 9 MILES FROM 1
Los Angeles, with running water- 800 1
acres of barly stubble; balance wild 'oats 1
alflllerla and burr clover; horses '
brought and delivered; no responsibility J
for accidents or escapes. Address SAN- c
BORN HOWARD. Burbank. Cal" "r 160 ,
6-27
PLUMBERS '
FRANK A. \
and gasfltter, E. Second st.; tel. 188. *
(T»r additional classified see Pace Two.) 1
THE HERALD
WAR PAINT
IS DONNED
By the Indians in Southern
Montana
MANY KILLINGS REPORTED
BUT WAR OFFICIALS ABE NOT
ALARMED
The Reports Are Old and Probably
Exaggerated—Almighty Voice
Is Silenced Forever
Associated Press Special Wire.
DENVER, Col., May 81.—A special to
the Republican from Helena, Mont.,
says: The Cheyenne Indians have gone
on the warpath and are said to have
killed a dozen people, including five
United States soldiers. The Indian*have
no reservation, but make Lame Deer
agency their headquarters.
A sheep herder was recently shot by
the Indians because he caught several
of them killing sheep. The settlers have
armed themselves to protect their prop
erty. Two companies of colored cavalry
from Custer were ordere-d to the agency
Wednesday.
Saturday a courier arrived from the
agency with the information that Geo.
Walters, postmaster, and Lou Alderson,
a stockman, had been shot and killed;
also that the Indians shot into the-cav
alry, killing five, and had sixty cowboys
surrounded. Cavalry from Fort Keough
and Company E, Infantry, left Saturday
for the scene. Settlers have moved their
families from near the reservation to
Miles City. Ranchmen and stockmen at
Cheyenne agency demand the Indians
who killed Hoover. The'names of the
Indians are known and they are pro-
tected by fifty bucks.
Orders have been given the ordnance
officer at Fort Keough to have 10,000
rounds of ammunition ready for Issue to
day. It is supposed more troops are to
go to the agency. Deputy Sheriffs Smith
and Winters were ordered off the reser
vation by the military agent, Captain
Steuch, who did not want to arrest the
Indian murderers at the time lest it
cause more trouble. The deputies re
turned to Miles City and have gone back
with Sheriff Glbba with warrants for the
arrest of Agent Steuch for Interfering
with officers ln the discharge of duty
and warrants for the Indian murderers.
NOT VERY SERIOUS
WASHINGTON. May 31.—The Indian
trouble in> Southern Montana, reported
from Helena, was made known to the
authorities of the war department last
week, and in the opinion of officials is
not likely to be followed by serious re
sults. Thefirst knowledge of the affair
came to the department in a telegram
from Col. Sheridan, the adjutant gen
eral of the department at St. Paul. At
present the department has no com
mander, owing to the recent retirements
among the major generals and the brig
adier generals and the delays in assign
ing the new commands among the col
onels recently promoted. So Secretary
Alger himself is responsible for. the
command, and he is directing affairs
through Adjutant General Ruggles.
Col. Sheridan's telegram was received
last Friday and simply stated that a
report had come to headquarters at St.
Paul that two white men, herders, had
been killed near Lame Deer reservation
ln Southern Montana. To guard against
trouble, two troops of cavalry were or
dered by telegraph from Fort Custer.
They started last JvfftßTj, and since then
no dispatch has come to the war de
partment, although it is possible Alger,
who is now at West Point, may have
telegraphed. The absence of further
reports from the troops satisfies the war
department that trouble has been qui
eted, for they say they would be sure
to hear if anything so serious as the
killing of troops had occurred. More
over the agency where the men are
reported to have been killed is in charge
of an army officer. Captain Stouch, who.
it is said, has the entire confidence of
the Indians and is capable of dealing
with them without friction, if not in
terfered with from outside sources.
