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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, June 08, 1897, Image 2

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senators who are conducting the debate
on the, other side," said he, "after its
passage, we woukfcdtscover every Indus
try in the respective states had been
amply protected. (Laughter.) Morally,
there is a great deal of human nature In
the Democrats."
The merriment was so great that the
chair was called upon to suppress it.
Bacon, sought to turn the argument,
when Hoar improved the opportunity by
asking his position, as to duty on hides,
but ths Massachusetts senator, after
expressing his ideas on thissubject, nar
rowly avoided committing himself by
asserting that in such a bill as the pres
ent he would yield his Individual con
victions if he couldinot persuade his col
leagues that he was right.
Jones of Arkansas! characterized as
absurd the claim that this country was
being flooded by foreign manufactures
of lumber in the face of the fact that but
17,500,000 worth of lumber was Imported
last year, against $540,000,000 consumed.
He spoke of the "Innocent" lumber ba
rons of the northwest, who wanted
the people of the country to pay for the
alleged stumpage paid by them, the
great risks' they ran on. account of fires,
etc., as set forth in the petition to the
ways and' means committee.
Spooner of Wisconsin protested'against
the arraignment c-f lumbermen, as a
whoie. because of the unscrupulous
methods of a few, and paid, a high tribute
to the integrity ar.d high public spirit of
the better class. Mr. Spooner called at
tention to the remarkable nature cf
Vest's amendment, which proposed to
exclude white pine from the general
duty of $2. on timber. Why should, the
lumber interests of Minnesota, Wiscon
sin and Michigan be deaH this blow?
Vest disclaimed' any Intention of dis
criminating, and said he would be will
leg to withdraw his amendment and
take the yeas and mays on Allen's
amendment to put all lumber on. the
free list. AM he wanted, he said,, was a
test vote on free lumber. Spooner ex
pressed hiss willingness to agree to this,
whereupon Vest declined to withdraw
his amendment.
To put white pine on the free list,
Spooner said, would give an undue ad
vantage to Canada, and would amount
to the conversion of property of men who
had invested their money on this side of
the border.
From the standpoint of the. senator
flrom lMsnouri, he said, he could see some
logic in the motion to put all lumber on
the free list, but none in the proposition
to single out white pine and leave the
timber of New England, the. south ar.d
west protected from Canadian competi
tion by a duty of $2.
Gray of Delaware spoke in opposition
to a tax on lumber. If private owner
ship of land, he said, is to be defended.
II cannot be defended with the Idea that
the owners have the right to tax the
great body of the people before they
can enjoy the bounties the land possess
es. Upon the statement by Hale that
Gray's remarks resembled thos; of a
free trader, the latter said he had l no
objection to the word "free" or "free
dom."
"Why do you draw the line at the
free coinage of silver?" asked Tillman,
whereupon the senate and galleries j
raored.
"The protection senator from' South !
Carolina takes up the sword of the j
senator from Nevada (Stewart) during
his absence." remarked Gray. "Free
Silver, like the flowers that bloom in the
spring, has nothing to do with the case."
Rawlins of Utah, Democrat, spoke of
the unfortunate fact that the Democrats
who were now standing shoulder to
shoulder in opposition to this tariff bill
should have been divided in the last
campaign.
"If some of them," he said, "had stood
with us then, we would not now have
been fighting this bill."
"If the senator and others like him,"
Interrupted Gray, "had paid more atten
tion to free trade and less to free silver,
that would be true."
Vest's amendment to except white
pine lumber from the $2 rate was lost.
20 to 3S. The negative vote included
eight Democrats, viz.: Bacon and Clay
of Georgia. McEnery of Louisiana, Mc-
Laurin and' Tillman of South Carolina,
Martin of Virginia, Rawlins of Utah,
and White of California. Heitfeld, Pop
ulist, of Idaho, who has been voting
with the Democrats, voted no. Carter
of Montana, Republican, voted yes, and
Quay of Pennsylvania. Republican, was
paired for the amendment. Allen of
Nebraska, Harris of Kansas and Kyle
cf South Dakota. Populists, voted yes,
as did Cannon of Utah and Mantle of
Montana, Silver Republicans.
Allison offered a new paragraph,
which was agreed to, placing a duty on
boxes for" fruit at "0 per cent ad valorem,
and when such boxes are exported they
may be reimported at one-half the rate. I
The house rate on manufactures of
csler or willow of 50 per cent was re
stored.
The lumber paragraph, as a whole,
was then agreed to, also the paragraph
on clapboards, shingles and chair cant,
heretofore passed over.
Alien then moved to substitute th
provisions of the Wilson bill for the en
tire lumber schediule. Rejected., 21 to
37. This disposed of the wood schedule
and brought the senate up to the sugar
schedule. White as.ked Allison as to the
plans of the committee on going on with
that schedule.
Allison responded that it was possible
that some amendments might be mad"
to the sugar schedute, so that he thought
11 would be inexpedient to go on with li
tomorrow. It was the purpose of the
committee, however, to have that sched
ule considered as early as. possible, if
any changes were to be made they
would be proposed in open senate, ana
after that sufficient time would be giver
gentlemen on the other side to consider
them, if sugar went over tomorrow,
then the tobacco schedule would be close,
and if that went over, then the agri
cultural schedule would be taken up.
In response to further inquiries Mr.
