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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, June 07, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-06-07/ed-1/seq-1/

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TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 25a
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
■ERALD SUB-AGENCIES
ADVERTISEMENTS left at the fol
lowing agenoies will receive prompt at
tention and' will be printed as quickly
and with the same care as tf left at
tbe main office, 22$ W. Third street;
DOWNEY AYE. AND EAST BIDE
I* P. COLLETTE. 621 Downey avenue.
OLD WORLD DRUG STORE. 1028
Downey avenue. Phone Flora 242.
WM. H. HARMON, 7(5 Pasadena aye..
Phone East 58.
CENTRAL AYE. AND VERNON
S. E. BARNEY, 260$ Central aye.
CHICAOO PHARMACY. Central ave
nue and Twelfth street, Phone West 112.
T. J. AKEY. corner Central and Vernon
avenues, Phone West 32.
MAIN ST. AND SOUTHWEST
LIBCOMBB PHARMACY, Main and
Fifteenth st*.. Phone W. 68.
E. T. PARKE. PHARMACY, 812$ S.
Main. Phone Blue 2062.
B. VAN DYKE, DRUGGIST, 711 W.
Jefferson St., Phone White 1271.
WESTLAKE GROCERY, corner Al
varado and Seventh sts.. Phone Main
1382.
H. L. PARK, DRUGGIST, corner
Thirty-eighth and Wesley ay*., Phone
Blue 1801.
T. W. BROWN, JR., DRUGGIST, Junc
tion of Hoover, Union-and Twenty-fourth
st*.. Phone Blue 1101.
BOYLE HEIGHTS
H. C. WORLAND, 218$ E. First, Sta
tion B.
T. P. WYLIE, 1977 E. FIRST, Phone
Park Is.
T. M. HARRIS, 1842 E. FIRST, Phone
Park 21.
TEMPLE ST. AND NORTHWEST
DR. H. KALLEWODA. DRUGGIST,
corner Temple *t. and Beaudry aye.,
Phone Main 208.
STAR PHARMACY, corner Temple and
Belmont aye.. Phone Main 607.
VIOLE ft LOPIZICH. DRUGGISTS,
4*7 N. Main St., Phone Main 871.
LOS ANGELES
—SAN FRANCISCO—
▲ chance for advertisers to reach the
public of both cities en the most ad
vantageous terms ever offered.
W* have concluded arrangements
whereby classified advertising may be
inserted simultaneously in th*
LOS ANGELES HERALD
And in the
SAN FRANCISCO POST
For
$ CENTS PER LINE.
8 CENTS PER LINE,
$ CENTS PER LINE,
8 CENTS PER LINE
Here is a rare opportunity for people
having bargains to offer or wants to be
known.
HERALD PUBLISHING CO.,
tf 222 W. Third St.
SPECIAL NOTICES
KOTICE-NOTTCE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that at the hour of 12 o'clock m. on the
14th day of June, 1897, the undersigned
will sell at public auction to the highest
bidder for cash at the west front door
of the county court house. In the city of
Los Angeles, state of California, -for ac
count of whom it may concern, sixty (60)
ot the first mortgage 7 per cent gold
bonds of the Pasadena and Mount Wilson
Railway company, the same being num
bered from 541 to 600, both inclusive, and
being for five hundred ($500.00) dollars
each, with Interest coupons thereon repre
senting interest from July Ist, 1896. ex
cept on bond 600. which has coupon*
thereon representing Interest only from
January Ist. 1896.
Dated this June sth, 1897.
C. A. SUMNER,
1* Auctioneer.
THE CROWDS OF THTn'kiNG"pe6pLE
who may be seen dally at the parlors
of Prof. J. B. Wyckoff, th* orthodox
palmist, is sufficient evidence to convince
the public that his readings of the past
and future are absolutely true. What
ever may be your troubles, desire*, per
plexities, fears, ambition, call on that
gifted oracle of occult force. He may be
the means of saving you thousands of
dollars. Parlors, 427 S. Main St.; sittings,
$0 cents and $1; hours, 9 to 6. tf
SOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES ~CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol- ■
lowing rules: The hour* for'sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oelock ■
a.m. and 6 and 8 oelock p.m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water .
will be shut off and a fine of $2 will be 1
charged before the wat-r will be turned
on again. tf
MAGNETIC INSTITUTE - REMOVED
from 43114 S. Spring st. to N. E. cor. of .
Spring apd Sixth sts: entrance 126 W.
