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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, June 07, 1897, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-06-07/ed-1/seq-2/

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TO SEE SIGHTS
111 American Industrial
Centers
MEXICAN TRADE DELEGATES
Will be taken on a six weeks
TOUB
The Visitors to Be Hade Familiar
With the Business Methods of
the United States
Associated Press Special Wire.
PHILADELPHIA, June 6.—The dele-
gates from, cities and towns of Mexico
and of the Central and South American
states, forty-nine in number, who came
here to the Pan-American trade con
gress, which closed on Friday, will leave
this city tomorrow morning for a six
weeks' sight peeing tour of the United
States. All the commercial and indus
trial centers of the eastern and western
states and some few of the southern
states will be visited.
Some of the delegates who represented
trade bodies ot the cities ot the United
States at the congress will accompany
the'party, as will also a few of the offi
cials of Philadelphia commercial muse
um, who wijljook after the arrangements
and, detaifs of the trip.
Committees of prominent citizens and
business men will meet and take charge
of the party at the respective places
visited and will direct the movements
of the visitors In seeing the manufactor
ies, business establishments and other
places of Interest.
The party will leave tomorrow morn
ing for Baltimore on special cars attached
to the regular train on the Baltimore &
Ohio railroads Monday and' Tuesday will
te spent in Baltimore and Washington,
and on Wednesday they will arrive at
New York. While at New York the party
will visit Brooklyn, Jersey City, Newark.
Patterson and other places in the vicin
ity of the metropolis, and will leave on
Sunday evening on one of the sound
steamers for Fall River. Ten days wili
be spent in New England, returning to
New York on June 23, when they will
leave at once for the west, the first stop
to be made at Pittsburg Up to their
arrival at New York on June 23 they will
travel in special cars attached to regular
trains, but from. New York through the
west and back again to New York about
July 18 the party will occupy a special
vestibuled Pullman train equipped with
all the modern appliances. The train
will have sleeping cars, a dining car,
smoking car and observation and parlor
cars, and the visitors will thus be placed
in direct touch with the most advanced
ideas of American railroading. Leaving
Pittsburg the party will go to Dayton,
Cincinnati, Nashville, St. Louis, Chicago,
Milwaukee, Grand Rapids, Detroit,
Cleveland, Buffalo, Niagara Falls and
across New York state to Troy and
Albany, thence bji day, boas oij th'j Hud
son to New York city.
The following are the representatives
of the Philadelphia museum who will be
with the party: Dr. W. P. Wilson, di
rector; Dr. Gustav Niederlein, chief of
the scientific department; C. A. Green,
assistant chief of the bureau of informa
tion, and D. N. Harper.
IF IT IS TRUE
It Is Very Interesting to Ex-Mrs.
Magowan
TRENTON, N. J., June 6.—People re
siding in the neighborhood of ex-Mayor
Frank A. Magowar's colonial mansion
were awakened about midnight last
night by a disturbance in which the ex
mayor, his two boys and a policeman
were the central figures, Mrs. Magow
an and her children live next door to the
house occupied by the ex-mayor and
Mrs. Barnes. It is claimed that last
night Magowan and Mrs. Barnes walked
past the house where Mrs. Magowan
and her children reside an unusual num
ber of times. The boys believed it was
done with the deliberate purpose of an
noying their mother. They began to
shout at Magowan and told him to take
Mrs. Barnes into the house, and, It is
said, made some uncomplimentary re
marks about her. Magowan walked into
the yard of his former wife's house after
the boys. They ran into the house.
Meanwhile Mrs. Magowan sent for a
policeman and ordered the arrest of the
ex-mayor. The latter told the police
man to arrest the boys, but the police
man declined to do either without a
warrant. The matter was soon quieted
down by Magowan leaving. During the
day there has been some talk of war
rants being issued, but at police head
quarters tonight it was said that no such
steps had been taken.
A MARINE RACER
The Porter Should Wear a Glass
Bustle
NEW YORK, June C—The United
States torpedo boat Porter came out ofj
the dry clock yesterday afternoon with
new paint on her steel bottom, which]
had been swept bare within three week?,
by the friction of water occasioned by;
her remarkable speed. Her final trial i
is understood to have been fixed for'
Tuesday, June Bth. Today Lieut. Fre-j
mont, in command, took her down
around Scotland lightship and back;
again. Xhe stretch from the Battery to
Scotland lightship is twenty-one miles,
the round trip is forty-two miles and the
time in which the Porter traveled this
distance was one hour and fifty minutes,
and she did it easily, for at no time was
more than 200 pounds of steam pressure
developed, and that for only a short
time.
A Cloakmakers' Strike
NEW YORK, June 6.—The United
Brotherhood of Cloakmaker j had a busy
day today. Secret meetings were held
In assembly rooms scattered throughout
the East Side to organize the 12.000
cloakmakers In New York and vicinity
preliminary to a strike. Secretary Braff
of the organization said today that there
are now 6000 enrolled members in the
union and that In less than a week he
expects all will have joined. There are
about 4000 organized women who will be
affected if the strike goes Into effect on
schedule time. The crisis of the strike
of the Brotherhood of Tailors will be
reached Tuesday, when the Hebrew
holidays, which began Saturday, will be
over.