Allison said that Mr. Aldrich hoped to
be present during the consideration of
the sugar schedule, and hie hralth was
such that he might be back in the senate
tomorrow. He again stated that tne
sugar schedule "might be modified," In
which case senators on the other side
would have full opportunity to consider
the changes.
Mr. Allison said the committee wa;
ready to proceed tomorrow on any sched
ule the other side might desire to take
up.
At this point Mr 1 . Jones of Arkansas
said the minority desired to know posi
tively whether the sugar schedule would
cr would not be taken up tomorrow.
"The senator should remember," an
swered Mr. Aliison, "that the sugar
schedule is In order now, and sufficient
unto the day is the evil—or the good
thereof."
"I submit that the minority has a right
to know what will be done," persisted
Mr.-Jones.
"Then I give notice," concluded Mr.
Allison, "that the sugar schedule will be
passed over tomorrow, and that the to
bacco schedule will be taken up."
In response to Inquiries by Mr. Can
non, Mr. Allison stated the committee
would probably return to the sugar
schedule and dispose of it ahead of the
other schedules, as senators desire to
have it out of the way.
At 5:30 the senate held a brief execu
tive session and at 5:46 p. m. adjourned.
IN THE HOUSE
The Majority Leaders Carry Out the
Program
Bailey of Texas, Democrat, the minor
ity leader, was in his seat when the house
met today for the first time in a fort
night. On motion of Dinsmore of Ar
kansas, Democrat, the senate resolution
to permit Carlos Quttierez of Salvador
to be received as a cadet at West Point
was adopted, and on motion of Morris of
Minnesota the senate bill to amend the
act for constructing a steel bridge across
the St. Louis river was passed.
McMillln of Tennessee, Democrat,
called attention to the fact that the last
bill had not been considered by any com
mittee of the present house. (It had been
passed by the last house.)
"We are working up the remnants of
the last house." said he.
A senate bill to authorize the con
duction of a bridge across Pearl river,
Mississippi, was passed.
Grosvenor of Ohio then moved ad
journment.
"As long as the Cuban resolution and
the bankruptcy bill are undisposed of,"
interrupted Mr. Bailey before the vote
was taken, "we feel constrained to resist
these motions to adjourn."
The opposition scored its first victory
this session, when on a rising vote the
motion to adjourn was defeated, 79 to 80.
The opposition cheered the announce
ment. Grosvenor Immediately de
manded the peas and nays, which were
ordered. The roll call reve-rsed the pre
vious vote, ar.d the motion to adjourn
was carried*—9l to 79. Present ard not
voting. 11.
Terry rwad'e the point of no quorum,
and further pointed out that the house
could rot adjourn for more than one day
without a quorum. The speaker de
clined to hear him, calling attention to
the fact that with thjwe present and not
voting a quorum was present. He than
announced the house adjourned until
Thursday.
IN CAUCUS
The Sugar Schedule Is Now to Be
Considered
WASHINGTON, June 7.—Chairman
Allison of the Republican senatorial cau
cus decided today to call the cau
cus together tomorrow at 10 oclock. The
mee.tirg has be™ under contemplation
for several days, owing to the fact that
there ire variousarticleson which It has
been found desirable to have the party
mi the senate agree in its assembled ca
pacity, and the calling of the caucus was
precipitated by the fact that the sugar
schedule had been practically reached in
its order, and it became nece?ary to de
cide what position the party should take
upon this qucf.tion. There has been very
pronounced opposition among many Re
publican senators to the schedule as pre
pared by the. senate committee on
finance, some of them going SO far as to
declare they would not vote for It unless
altered.
Some of thetse st r.ators declare they wil
not obey even the behest of the caucus
in case it declares for the finance com
mittee's schedule. The finance commit
tee admits that state of affairs, and also
admits that a change will be made which
will make the schedule acceptable to the
entire party in the senate. There are va
rious schedules as to what change will be
made, but the matter is as yet in such
chaotic shape as to render it impossible
for even, the Republican leaders to state
what may be done.
Senator Aldiiich is expected to be pres
ent at the caucus. He is convalescent,
and bio friends say he will be able to at
tend tomorrow's meeting. It is prob
able that the caucus would not be held
in his absence. There are various ques
tions which wili be taken up in the cau
cus if the sugar question does 1 not occupy
the entire time. These include the tea
duty, the agiitation for an increase on
wool, the beer tax, the proposition to tax
bank checks., deeds, etc., the hide duty,
the lead ore rates, etc. The indications
now are very strong that beer and tea
will both go out of the bill. This is
practically decided upon by the com
mittee unless they are found to be abso
lutely necessary for revenue. It Is also
quite certain that there will be an In
crease In the woolen duty. The sup
porters of the hide duty and of the sen
ate rate on lead are express confidence
that these will remain untouched.
Senator Nelson's anti-trust amend
ment will also be brought to the atten
tion of the caucus if opportunity offers.
DURRANT'S DEATH
Will Be Delayed to Avoid Legal Com
plications
SAN FRANCISCO, June 7.—The pe
culiar status of the Durrant case is ex
citing an unusual amount of public com
ment. Since the postponement of Wov •
den's execution the opinion is generally
expressed that Durrant will not hanj?
on Friday next. Attorney-General Fitz
gerald, however, said today that unless
Officially notified or restrained. Warden
Hale stands ready to carry out the sen
tence. Warden Hale has asked for the
opinion of the attorney-general, who
will render his decision tomorrow.