Sixth St.; seven years' successful work 1
in Los Angeles; send for testimonials;
diseases diagnosed without asking ques
tions. ESTHER DYE, Magnetic Healer.
6-30
THE DAIL YJJOURNAL, PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one -
dollar monthly. 206 New High st. t <
SPECIAL NOTICES
iOOD QUALITY WALL PAPER TO COV
•r 12-foot room, tl; Ingrain, »3, border In
cluded. WALTER, 218 W. Sixth et. 8-11
FOR SALE—STATE LOAN AND TRUST
Co. stock at 86 cents. 1.. Box 6, Herald.
tf
rO EXTON'S FOR NEW MUSIC, $37 8.
Spring it. 6-7
****■*■■*■■■**■*■ ssss^sswssss
HELP WANTED—MALE
HUMMEL BROS. * CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building,
$00-802 W. Second street, in basement.
Telephone 60$.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
HUMMEL BROS, ft CO.
WANTED—SIOO PER MONTH; WHY BE
poor or hard up when an intelligent lady
or gentleman can get a light, easy posi
tion (all or part time) paying $100 per
month? T. WORLD M'F'G. CO., (12) Col
umbus, Ohio. Permanent; write for
place. S
WANTED—TRUSTWORTHY PERSON,
competent to earn $65 monthly and ex
penses, to travel: references. THE DO
MINION COMPANY, 901 Star building,
Chicago. ' 7
WANTED—EG AN'S RESTAURANT, 126
-128 E. Second st., serves the best 10c meal
In the city; try it and be convinced. 8-11
WANTED— TO WORK A
day or two in exchange for picture fram
ing. Call today at 12:30. 660 S. Spring st. 7
WANTED—A COMPOSITOR." WHO IS
accurate and l careful: none other need
answer. Address A., box 6, Herald l . 7
11 11 ' 1 '~,,11 —I—M
HELP WANTED—FEMALE
WANTED—SOME LADY GOING NORTH
to take charge of child 6 years old to
Stockton. Z., box 8. 7
SITUA TIONS WANTED — FEMALE
WANTED—SITUATION BY A WIDOW
to do general housework. SE. cor. Thirty
third and Main, sts., up stairs. 8
WANTED — ORDERS FOR HOUSE
girls, ORLIN THURSTON, Employ
ment, 81$ 8. Broadway, rear. 8-16
WANTED—SITUATION BY CAPABLE
woman to do housework. 735 Banning st.
7
WANTED—AGENTS
WANTED—TO BALE YOUR HAY AND
take baling out In hay. D. F. McGARRY,
Ninth and Alameda. 13
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
Hornet aad Lota
FOR SALE—THE PRETTIEST T-ROOM
house In town; No. $3 in the beautiful St.
James park. Inquire on premises or at
421 W. Adams St. 6-29
BEN WHITE. 285 W. FIRST ST.. HAS
nice homes for sale on terms like rent,
$50 to $100 cash; balance to suit. 7
City Lota
FOR SALE-C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots in his Third addition on easy install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Office, 213 W. First st. tf
Bus/nets Property
FOR SALE—WE SELL THE EARTH.