STRIKING CONVICTS
Will Be Set at Work Again This
Horning
SAN QUENTIN PRISON, June «.—
The trouble with the convicts employed
in the Jute mill at this prison is about
over and no further disturbance is look
ed for. Work will be started up tomor
row morning in that portion of the mill
known as the "old Jute," with some 400
men. This leaves about 250 of the most
desperate and mutinous of the criminals
still confined on a diet of bread and wa
ter and it is expected that of these all
but the ringleaders of the so-called
"strike" will be at work again. The ring
leaders and those who took part in the
attempted break from the dungeon will
be brought before the board of directors
and their cases considered for punish
ment. Extra guards will be stationed
In the mill to prevent any further trou
ble and to see that the more peaceably
Inclined convicts who wish to work are
not intimidated by their more hardened
and vicious fellow prisoners.
EXPOSITION MANAGERS
WELL SATISFIED WITH THE IN
TEREST SHOWN
The Presidential Visit to Nashville Is
Expected to Largely Increase
the Attendance
NASHVILLE, Term., June 6.—The
week of the exposition just has
been most satisfactory from every point
of view, and very satisfactory in attend
ance Large numbers of people from
dilstamt states were here today, and the
coming week will undoubtedly show a
great Increase, not only in local attend
ance, arid' from aM parts of the state, but
from other states. This week will end
with the visit of President McKinley,
upon- Ohio and Cincinnati day, and, will
have numerous special features prior to
the grand finale. The visit of the presi
dent has already caused the greatest in
terest. Preparations are being made to
give him a hearty and enthusiastic wel
come, and all parts of the state will be
represented.
The program for Friday, Ohio day, the
day President McKinley arrives, has
been arranged. In brief, it is as fol
lows: The president. Governor Bushnell
of Ohio and party will be escorted to the
Maxwell house for breakfast, after which
Governor Taylor wllli be received. At
10:30 the president and party will be es
corted to the Centennial grounds Ac
companying them will be Governor
Bushnell and staff and Governor Taylor
and staff. The escort will include United
States troops and Tennessee state troops.
At 11 oelock in the auditorium addresses
of welcome will be delivered by Presi
dent Thomas, Mayor McCarthy amd
Governor Taylor.
Responses will be made by Senator
Clark of Ohio, Governor Bushnell and
the president.
Luncheon will follow, and then the
inspection of the buildings and grounds.
At 5 oelock the president, Mrs. McKin
ley and the ladleeof the party will hold
a reception for ladies In the Woman's
building.
Satui fi'ay morning at 11 oolock Presi
dent McKinley wiM hold a reception in
the audlltortum, and will also participate
in the exercises of Cincinnati day. Sat
urday night the president and party
leave for Chattanooga. Innes' band be
gins an. engagement tomorrow.
IN COLLISION
Several British Vessels Damaged and
Sailors Drowned
LONDON, June 6.—The steamers Bit
tern and Ystroom, both bound for Am
sterdam, collided in the Thames early
this morning. The Ystroom foundered,
two of her passengers being drowned.
The remainder- of her passengers andi
i her crew were taken aboard the Bittern,
which was damaged. The Bittern's sec
ond officer and carpenter were drowned.
The British tank steamer Aral, fromj
New York to Dover for orders, collided I
with and sank the schooner Peaii,
bound from London to Port Talbot, off
Wolf rock last night. The captain'u
wife and two of the Pearl's crew were
drowned. The captain and two mem
bers of the crew have been landed at
Salcombe.
The British steamer Orellana was
damaged by colliding in a dense fog
with the Norwegian bark Midnatssol,
from Ship island for Buenos Ayres,
which was at anchor in the Rio de la
Plata, and has been towed to Montevi
deo full of water.
In a dense fog off the mouth of the
Tyne, the British steamer Ganges, Cap
tain Dlckes, from Montreal May 18, col
lided with and sank the Norwegian
steamer Diana. The latter went down
almost immediately, but her crew clam
bered aboard the Ganges and were
saved.
Cadet Graduates
WEST POINT, N. V., June 6.—The
chapel of the West Point military acaci
jemy was completely Ailed this morning
by the corps of cadets, the board of
j visitors, the officers and ladies and fam
: ilies of the cadets at the customary hour
for religious worship to listen to the
farewell discourse of Rev. Herbert Ship
man to the graduating cadets. Rev. C.
G. O'Keefe of Highland Falls preached
for the Catholic cadets in the soldiers'
chapel under the hill.
Knights of Honor
ST. LOUIS, Mo., June 6.—Most of the
delegates to tomorrow's session of the
supreme lodge. Knights of Honor, num
bering nearly 100, came In by the night
trains, and more are expected. The ses
sion will be held at the Southern hotel
and is expected to last a week. Thirty
six Etates will be represented. John
Mulligan of Yonkers, N. V., is supreme
director and John P. Shannon of Elber
ton, Ga., supreme reporter.
Fanatics Defeated
NEW YORK, June 6.—A dispatch to
the Herald from Buenos Ayres says:
The Herald's correspondent in Rio de
Janeiro, Brazil, telegraphs that late ad
vices from Canudos, Bahia, state that
8000 fanatics under Conselheiro were de
feated by the Brazilian troops. The fa
natics made a stubborn and desperate
resistance, but were finaly compelled to
flee in great disorder before the federal
artillery.