So confident is Durrant of the ou'
come of his appeal to the court of last
resort that he is already making plans
for the future. It is g.neraily believed
among the legal fraternity that pending
the action of the supreme court. Gov.
Budd will grant a reprieve, in order to
prevent the necessity of resentencing
the prisoner, and the endless .litigation
which it might result in.
Needs Catching
ANTIOCH, June 7.—A man about 2(1
years old attempted to assault two farm
ers' wives between here nnd Brentwood
last Thursday while their husbands were
away, lie choked one woman and beat her
but was frightened away before he ac
complished his object. Officers are scouring
the country for the fellow and are s.'iiu to
have him cornered on the Baseo grant.
Rev. Brown Reinstated
CHICAGO, June 7.—At a meeting of the
Chicago Congregational association a vote
was taken on the admission of Rev. C. O.
Brown, late of San Francisco, and It was
decided to admit him to fellowship by ST
to 25. The result was greeted with ap
plause. Dr. Brown has been preaching a!
the Green-street church for some time and
will remain there.
Undelivered Telegrams
There are undelivered telegrams at the
Western I'ni&n telegraph office for John
David, J. F. McConnell, Mrs. A. Hampel
Peter Brunold. E. C. Cunningham, F. W
Robinson, E. H. Sweetser, Daisy.
LOS ANGELES HBRAIDt TUESDAY MORNING. JUKI V<lf>
REPUBLICANS
Who Favor Free Coinage
of Silver
WILL ORGANIZE FOR ACTION
THE LEADERS MEET TODAY AT
CHICAGO
The Fight Is Already Started and Will
Be Kept Up Until the Next
Presidential Campaign
Associated Press Special Wire.
CHICAGO. June 7.—The leaders of the
Sliver Republicans are gathering in the
city for a committee meeting Tuesday.
Among those already here are: Ex-
Congressman C. A. Toy. ne of Minnesota,
Senator F. T. Dubois of Idaho, Senator
R. F. Pettigrew of South Dakota, Con
gressman Charles S. Hartman of Mon
tana, Congressman M. C. Jones of
Washington and'Gov, J. P, Lee of South
Dakota.
June Bth was set for a meeting of the
Silver Republican forces in Chicago on
February 22 last. At that time the four
Senators and six Representatives of that
1 faith sent out of AVashlngton to the
Chairman of each State Central Com
mittee a call for a meeting at this time.
: The object is to reorganize the party and
:to extend it to every section of the
United' States.
The committee consists of one mem
ber from each State with ex-Congress-
I man Towne as Chairman.
Few Senators or Congressmen are
members, but most of them of that faith
will be present to lend inspiration to the
cause. Besides those mentioned, Sen
ators Teller. Stewart and Mantle and
Congressmen Shafroth, Newlands and
Carter are expected today. The meeting
will be called to ordtr at 10 o'clock to
morrow at the Leland Hotel and a cam
paign of action will be instituted.
It is expected that speakers and liter
ature will be sent out through the coun
try and particularly the East, and a
continual fight made from now until the
next Presidential election. In an inter
view Congressman Hartman said: "We
are here, not to divide the silver forces,
but to unite them. We realize that sil
ver Is strongest among the Democrats«
and we expect to heartily affiliate with
them in anything that is for the ad
vancement Of the silver cause. How
ever, many Republicans are not willing
to call themselves Democrats or Popu
lists and so we have to make a party for
them. We are not for any individuals
or party, but for s-ilver. Our meeting
here will be harmonious and much
good to the cause of silver will result
from It."
j Ex-Senator Dubois said: "The cause
of silver is growing stronger every day.
j The money question is the greatest issue
today and we will keep up the fight for
i silver regardless of the work being done
by the monetary commission now
j abroad."
Senator Pettigrew said: "I have just ar
rived from Washington where I have
been making a hard fight on the lumber
schedule in the Dlngley bill. We are
making good progress now on the bill
and I think It will pass before June 25. It
will then go to the House and i motion
to concur will be defeated. A confer
ence committee will then be named by
each branch and probably by July 8 or
10 a bill will be agreed upon. This will
be at once passed by both houses and
an adjournment will then take place.
The Silver Republican Senators, will not
oppos>e the bill. It is not probable that
their votes will be needed, but I believe
ail of them will vote for it rather than
have it defeated. As it is they probably
will not vote at all. The Republican
party is purely responsible for the bill
and we are anxious to have it pass in
order to demonstrate that it is not the
tariff that is effecting the country. The
people will then realize the truth."
It is expected that at least thirty
two states will be represented. Among
the more prominent members who have
already arrived are ex-Senator Dubois
of Idaho, Senator Mantle of Montana,
Congressman Hartman of Montana.
Jones of Washington, Shafroth of Colo
rado, A. A. Stevenson. Judge Peter M.
Palmer. Samuel Belford of Colorado.
Judge Peek of Oklahoma, J. S. Petty
man, Jr., of Delaware and P. J. Van
Voorhees of Illinois.
Senator Pettigrew was here, but left
tonight for Washington. It is under
stood that Senator Teller will be offered
the chairmanship of the meeting to
morrow. Congressman Hartman said
today: "We want it distinctly under
stood that the organization of the Silver
Republican party will not be antagon
istic to any of the organizations that in
dorse the free coinage of silver, but
that we will make war with them on the
common foe. the Republican party,
standilrg of the gold standard."
