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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, June 10, 1897, Image 1

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TWETnY-SKTH YEAR. NO. 253.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
■BRALD SUB-AGENCIES—
ADVERTISEMENTS left at the fol
lowing atrencle* will receive prompt at
tention an* will be printed as quickly
and with the aame care aa if left at
(be main office, 222 W. Third etreet:
DOWNEY AYE. AND BAST SIDE
I*,-P. COLLETTE, Ol Downey avenue.
OLD WORLD DRUG STORE, 1028
X>owaey avenue. Phone Flora 242.
WM. H. HARMON. 766 Pasadena are..
Phone East 58.
CENTRAL AYE. AND VERNON
B. E. BARNEY, 2605 Central aye.
CHICAGO PHARMACY, Central ave
nue and Twelfth street, Phone West 182.
T. 3. AKJIY, oorner Central and Vernon
•venues. Phone Wett 81
MAIN BT. AND SOUTHWEST
LISCOMB'S PHARMACY. Main and
Fifteenth sts., Phone W. 68.
E. T. PARKE. PHARMACY, 1129 B.
Main, Phone Blue 2082.
E. VAN DYKE, DRUGGIST, 711 W.
Jefferson at., Phone White 1271.
WESTLAKE GROCERY, corner Al
varado and Seventh sts., Phone Main
1882.
H. L. PARK. DRUGGIST, corner
Thirty-eighth and Wesley aye.. Phone
Blue 1801.
T. W. BROWN. JR., DRUGGIST, Junc
tion of Hoover, Union and Twenty-fourth
sts., Phone Blue 1101.
BOYLE HEIGHTS
H. C. WORLAND, 2188 E. First, Sta
tion B.
T. P. WTLIE, 1977 E. FIRST, Phone
Park 13.
J. M. HARRIS, 1(42 E. FIRST, Phone
Park 21.
TEMPLE ST. AND NORTHWEST
DR. H. KALLEWODA, DRUGGIST,
corner Temple st. and Beaudry aye..
Phone Main 208.
STAR PHARMACY, corner Temple and
Belmont aye.. Phone Main 607.
VIOLE & LOPIZICH. DRUGGISTS,
427 N. Main at., Phone Main 87S.
AOS ANGELES—
-AN FRANCISCO-
A chance for advertiser* to reach the
public ot both cities on the most ad
vantageous terms ever offered.
We have concluded arrangements
whereby classified advertising may be
Inserted simultaneously In the
LOS ANGELES HERALD
And In the
SAN FRANCISCO POST
For
I CENTS PER LINE.
8 CENTS PER LINE,
8 CENTS PER LINE,
8 CENTS PER LINE
Here is a rare opportunity for people
having bargains to offer or wants to be
known. •
HERALD PUBLISHING CO.,
tt 222 W. Third at.
SPECIAL NOTICES
WOTICE—NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that at the hour of 12 o'clock m. on the
14th day of June, 1897, the undersigned
will sell at public auction to the highest
bidder for cash at the west front door
of the county court house. In the city of
Loa Angeles, state of California, for ac
count of whom it may concern, sixty (60)
Of the first mortgage 7 per cent gold
bonds of the Pasadena and Mount Wilson
Railway company, the same being num
bered from 641 to 600, both Inclusive, and
being for Aye hundred ($500.00) dollars
each,with interest coupons thereon repre
senting interest from July Ist, 1895, ex
cept on bond 600, which has coupons
thereon representing Interest only from
January Ist, 1896.
Dated this June 6th, 1897.
THOS. B. CLARK.
14 Auctioneer.
WOTICE-THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oclock
a.m. and 6 and 8 oclock p.m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut off and a fine of 22 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
MAGNETIC INSTITUTE - REMOVED
from 48114 s - Spring St. to N. E. cor. of
Spring and Sixth sts; entrance 125 W.
Sixth St.; seven years' successful work
In Los Angeles; send for testimonials;
diseases diagnosed without asking ques
tions. ESTHER DYE, Magnetic Healer.
-J- 6-80
*HE DAILY JOURNAL. PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 266 New High st. 2
MME. F. E. PHILLIPS HAS REMOVED
her halrdressing establishment from the
Wilson block" to her new store, 340 8.