BASSETT ft SMITH, Pomona. Cal. g-jjtf
FOR EXCHANOE—REAL ESTATE
FOR EXCHANGE—I 2 ACRES NICE,
rich, level soil; water deeded with land:
set solid to prunes and apples, 8 years
old; all fenced, etc.; price $2000; will take
city property and assume or a good lodg
ing house or grocery. BEN WHITE, 235
W. First st. 7
TOR EXCHANGE—7-ROOM COTTAGE,
lot 100x125, with barn, well, wlndi mill;
price $2000; mortgage $650; want clear,
in property or Pasadena property. BEN
WHITE, 235 W. First st. 7
•""OR EXCHANGE—2O ACRES NICE,
rich, level land,, Lankershlm ranch, free
of debt, for city property; will assume
mortgage. BEN WHITE, 235 W. First. I
EQUITIES IN 50 HOUSES, FROM $500
upward, to trade for clear lots or acre
age. BEN WHITE, 235 W. First st. 7
FOR RENT—HOUSES
rO LET—6-ROOM HOUSE, 1008 E. SIXTH
St., $14: 5-room house 717 E. Eleventh
St., $16; all new and modern; 4-room
house 771 E. Seventeenth St., $8; 3-room
house with bath 718 San Julian St., $7;
2-room house 712 E. Tenth St., $6. Inquire
721 San Pedro St. 8
?"OR RENT—FIRST FLOOR FLAT,
furnished; 8 large, light, pleasant rooms;
close in. Apply 115 S. OUvo st. 7
?OR RENT—3 NEW 4-ROOM FLATS,
only 9 blocks from center of town; $8 to
$11 each Hat. 624 Towne aye. 7
FOR RENT—ROOMS
?OR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS,
from $1.50 up per week; single rooms 25c
and 50c per night; baths free. Russ House,
cor. First and Los Angeles sts. 7-21
'OR RENT-S UNFURNISHED ROOMS
for housekeeping, with range and bath;
also furnished room; very close In. 126
W, Fourth St.. next to Van Nuys hotel, tf
""OR RENT-COOL
and $12. at HOTEL BALTIMORE, cor
ner Seventh and Olive. 6-27
'OR RENT—BEAUTIFUL FURNISHED
room at the WOODLAWN, $41S. Matn.6-11
'OR RENT;—FURNISHED Ro7)MB~FbR
housekeeping. 82114 W. Seventh st. tf
'OR RENT—HOUSEKEEPING - ROOMS,
fine location. 82714 S. Spring st. 6-12
'OR RENT - HOUSEKEEPING ANIS
office rooms. 450 So. Hill et. 7
FOR RENT-PASTURE
-OR RENT—I4OO ACRES, 9 MILES FROM
Los Angeles, with running water- 200
aores of barly stubble; balance wild 'oats
alfilierla and burr clover; horses
brought and delivered; no responsibility
for accidents or escapes. Address SAN
BORN HOWARD, Burbank. Cal. or ISO
S. Main st. _ ' 6-27^
For additional classified see Page Two.)
THE HERALD
THE WALLS
FELL DOWN
Burying the Firemen in
the Debris
MAHOLEY'S LITTLE DELAY
COST HIS OWN AND TWO OTHER
LIVES
A San Francisco Fire Results in the
Death of Three Firemen and
Causes Heavy Damage
Associated Press Special Wire.
SAN FRANCISCO, June 6.—A life In
the southeastern part of the cityat noon
today cost three firemen their lives and
entailed a property loss of $100,000. The
killed:
John Maholey, of chemical engine
No, 8.
Frank Keller, steward of hose cart
No. 2.
James Halllnan, driver of truck No. 1.
The fire started mysteriously In the
four-story brick building owned by
Schroth ft Westerfield and leased to the
Handiard Biscuit company. Work in the
factory ceased' for the week at 5:30 yes
terday afternoon and, so far as known,
the only occupants of the building this
morning were John Erwln, the book
keeper, and W. Cook, the cashier, who
were at work In the office. Cook departed
at 11 oelock and Erwln was still occupied
with his books at noon, when a fireman
rushed in convey ing the information that
the building was ablaze in the upper
stories. Erwln had been quite uncon
scious of the fire, which had been ob
served but a few minutes earlier by sev
eral passers by, who were startled by a
sudden burst of flame in the fourth story.
After the first alarm the fire chief turned
in a second and general alarm. A stiff
breeze fanned, the fire within the brick
walls, causing it to develop with extra
ordinary rapidity, and it was soon appar
ent that the interior of the structure
would be. entirely destroyed. Adjacent
to the brick factory was row of old
wooden buildings. Including a brancn
Salvation army'barracks and the South
ern police station. These seemed
doomed. Fortunately the police station
contained, only three prisoners, but the
terrified yells and appeals of the trio to
be liberated caused Intense excitement
•mong the gathering crowds. They were
transferred as quickly as possible to the
central station. - -
Meanwhile floor after floor of the
cracker factory fell in. rendering; the side
walls unsafe. Then the east wall of the
factory toppled over and a waving- sheet
of flame spread over the wide wooden
area adjoining. With the crash of the
east wall occurred the tragedy of the con
flagration. A score of firemen were in-a
neighboring l paint shop endeavoring from
that point to check the spread of
flames. 'A falling timber struck Fire
man Miaholey on the leg, breaking it. He
refused to allow his comrades to carry
him away in their arms, .insisting that
he must be born off on a shutter. All
but two of the band of firemen ran to
procure a shutter, and Just, as they left
their injured companion the wall- fell,
burying beneath a mass of brick .and
mortar Maholey and his faithful friends.
By dilnt of much dangerous labor the
three bodiles were recovered and sent
with police escort in as many patrol
wagons.