LOS ANGELES HERALD* MONDAY JUNE 7, tW7
BOLD BRITONS
Not Afraid of Philadelphia
Cricketers
VISITING YANKEES WILL WIN
BUT THEY WOULDN'T—IF AND
IF AND IS
Kangaroo Ball Tossers at Chicago.
Sunday Cyclers at Sacramento
Break World's Record
Associated Press Special Wire.
OXFORD, June 6.—The Philadelphia
cricketers arrived here at noon today.
No one met them. They spent the after
noon quietly. There does not seem to be
much interest In the match game among
the townspeople, who have been relied
upon to furnish a good date. The pres
ent prospects are for fast wicket to
morrow, although Riddle and one or
two other members of the American
team have not fully recovered from the
voyage. The men are quite confident
that they will give a good account of
themselves.
The Oxford team, while very much
Improved since the opening: of the sea
j son, evidently stand in some awe of the
| Philadelphians because of their achieve-
I ments over the Australians last year,
j The Philadelphia team for tomorrow,
considering the arrangements tonight,
will consist of Bailey, Biddle, Bohlen,
Clark, Coates, King, Lester, Patterson,
Ralston, Thayer and Wood. The Amer
ican visitors are pretty generally ex
pected to win. It is also believed that
later on they will defeat Cambridge, but
it is not thought they will be equally
successful in other matches. Their pro
gram is ambitious but it does not in
clude an all-England or representative
match, as they will meet only the best
players in the respective county teams.
This is doubtless a wise step on their
part, though disappointing to English
cricketers, who would have liked to see
what Philadelphia could accomplish
against England's finest eleven.
Apropos of the visit, Prince Ran Jit
Sinhjl, one of the most popular cricket
i ers in England, said yesterday to a rep
resentative of the Associated Press:
"There is of course a good deal of inter
est felt in the visit of the Americans, and
this will undoubtedly increase as their
tour lengthens. Their quality as a team
will not have been tested in the most
effective way, because they do not in
tend to play any representative match.
I shall meet them when playing for my
county at Brighton, June 17 and 19. If
I am not engaged in any county match
at the time they play Marylebone at
Lords I shall meet them again, playing
them there for the home team. ,
"At Bristol they will meet Dr. Grace.
So far as the Oxford and Cambridge
teams are concerned, the Philadelphia
players may not find them very strong
opponent?, but unleeo the Americans
xre a thoroughly capable team they will
have very little chance against them."
ON THE DIAMOND
Amateurs From Kangarooland Arrive
at Chicago
CHICAGO, June 6.—The Kangaroo
ball players from Australia gave the
Illinois Cycling club baseball team the
scare of its life in the game today. The
wheelmen won out by a score of 13 to 8,
only after the hardest kind of ball play
ing and with the assistance of a couple of
bad throws on the part of the visitors.
The Australians astonished the na
tives with their batting, and In spots
. their fielding was equal to anything seen
on an amateur field. They played in a
manner that showed that the rudi
ments of the game were well grounded
■ and that they were reaching out for the
fine points.
SMALL SUNDAY CROWD
WASHINGTON, June 6.—Sunday
baseball was Inaugurated in this vicin
■ ity today by a game between the Cleve
lands of the National league and a
picked nine. The contest occurred at
1 Riverside park, a resort about two miles
! below Alexandria, Va. It resulted in
I a victory for the league club by a score
of 12 to 1. The attendance was very
' small, only about 600 persons being
present.
A TOURNAMENT GAME
FRESNO, June 6.—ln the baseball
game for the Examiner prize today the
Fresno Republicans won by a score of
9 to 0, the Will & Fincks refusing to
play after the third inning, when they
claimed they had received the worst of
a decision. After a delay of half an hour
the Will & Fincks agreed to play an
exhibition game. The Republicans won
I this game also by a score of 7 to 3.
ON THE WHEEL
Sunday Cyclers at Sacramento Beat
Three Records
SACRAMENTO, June G. —Three
world's records were smashed on the
new three-lap cycle track here today,
and In scorching weather, with the mer
cury close to 100 in the shade.
The Olympic circuit riders' feats were
witnessed by close to 3000 people, fully
half of whom were ladles.
Otto Zlegler must have a very kindly
feeling for Sacramento, for it was over
at Agricultural park in this city that
he, three years ago, lowered the world's
one mile flying start and paced record
to 1:50, and at once sprangjrlnto fame.
Today he lowered (he world's record in
the single paced mile (scratch) pro
fessional to 2:05 2-5, and in the handicap
to 2:06 3-5. Zlegler is a great favorite
here and received a great ovation at the
hands of the spectators.
The mile competition amateur handi
cap fell to J. E. Wing of the Olympic
Club Wheelmen of San Francisco. He
won the second heat in 2:08 4-5 and the
final in 2:10 3-5.
Jacob Hirsch of the Capital City
Wheelmen won the second and final heats
in the tw : o-thridis of a mile amateur
scratch event in 1:28 4-5 and 1:35 1-5 and
would have given Wing a hard l battle in
the mile handicap and perhaps have
beaten him had it not been that he failed
to qualify In the second heat in conse
quence of losing one of his toe clips. Re
sults:
Two-thirds of a mile, scratch, amateur
—Won by Hlrsch, Rus* second, 'Wine
third; time 1:36 1-6.