Broadway. 12
.GOOD QUALITY WALL PAPER TO COV
er 12-foot room. 21; ingrain. $3, border ln
cluded. WALTER tig W. Sixth it. 8-12
MRft " BELL DOES GENTLEMEN'S
mending and plain sewing. 696 8. Spring
at, room M. ».g
SPECIAL NOTICES
FOR BALE—STATE LOAN AND TRUST
Co. stock at 85 cents. 1., Box 6, Herald.
tt
HELP WANTED—MALB
HUMMEL BROS. * CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building,
MO-302 w. Second street. In basement.
Telephone 60S.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Two first-class plastereri, (3 day, call
early; hay baler, 15c, etc., ton; chore man
or boy, 110, etc.; partner In laundry busi
ness; man on harvester, oiling, etc., $1.60
and board; blackberry pickers, lo pound;
plumber, 12.60 day and fare; harvester
driver, WO, etc.; scraper teamster, 232,
etc.; milk wagon driver, 115, etc.; man,
Junior Monarch press, 12Hc etc., ton;
wood chopper, 22.50 cord; mountain team
ster, $30, etc.; ran'oh hands, $15, $20, $26,
eto.;Bnglish or Irish coachman. $25, etc;
German boy, stable; man, haul hay for
half; German shoemaker; etc., etc.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Camp cook. $26. etc.; second cook and
do pastry. $20, etc.; dishwasher, $15, etc.:
cook, hay baler crew, $26, etc.; man and
wife, laundry; second cook, restaurant,
$20, etc.; hotel cook, Inyo county, $40,
etc.; cook, Phoenix, Aria., $10, etc.; count
er waiter. $5, etc.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
Housegirl, $15; girl assist, $10; girl,
wait on lunch counter, $1 week;
housegirl, country, $25, employer here to
day; girl, second work and laundry, 220;
second girl, home nights, $15: woman
with a child, housework, $12, near city.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Waitress, San Diego and Santa Monica,
$15 and fare: woman cook. 10 to 12 people,
$25; pastry cook, hotel. $25; 2 waitresses,
Arizona, $25, etc.
HUMMEL BROS, tt. CO.
WANTED—BOY 16 YEARS OLD, LlV
ing with his parents, desires situation In
a good store; well acquainted with the
city. Address EARNEST, box 23, Her
aid. U
WANTHD-EQAN'B RESTAURANT. 126
-122 E. Second st„ serves the beet 10c meal
ln the city; try tt and be convinced. 8-11
WANTED—GOOD, BRIGHT LAD FROM
14 to 17; good, permanent position. Ap
ply 711 8. Main st. 10
WANTED—SOME OIL MAN TO SINK
a well and take pay in oil. Address W.,
box 6, Herald. 10
HELP WANTED—FEMALE
WANTED—SOME LADY GOING NORTH
to take charge of child 6 years old to
Stockton. Z., box 8, Herald, 10
SITUATIONS WANTED-MALB
WANTED—BY ALL-ROUND COOK,
engagement at hotel, camp or ranch;
steady, sober man. Address DAPP, 529
N. Figueroa St. 10
SITUATIONS WANTED — FEMALE
WANTED — ORDERS FOR HOUBE
girls, ORLIN THURSTON, Employ
ment, 312 S. Broadway, rear. 8-16
WANTED—SITUATION BY A YOUNG
woman; good cook; city or country. Ad
dress "64 S. Los Angeles st. 10
WANTED—AOENTS
WANTED—TO BALE YOUR HAY AND
take baling cut in hay. D. F. McGARRY,
Ninth and Alameda. 12
WANTED TO RENT—HOUSES
WANTED—TO RENT, FROM 10 TO 16
-room house In good order, between Main
and Grand, Temple and Ninth. MRS. B.
MILLER, Temple and Union aye., Rogers
house. 10
WANTED—TO BUY LIVE STOCK
WANTED—TO BUY A HORSE AND
buggy. Address B. O. HANBY, 1619 Ma
pie aye. 10
PERSONAL
P.ERSONAL—ONE HAND READ FREE;
life read from cradle to grave; advice on
business matters, family affairs. Illy, W.
Third st. 6-11
Watchmaking
EIGHTEEN AND 14-K. WEDDING
rings, guaranteed as represented. W. J.
GETZ, watchmaker and Jeweler, 336 S.