The loss to the brick buildings Is esti
mated at $40,000, with $60,000 loss on the
contents, consisting of machinery and
stock. The damage to the Salvation army
barracks was $1000, and to the police sta
tion the damage was nominal.
The biscuit factory was operated by a
corporation- organized' a year ago and
reputedly transacted a large and pros»
perous business. The cause of the fire is
as yet unknown,.
FIRE AT DELANO
DELANO, Cal., June 6.—Fire broke out
here this morning which, before It was
spent, caused a loss of $20,000. The fire
started from burning waste paper in the
living rooms of the family of E. B. Metz
ger, who occupied the first floor of the
building as a tin shop and, the second as
a residence, and from there it spread both
ways to an unoccupied building and
blacksmith shop of D. C. Abbott on the
south and an unoccupied' store room
owned by B. Slides, D. S. Coverdale's
office, the Delano Currier office and the
hardware store of Weav*r ft Co. on the
north. The buildings were all frame
and the business block in the town. From
ths time the Are was discovered until
the buildings were consumed was con
siderably less than an hour, and no effort ,
could be made to save them. Every en-'
ergy was spent to prevent the Are from
spreading to the buildings Just back and
to the east of them. Consequently noth
ing was saved from the flames. Weaver
ft Co. are the heaviest losers, their loss
being about $7600, with Insurance of $4000.
The total loss Is $20,000 and total insur
ance about $5500.
Postal Congress Men
ST. LOUIS, June 6.—Tho delegates to
the International Postal congress left
here for Chicago over the Alton railroad
ton lght. A drizzling rain spoiled, some of
the entertainment which had been pre
pared for the delegates,- but in spite of
It they made a trip down the river and
were driven around the city. They were
entertained at dinner by the reception
committee at the Planters/ hotel tonight
and an hour afterward!* went to the de
pot.
Southern Slugging
NEW ORLEANS, La., June 6.—Prof.
Ed Racy defeated Alphonra Garcia, a
local lightweight, in three rounds before
the new St. Bernard Athletic club, just
below the city, thin morning. Van Heest
and' Australian Billy Murphy will fight
before the club on June3o.
Essequibo Maps
WASHINGTON, June 6.—The maps
of th* Orinoco Esqulbo region of South
LOS ANGELES, MONDAY MORNING, JUNE 7, 1897
America, compiled for the use of the Ven
ezuela boundary commission, have been
published in atlas form. There are sev
enty-six maps In all, of which fifteen
are new and made especially for the
commission's use, while the remaining
sixty-one are fac-simile productions of
old ones, selected from the large num
bers brought to the attention of the com
mission. The publication contains much
valuable data that will be f use to the
counsel for the respective countries in
the arguments before the arbitration
tribunal, to which body the boundary
decision has been relegated.
Used to Explore Ancient Indian Dwel
ling Places
BAYONNE, N. J., June 6.—Prof. Wil
liam Llbby. Jr., of Princeton, university,
will leave for Albuquerque. N. M., early
In July with a party of six explorers.
Their plan Is to attempt to scale a tabie
land, shaped' like a figure 8, with per-
pendlculareldef seven hundredifeet high.
The outcroppings of red sandstone pro
ject from the face of the walls, making it
inaccessible by any ordinary means.
There are indications of occupancy by a
prehistoric race in the fragments-of pot
tery at the base of the formation. Libby
has arranged to throw a line over this
tableland, which Is several acres In ex
tent on top, by means of tandte'm kites,
with which experiments were conducted
here yestterday by W. A. Eddy, who sent
up three large kites, which were main
tained' some time In the air, although the
wind was too light for a satisfactory ex
periment. Prof. Llbby has a mortar and
life line packed, ready for shipment, with
which an attempt wilt be made to fire a
line over the tableland Incase the wind
is too light for the kites.. Larger lines
will be dragged over and the ascent
made In a boatswain's chair. The table
land can be approached on all sides, and
is surrounded by a plain, but so far as
known it has never been scaled.
KANSAS CITY, Mo., June 6.—An
nouncement is made of the sale of half
interest In the Olden fruit farm, said to
be the largest farm in the world devoted
exclusively to the raising of fruit. The
purchaser is Mr. T. L. Moore, the weal
thy merchant and capitalist of this city.