One mile, scratch, professional—Won
by Zlegler, Jones second, Davis third;
time 2:06 2-6. (World's record.)
One mile, amateur—Won by Wing,
Peck second), Leltch third; time 1:10 3-6.
Mils handicap, professional—Zlegler
won, McCrea second, Jones third; time
2:06 3-6.
BLINDFOLD CHESS
BROOKLYN, N. V.. June 6.—A re
markable exhibition of simultaneous
blindfold chess playing was given Sat
urday evening at the Brooklyn Chess
club by Harry N. Plllsbury, the Ameri
can chess champion. Eight members of
the club studied the games at chess tables
In one room, while Mr. Plllsbury played
from memory In an adjoining room. The
games were well conducted on both side*,
Mr. Plllsbury finally startling his oppo
nents by his combinations. He an
nounced a forced mate in four moves tn
one game and another in two moves.
After four hours' playing the score
showed that Plllsbury had won six
games, lost none, two games being
drawn.
A YANKEE VICTORY
LONDON, June 6.—Charles E. Kll
patrick, the American half mile cham
pion, won the half mile open handicap
from the scratch In the Seaford sports
yesterday.
THE LONDON MARKET
Increased Activity in American Bail
way Stocks
LONDON, June 6.—The principal fea
ture on the stock exchange last week
was the Increased activity in American
railway securities, started by German
buying after realizations. The market
is much stronger than before, and this
seems to have Infused new life into the
general market. Grand Trunk being es
pecially favored as the result of the
April statement. South American min
ing shares are more quiet, but there has
been no noteworthy fall. A good deal of
attention is given to West Australians,
where developments are promising.
A decidedly holiday feeling pervades
the city, and the stock exchange ieclosed
until Tuesday, when the settlement in
mining shares will begin, to be followed
no Wednesday by the general list.
There is always some difficulty in em
ploying balances over the holidays, as
the half per cent rate for the week really
averages from one-half to three-quar
ters. Last week discounts and money
rates fluctuated from day to day. The
very large applications for the new Jap
anese bonds caused some scarcity, but
the lendings by the India council since
have made the market somewhat easier.
FRENCH POLITICS
All Socialists Don't Seem to Love One
Another
LONDON, June 7.—The Paris corre
spondent of the Times says: The scene
!in the chamber of deputies on Saturday
during the Juares incident, when M.
Brisson, president of the chamber, sus
pended the sitting and sent for the
military guard to remove M. Richard,
the Socialist deputy who had referred to
some of his colleagues as "police spies,"
was one of unwonted scandal and vio
lence. M. Brisson, after the business
was resumed, declined to hear Juares,
who interpellated the government on
what he called an "attempt to muzzle
a deputy," basing his refusal on the
ground that no notice of the inter
pellation had been given.
A furious uproar followed. M. Brisson
was pale with anger but kept himself
well under control.
Never in the bitterest invective em
ployed against an opportunist minister
by demagogues of the extreme left was
there greater violence than in the lan
guage of which SI. Brisson, who owes
his seat largely to the Socialist vote,
was the unjust object.
SULTANIC SCHEMES
To Sacrifice His Ministers to Public
Indignation
LONDON, June 7.—The correspondent
of the Standard at Constantinople says:
Acting upon the advice of Izzet Bey, the
sultan is leaving the peace negotiations
wholly in the hands of his ministers,
thus evading personal responsibility and
placing himself in a position to sacrifice
them to popular indignation if neces
sary.
It is reported that the palace party
has entered into extensive stock ex
change operations on the theory that
the market will show a rise as the pros
pects of peace increase. The Ottoman
ambassador at St. Petersburg has In
formed the porte that Count Muravieff,
the Russian foreign minister, told him
he personally objected to Russian inter
vention on behalf of Greece and had
counteracted the feminine intrigues
started with that object, but the holy
synod induced the czar to Intervene.
It is reported from Constantinople that
armed Bulgarian bands have crossed
the frontier near Kosssona, and a large
! force of troops has been sent to that
point.
RAINED PITCHFORKS
But Did Not Spoil the Imaginary
Desert
DETROIT, Mich., June 6.—The pro
verbial dryness of the Shriners' desert
was not In evidence tonight when the
advance guard of the ancient Arabian
order of the Mystic Shrine arrived at the
Mecca of the Detroit Moslems. They
came in a drizzling rain, but they were
thrice welcomed by the looal brethren,
who had been preparing for the annual
meeting of the imperial council, of the
order, which will be held on Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday.
Harrison Dinglan of Washington, im
perial potentate of the Shriners, who was
among the arrivals on a special train
from the east bearing delegations from
several eastern cities. There will be a
land parade on Wednseday andthe naval
parade the same night, In which many
steamers and yachts will take part.
Stole a Baby
SAN FRANCISCO, June 6.—Saturday
morning the nineteen-monthis' old baby
of Charles Winckeimann, a well known
nporting man, was kidnapped from the
custody of Mrs. Becklow, at 307 Fell
street. The parents have not been living
together for several months, and: the
baby has been given by its father into
the care of Mrs. Becklow. The mother
was permitted to visit the child. When
she called Saturday Mrs. Becklow was
dreiu'ir.g the boy. There was a ring at the
door befll, andi when Mrs. Becklow re
sponded the baby was roughly grabbed
from ixr arms by a man, who carried It
to a buggy near by, where an accomplice
was awaiting him, and drove away.