Broadway. tf
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE—I WILL SELL A HALF IN
terest in my Downey cigar factory,
which is paying well, to some live.man
who is a good salesman, including a half
interest In the best patent for curing
tobacco on this coast ever discovered by
man; 35 or 40 acres are set out ln tobacco
In this valley and more being set out
every day: success Is bound to crown the
efforts of the man who comes first and
buys. I have so much business to. look
after that I cannot give It the proper
attention. If you mean business, come
and see the cigars being made from to
bacco grown ln this valley. We have over
25.000 cigars on hand; they sell like hot
cakes and give entire satisfaction. B. M.
BLYTHE, Downey, Cal. 18
FOR SALE—36 BUSINESS, 75 HOUSES,
rooms, furnished, unfurnished, for rent:
collections: wanted, help free and work.
EDW. NITTINGER, 23614 S. Spring st. tf
FOR SALE—THE STOCK OF JEWELRY
and fixtures at 249 S. Broadway must be
sold this week. Send offer to assignee
at once. 10
I SELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS
fcr cash. I. D. BARNARD, 111 North
Broadway, opposite Times building, tf
FOR SALE—CHEAP; A FINE HAND
made dry goods and peddling wagon; al
most new. 807 S. Los Angeles at. 10
FOR SALE—SALOONS AT VERY REA
sonable terms. Apply at 440 Aliso st. tf'
FOR SALE—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE—TYPEWRITERS CHEAP-
Smlth Premier, $40: Remington, $85;
Densmore. $35; Yost, $25; Callgraph, $25
All rented. ALEXANDER, 301 S.B'dway
6,30
PLUMBERS
FRANK A. WEINSHANK. PLUMBER
and gasfltter. 240 E. Second St.: tel. 136.
(For additional classified tee Page Two.)
THE HERALD
DISTINCT
REPORTS
Bearing on the Case of
Dr. Ruiz
SOME FACTS ARE AGREED ON
j
BUT LONG DELAY SEEMS VERY
CERTAIN
Fault Ia Found With Somebody Who
Allowed the Report to Become
Public
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, June Cal
houn, special commissioner to Cuba, had
another conference with President Mc-
Klnley today, lasting about three quar
ters of an hour. Neither Secretary Sher
man nor Assistant Secretary Day was
present.
It was learned this afternoon that the
department of state la ln possession of
two distinct reports bearing upen the
Ruis caee. They were brought to Wash
ington by Mr. Fishback, the secretary
to Mr. CaPhoun, and handed to Assistant
Secretary Day. One of these reports
was made by Consul General Lee, and
has been fully set out in the newEpa
pera. The other report, really the orig
inal, was a joint production, signed by
Consul General Lee and Dr. Congiosta,
the Spanish consul at Philadelphia, who,
with General Lee, a .special
commission to investigate tne condi
tions surrounding the death ot Drj Ruiz.
In this report the two cctmmissioneis
went as far as they could togther, which
necessarily confined them to a mere
statement of. facta that are not subject
to controvergy.
Falling to agree on a statement of the
causes which led to Ruiz's death, the
commissioners signed the document at
this point, and then by mutual agree
ment made what may be described as
supplemental reports to their own gov
ernments. In which they set out state
ments which they could not agree to
Include In the original report. The pub
lished! report of General Lee was cue
of these supplemental reports, and it
Is probable the Spanish government has
one intended to controvert it, made by
Dr. Congosta. With all this literature
on the subject in the possession of the
twt» government*,- the possibilities of
prolonged negotiations are promising.
After his conference with Assistant
Secretary Day Mr. Calhoun decided to
delay his departure from Washington
and Instead of starting for his home in
Danville, 111., this afternoon, he will not
go until tomorrow.
The publication of the Lee report' in
advance of its reception at the state
department has given much annoyance
to the officials, and" will probably be
made the subject of a quiet Inquiry, in
asmuch as It Is believed) that the po
sition of our government ln the nego
tlons sure to follow with Spain is weak
ened by this putting Its case ln the
possession of the other side.
FISHBACK'S VIEWS
NEW YORK, June 9.—George W.
Fishback, secretary of the commission
appointed to investigate the death of
Dr. Ruiz in Cuba, arrived here tonight
from Washington.
In. an Interview with a representative
of the Associated Press regarding the
work of the commission, Mr. Fishback
said: "General Lee's personal report
needs no comment. Mr. Calhoun's re
port practically embodies the same con
clusions as those in Gen. Lee's personal
report. It could not do otherwise afttr
an Impartial review of the case. Mr.
Calhoun's conversation with President
McKinley was confined almost entirely
to verbal explanations of the Ruiz mat
ter. Mr. Calhoun will return to Wash
ington next week and then will thor
oughly discuss the general condition of
Cuba with the president."