There is a disposition at the depart
ment to attribute the affair to the en
croachments of the whites living in
the neighborhood upon, the Indians. No
intimation of any trouble among the
Cheyennes has reached the Interior de
partment and the Indian officials are at
a loss to account for the lack of advices
if any trouble has occurred or Is ap
prehended. In view of the fact of the
lack of official advices, the fact that the
agency is in closest telegraph commu
nication, and that the agency Is in
charge of an experienced officer, no
alarm or uneasiness as to the safety of
the people in that section is felt. Inci
dents have been reported to the de
partment recently that would likely
lead to serious results, and the fact that
the reports and trouble date several
days back Is cited as significant.
A VOICE SILENCED
ST. PAUL, Minn., May 31.—A special
from Wlnlpeg to the Dispatch says:
Communication with Duck lake was re
sumed this morning at 3:30, when the
Dispatch correspondent,with the mount
ed police, who have been besieging the
four Indian murderers, including the
desperadoes, Almighty Voice, sent the
following message: "The Prince Al
bert volunteers got impatient yesterday
afternoon and prevailed on the officer
In charge to allow them to rush up the
bluff where the outlaws were hiding.
They were led by Dr. William Drain,
Japes McKay, Q. C, and Police Offi
cers Wilson and McDonald. In the first
rush they dldjnot find the hiding places
of the Indians, and they again went
through,' killing the only remaining In
dian. Almighty Voice and another In
dian were killed by shells for s> nine
pounder. No further casualties- oc
curred: on-our side.. The father of Al-'
mighty Voice to under arrest here as
LOS ANGELES, TUESDAY MORNING, JUNE I, 1897
an accomplice. No further trouble is
anticipated."
AN AGENT'S SUICIDE
SALT LAKE, May 31.—A special to
I the Tribune from St. George, Utah, says:
Indian Agent Thomas Olive of Crawford,
committed suicide today by shoot
ing himself through the head. No
cause can be assigned for the act.
NOT REPEALED
Arizona Homicides Will Not Escape
• Punishment
KINGMAN, Ariz., May 31.—The dis
covery has just been made that the
harshly criticised law enacted by the
last legislature defining homicide does
not repeal the old law. The repealing
clause refers to the act defining treason
and imposing punishment therefor, ami
Ib embraced in title three, in five sec
tions. The new law repeals three sec
tions under this title. The homicide
law sought to be repealed Is tinder title
eight. It Is now certain that an extra
session of the legislature will be called
to remedy the defect in the law defining
homicide and also to repeal the- law
passed at the last session requiring a
territorial registration of cattle brands,
popularly known as the bull tick law.
PEOPLE ARE IMPATIENT
! FOB PASSAGE OF THE TABIFF
BILL
Secretary Gage Sympathizes With
Business Men's Desire to Get at
the Currency Question
WASHINGTON, May 31.—Secretary
Gage has returned to this city from
Cincinnati, where he was a guest at
the banquet given last Friday by the
Commercial club of that city to the
visiting clubs from Chicago, Boston and
St. Louis. Mr. Gage said today that a
feeling of impatience seemed to be gen
eral among the people at the delay In
the passage of a tariff bill. The country
was In a condition approaching stagna
tion, and although the public realize
that the greatest care is necessary In
the construction of a bill of such vast
importance, the people were beginning
to complain of the time being consumed.
What they most wanted was the prompt
passage of a tariff bill that would pro
duce sufficient revenues, and with that
question out of the way they could take
up the question of reform in the cur
rency. The business men in attendance
on the Cincinnati meeting, Mr. Gage
thought, were agreed that a currency
should be authorized and appointed at
once with a view to the reformation
plan, which could be presented to con
gress on its reassembling in December.
During the recess of congress it was
thought that hearings could and should
be given to those who might desire to
be heard from all parts of the country.
It was a great question, he added, and
should have the fullest discussion. If
the commission should fall to agree
upon a satisfactory plan, the adminis
tration very likely would have a propo
sition to present to congress. In any
event, the people with whom the secre
tary conferred agreed that some action
should be taken at once. The business
of the country Impatiently demanded
it, he concluded. i
A SUGAR SCHEDULE
CHICAGO, May 31.—The Post' 3
Washington special says: The Demo
cratic members of the house ways and
means committee are formulating a su
gar schedule which they will offer as a
substitute for all pending propositions
in that line. It will be anti-trust and
the gentlemen who a_e engaged In its
construction claim that It will give quite
as much, if not more, protection to home
producers than either the Dingley or
the Aldrlch schedules, and at the same
time enable consumers to supply their
demands cheaply. They decline, how
ever, to go Into particulars.