Since then nothing has been seen or
heard of the boy and his abdluctom In
the absence of a decree of divorce, neither
th* father nor ths mother can mak* say
legal claim to th* txcluaiv* custody at
the child,
HAWAIIAN AFFAIRS
Trouble With Japan Threatana to Be
come Serious
SAN FRANCISCO. June (.—The
steamer Coptle arrived this evening
from Honolulu, bringing advice* up to
May 31. According to ths latest informa
tion procurable the difficulty between
Japan and Hawaii growing; out of the im
migration question has been Increased
raher than diminished by the diplomatic
proceedings. Officers on board th*
Japanese cruiser Nanlwa, now at Hon
olulu, stated that a second Japanese
man-of-war is now en route to Hono
lulu and that a third armed vessel is
about to depart from Yokohama for the
Islands.
Mrs. Shlmamura, wife of the Japanese
minister at Honolulu, has arranged* to
leave for Japan on June 5. The intended
departure caused a rumor In Honolulu
to the effect that the minister would
soon follow her. He admitted that he
was not satisfied with the answer of the
Hawaiian government in regard to the
Immigration controversy, and 1 he gave
close friends to understand that unless
a reply, satisfactory to him, were made,
he would depart for Tokio, thereby sev
ering diplomatic relations between Japan
and Hawaii.
Sunken Treasure
BOSTON, June 6.—The steamer Orion
will leave tomorrow for St- Lu
cia, where tihe steamer Ethel Gon
da. went ashore Wednesday night
while on a voyage from Buenos Ayres
for this port. The steamer will take out
three sets of submarine divers, steam
pumps, in fact, a whole let ot wrecking
gear.
Died in His Bath
ST. LOUIS, Mo., June 6.—Thomas W.
Booth, ex-president of the Merchants'
Exchange, president of the J. W. Booth
Commercial company, and one of the
best known men In St. Louis, was found
dead in the bath tub in his residence by
his wife today. He had been suffering
from a complication of diseases.
FINANCIAL
MONET TO LOAN IN ANT AMOUNTS,
on diamonds, watches. Jewelry, pianos,
safes, lodging houses, hotels and prlvaw
household furniture; interest reasonable;
partial payments received; money quick;
private office for ladles. G. M. JONES,
rooms 12-14, 254 S. Broadway. 2S-tf
MONEY LOANED ON DIAMONDS,
watches. Jewelry, pianos, sealskins, car
riages, bicycles, warehouse receipts and
ail kinds of collateral security: storage
free In our warehouse. LEE BROS., 401
S. Spring Bt. tf
MONEY TO LOAN ON FURNTURE,
watches, diamonds, pianos, sealskins and
real estate; interest reasonable; private
office for ladles; business confidential.
C. C. LAMB, 22« S. Spring St.; entrance,
room 467. 8-21 tf
MONEY TO LOAN—
$ioo to 375,000 on city or country real
estate.
LEE A. M'CONNELL.
7-24 113 S. Broadway.
TO LEND ON REAL ESTATE AT 6 PER
cent, payable at any time or In monthly
payments. MECHANICS' SAVINGS
MUTUAL BUILDING AND LOAN A -
BOCIATION, 107 S. Broadway. tf
TO LOAN—A BARREL OF MONEY ON
diamonds, pianos, furniture and all first
class securities; business confidential
CREASINGER, 247 S. Broadway, rooms
1 and 2. 6-29-tf
POINDEXTER & WADSWORTH, ROOM
303 Wilcox building, lend money on any
good real estate; building loans made; If
you wish to lend or borrow, call on us. tf
MONEY TO LOAN, 8500 TO 33000, IN SUMS
to suit; no delays. CONTINENTAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
126 W. Second St., Wilcox building, tt
TO LOAN-UNLIMITED AMOUNT FOR
smp.ll loans: no commission: light ex
pense. SECURITY LOAN AND TRUST
CO., 223 S. Spring St.
TO LOAN—IF YOU WANT MONEY ON
real estate security I have It in any
amount. WM. F. BOSBYSHELL, 107 S.
Broadway.
MONEY TO LOAN UPON EASY TERMS
of repayment. STATE MUTUAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASS'N.. 151 S.
Broadway. 5-20 tf
MONEY TO LOAN-LOWEST RATES ON
real estate, personal notes or security.
JOHN L. PAVKOVICH. 220 W. First, tt
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
A-$i«0; GOOD ROUTE. CLEARING 365
net profit monthly, with horse an* wagon
Included; trial until you are satisfied
before buying. BEN WHITE, 235 W.
First st. 7
FOR SALE-36 BUSINESS. 75 HOUSES,
rooms, furnished, unfurnished, torrent;
collections: wanted, help free and work.