THE CABINET CRISIS
NEW YORK, June 9—A dispatch to
the World from Madrid says: Senor Sa
gasta never advised the Queen Regent to
keep Premier Canovas and the Con
servatives in office. On the contrary, he
laid stress upon the expediency of the ad
vent of the Liberals into office, with a
view to the recall of Weyler and the re
versal of the whole policy followed by
the Captain-General ln Cuba, In order
to secure the sincere execution of the
reforms and improve the understanding
with the United States. The Liberals
persist in their determination to hold
aloof from Parliament and al! relations
with the government as long as Canovas
keeps the Duke of Tetuan it. the Cabinet.
Marshal Campos positively advised the
Queen Regent to select any Cabinet that
would be willing to undertake a more
liberal policy In Cuba and recall Wtyler.
Marshals Lopez, Domlnguez and Hlnnco
expressed the same opinion. Hence pro
found surprise was caused by the solu
tion of the crisis.
TRAINED IN SECRET.
NEW YORK, June 9 A dispatch to
the Press from Boston says: Col. Shep
ard Young, a well-known local military
man, In an interview divulged* the de
tails of a secret Cuban expedition which
left Boston on May 24th, and picked up
several recruits ln New York . Today he
received a cipher telegram from Jack
sonville, conveying the news that they
had just sailed from that city on a fast
light draught steamer, 115 strong, armed
with rifles of the latest pattern. All have
seen service In the militia. A movement
has been started to organize a commis
sary commission to supply stores. Co!.
Young says: "I conducted the drills in
a hall In Boston, put them through In
fantry tactics, cavalry tactics and ar
tillery tactics. Every man could load
and fire a cannon, no matter what the
siae, and swing a sabre or use a bayonet.
Not a soldier left Boston until he was
drilled sufficiently to take charge of a
regiment. The tactics wefe taught in
this city mostly at night. We got word
from New York that a spy had been sent
LOS ANGELES, THURSDAY MORNING, JUNE to, J897
to Boston. We did not see him. The
troops practiced with the machete, that
Is used mostly for front cut. The ma
chete is heavier than a sabre and wield
ing of one Is hard work, but the men soort
learned to uee it with skill."
WILL NOT ACCEPT
CINCINNATI, 0., June 9—A Com
mercial-Tribune reporter saw General
Cox tonight and asked him: "Are you
going to accept the offer of appointment
as minister from the United States to
Spain?"
General Cox answered promptly: "I
am not."
Kis personal reasons are that he ha 3
for several years been engaged ln lit
erary work, and that it will take some
years to complete it and he cannot af
ford to abandon it.
Furthermore, the position offered im
poses great responsibility and labor at
this time. But this Is a minor reason.
General Cox has been offered a profes
sorship In the law department of Cin
cinnati university, which he will de
cline for the same chief reasons.
TRATNS DYNAMITED
HAVANA, via Key West, Fla., June
.9—The passenger train which leaves
Havana for Matanzas daily at 6 a. m.
was dynamited this morning about
twelve miles from the city by a party of
insurgents. According to the official ac
counts the object was plunder of $6000
which was in the express car.
■ The officials had ordered the passenger
train to go ahead and a pilot engine to
follow. At a bend In the road a terrific
explosion wrecked the engine, which fell
Into a pit twenty-nine feet below, drag
ging three third-class cars after It. At
the same moment another explosion
wrecked the pilot engine, which came to
the rescue, and it fell into the pit also.
Both engineers, one fireman, one con
ductor and several soldiers were killed
and three passengers were severely in
jured, while thlrty-twO) suffered more or
less serious bruises.
The two trains were dynamited with
electric machines and bombs placed on
a culvert at the curve.
The body of an Insurgent was found
lying near the wire communicating with
the bombs. The military escort of the
train quickly recovered, and opened Are
upon the Insurgents, who vanished to
ward the cars, and drove them off.
Captain-General Weyler is personally
inquiring Into the charges whlchi have
resulted from the expulsion of many of
the political leaders, and is extending to
a majority what his press censor calls "a
generous pardon."
The Presidential Party Favored With
CLIFTON FORGE,Va., June 9.—Clear
skies and growing enthusiasm along the
route have marked the afternoon pro
gress of the presidential party. At
Charlotteville there was a good assem
blage of citizens, to some of whom was
accorded a hearty handshake by tht.
president.