The national provisional committee
will decide on a plan for a permanent
national organization, calling a national
convention for that purpose. It is given
out as the intention to organize thor
oughly from the voting precincts up.
with the view of selecting congressmen
wherever possible in 1898, and is also tak
ing an active part in the next presiden
tial campaign.
The new political organization is al
ready christened the Silver Republican
party of the United States. Its pro
moters are Henry M. Teller, Fred T.
Dubois. John P. Jones, F. J. Cannon.
Richard S. Pettigrew, Senator Mantle,
Charles A. Towne, Charles S. Hartman,
John F. Shafroth and Charles H. Allen.
These men bolted the St. Louis con
vention and supported William J.
j Bryan. They and their followers now
fare congregating here to attend a cau
cus tomorrow, at which it is proposed
to create a national committee and start
the campaign for congressional elec
tions next year.
Ex-Congressman Charles A. Towne of
Duluth acted as provisional chairman,
and instructions were issued by him to
day to a corps of lieutenants and infor
mation was disseminated as to the ob
jects and aims of the gathering. It was
explained by Mr. Towne the initiatory
step was taken on February 2i!d, when
the statesmen and men named issued an
j address calling upon silver Republicans
in every state and territory to select
I national committeemen and have them
attend a conference in Chicago on June
Bth to start the fight.
FIRE AT FRISCO
A Great Bis; Scare and Bather Serious
Damage
SAN FRANCISCO, June 7.—Another
big fire threatened the southern portion
of the city this afternoon. Four alarms
were turned in, the first at 1:20 oclock
and following closely upon the fatal fire
of yesterday, occasioned much excite
ment.
The extensive plant of the Truckee
Lumber company and box factory on
Berry street between Fourth and Fifth
was the scene of today's Are. The blaze
started in the sawdust bin In the rear of
the factory, from some unknown cause,
and spread with such rapidity that be
fore the arrival of the flre brigade the
main building was enveloped In flames.
From the factory the fire spread to the
lumber yard adjoining, but was checked
before much damage had resulted to the
stock on hand there. The factory was
completely gutted, however,and a rough
estimate of the damage placeß the losn
at $50,000, of which at least one-half was
In machinery. The latter was insured
for $19,000 and the contents of the build
ing w ere insured for $6000 more. About
$6000 worth of finished cedar lumber was
so charred and warped by the heat and
flames as to be useless.
CHICAGO'S ELECTION
COUNTED AS A REPUBLICAN
VICTORY
But Six Democratic Judges are Re
elected—The Torrens Land Law
Goes Through Flying
CHICAGO, June 7.—Fourteen Judges
of the Circuit Court, one of the Superior
Court and one Justice of the State Su
preme Court are being voted for at Chi
cago toddy. In addition, the Torrens'
Land Title law, which was declared un
constitutional, but amended by the tact
Legislature to conform with the court's
decision, is up for adoption or rejection.
The Republican ticket is composed'of all
the present members ot the Circuit
Bench—eight Republicans and six Dem
ocrats. The straight Democratic ticket
and silver and anti-machine are the only
full tickets, in the field. The United Sil
ver party has. five Circuit Court candi
dates up for election, while the People's
party has only one candidate each for
the Supreme andi Superior Court Judge
ships.
The election was carried by the* Re
publicans, who elected all their candi
dates by pluralities of about 12,000 in
Lite city, and 4000 in the county outside
of the city. Although the ticket was
called Republican, it included all the
fourteen judges now on tbe bench of the
circuit court, eight Republicans and six
Democrats. In addition to the judges of
the circuit court, judges of the 1 superior
court, and one judge of the supreme
bench were voted for but Magruder, for
the latter position, ar.d Brentano, for the
former, were indorsed by the Republi
cans and 1 Democrats.
The Silver party had Aye candidates
in the field for the circuit bench, but it 4
candidate?? secured but about one-nfih
as many votes as the Republicans. The
interest in the election was small,
scarcely half the regular vote being
polled. The amended Torrens land title
law was overwhelmingly adopted.
A JUDGE'S SUICIDE
CHICAGO, June 7.—August Miller,
election Judge, shot and killed liimself
this morning after having been excused
half an hour on account of illness. Miller
had been acting peculiarly all the mprn
ing and was finally void to go home fc
a while. Business reverses are thought
to have unsettled his mind.
WORKS SHUT DOWN
A Thousand Standard Oil Hen Are
Idle
CLEVELAND. Ohio, June 7.—At noon
today the entire plant of the Standard
1 oil works in this city shut down for an
indefinite period. The foreman told the
men that there would be no work for
i weeks ar.d maybe a much longer time.
: The men believe that during that time
; another section of the plant will be
1 abandoned, carrying out the Standard's
policy of making in this city only enough
! oil and other products to supply thi
j home demand. Close to 1000 men are
j thrown out of work by the shut down.
It is said that the Standard has an
immense stock on hand in the Klngs
! bury Run warehouse, enough, in fact,
to supply all the demand In this district
until January 1, 1898, or longer.
An Easy Escape
KANSAS CITY, June 7.—Prentis Teller,
] alias Charles H. Price, the notorious ex
press robber and forger, who was released
from the Michigan penitentiary last week
j and immediately arrested, charged with the
robbery of mall sacks at St, Joseph, Mo.,
escaped from the United States marshal's
office here this atfernoon. Teller was- in
the custody of Deputy Marshal Chris Mad-
I een, who was in the room with his pris
i oner at the time of the escape. While
■ Madsen's back was turned. Teller noise
j lessly opened the door and walked out and
tscaped among the crowds on the street.