EDW. NITTINGER, 236 ft S. Spring St. tf
GROCERY STORE, WITH NICE Liv
ing rooms, well located,: only 1400; rare
bargain. BEN WHITE, 235 W. First St. 7
I SELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS
fcr cash. I. D. BARNARD, 111 North
Broadway, opposite Times building, tt
FOR EXCHANGE—OVER 2000 PROPER
ties of every description. Apply to BEN
WHITE. 235* W. First St. 7
FOR SALE—SALOONS AT VERY REA
sonable terms. Apply at 440 AUso St. tf
FOR SALE—2-CHAIR BARBER SHOP;
340. Inquire 326% N. Main St. »
DENTISTS
PARLORS,
239% S. Spring st.; painless extracting and
filling: plates 85, 38, 310; all work guar
anteed; established 10 years. Hours, 8-5;
Sundays, 10-12. Telephone Black, 1273.
. ,
FRANK STEVENS, 324 ft S. SPRING ST.,
open days and evenings; also Sundays;
electric light. Tel. Black 821.
DR. KENNEDY, DENTIST, 108 ft N.
Spring st., rooms 2, 6 and 7; painless ex
traction.
PERSONAL
PERSONAL—YOUR FATE AND FOR
tune correctly read; also how to get Inde
pendent slate writing. F. W. SMITH,
Hotel Portland, 444 S. Spring. t
PERSONAL—ONE HAND READ FREE;
life read from cradle to grave; advice on
business matters, family affairs, Utft W.
Third st. 6-11
PATENTS, COPYRIQHTS. ETC
KNIGHT BROS.', PATENT SOLICI
tors; free book, on patents, 434 Byrne
bldg. ' 9-22-6
PLUMBERS
FRANK A. WEINSHANK, PLUMBER
and gasntter, 340 E. Second St.; tel. 136.
MEDIUMS
j
■ME. LEO WILL REMAIN IN THOT
city for a few day* only; the renowned
forecast**- and card reader: she tell* th*
past, present aad future; she advise* you
with a certainty as to th* proper course to
pursue la Ufa; *h* give* lucky charms,
bring* th* separated together, cause*
speedy marriage with th* one you love;
tells If th* on* you lov* 1* false or true:
also very suooauful In locating mines
and mineral*; all tho** In trouble in busi
ness matters, lov* and family affairs
should by all means consult her; Utters
containing to cent* la stamp*, giving
age, color of hair and eyes, married oi
single, will receive prompt attention;
don't fall to see her; hours • am. to 7:80
p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m. to i p.m., at SUM
W. Sixth St.. Los Angele*. 6-18
MRS. PARKER. PALMIST, CLAIRVOY
ant and medium: lit* reading, business
removals, law suits, mineral looatlona,
love affairs ,etc. Take Third st. electrlo
car to Vermont ay*. and Vln* st. Sec
ond house on Vln* st., wait of Vermont
aye. 60c and 81.00. tf
MRS. WALKER, CLAIRVOYANT AND
life business reading medium; all busi
ness affair* of lit* looked into for th* ad
vancement of your future. Hours, 9 a. m.
to 8 p. m. 114 ft B. Spring at 6-20
GRACE GILMORE, CLAIRVOYANT
.and card reader; advice on mining, busi
ness and lov* affairs; ladles, 25 cent*;
gents, 50 cents. 181 ft 8. Broadway, rooms
8-10. (MO
MME. GRACE, CARD MEDIUM; THE
wonder of th* 19th century; reveal* th*
past, present and future. 644 8. Los An
geles St., bet. Fifth and Sixth sts. 8-19
MRS. E. Z. BARNETT, 444 ft R SPRING
St.; notice of change of location; sit
tings daily; circles, Tuesday and Thurs
day evenings. 7
■IRS. BANFORD JOHNSON, THE
well known independent slate writer and
clairvoyant, give* sitting* dally at 833 S.
Broadway. M
HLLA M. WHITE. TRANCE CLAlR
voyant medium; readings daily except
Sunday. 346 B. Hill St. 6mo
ROBERT B. G. FRAM, PHYSICAL HE
dlum, will give a circle tonight. 315 W.
Eighth st. 7
AGNES H. PLEASANCE. TRANCE
medium; sittings dally; at 365 ft B. Spring
street. 7-5
MISS GRACE WALLER, MEDIUM AND
card reader, 245 ft S. Spring St., room 15. 9
PHYSICIANS
DR. V. CQNDORY, VIENNA PHYS
lclan (Austria), late of Hot Springs,
Ark.; offloe, 324 ft S. Spring St., Los An
geles, Cal.; office hours, from 9 to 12 a.
m. and 2 to 6 p. m.
During thirty years' practical expe
rience I have treated sucessfutly and
under guarantee, rheumatism, gout,
scrofula, catarrh, hay fever, asthma,
chronic diseases of women, chronic dis
eases of the skin, chronic ulcers, liver
complaint, dyspepsia, piles, constipation,
old wounds, all kinds of stomach trou
bles and syphlls (without mercury and
without Interfering with patient's oc
cupation), swollen and stiff Joints, con
tracted muscles and all secret diseases.
Call or write. Everybody will receive
satisfaction. 8-80
DISEASES WHICH ARE TREATED IN
Hot Springs with mercury are treated by
the eminently successful European
method without mercury by Dr. Schick;
only three months required for a com
plete recovery; no relapse possible; no
detention from business, and a positive
cure guaranteed In three month*. DR.