Mr. and Mrs. McKlnley sat In the ob
servation end of their car and were vis
ited from time to time by one or another
of the secretaries of the distinguished
guests. Questions of public policy were
tabooed. Mr. McKlnley said plainly
that as he would have all the public
functions he could safely meet in Nash
ville, he preferred to rest en route. He is
a good traveler and Is companionable,
affable and placid. His declaration not
to speak was broken in a measure at
Staunton, where thousands of citizens
cheered lustily as the special train drew
into the station. Ex-ongressman Tuck
er paid his respects and, yielding to en
treaties and amid cheers, Mr. McKinley
stepped upon the platform while the
Stonewall Jackson band played "Hail
to the Chief," and men and boys shouted
while the ladies waved a welcome. The
president greeted them in a very few
words.
Promptly on schedule time, 7 p. m.,
•the special reached here in two sections,
the last few miles being over grades
which made the dividing of the train ex
pedient. In accordance with Mr. Mc-
Klnley's wish there were no formal re -
ceptions. The guests of the hotel and
residents of the place gave to the chief
magistrate a hearty welcome and In a
very short time every one was dining.
The president and his immediate party,
to the number of ten, dined alone. Ev
ery one retired early, Intending to be up
In good season for further sight-seeing.
The route will be resumed at 11 oclock
tomorrow, Louisville being the next im
portant stop. .
SONORA, June 9.—The session of the
N. D. G. W. is progressing harmonious -
ly. The reports of the president and
secretary show the order to be In a
flourishing condition, 500 new members
and ten new lodges being added during
the past year. A grand reception was
tendered the visitors last night, over
4000 people celebrating the event. A
golden key, valued at $130, was present
ed to Grand President Mary E. Till
man. This afternoon 120 delegates were
driven to the Golden West mine and sev
eral hours were spent in an inspection
of the ledges and drifts. Woodland was
selected as the scene of next year's ses
sion and the disposition of the offices
will be settled tomorrow.
GUNNISON, Col., June 9.—A large
body of sulphur In the Vulcan mine was
set on fire by a miner dropping a candle
and a furious Are Is now In progress un
der ground. Smoke Is spreading to the
mammoth chimney, 400 feet away, and
the men have been compelled to stop
work. Both properties will be de
stroyed if the Are cannot be put out, but
no one knows the extent of the sulphur
body and it may burn for an unlimited
time. The two mines are gold produc
ers and are among the most valuable In
Gunnison county.
OAKLAND, June 9.—Benjamin L.
Hill, recently convicted of the murder of
his wife, was today sentenced by Judge
Ogden to be hanged on August 27, next,
it San Quentin. An application for ex
ecutlve clemency will be made on Hill's
behalf to the governor.
NASHVILLE, Term., June 9.—This
morning Prof. Barnard undertook to try
another voyage In his airship. The'bal
loon had been too highly Inflated, and
when away up in the air the machine be
gan to descend rapidly. The balloon had
burst, but the parachute appliances en
abled the professor to land safely.
OFF FOR NASHVILLE
Fine Weather
Native Daughters
A Mine on Fire
Wants a Pardon
It Didn't Fly
DURRANT'S
EXECUTION
Scheduled to Take Place
on Friday
JT IS NOT LIKELY TO OCCUR
PENDING THE SUPREME COURT
APPEAL
Reprieve Has Not Been Granted, But
Everbody Interested Thinks
That It Will Be
Associated Press Special Wire.
SAN FRANCISCO, June 9— It would
be a difficult matter to conceive of a case
more complex than that of Theodcr?
Durrant, the condemned murderer of this
city. His attorneys wholly rely upon the
application for a writ of habeas corpus,
which they hope to m<xke to the Supreme
Court of the United States in August.
That the Circuit Court of Appeals, while
denying the writ asked for last week, al
lowed an appeal, has been construed as
negativing the decree of death of the
State's Court for the present. But the
Attorney-General is in doubt, and, al
though he has had several conferences
with Warden Hale of San Quentin pris
on within the past few days, he has not
yet rendered a decision. Durrant's at
torneys claim that should Warden Hale
proceed with the execution of their client
on Friday he would be guilty of "legal"
murder. Attorney-General Fitzgerald
entertains no suoh view of the matter,
but whether or not he would be Justified
in ordering that the law take Its course
is the prdblem which is not yet solved.