Hit a Whale
j SAN FRANCISCO. June 7.—The pleasure
' steamer ITermosa, which rurfs between San
' Pedro and Catalina Island, arrived in this
port today pretty well shaken up by a
collision with a whale when twenty miles
: south of the Golden Gate. The steamer
was coming along at a fair speed' in a
I ra.her thick fog when she ran into two
j whales that were lying close together on
I the surface of the water. One of the
whales was cut almost In two and the
! water about the vessel was covered with
biooil. The Hermosa will probably go into
! the Merchants' dry dock for repairs.
Stanford Summer School
j PACIFIC GROVE. June 7.-The Stan
j ford university summer school of natural
i history opened its sixth session In the
[ Hopkins seaside laboratory today. Excep
! tionally interesting work is contemplated.
George C. Price, professor of zoology;
Walter Shaw of botany, both of Stanford,
and Harold Heath, professor of zoology,
University of Pennsylvania, are the In
structors. The session continues for six
weeks.
Fun for Shriners
DETROIT. June 7.—Some 200 Arabs of
the Mystic Shrine are sheltered In the Inns
of Detroit tonight, with perhaps as many
more en route across the deserts to the an
nual gathering of the imperial council.
The headquarters of some of the temples
are marvels of fantastic beauty and in
genuity. Tonight was spent In visiting.
The actual fun-making of the meeting be
gins tomorrow.
CALHOUN'S
COMMENTS
(Continued from Page One)
he ran acrosis the ceU, describe* by one
of the. Jailers, and butted' his head on the
door in a frantic effort to get out. An
other Is that he was sitruck over the head
with one of the clubs carried by the
Jailers—by the" Immediate watchman,
who had probably ordered him to cease
hlc cries for relief and for his children,
and, upon his not doing so, struck him
with more force than he intended or it
la possible th« .blow was delivered to
make him confess or give evidence
against others.
"It is possible he went mad, and many
causes combined to produce such a re
sult.
"His knowledge of his own Innocence —
his confinement in a gloomy cell where
he was not allowed to communicate with
his family or friends or to send or write.
Alone, all alone, the thought doubtless
impressed itself upon bis mind that he
was liable in the reign of terror then
existing in and around Guanabacoa to
be summarily executed at any moment.
He loved his wife and children and in
the darkness and loneliness of his cell
he was constantly crying out for them.
The thought that they were but a few
rods away, and yet he might never see
them again or hear the sound of their
voices, or feel the touch of their lips
and hands, maddened him and proved
too much for the mind of the distracted
and unhappy man. I thought it not im
probable as the long hours passed by,
It may have given way and left him a
mad man. His wife says his derby hat
was all battered up and his clothes
greatly torn when he returned to her.
"But whether when bereft of reason
he Inflicted the blows which produced
brain congestion or whether he died at
the hands of others, truth will probably
only be known when the hearts of all
are revealed. The facts remain his un
just confinement killed him, and had he
been released from incommunicado by
the hand of man at the end of seventy
two hours the hand of death might not
have released him at the end of 351 hours,
and today the widow would have had
the support ot her husband and the
monas of his fatherless children would
never have been heard In the land.
"I therefore conclude, saying as I have
done in all previous reports about this
case, that whether Dr. Ruiz killed him
self or was killed by some one else, will
under existing conditons always remain
unknown."
SYMPATHIZERS FIGHT
"NEW YORK, June 7.—A Herald dis
patch from Mexico City says: A conflict
has occurred at Vera Cruz between
j twenty marines of the Spanish gunboat
! Neuva Espana and Joseph Lang and
; Charles Holbrook of Texas and about a
score of Mexican sympathizers with the
! Americans. The Texas men used their
' knives and the marines their bayonets.
I The Mexicans were not all armed but
• they rendered effective assistance to the
j Americans.
The trouble ended only by the appear
ance of a large force of police and a
company of 100 soldiers, ordered out by
the authorities.
The right was caused by the marines,
who shouted "Viva Cuba Espanola" In
the streets. This was answered by
"Cuba libre" from the Americans. They
were immediately attacked by the Span
iards and would unquestionably have
been killed had it not been for the as
sistance of the citizens of Vera Cruz,
who, seeing their peril and noting the
fact that they were so overwhelmingly
outnumbered, hastened to their assist
ance. The police arrested the whole
party, but the consuls of both nations
Interfered In their countrymen's behalf
and all were released.
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
Houses and Lots
FOR SALE—THE PRETTIEST T-ROOM
house In town; No. S3 In the beautiful St.
James park. Inquire on premises or at
421 W. Adams St. 6-29
FOR SALE —8-ROOM HOUSE, STABLE;
sewer and corner lot; close in; for $1600,
in $15 payments. R. VERCH, room 80,
Temple block. 6-8-10
City Lots
FOR SALE-C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots in his Third addition on easy Install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Office, 213 W. First St. tf
Business Property
FOR SALE—WE SELL THE EARTH.