OHIO SOCIALISTS
They Put a State Ticket In the ,
Field
CANTON, Ohio, May 31—The State
convention of the Socialist Labor party
of Ohio held two sessions. Forty dele- i
gates were present. Samuel M. White i
was chosen permanent chairman. Re- i
solutions were adopted against the elec
tion of M. A. Hanna, or John R. Mc- t
Lean as Senator, that it would not be i
advantageous to wage earners of the
State; favoring laws to assist the un
employed; condemning government by ,
Injunction. j
The following State ticket was placed ,
In nomination: For Governor, Wm. ,
Watkins, Dayton; Lieutenant-Governor,
D. W. Wallace, Hollister, Athens coun
ty; State Treasurer, Edward Larren,
Cleveland; Members of Board of Public '
Works, John T. Jones, Canal Dover; '
School Commissioner, Samuel M. White, 1
Canton. 1
Glesson in Trouble
SAN FRANCISCO, May 31.—Profes- j
sorGleason, the horse trainer, was arrest- .
ed here today, charged with having de
frauded the proprietor of the hotel at
San Jose to whom he gave a draft on
a Seattle man for $217 in payment of a *
bill recently. When the draft was for- <
warded for collection it was returned dls- <
honored and the hotel man swore to a '
complaint which resulted in Gleason's i
arrest. The latter says It is all a mistake, t
but Constable Haley insists upon his re
turn to Santa Clara County to explain
mattres, and he went there this after- ,
noon. j
Naval Gunnery
PORT TOWNSEND, May 31.—After ]
three days stay here the United States t
battleship Oregon left this morning for
the target field down the Straits of Fuca. (
There have been' forty desertions from |
the Oregon since her arrival on Puget i
Sound two months ago. ,
A Bicycle Collision
ATLANTA, Ga., May 31.—Miss Annie <
Hunter, a young society woman of this <
city, while out bicycling last night with
her escort on Whitehall Road, was run I
down by a negro bicyclist, Charles Tait. ,
The negro is dead and the young woman <
la not expected to live. 1
BLOSSOMS
SCATTERED
On the Graves of the Na
tion's Dead
MOST IMPOSING CEREMONIES
HELD IN THE MANY NATIONAL
CEMETERIES
At Vicksburg Grizzled Ex-Confeder
ate Veterans Decorate Their Erst
while Opponents Graves
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, May 31.—Memorial
day was generally observed in Washing
ton. The Senate adjourned over until
Tuesday. The House held only a 15
--minute session. All departments and
business houses were closed, and the
day was given up to patriotic observ
ance and tributes to the;heroic dead.
The most imposing ceremonies were at
the National Cemetery, Arlington, on
the Virginia side of the Potomac. The
exercises were made particularly mem
orable by the presence of President Mc-
Klnley. They began at 12 o'clock with
a national salute of 21 guns from a light
battery of the Forty-eighth Artillery,
U. S. A. Led by the Marine Band, the
G. A. R. and other organizations
marched to the tomb of the unknown
dead, where the band played a dirge
while the massive monument was being
decorated. The graves of all the vast
army beneath the trees received their
tributes of flowers. The organizations
afterward gathered at the Amphitheater.
Representative Dolliver of lowa deliv
ered the oration of the day. A poem was
read by Dr. Thomas Calver. Hon. Web
ster Davis, Assistant Secretary of the
Interior, followed with an oration. The
exercise© concluded with Beethoven's
"Funeral March to the Dead Hero,"
played by the Marine Band,
At the Soldiers' Home cemetery the
services were conducted by Henry Wil
son post No. 117, G. A. R. Several ser
vices were held at the tomb of General
John A. Logan under the direction of a
committee of the Logan Guard of Hon
or and a committee of the Loyal Legion
of Loyal Women, A notable feature of
the exercises here today was the great
inroads the past few years have made
In the ranks of the veterans. In sev
eral instances the bands outnumbered
the posts they were escorting.