The farm is valued at between $250,000
and $300,000, and is situated at Olden, on
the Memphis railroad, in the Ozark
mountains. The farm consists of 2280
acres, on which there are 100,000 peach
5000 apple trees, 2000 pear trees and forty
acres in blackberries, besides a large va
riety of other fruits. On the property
are a large warehouse, a cannery with
a capacity of 10,000 cans per day, a cold
storage building holding 15,000 barrels
of apples, a hotel, a sawmill and a num
ber of houses for.the use of the managers
and tenants.
LONDON," June 6.—The premier of
Hyderabad' telegraphs to the London pa
pers thto morning that the story widely
circulated to the effect that the Imperial
diamond, the property of the nisam of
Hyderabad, had been stolen, Is pure fic
tion. The original story reported, that
the thief had replaced the Imperial with
a clever substitute, and that the im
posture was for a long time successful.
The Imperial is the largest brilliant in
the world, weighing 180 karats, and has
58 faces. It was sold to the nizam in
1891, through Alexander Jacob, for $2,
--000,000, though this sum was veTy much
in excess of its real value. The tran
saction gave rise to complicated litiga
tion, the Indian ovemment authorities
objecting to co large an outlay by the
rrlzam for a mere luxury.
C. U. Commencement
WASHINGTON, June 6.—The com
mencement exercises of the Catholic
university began today with solemn
high mass sung by the Very Rev. Dr. P.
J. Garrigan. vice rector. The bacca
laureate sermon was preached by the
Rev. William Fitzgerald of Lambert
vllle, N. J. Taking his inspiration from
the feast of the day, he spoke eloquently
of the Holy Ghost as the teacher of all
truth. He traced the origin of the mat
ter of truth through the senses, reason
and revelation and urged the students
to labor diligently to acquire all truth
and take it as their motto.
PARIS, June 6. —A cloudburst in the
hill country of the province of Iser, in
Southeastern France, has caused tht
overflow of the River Morge and the
destruction of a number of paper mills
and silk factories, as well as houses
along the banks. At the towns of Voi
ron and Muirans the river roße sud
denly twenty feet. One person was
drowned and the loss to property is es
timated at 10,000,000 francs. Four
thousand factory operatives are thrown
out of work.
PARIS, June 6.—M. Thomson and- M.
Mirman, members of the chamber of
deputies, fought a duel today, growing
out of an article written by the latter
attacking M. Thomson. M. Mirman was
slightly wounded in the forearm. The
latter is a Radical Socialist and gained
considerable notoriety through his pro
test against being confined in the bar
racks as a conscript during the election
of a president to succeed Casimir-Pcrier.
MONTREAL, Que., June 6.—Hon. Wil
liam J. Bryan, who is resting here for a
day after hie lecture last night, today at
tended the American Presbyterian
church, and was afterward entertained
at lunch by George W. Stephenson, M.
P., a millionaire lawyer and politician.
Mr. Bryan was driven around the city
by the Knights of Pythias in the after
noon and will leave for Ottawa tomor
row.
NASHVILLE, Term., June 6.—Yester
day members from many states of the
National Brotherhood of Friendship
(colored) and Sisters of the Mysterious
Ten (colored) met and adopted resolu
tions requesting the grand master to
change the date of the national conven
tion from Nashville to Washington. The
convention meets In July.
NEW YORK, June 6.—Mrs. H. M.
Nicholson, wife of Commodore Nichol
ex>n, retired, died suddenly today. She
leaves a family of two daughter*, and
five Bomsv one of tne latter being- in the
army, and the latter in the navy.
KITES AND CANNON
Bought a Big Farm
Has Not Been Pinched
A French Cloudburst
Deputy Duelists
Bryan's Movements
Negro Secret Orders
A Commodore's Wife
SPANISH
CABINET
Suddenly Lifted Back Into
Power
CANOVAS IS COMPLIMENTED
AND CUBAN POLICY WILL NOT
BE CHANGED
The European Diplomats Are Much
Surprised and the Spanish Op
position Is Very Mad
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, June 6.—Spanish
Minister Dupuy De Lome today receiv
ed a cablegram announcing the result of
the queen's decision in the matter of the
Spanish premier and cabinet ministers
who recently tendered their resigna-j
tions. The minister's dispatch Is in lin»
with the Associated Press advices and
says the queen had reached her decision
after consulting with the former prem
iers and marshals. Included In the
former were Senor Sagasta, the pres
ent leader of the Liberal party, and
Martinez Campos, the captain-general
of Cuba who gave way to Gen. Weyler.