BASSETT & SMITH, Pomona, Cal. 6-26tf
Country Property
FOR SALE—4O-ACRE RANCH, HALF
in alfalfa, remainder In lemons and mis
cellaneous fruit trees; elegant modern
7-roomed house, with bath and pantry;
large barn; stable with five stalls and
useful outbuildings.
20-acre olive orchard; trees In fourth
year.
540 acres of elegant land li) various
plots.
All above near Oceanslde on. Southern
California railway. Creamery near by.
Property must be sold, owing to death
of late owner. Write for particulars and
prices to C. ISEARD, San Luis Rey, Cal.,
or call at 27 German-American Bank
building. 68 10 1214 16
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE-36 BUSINESS. 75 HOUSES,
rooms, furnished, unfurnished, for rent;
collections; wanted, help free and work.
EDW. NITTINGER, 236% S. Spring St. tf
I SELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS
• for cash. I. D. BARNARD, 111 North
Broadway, opposite Times building, tf
FOR SALE-SALOONS AT VERY REA
sonable terms. Apply at 440 Allso st. tf
FOR SALE—2-CHAIR BARBER SHOP;
340. Inquire 326% N. Main St. 9
FOR EXCHANGE—REAL BSTATB
FOR EXCHANGE—DOUBLE HOUSE, 12
rooms, stable, sewer and lot 65 feet front,
close in, for land or vacant lot; house 6
rooms, stable, etc.; nice home. Twenty
ninth and Vermont; see owner. R.
VERCH, room 80, Temple block. 6-8-10
FOR EXCHANGE—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE—A GUN OF
Anson & Deeley's, London, for a Ram
bler or Hoffman bicycle. 566 Crocker st. (
FINANCIAL
MONET TO LOAN IN ANT AMOUNTS,
on diamonds, watches, jewelry, pianos,
safes, lodging houses, hotels and prlvatt
household furniture; Interest reasonable;
partial payments received; money quick;
private offioe for ladles. "O. M. JONES,
rooms 18-14. 184 B. Broadway, 28-'-f
MONEY LOANED ON DIAMONDS,
watches, jewelry, pianos, sealskins, car
riages, bicycles, warehouse receipts and
ail kinds ot collateral security; storage
free In our warehouse. LEE BROS., 408
8. Spring st. tf
MONEY TO LOAN ON FURNTURE,
watches, diamonds, pianos, sealskins and
real estate; Interest reasonable; private
office for ladles; business confidential.
C. C. LAMB, 228 S. Spring St.; entrance,
room 467. 8-tl tt
LOAN—
$100 to $75,000 on city or country real
estate.
LEE A. M'CONNELL.
7-24 113 S. Broadway.
TcTIEND ON REAL ESTATE AT 6 PER :
cent, payable at any time or in monthly
payments. MECHANICS' SAVINGS
MUTUAL BUILDING AND LOAN AS
SOCIATION, 107 S. Broadway. tf
TO LOAN—A BARREL OF MONEY ON
diamonds, pianos, furniture and all first- '
class securities; business confidential.
CREASINGKK, 247 S. Broadway, rooms
1 and 2. 6-2.1-tf
FOINDEXTER & WADSWORTH, ROOM
308 Wilcox building, lend money on any
good real estate; building loans made; If
you wish to lend or borrow, call on us. tf
MONEY TO LOAN, $500 TO $5000. IN SUMS
to suit: no delays. CONTINENTAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
126 W. Second st., Wilcox building, tf
TO LOAN—UNLIMITED AMOUNT FOR
small loans: no commission: light ex
pense. SECURITY LOAN AND TRUST
CO., 223 S. Spring St.
TO LOAN—IF YOU WANT MONEY ON
real estate security I have It in any
amount. WM. F. BOSBYSHELL. 107 S.
Broadway.
MONEY TO LOAN UPON EASY TERMS
of repayment. STATE MUTUAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASS'N.. 151 S.
Broadway. 5-20 tf
MONEY TO LOAN—LOWEST RATES ON
real estate, personal notes or security.
JOHN L. PAVKOVICH, 220 W. First, tf
MEDIUMS
MME. LEO WILL REMAIN IN THE
city for a few days only; the renowned
forecaster and card reader: she tells the
past, present and future; she advlaes you '
with a certainty as to the proper course to
pursue in life; she gives lucky charms,
brings the separated together, causes
speedy marriage with the one you love;
tells If the one you love Is false or true;
also very successful In locating mines
and minerals; all those In trouble in busi
ness matters, love and family affairs
should by all moans consult her; letters
. containing 50 cents tn stamps, giving
age, color of hair and eyes, married or
single, will receive prompt attention;
don't fall to see her; hours 9 a.m. to 7:30
p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 616 V*
W. Sixth St.. Los Angeles. 6-13
MRS. PARKER. PALMIST, CLAIRVOY
ant and medium; life reading, business
removals, law suits, mineral locations,
love affairs .etc. Take Third St. electric
car to Vermont aye. and Vine st. Sec
ond house on Vine St., west of Vermont
aye. 50c and $1.00. tf
MRS. WALKER. CLAIRVOYANT AND
life business reading medium; all busi
ness affairs of life looked into for the ad
vancement of your future. Hours, 9 a. m.
to 8 p. m. 31«4 S. Spring St. 6-20
GRACE GILMORE, CLAIRVOYANT
and card reader; advice on mining, busi
ness and love affairs; ladies, 25 cents;
gents, 50 cents. 131% S. Broadway, rooms
9-10. 8-10
MME. GRACE. CARD MEDIUM; THE
wonder of the 19th century; reveals the
past, present ar.d future. 544 S. Los An
geles st., bet. Fifth and Sixth sts. 8-19
MRS. E. Z. BARNETT. 444% S. SPRING
St.; notice of change of location; sit
tings dally; circles, Tuesday and Thurs
day evenings. 10
MRS. SANFORD JOHNSON. THE
well known independent slate writer and
clairvoyant, gives sittings dally at 833 S.