AT CINCINNATI
CINCINNATI, 0., May 31—Perfect
weather, clear atmosphere and a cloud
less sky blessed the greatest Memorial
day parade that has passed through the
streets of Cincinnati. It was in six di
visions and included the Grand Army
posts, the Union Veterans' union, the
Sons of Veterans and the boys of the
public schools. It took an hour in pass
ing. On both sides of Fourth street the
girls of the schools were ranged to wit
ness the parade. They were all pro
vided with small flags. The passing of
the gray-haired and totterlntr veterans,
bearing with stern pride their cher
ished battle flags, was to the children a
lesson in patriotism not soon 1 to be for
gotten. Following them came the bat
talion of boys, with flags and drums
without number.
Gen. Warner of Kansas City and Hon.
E. S. Leboyer spoke tonight at Music
hall.
AT CHATTANOOGA
CHATTANOOGA, Term., May 81.—
The graves of the 14,000 Union soldiers
buried in the National cemetery at this
place were decorated today with elab
orate ceremonies. Captain J. H. Mc-
Gowan of Washington delivered the
unual oration. An immense throng was
present.
AT VICKSBURG
VICKSBURG, Miss., May 31.—An im
mense assembly joined In the ceremo
nies of Decoration day at the national
cemetery today. In accordance with
the custom of years, a delegation of
Confederate veterans took flowers and
scattered them over the graves.
AT* KANSAS CITY
KANSAS CITY, Mo., May 31.—A fea
ture of the Memorial services in this
city today was the Interment of the re
mains of the late ex-Confederate Gen
eral J. O. Shelby.
AT BOSTON
BOSTON, May 31—Decoration day was
of a peculiar significance on account of
the unveiling and dedication of the elab
orate memorial structure on Boston
common erected in honor of Col. John
Robert Gould Shaw of the Fourth Mas
sachusetts regiment and the brave men
who composed his followers and who
fell with the colonel ln the assault upon
Fort Wagner, S. C, July 18, 1863.
AT CANTON
CANTON, 0., May 31.—A member of
Canton Woman's Relief Corps on Mon
day received a box of roses, lilies and
other flowers from Mrs. Ida McKinley.
They were sent from Washington for
the purpose of being strewn upon the
graves of soldiers at this place.
AT SAN FRANCISCO
SAN FRANCISCO, May 31.—Memo
rial day was observed in the usual man
ner in this city. The weather was all
that could be desired. The features of
the day were the parade and exercises
held at Odd Fellows' cemetery and at
the Presidio.
The parade was participated ln by
over 2000 people, representing the army,
the navy, the veterans and some of the
religious and fraternal orders were rep
resented.
After the parade the veterans and
their friends adjourned to Odd Fellows'
cemetery or to the Presidio, where exer
cises were held.
Mayor Phelan addressed the assem
blage at the cemetery, and his oration
was a brilliant one. At the Presidio the
George H. Thomas post, G. A.R.. and
their friends held forth. The principal
INDEX
TO TELEGRAPH NEWS
Northwestern central states visited
by heavy frosts.
The Baroness Yon Turkhelm reaches
Montreal and registers as Mrs. Del
mas.
The first game of the international
chess match scored to the credit of Mr.
Flunkett, M. P.
President Woodmansee calls the Na
tional League of Bepublican clubs to
meet at Detroit, July 13.
Cities from the Mississippi river to
the Atlantic ocean shaken by earth
quake, but no damage done.
A New York excursion steamer with
3000 people on board runs ashore and
catches fire, but nobody gets hurt.
Howard Mann pulls the big Brook
lyn handicap out of the mud; league
ball games and work on the wheel.
Governor Budd formally announces
his decision not to interfere in the
cases of Durrant and Worden, sen
tenced to death for murder.
Secretary Gage thinks that the busi
ness world is getting impatient at de
lay in passing the tariff bill and con
sidering the currency question.
President McKinley will offer his
good offices to Spain to end the Cuban
war; the conditions in the island are
horrible and are steadily growing
worse.
The Hawaiian government insists
on its right to keep out undesirable
immigrants. The TJ. S. S. Marion
booked for an indefinite stay by rea
son of disabled machinery.