Mr. De Lome declined to discuss the
possibilities of the retention in office of
the present ministry in relation to the
policy to be pursued with regard to Cu
ban affairs and the Incumbency of Cap
tain-General Weyler.
Secretary Snerman also received a
long cable dispatch from United States
Minister Taylor at Madrid. Presumably
it is in connection with the happenings
of the day In that city, but as it was in
cipher the secretary was unable to dis
close the contents. The secretary de
clined to make any statement in regard
to the matter further than to suggest
that it indicated the confidence of th:
queen in the ministry.
POLICY UNCHANGED
MADRID, June 6.—The queen regent
has confirmed Senor Canovas, the prem
ier, in his ministerial powers, and the
cabinet will remain in office with per
sonnel and policy unchanged.
All the leading members of the diet
and chamber of deputies who were, con
sulted by her majesty, as well, as three
marshals, have advised her - to recall
Captain-General Weyler from Cuba.
At a cabinet council held this after
noon at his residence, Senor Canovas,
the premier, announced that the queen
regent had renewed his powers and
those of the cabinet in terms most flat
tering to htm and all his colleagues. It
is understood that the government does
not contemplate any immediate change
in the supreme command in Cuba.
The surprise and displeasure of the
various sections of the opposition are
not easy to describe.
CUBAN RELIEF
HAVANA, Cuba, June 6.—ln political
circles and among the Spanish general
public, where a feeling of acute anxiety
has existed as to the outcome of the cab
inet crisis in Madrid, keen satisfaction
is expressed at the news that Senor Ca
novas has received fresh proof of confi
dence in the crown.
Today La Gaceta, the official gazette,
publishes the reforms recently promul
gated by the queen regent in council.
Senor Jose Congeste, the Spanish rep
resentative on the Ruiz investigating
committee, sailed yesterday for New
York.
Heavy rains have fallen In the prov
inces of Santiago de Cuba and Plsar del
Rio, and many of the rivers have over
flowed their banks.
IT CAUSES SURPRISE
LONDON, June 6.—The Madrid corre
spondent of the Times says: The solu
tion of the crisis is a general surprise,
as much In ministerial circles as in the
world at large. It was thought, not
without reason, that the counsels of the
higher military authorities, as reported
by Marshal Campos, Marshal Blanco
and Marshal Dominguez, would have in
clined the crown toward a radical and
distinct change of policy in the Cuban
campaign. This idea was especially
prevalent as Senor Canovas has himseif
admitted that both as«regards reforms
and the conduct of the war by Captain-
General Weyler, his own hopes and as
pirations have scarcely been fulfilled.
The only explanation is that the first
thought of the premier is to vindicate
its amour propre so far as the Liberais
are concerned, and when this is estab
lished to find occasion at an early date
so to modify the cabinet as to satisfy
the Liberals and to terminate the dead
lock before the cortes reassembles.which
will probably not be for several months.
It can hardly be doubted that the mod
ifications will Include the replacement
Of Captain-General Weyler by some
other commander.
A PRISONER RELEASED
CINCINNATI, Ohio, June 6.—A spe
cial to the Commercial Tribune from
Evansville, Ind„ says: Wendell P. Phil
lips, Cuban war correspondent of the
London (Jtoronlcle, was, with several
I other newspaper men, released from
prison ut Motanzo this morning, wheie
he has been confined ten days, on condi
tion that he will leave Cuba and never
return. Phillips avoided Spanish ctn
sorship by sending his letters to the
Chronicle through the British consul at
Havana. During his trial yesterday he
was defended by the British consul. This
news comes through a telegram to his
relatives, who live here.
LEE'S SUCCESSOR
WASHINGTON, June 6.—Ex-Con
gresaman J. Frank Aldriclt of Chicago
arrived here thto afternoon. He is die
cree'tly silent, but it In known that he
came on instructions to be in Washing
ton when Mr. CalSioun arrived. Mr.
Aldrich was offered and accepted the
poet of consul-general at Havana over a
month ago. and his visit here at this
INDEX
TO TELEGRAPH NEWS
The signs of the times give good
promise of a war in passenger fares.
The New York Democracy won't re
pudiate the Chicago platform, because
it can't
Mrs. Gaumer, the Urbana victim of
the lynched negro's lust, writes a card
of thanks for sympathy offered.
Fire at San Francisco results in the
death of three firemen and causes
heavy damage; fires at other places.
Philadelphia cricketers visiting in
England and Kangaroo ball tossers at
Chicago; Sunday cyclers break reoords
at Sacramento.