Should he decide so, Durrant's attorneys
wouid be compelled to have recours* to
an application for an injunction to the
Federal Courts. If this were denied, a
new problem would be offered, Inasmuch
as the action Itself would be an Indirect
admonition to the warden to proceed
with the execution. It Is argued that if
Warden Hale should persist ln hanging
Durrant on Friday the Supreme Court
would be called upon to pass upon a
"moot" case, but that official says that
he has not yet decided what he will do.
Warden Hale of San Quentin came to
this city today for the purpose of con
ferring with Attorney-General Fitzger
ald as to his position with regard to the
execution of Theodore Durrant, but af
ter being closeted together for two
hours, both officials declined to be In
terviewed as to the conclusion reached
by them. Durrant's attorneys profess
entire unconcern as to what the state In
tends to do with their client, claiming
that the warden dare not proceed with
the execution after having been served
with notice of an appeal to the United
States supreme court, and threatening
In the event of Durrant's being hanged
to proceed against the warden and gov
ernor on charges of conspiracy and trea
son. It Is considered very unlikely that
Durrant will be hanged on Friday under
existing circumstances.
REPRIEVE EXPECTED
SACRAMENTO, June 9.—Governor
Budd is SUM in the Yosemite Valley, but
has been ln telegraphic communication
with the office today ln regard to the
Durrant case. Private Secretary Shields
said this afternoon to an Associated
Press reporter that he could not state
what action the Governor intended
to take. It is generally understood, how
ever, about the capltol, that Durrant
will be reprieved.
JUST A CRANK
PORTLAND, Or., June B.—A. S. Aus
tin has for the past several days been
busily engaged in interviewing the news
paper offices and various public officials
on the subject of Durrant's 1 innocence.
He is looked upon here as a sort of legal
knight-errant and is probably some
what unbalanced mentally.
REPRIEVE CERTAIN
SAN FRANCISCO, June 9—Theodore
Durrant will be reprieved tomorrow.
Gov. Budd has decided upon this course
ln order to settle the question of the
rights of the federal courts to interfere
in the execution of a sentence imposed
by the state court. He has named July
9th as the day upon which the sentence
shall be carried, out.
The object of the reprieve, as the at
torney-general explained tonight, la to
avoid the necessity of resentencing the
convicted man.
If the position taken by the governor
be supported by the state supreme court
the sentence will be carried out on July
9th, Just as It would have been Friday
but for the habeas corpus proceedings.
Tomorrow the necessary telegrams
ordering a stay of execution will be sent
to Sacramento by the governor.
The position taken by Gov. Budd is
that the habeas corpus proceedings and
the appeal Incident to the deniil of the
writ sued' out by Durrant's attorneys
does not act as a stay of proceedings.
In other words, thegovernor desires that
the supreme court pass upon the opinion
rendered by Attorney-General Fitz
gerald holding that the proceedings do
constitute a stay.
Durrant is still In the condemned cell,
and until definite orders are received he
will not be moved to other quarters.
Very Peculiar
SAN FRANCISCO, June 9—A pecu
liar suit for damages has been institut
ed in the justice's court in this city.
Justin Danvilllers, a florist, being un
able to collect the sum of $6, alleged to
be due from Eugene Blanchl, posted th»
unpaid bill on the grave of the debtor's
parents in Laurel Hill cemetery and has*
been sued for $300 damages in conse
quence.
A Discouraged Painter
COLUSA, June 9.— F. L. Davidson, a
painter and decorator, committed sui
cide this afternoon by jumping; Into the
Sacramento river. The deceased leaves
a wife and two children.
INDEX
TO TELEGRAPH NEWS
A Maryland mob beats, hangs and
shtfots a negro rapiat already under
sentence of death.
Big purses to be held up for Fourth
of July wheelmen at San Francisco;
results on turf and diamond.
Durrant's execution was set for to
morrow; no reprieve has been granted,
but it seems generally agreed that it
will be.
A famous expert pronounces Hoff
man's signature to Figel's alloged re
ceipt a forgery; the bookkeeper not
yet under arrest.
Japan grows more, modest in her de
mands on Hawaii; the sugar planters
tire of the trust and threaten to ship
thoir own product.
Charges of cowardice at the French
bazaar fire lead to a duel; one alleged
noble cuts his hand and promptly goes
into drydock for repairs.
Five fiddling rounds in tbe Shar
key-Maher match are succeeded by
two bloody ones; then the police wade
in and arrest the whole gang.