Broadway, 8-7
ELLA M. WHITE. TRANCE CLAlR
vovant medium; readings dally except
Sunday. 245 S. Hill st. 6mo
AGNES H. PLEASANCE. TRANCE
medium; sittings daily; at 3534 S. Spring
street. 7-5
MRS. I. RUSSELL, 330% S. SPRING ST.;
sittings dally; circles Monday and Fri
day. 14
MISS GRACE WALLER. MEDIUM AND
card reader, 245% S. Spring St., room 15. 9
DENTISTS
ADAMS BROS., DENTAL PARLORS,
239% S. Spring st.; painless extracting and
lining; plates $5, $8, $10; all work guar
anteed; established 10 years. Hours. 8-5;
Sundays, 10-12. Telephone Black, 1273.
FRANK STEVENS, S£4% S. SPRING ST.,
open days and evenings; also Sundays;
electric light. Tel. Black 821.
DR. KENNEDY, DENTIST, 108% N.
Spring St., rooms 2, 6 and 7; painless ex
PERSONAL
PERSONAL.—YOUR FATE AND FOR
tune correctly read; also how to get Inde
pendent slate writing. F. W. SMITH,
Hotel Portland, 444 S. Spring. 9
PERSONAL—ONE HAND READ FREE;
life read from cradle to grave; advice on
business matters, family affairs. 111% W.
Third st. «-ll
i "
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
I.UCIEN carle. attorney at law,
office, Bullard building; entrance, room
420; telephone black 1445. 7-24-97
BROUSSEAU & MONTGOMERY,
Attorneys-at-Law,
403 Bradbury block, Los Angeles. tf
WATCHMAKING
COMFORTABLE SMOKED GLASSES;
prices less than peddlers' and satisfac
tion guaranteed. W. J. GETZ, Jeweler,
336 S. Broadway. tf
LOST AND FOUND
i LOST—MASONIC GOLD PIN AT AR
cade depot Friday night. Finder please
return to Herald office and receive re
ward. 8
1 FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
l ~— -~ •
liUDWIG & MATTHEWS, WHOLESALE
and retail fruits and vegetables. MOTT
MARKET, 135 S. Main St., tel. 550, tf
; HYPNOTISM
' HYPNOTISM TAUGHT SCIENTIFCAL-
Iy. HYPNOTIC INSTITUTE, 425% I.
I Spring st. M*
PHYSWIAMS
DR. V. CQKOORT, VIBmtA PHYS-
Iclan (Austria). Ist* of Ret Springs,
Ark.; office. 114% 8. Spring st. Los An
geles. Cal.; office hours, from (to2l a,
m. and 2 to I p. m.
During thirty years' practical expe
rience I have treated sucessfully and
under guarantee, rheumatism, gout,
scrofula, catarrh, hay fever, asthma,
chronic diseases of women, chronic dis
eases of the skin, chronic ulcers, liver
complaint, dyspepsia, piles, constipation,
old wounds, all kinds of stomach trou
bles and syphlls (without mercury and
without Interfering with patient's oo
cupation), swollen and stiff joints, con
tracted muscles and all secret diseases.
Call or write. Everybody will receive
satisfaction. 8-80
IMMEDIATE RELIEF AND PERMA
nent cure of rheumatism, stiff joints,
neuralgia and catarrh; eminently suc
cessful European method introduced
here by DR. SCHICK, physician, sur
geon, 122 W. Third st. (elevator). 7-4
. MM
FREE CONSULTATION BT DR. UN
OER, German army physician and sur
geon; hours, 9 to 12, 2-5, 7-8: diseases of
men and women; cures cancers, tumors
and piles without knife. 107% N. Mala
st., room 12. 6-6
CONSULT DR. MINNIE WELLS, SPE
cialist, 316 W. Seventeenth It., corner of
Grand aye. J-16tf
EDUCATIONAL
WOODBURY BUSINESS COLLEGE (IN
corporated), 226 S. Spring it., is the oldest
and largest commercial school In South
ern California; the most beautiful col
lego rooms and equipment to be found
in the state; elevator for pupils' use; a
large faculty of experienced and able in
structors; open the entire year; both day
and evening sessions; a practical Eng
lish course, a thorough business course
and a course In shorthand and type
writing under an experienced stenog
rapher. Write or call for Illustrated cata
logue and full Information. G. A.
HOUGH, president; N. G. FELKER,
vice-president.
SUMMER LAW LECTURES, UNIVEI£
slty of Virginia, July 1 to August 31, 1897.
Course includes 36 lectures by Mr. Jus
tice Harlan of 17. S. supreme court. For
catalogue address R. C. MINOR, secre
tary, (inirlotiesvillo, Vn.
MIMNQ AND ASSAYING
MORGAN & CO., ASSATERS AND RE
llners and ore testers: bullion purchased;
consulting metallurgists: mines examined
and dealt in. Office, 261 Wilson block. Los
Angeles. Cal. 25-tf
THE BIMETALLIC ASSAY OFFICE
and Chemical Laboratory, 121 S. Main st.