Reports of the Cheyenne uprising
in Montana are believed by the war
department officials to be much exag
gerated. Winnipeg Indian troubles
ended by the death of the Almighty
Voice.
speakers were General Chlpman, Sam
uel M. Shortridge and John G. Currie.
AT STOCKTON
STOCKTON, May 31.—Memorial day
was more generally observed here today
than ever before. The G. A. R. had
charge of the exercises which began with
a parade in the morning made up of Raw
lins poet, G. A. R., Society of San Joa
quin pioneers, veterans of the Mexican
war, W. R. C. and school children. The
cemeteries were visited and the graves
of the soldier dead strewn with flowers.
AT NEW YORK
NEW YORK, May 31.—A rainy fore
noon interfered greatly with the observ
ance of Memorial day ln New York and
vicinity. There were, however, com
mittees of veterans of the Union army at
all the cemeteries in and about New
York to decorate the graves of those of
their comrades who have found burial
there.
The tomb of General Grant in Rlver
sida park.was well remembered, for, be
sides the tributes of the local posts of
the G. A. R., there was received a box
inscribed: "Flowers for the tomb of
General Grant, Riverside Park, New
York, from the conservatory, executive
mansion, Washington, D. C." The box
contained a large number of choice flow
ers.
RICHMOND, Va., May 31.—Confed
erate Memorial day exercises were held
at Holly cemetery this afternoon, and
as uyual all the military of the city, the
Confederate veterans' companies par
ticipating, with ladies of the Hollywood
Memorial association. The usual fed
eral decoration exercises took place at
the Federal cemetery.
RIOTING CONVICTS
Show Small Sign of Yielding to
Authority
SAN FRANCISCO, May 31,-The sit
uation, regarding the? recalcitrant con
victs at San Quentin prison remains un
changed, the officials having taken no
steps today to test the temper of their
charges, who still maintain their defiant
attitude and make as much noise as pos
sible whenever one of the guards or
Warden Hale shows himself in the vi
cinity of the cells where the striker*
are confined. Despite the fact that he
has expressed the opinion that the insu
bordinates are weakening, Warden Hale
has doubled his guards and armed every
available man within the precincts of
the prison with shotguns, while gatling
guns are trained upon the quarters oc
cupied by the mutineers, ready to be
utilized the moment any sign of an out
break is made by those within the tanks.
The board of state prison directors, at
a meeting held this afternoon, passed
resolutions upholding the warden in his
action in connection with the striking
convicts and deciding also that the stri
kers who refuse to return to work shall
forfeit all credits due or to be earned by
them in the future. The directors were
unanimous in the expression that the
most severe measures should be taken
to put down the strike. A message was
also received from the governor in which
he assured the board and warden of his
support in thir efforts to quell the strike,
adding that any convicts who refused
to work or who in any way Intimidated
their fellow prisoners would not at the
expiration of sentence be restored to
citizenship, and also that under no cir
cumstances would executive clemency
be shown them in any way. The strike
has quieted down somewhat, though the
rebellious convicts who, after breaking
out of the dungeon were transferred to
"Kid's alley," began making their usual
noise this evening, but when they saw
a line of hose laid along the center of
the alley and guards stationed there
with orders to turn on the cold water
they were quiet for a time. The cold
water was tried at 9 oclock on the riot
ous convicts and was found to be a good
way to keep the convicts in order. At
midnight all is quiet about the prison.
Killed by the Cars
NEW YORK, May 31.—A tallyho con
taining 22 of the Alpha Delta Phi
Society of Brooklyn, on> an outing, was
struck by a train. Six occupants of the
coach were killed. Three others will die.
All were more or les* injured.
Ten Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
DURRANT
IS DOOMED
The Governor Announces
His Decision
A CAREFUL INVESTIGATION
SHOWS NO GOOD GROUND FOR
ACTION
Executive Clemency Also Denied
Worden—Durrant's Attorneys
Still Stubbornly Fighting
Associated Press Special Wire.