Nashville exposition managers re
port good attendance, which will be
largely increased by the president's
visit on Friday.
The Indian troubles in Montana are
far from ended; two hundred Indians
are off the reservation and settlers are
hurrying into the towns.
Mexican delegates to the Pan-Amer
ican trade congress to be given a six
weeks' tour through the United States
business and commercial centers.
The Spanish queen regent suddenly
makes upi her mind and flreL< the old
cabinet back into power; whereat
there is much surprise in European
diplomatic circles and more anger
among the members of the Spanish op
position.
A tax on tea will be proposed as an
amendment to the tariff bill, but tax
on tea got itself disliked in America
a long time ago; the sugar schedule
promises to cause a good deal of de
bate and delay; the house will do noth
ing but meet and.adjourn.
time inc'icate9 thut Consul-General Lee's
stay in the island will be fhort.
AWFUL ATROCITY
VANCOUVER, B. C, June 6.—The of
ficers of the steamer Hupeh, which ar
rived 1 today from the Orient, state that
when in the Philippine islands, on their,
laet trip, it was learned that the Spanish
government had captured twenty-five
Roman Catholic priests, supposed to be
in sympathy with the rebels, and had
roasted them.
NEW YORK DEMOCRACY
WON'T REPUDIATE THE CHICAGO
PLATFORM
Advice Given to Conduct Local Cam
paigns Without Regard to Na
tional or State Issues
ALBANY, N. V., June 6.—The Demo
cratic party will not force national Is
sues in the various state campaigns and
while repudiation of the Chicago plat
form will not be allowed, it will not be
brought forward as an issue paramount
to anything else. That is the statement
of National Committeeman Frank
Campbell of Bath. Mr. Campbell was
in the city tonight fresh from a confer
ence with party leaders and said: "The
policy of the Democratic party of the
nation as laid down in the platform of
the Chicago convention in 1896 cannot
be disturbed until the next Democratic
national convention, which will be held
in 1900. It will make no difference
whether state, city or county conven
tions endorse it or repudiate it. It will
stand unaltered. In the election last fall
the regular organization of the state of
New York was true to the nominees and
the platform of the Chicago convention.
The same party heartily endorsed Cleve
land four years ago as the Democratic:
candidate for president, although three
delegates were opposed to him in the
national convention.
"I believe in home rule. If the Demo
crats of the city of New York, Buffalo
or Rochester deem it expedient and
wise for party success to conduct their
local elections without injecting into
them state or national Issues, I believo
they have a perfect right to do so, with
out Interference of any state or national
committee.
"Democrats living in the state outsid-3
o{ the city of New York are looking anx
iously for the election of a Democratic
mayor for greater New York. If this
could be accomplished it would encour
age the rank and file of the party ard
enable the organization to get into
lighting shape for the more important
state election that is to take place a
year from this fall, when governor, state
officers and legislature are to be elected.
If we carry greater New York and
elect the officers this year, then the par
ty will be in shaps, with a fair chance of
placing New York state in the Demo
cratic column in 1900.
"As the representative of the organiz
ation in New York of the committee, I
can state the committee has no desire to
interfere with New York state in its
local elections this fall, nor to dictate to
the Democratic party the issues it shall
use in elections."
Sailed for London
QUEBEC, Que., June 6.—The Canadian
military continent for the queen's Jubi
lee celebration in Londo.'. sailed this
morning on the steamer Vancouver, 176
strong. This force Is composed of repre
sentatives of all the different branches
of the Canadian militia, regulars as> well
as volunteers', and Is commanded by
Lieutenant-Colonel Aylmer, adjutant
general, with Captain McDouga'.liof the
St. John's School of Instruction, sacond
in command.
An Austrian Strike
VIENNA, June 6.—A general atreet
railway strike to In progress in this city.
All the employes, inclludling the re-serve
men, Hive gone out. Only a few cars
are run in the day, and thee'a are guard
ed by x'tron/j bodies of police. Thus far
there hap beii.i no violence, - and the
strikers siow a disposition to secure
their ends in an-orderly faiiaion.