A large amount of political talk
fails to advance the work of settling
the tariff schedule. Mills of Texas
talks old-fashioned Democracy.
The Spanish commissioner and Con
sul Dee fail to agree on facta in the
Buiz case, and file separate reports;
long negotiations seem certain.
A MAD MARYLAND MOB
BEATS, HANGS AND SHOOTS A
NEGBO
He Had Already Been Sentenoed to
Hang, But the Impatient Crowd
Couldn't Wait
PRINCESS ANNE, Md., June 9.>-Will
iam Andrews, the young negro accused
ot felonlons assault upon Mrs. Benja
min T. Kelley was taken from the sheriff
here today and beaten into insensibility,
then hanged to a tree by a mob, imme
diately after having been tried in court
and sentenced) to death for hls> crime.
Andrews, who was but 20 years old,
came here from North Carolina, and
on May sth of this year was arrested
for assault upon Mrs. Kelley. At that
time a mob endeavored to lynch him.
but he was hurriedly taken to Balti
more and confined ln the. Jail in that
city until last night, when he wa;
brought here for trial. Shortly before
noon Andrews was taken from the Jail
to the court house and arraigned before
Judge Paige. He was much frightened
and pleaded guilty. Judge Paige then
sentenced him to be hanged, and Sher
iff Nelson, together with Deputy Sheriff
Dryden, started to remove the. prisoner
to the Jail. Just as they reached the
outer door some one shouted, "Come
on boys, let's take the damned nigger!"
and a rush was made for the sheriff and
the deputy. Blow after blow wlthiclubs,
bludgeons and pistol butts were rained
upon the head of the prisoner, ln spite
of the efforts of the officers to shield
him. Judge Paige ran out of the court
room and implored the crowd to wait
and let justice take its course, but with
out avail. The sheriff and his deputy
were soon overpowered, and the crowd
pounced upon the negro, threw him to
the ground and kicked him into insensi
bility. Meanwhile a rope had been pro
cured, and picking up the inanimate
form, the mob placed the rope arounl
the neck of the dying man and, dragging
the body to a tree within a hundred
yards of the court hcuse door, threw
the rope over a limb and swung the body
Into the air. Then a dozen bullets were
fired into the body, and it was left
dangling until the coroner ordered It cut
down. No attempt at disguise' was
made by any of those who participated
in the lynching.
BRYAN'S ITINERARY
Five Days of Earnest Work for
Silver
STOCKTON, June 9.—Chairman
Gould this evening announced the fol
lowing itinerary of William J. Bryan
through the state: Arrive at Sacramento
on the morning of July 3d; leave at 9
oclock for Stockton on special train;
speak at Stockton at midday, briefly
at Merced, Modesto and Madera in th
afternoon and at Fresno in the even
ing; San Diego on the morning of. ths
sth (Mr. Bryan will travel but will not
speak on Sunday); at Los Angeles
meeting on the afternoon of the sth and
banquet in the evening; leave Los An
geles on the morning of the 6th. The
train will stop half an hour at Bakers
field and the same length of time at Tu
lare and will reach Oakland on the
morning of the 7th. Mr. Bryan will
speak at Alameda at 10 oclock; at Oak
land at 12 oclock; will hold a reception
at the Palace hotel in San Francisco in
the afternoon and speak at Woodward's
pavilion at night. The following day he
will have a midday meeting at San
Jose and an evening meeting at Sacra
mento, taking the midnight train from
that city for Oregon.
A Nasty Justice
SAN JOSE, June 9.— W. H. Dwyer,
township Justice for San Jose township,
was arrested today charged with inde
cent exposure of hts person. He gave
bail ln the sum of $500 to insure his ap
pearance for trial next Monday. It is al
leged that he has on several occasions
exposed himself to young women who
were passing along the street. The ar
rest and charge created a sensation.
Work on Apricots
TUBA CITY, June 9.—The cannery at
this place began operations this week on
apricots, having made a run on cherries.
The fruit crop is generally good ln this
county. Two mixed carloads were ship
ped east today from this place.
Ten Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
TOO MUCH
TALKING
Delays Progress in the
Senate
MILLS TALKS DEMOCRACY
• '
GIVING WARNING OF DISASTER
TO COME
Doesn't Like Girls Fatted Like Heifers
for the European Market by Pro
tection Processes
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, June 9.—The senate
had a period of tariff speeches today,
and as a result little progress was mada
on the bill.