SAN FRANCISCO, May Sl.—Governor
Budd, at 3 o'clock this afternoon issued
a statement to the effect that he saw
no good reason for interfering in either
the cases of Durrant or Worden, sen
tenced to hang for murder on June 11th,
and 4th, respectively.
The former was convicted of the mur
der ot Blanche Lamont at Emanuel
Baptist church, and Worden was found
guilty of wrecking a train, during the
A. R. U. strike three years ago, when
Engineer Clark and three United States
soldiers were killed.
DURRANT'S CASE
SACRAMENTO, May 31.—The state
ment of the governor in the Durrant case
as given out at his office late this after
noon runs as follows:
"The hearing of the application of W.
H. T. Durrant for pardon or commuta
tion of sentence, heretofore filed, came
on for hearing at this office Friday, May
14, 1897. Notice was given to the attor
neys for Durrant, the district attorney
of San Francisco, and to the public
through the press. Mr. Eugene Duprey
and George A. A. Tubb, attorneys for
Durrant, appeared at the hearing and
presented his claims for executive inter
ference. No appearance was made in
opposition. At the conclusion of the
hearing the matter was taken under ad
visement. Under the law and the con
stitution, the duty is Imposed upon the
governor of inquiring into applications
for pardon or other Interference with
the judgments of the courts in the moat
geneal manner. The evidence Is required:
to be forwarded to him for examination.
The trial judge and district attorney are
required to furnish statements of the
facts poven at the trial, and the gov
ernor may inquire into and require a
statement of any other facts having ref
erence to the propriety of granting or
refusing the pardon.
"Under euch circumstances it becomes
the duty of the executive in a proper
case to give the evidence in the case, the
circumstances attending the trial andi
the credibility of the witnesses the
most searching investigation. He
should examine newly-disoovered evi
dence and consider and give the proper
weight to evidence and circumstances
which could not have been and were not
introduced at or considered by the trial
court
"In the case of Durrant the petition
was based upon the claim that the de
fendant did not have a fair and impartial
trial, that the passion of the people and
prejudice of the community in which he
was tried and the course of the press
during the conduct of the trial were such
that the evidence could not have been,
and would not have been, impartially
considered by the jury, and that if it had
been so considered, that the defendant
would not have been convicted,
"The claim was also made that the
witnesses, through age and the lack of
powers of observation or from interest
ed motives, had misunderstood or mis
stated the facts, and that there was evi
dence that had r.ot been or could nt
have been presented to the trial cou t
or considered by the supreme court, be
cause of its character, or other reasons.
Under such circumstances and upon;
such reasons having been advanced, the
duty of the governor to thoroughly In
vestigate the case, to look into the cir
cumstances of the trial, to sift he evi
dence, to inquire into the motives and
credibility of the witnesses and to make
such other and further investigation
into the matter as its nature and its
gravity demanded, was plain.
"I have deemed it my deuty In this)
case, without regard to precedent, to
make this investigation.
"In the case under consideration, W.
H. T. Durrant has been convicted of the
murder of Blanche Lamont, and has
been informed against for the killing of
Minnie Williams.
"I have carefully considered the evi
dence produced at Durrant's trial. I
have interviewed the witnesses and in
quired into their character and credi
bility; I have heard all arguments made
or offered by his attorneys, and by other
persons who might bs likely to inform
me in this matter.
"A careful and thorough Investiga
tion into the evidence in this case and
the facts ar.d circumstances attending
it, has convinced me that it is not a
proper case for my interference.
"No new evidence has been produced
tending to show the innocence of Dur
rant or creating a doubt of his guilt.
I feel satisfied that his trial, where he
was found guilty by a Jury, was fair,
and surounded and attended by all prop
er legal safeguards and guarantees.
"After conference with the witnesses
I am convinced of their honesty and
credibility, and from an examination of
the evidence I feel that it was in itself
sufficient in character and extent to
have Justified the verdict and the judg
ment passed upon it, while in my In
vestigation I found other material cor
roborating circumstances not produced
at the trial, which tended further to sup
port he verdict.
"Under, such circumstances, finding
no irregularity in the trial of the ease,
and that the evidence Justified a verdict
of guilty, I cannot do otherwise than
follow the supreme court and permit the

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