Eight Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS
A SIX=PENNY
TAX ON TEA
Was Once Very Unpopu-
lar in America
THE TAX WILL BE PROPOSED
AND JTJST AS CERTAINLY BE
DEFEATED
The Sugar Schedule Sandbar Promise*
a Long Delay in the Ship
of State
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, June 6.—While the
tariff bill will continue the general topic
of discussion in the senate during the
present week, there is no certainty as to
what portion of it will receive general
attention. This uncertainty is due
largely to the difficulty of ascertaining
when the sugar schedule will be taken
up. It is so generally understood that
this schedule will consume considerable
time that there is no effort to outline
I the course of proceedings beyond it.
The wood schedule will afford a brief
; respite Monday, before reaching the su
gar question, as that subject was left un
disposed of when the senate adjourned'
Saturday. Senator Allen probably will
: enter a motion to strike out the entire
' schedule relating to sawed lumber, and
the motion may lead to other speeches
than hie own.
Whether the eugar schedule will be
i taken up In order is still undetermined.
There are many differences of opinion
on the subject, but the prevailing de
[ sire is to get the schedule out of the way
;as soon as possible. This is the case on
both sides of the chamber, but it is es
| pecialiy true of the Republicans, as the
' responsibility for action rests there.
: Still there is a desire among Republican
; senators that there should be absolute
agreement among themselves on the
rates of this schedule before entering)
upon Its discussion In the senate, and
it is realized that this may be difficult
of attainment without a further ex
change of opinions than has yet been
permitted. There Is no doubt in any
event of postponement until Senator Al
drich's return to the senate. He Is still
confined to his room, but is expected
to be out early in the week.
That the Hawaiian treaty will be pro
tected by the finance committee is con
sidered settled, but a caucus may be
necessary to determine whether other
changes should be made.
Senator Pettlgrew has decided definite
ly to offer his anti-trust amendment in
connection with his schedule, but be
yond the fact that it would lead to a
number of speeches, there is no certainty
as to its course or its fate.
The tobacco schedule immediately fol
lows the sugar schedule, but if it should
be reported on Monday It would be nec
: essary also to temporarily pass it over,
as the committee has promised the to
bacco men a hearing on Monday night.
They will ask for $12 on wrappers and
35 cents on filler tobacco. There Is also
an inclination to return to the language
jof the Wilson law on this subject. This
is understood to be the wish of both the
Importers and the tobacco growers.
There are many sharp contests ahead
on the paragraphs of the agricultural
schedule, which is next after tobacco,
including those on rice, on which there
will be an effort to secure a return to
the house rates; on cattle, on which, it
will be claimed, there should be an ad
valorem rather than a specific duty; and
j on fish, chicory and salt. The innovation
|of a duty on tea is also proposed on this
schedule, but it is practically certain
that this provision will be withdrawn.
Thus what would have been one of the
severest contests over tea will be avert-
I cd. Cotton and spirit schedules, it is
now thought, will excite comparatively
little debate.
IN THE HOUSE
The house has no work ahead of it
this week, and it is the intention of the
: majority leaders to adjourn tomorrow
j until Thursday, and from Thursday un
| til Monday.
j Mr. Simpson and other membersof the
, minority doubtless will essay the usual
; maneuvers with the purpose of embar
rassing the Republicans, but in the pres
ent condition of the house their latitude
is narrow and they can be easily over
borne by their adversaries.
Dickinson College
1 CARLISLE, Pa., June 6.—The 114 th
, commencement of Dickinson college was
i formally opened today. Prof. George
Edward Reed delivered the baccalaure
ate sermon in Allison Memorial church
•at 10:30 oelock this morning. There was
la large selected choir. Prayer was said
jby Rev. John A. Roche of New Tork.
. J, Vernon Adams, president of the col
lege, delivered an address tonight be
jj fore that body. The law school com
.j mencement will be held tomorrow and
i the college commencement on Wednes
jday. The graduates in both number
j eighty-eight.
Schlatter Reported Dead
DENVER, Col., June 6.—A special to
the News from El Paso, Tex., says that
Francis Schlatter, who claimed to per
form miraculous cures by divine power,
was recently found dead in the foothills
of Sie-rra MadTe, 35 miles southwest of
Case Grande, in the state of Chihuahua,
Mexico. He had been fasting, and ap
parently starved to death. While In
Denver, from August 22nd to November
13th, 1895, about two hundred thousand
people visited Schlatter to receive
treatment.
Tired of Office
GUTHRIE, O. T., June 6.—Patrick
Nagle, United States marshal for the
district of Oklahoma, has wired his res
ignation to President McKinley. He an
nounces that he is tired of the place and
desires to be relieved. The affairs of ths
office were recently investigated by •
{Special agent from Washington.

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