SCHICK. 122 W. Third St., hours, 10 a. m.
to 4 p. m. and 7 to 8 p. m.; consultation,
examination and advice free of charge. 7
IMMEDIATE RELIEF AND PERMA
nent cure of rheumatism, stiff Joints,
neuralgia and catarrh; eminently suc
cessful European method introduced
here by DR. SCHICK, physician, sur
geon. 122 W. Third st. (elevator). 7-4
FREE CONSULTATION BY DR. UN
GER, German army physician and sur
geon; hours, 9 to 12, 2-6, 7-8; disease* of
men and women; cures cancers, tumors
and plies without knife. 107 ft N. Main
st., room 12. 6-4
CONSULT DR. MINNIE WELLS. SPE
cialist, 816 W. Seventeenth St., corner of
Grand aye. 3-16tf
EDUCATIONAL
WOODBURY BUSINESS COLLEGE (IN
corporated), 226 S. Spring St.. is the oldest
and largest commercial school in South
ern California; the most beautiful col
lege rooms and' equipment to be found
In ths state; elevator for pupils' use; a
large faculty ot experienced and able In
structors; open the entire year; both day
and evening sessions; a practical Eng
lish course, a thorough business course
and a course In Shorthand and type
writing under an experienced stenog
rapher. Write or call for Illustrated cata
logue and full information. G. A.
HOUGH, president; N. G. FELKER,
vice-president.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
LUCIEN EARLE, ATTORNEY AT LAW,
office, Bullard building: entrance, room
420; telephone black 1445. 7-24-97
BROUSSEAU & MONTGOMERY,
Attorneys-at-Law,
403 Bradbury block, Los Angeles. tf
DIRECTORY OF CALIFORNIA HO
TELS.
GRAND HOTEL-B. F. THORN, Manager.
Cor. Market and Montgomery sts.,
Ban Francisco.
European Plan,
HOTEL GREEN—J. H. Holme*, manager,
Pasadena.
HOTEL MBTROPOLE—On Catallna Isl
and.
HOTEL ARCADIA—Santa Monica, S.
Khelnhart proprietor.
HOTEL HOLLENBECK—Spring and Sec
ond streets, Los Angeles.
HOTEL RAMONA—Spring and Third
streets, Los Angeles.
ABBOTSFORD INN—Corner Eighth and
Hope street*, Los Angeles.
HOTEL PORTLAND—444 South Spring
street, Lo» Angeles.
HOTEL BRUNSWICK-Santa Ana; Amer.
lean and European plan.
HOTEL HOLYROOD—Riverside, Cal.-B,
Cochrane, proprietor.
THE ROWELL—Main and Ninth streets,
Riverside; E. J. Davis, proprietor.
HOTEL CARLTON—I3 to 37 East Colo
rado itrest, Pasadena.
HOTEL AVALON-AVALON. Santa Cata-
Una Island.
HOTEL BREWSTER—J. E. O'Brien, pro.
prietor; Fourth and C its., San Diego.
HOTEL BELLBVUB TERRACE—Cor
ner Sixth and Pearl at*.; F. A. Urban,
proprietor.
MINING AND ASSAYING
MORGAN * CO.. ABBAYBRB AND RB
nners and ore testers; bullion purchased;
consulting metallurgists; mines examined
and dealt In. Office, 261 Wilson block, Los
Angeles, Cal. js-tt
THE BIMETALLIC ASSAY OFFICE
and Chemical Laboratory, 124 s. Main at.
R. A. PEREZ. E. M„ manager. 12-4tf
MUSICAL
UPRIGHT
Grand Bass piano at a great sacrifice.
Room No. 11, The Savoy, Fourth and
Hill sts.; call mornings. tf
THE WONDERFUL GRAMAFHONES
for sal* at A. G. GARDNER'S. 118 Win
»ton st.; also piano* for sale and rent, tf
FOR SALE—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE—TYPEWRITERS CHEAP—
Smith Premier, 840; Remington, 885;
Densmore, 886; Yost, 826; Callgraph, 825.
All rented. ALEXANDER, 301 S.Bdway.
6.80
* —————
NURSERIES
FOR SALE—LEMON TREES. ON YOUR
own term*, or will trade: must be moved
by July Ist. Address or call, R. L.
BAKER, 419 E. Colorado it., Pasadena. I
I ■!I II ■ B—
WATCHMAKING
COMFORTABLE SMOKED GLASSES;
price* less than peddlers' and satisfac
tion guaranteed. W. J. GETZ, Jeweler,
886 S. Broadway. tf
£.057 AND FOUND
LOST—MASONIC GOLD PIN AT AR
cade depot Friday night. Finder pleass
return to Herald! office and receive re
ward. | g
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
LUDWIG & MATTHEWS. WHOLESALE
and retail fruit* and vegetables. MOTT
MARKET. 135 8. Main St., tel. 650. tf
HYPNOTISM
HYPNOTISM TAUGHT SCIENTIFCAL-
Iy. HYPNOTIC INSTITUTE, 428 ft 8.
Spring at. 6-14
PACIFIC COAST STEAMS^U^Co7~"
The company's elegant steamers Santa
Rosa and Corona leave Redondo at 11 a. m.
and Port Los Angeles at 2:30 p. m. for
San Francisco via Santa Barbara and Port
Harford, June 1. 6, 9, 13. 17, 21, 25, 29, July
8, 7, 11, 15, 19, 23, 27, 31. Aug. 4. 8. 12. 16, 20.