Rawlins of Utah and Mills of Texas
discussed the Democratic attitude on
the tariff from their respective stand
points. Rawlins was a member of the
platform committee jf the Chicago con
vention and proposed the tariff plank
which was adopted. He held that the
vote he and several other Democratic
senators had cast for duties on cotton
and other agricultural products was
Justified by that platform and by the
traditions of the party.
Mills severely arraigned the bill as a
class measure designed to build up the
vast fund for distribution among the
beneficiaries of the bill and at the ex
pense of the "forgotten men," the tax
payers. He indirectly criticized those
Democratic senators who voted for the
amendments to the bill putting a tax ptt
cotton and other articles, contending
that their course was a radical depart
ure from the tenets of Democracy. Later
in the day Cannon of Utah proposed an
amendment placing an export bounty on
agricultural products. He spoke for
two hours on the need of giving the
farmer a share of the benefits of the
tariff. Butler of North Carolina also
i spoke in favor of giving the farmer equal
benefits with other classes under the
bill. Only half a page of the bill, cov
ering four brief and comparatively un
important paragraphs, 229 to 233, were
disposed of during the day.
The session will begin at 11 a. m. to
morrow.
A concurrent resolutlo'n offered by Al
len of Nebraska, was agreed to, nation
alizing the Transmississlppi Exposition
to be held at Omaha, and requesting the
President to invite foreign nations to
participate. A joint resolution on the
same general subject was agreed to,
suspending the Immigration and Chi
nese Exclusion laws so as to permit for
eign labor to take charge.of foreign ex
hibits at the Transmississlppi Exposi
tion.
THE TARIFF BILL.
WASHINGTON, June 9.—The consid
eration of the tariff bill was resumed ln
the Senate at 12.15, the debate proceed
ing on the agricultural schedule. The
rice paragraph was agreed to as it came
from, the House. Paragraph 231 on tap
ioca has been struck out by the Senate.
On the question of agreeing to this
change Rawlins of Utah took the floor to
answer Vest's statement yesterday
"That a new evangel of Democratic doc
trine is being proclaimed by certain
Democratic Senators." Rawlins said he
had been a member of the committee on
resolutions and platform at the Chicago
convention, presenting that tariff clause
which had been under discussion. It
was on his motion that it was agreed to.
Lindsay of Kentucky, platform in
hand, interrupted: to ask Rawlins since
he presented the tariff clause, why the
good Democratic word "only" after the
tariff for revenue came to be omitted.
"Was it an intentional omission?" Lind
say asked.
"I think not," responded Rawlins.
"I can throw some light on that sub
ject," said Tillman, also a member of th'!
committee on platform at Chicago. "It
was omitted purposely after discussion."
Rawlins reviewed the course of the
Democratic party in early tariff legis
lation. The essential principle of this
was that all burdens and benefits
should be borne equally. There was no
evangel and no vile reptile or rattle
snake, as Vest had characterized it, and
there was no need of any Democratic
senator invoking the Almighty against
such doctrine. It came to Democratic
senators pure and undeflled from the
Democratic fathers, and he would, sup
port it.
Mills spoke on the general features
of the bill. For two months, he said,
the congressional committees had
sought to adjust and readjust again the
tariff law in the interest of a monstious
trust fund which this bill is intended to
raise. He came, he said, to speak for
the "forgotten man," the taxpayer, from
whose labor and sweat was to be wrung
by legislative rapine, this vast fund for
distribution among favored beneficiar
ies. Here was a bill of confiscation, he
declared, proposing to take the property
of those who were not favorites, the
"forgotten man," who is laboring In the
streets and fields. And yet, when an
explanation was asked for the exorbit
ant rates of this bill no answer was
given, save " What are you going to do
about It?"
Mills warned those on the other side
of the chamber to remember the biblical
injunction: "For all these things God
will bring you unto judgment."
The process of framing the bill pro
ceeded against the fundamental prin
ciple of the Anglo-Saxon doctrine that
every man shall have a hearing. But
there was a tribunal whose doors always
stood open, and before that tribunal the
projectors of this bill would be sum
moned. In 1890 a similar act had fallen
like the bubonic plague on the country,
and the tribunal of the people had put
the Republican party in quarantine.
Turning to the Democratic senators
who had voted yesterday for a duty on
cotton, Mills showed how the delega
tons from Georgia, South Carolina) nut

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