R. A. PEREZ. E. M.. manager. 12-4tf
MUSICAL
FOR SALE-HANDSOME UPRIGHT
Grand Bass piano at a great sacrifice.
Room No. 31, Tho Savoy, Fourth and
Hill sts.; call mornings. tt
THE WONDERFUL GRAMAPHONES
for sale at A. G. GARDNER'S, 118 Win
ston St.; also pianos for sale and rent, tf
FOR SALE—LIVE STOCK
FOR SALE—AUCTION SALE OF FORTY
head of fine, light draught, driving and
saddle horses taken on mortgage, will be
sold without reserve to the highest bid
der; stock guaranteed as represented by
mortgagee, T. E. Moore: sale at 411 Allso
St., Saturday. June 12th. BEN O.
RHODES, auctioneer. 6-8-9
FOR SALE—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE—TYPEWRITERS CHEAP—
Smith Premier, 140: Remington, 835;
Densmore, 135; Yost. 825: Callgraph, 825.
All rented. ALEXANDER, 301 S.B dway.
6JO
NURSERIES
FOR SALE-LEMON TREES. ON YOUR
own terms, or will trade; must be moved
by July Ist. Address or call, R. L.
BAKER, 419 E. Colorado at., Pasadena, g
PACIFIC COAST STEAMSHIP CO.
The company's elegant steamers Santa
Rosa and Corona leave Redondo at 11 a. m.
and Port Los Angeles at 2:30 p. m. for
San Francisco via Santa Barbara and Port
Harford, Jure 1, 5. 9. 13. 17. 21. 25. 29. July
3. 7, 11, 15, 19, 23, 27, 31, Aug. 4. 8, 12. 16. 20.
24, 28. Leave Port Los Angeles at 6 a. m.,
and Redondo at 11 a. m. for San Diego
June 3, 7, 11, 15, 19, 23. 27, July 1, 5, 9, 13, 17,
21, 25, 29, Aug. 2, 0. 10, 14, IS, 22, 26. 30. The
Corona cajls also at Newport. Cars con
nect via Redondo leave Santa Fe depot at
9:45 a. m. or from Redondo railway depot
at 9:30 a.m.
Cars connect via Port Los Angeles leave
S. P. P.. R. depot at 1:35 p.m. for steamers
north bound.
The steamers Eureka and Coos Bay leave
San Pedro and East San Pedro for San
Francisco via Ventura, Carplnterla, Santa
Barbara, Gavlola, Port Harford, Cayucoa,
San Simeon, Monterey and Santa Crus. at
6:30 p. m.. June 2. 6, 10,14. IS, 22, 26, 30, July
4. 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, Aug. 1, 5, 9, IS, 17, 21.
25, 29. Cars connect with steamers via
San Pedro leave S. P. R. R. (Arcade depot)
at 5:03 p. m. and Terminal railway depot
at 6:10 p. m. The company reserves right
to change without previous notice, steam
ers, sailing dates and hours of sailing.
W. PARRIS, Agt., 124 W. Second st„ Loa
Angeles. GOODALL, PERKINS & CO.,
Gen. Agts., S. F.
LOS ANGELES TERMINAL RAILWAY.
April 12, 1887,
PASADENA
Leave Arrive
Los Angeles. , Los Angeles.
7:30 a. m. 8:47 a. m.
9:35 a. m. 11:10 a.m.
11:40 a. m. 1:05 p. ra.
3:15 p. m. 4:50 p. m.
6:38 p. m. 6:40 p. m.
MT. LOWE AND ALTADENA.
9:35 a. m. 11:10 a. m.
3:15 p. m. 4:50 p. m.
The only line from Los Angeles making
connection with Mt. Lowe Railway with
out change of cars.
GLENDALE
7:25 a. m. 8:33 a. m.
1:15 p. m. 2:28 p. m.
6:20 p. m. 6:80 p. m.
LONO BEACH AND SAN PEDRO
8:60 a. m. 8:30 a. m.
1:20 p.m. 11:86 a.m.
5:12 p. m. S:» P' m>
.•8:00 a. m. • 7: * P- m -
CATALINA ISLAND
••1:20 p.m. P.m. ,
•8:00 a. m. P- m
•Sundays only.
••Sunday excepted. ,
Direct connections with steamer Falcon
going and returning daily. Tourists can
make the round trip in one day If dMlred
The best fishing on the coast. Boyle Heights
cars pass Terminal station^
j General Passenger Agent.
LOS ANGELES AND REDONDO RAIL
, way Company. „ _ .
Los Angeles depot: Corner of Grand ave
nue and Jefferson street.
Leave Leave
I Lo. Angeles ' Redondo for
; for Redondo. Los Angeles.
g-10 a.m. Sun. only 7:00 a.m. Sun. only
9-30 a.m. dally 8:00 a.m. daily
10-45 a.m. Sun. only 9:30 a.m. Sun. only
l-'jO p.m. dally 11:00 a.m. dally
6:80 p.m. dally 4:15 p.m. dally
7:00 p.m. Sun. only 5:45 p.m. Bun. only
Take Grand avenue electrle ears or llsls
, street and Agricultural Park ears,
street an PSUtT| |ttja*rirt«UM|. j

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