24, 28. Leave Port Los Angeles at 6 a. m. a
and Redondo at 11 a. m. for San D.'ego
June 3, 7, 11, 15. 19. 23, 27. July 1. 5. 9, IS. 17,
21, 25, 29. Aug. 2. 6. 10, 14, 18. 22, 26, 80. Th*
Corona calls also at Newport. Cars con
nect via Redondo leave Santa Fe depot at
9:46 a. m. or from Redondo railway depot
at 9:80 a.m.
Cars connect via Port Los Angeles leave
S. P. R. R. depot at 1:36 p.m. for steamer*
north bound.
The steamers Eureka and Coos Bay leave
San Pedro and East San Pedro for San
Francisco via Ventura, Carplnterla, Santa
Barbara, Gavlota, Port Harford, Cayucos,
San Simeon, Monterey and Santa Crus, at
6:30 p. m.. June 2, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30, July
4, 8. 12, 16, 20, 24. 28, Aug. 1, 5, 9, 13, 17, 81,
25, 29. Cars connect with steamers via
Ban Pedro leave S. P. R. R (Arcadedepot)
at 6:03 p. m. and Terminal railway depot
at 5:10 p. m. The company reserves right
to change without previous notice, steam
ers, sailing dates and hours of sailing.
W. PARRIS. Agt.. 124 W. Second St., Los
Angeles. GOODALL, PERKINS * CO.,
Gen. Agts., S. F.
LOS ANGELES TERMINAL RAILWAY.
April 12, 1897.
PASADENA
Leave Arrive
Los Angeles. Los Angela*.
7:80 a. m. 8:47 a. m.
9:35 a. m. 11:10 a.m. ,
11:40 a, m. 1:06 p. m.
8:15 p. m. 4:50 p. m.
6:88 p. m. 6:40 p. m.
MT. LOWE AND ALTADENA.
9:85 a. m. 11:10 a. m.
8:16 p. m. 4:60 p. m.
The only line from Los Angeles making
connection with Mt. Lowe Railway with
out change of cars.
GLENDALE
7:25 a. m. 8:33 a. m.
1:15 p. m. 2:28 p. m.
6:20 p. m. 6:30 p. m.
LONG BEACH AND SAN PEDRO
8:50 a. m. 8:30 a. m.
1:20 p. m. 11:36 a. m.
5:12 p. m. 6:36 p. m.
•8:00 a. m. »7:30 p. m.
CATALINA ISLAND
••1:20 p. m. 5:36 p.m.
•8:00 a, m. •7:80 p. m.
•Sundays only.
••Sunday excepted.
Direct connections with steamer Falcon
going and returning dally. Tourists can
make the round trip In one day it desired.
The best Ashing on the coast. Boyle Heights
cars pass Terminal station.
W. J. COX.
General Passenger Agent.
LOS ANGELES AND REDONDO RAlL
way Company.
Los Angeles depot: Corner of Grand ave
nue and Jefferson street.
Leave Leave
Les Angeles Redondo for
for Redondo. Los Angeles.
8:10 a,m. Sun. only 7:00 a.m. Sun. only
9:30 a.m. daily 8:00 a.m. dally
10:45 a.m. Sun. only 9:30 a.m. Sun. only
1:30 p.m. dally 11:00 a.m. dally
6:30 p.m. dally 4:15 p.m. dally
7:OJ p.m. Sun. only 6:45 p.m. Sun. only
Take Grand avenue electrlo cars or Mala
street and Agricultural Park cars.
L. J. PERRY, Superintendent.
Notice lor Publication ot Time tor
Proving Will, Etc.
IN THE SUPERIOR COURT, STATE OF
California, county of Los Angeles.—**.
In the matter of the estate of Edward
A. Hall, deceased.
Notice Is hereby given that Tuesday, the
Bth day of June, 1897, at 10 oelock a. m. of
said day, at the court room of this court.
Department Two thereof, in the city of
Los Angeles, county of Los Angeles, state
of Californa, has been appointed .as the
time and place for hearing the application
of Walter S. Newhall praying that a docu
ment now on file In this court, purporting
to be the last will and testament of the
said deceased, be admitted to probate,
that letters testamentary be Issued there
on to said petitioner, at which time and
place all persons Interested therein may
arpear and contest the same.
Dated May 24. 1897.
T. E. NEWLIN. County Clerk.
By C. W. BLAKE, Deputy.
P. W.. DOONER, Esq., Attorney for
Petitioner. g - 7 -W
Supplies lor tbe State Hospitals
COMMENCING JULY I, 1897, AND END
ing Tune 80, 1898.
Notice is hereby given that sealed propo
sal* will be received at the state hospital*
located at Stockton, Napa, Agnews, Uktah
and Ban Bernardino up tol:80o'clock p. m .
June 16, 1897, for furnishing furniture and
household furnUhing goods, provisions,
full, forage, drugs, clothing or material
for clothing and other material, for one or i
all th* aaid hospitals for the twelve month*
ending June 30,1898.
Bid* will be awarded on articles. Blank
bid* and schedules of supplies needed may
b* obtained by applying to the hospitals
above named or to this commission. The
several boards of manasers reserve th*
right to reject any and all bid*.
By order State Commission in Lunacy.
JOHN F. CAREERS. Secretary.
15-18-21-24-27-29-June 1-8-5-7-fMI

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