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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, June 12, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-06-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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Double Sheet
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 255.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
■BRaLD SUB-AGENCIES
ADVBRTISEMBNTS toft t>t th* foi
tawing MtaeiM will r*c«iT* prompt at
tuittnm aa* will bo printed v quickly
' ial with th* same ear* a* If toft at
I the main offlca, tn W. Third itrot:
[ DOWNEY AYE). AND BAST SIDE)
| L. P. COLLBTTB, 621 Downey avenue.
OLD WORLD DRUG STORE, IMS
Downey avenue, Phone Flora 242.
WM. H. HARMON, 7(6 Pasadena are.,
Phone Beat 88.
CENTRAL AYE. AND VERNON
» 8. B. BARNEY, 2606 Central aye.
CHICAGO PHARMACY. Central ave
nue ard Twelfth street, Phone West HI
T. J. AKEY, corner Central and Vernon
avenues. Phone West tt.
MAIN ST. AND SOUTHWEST
LKCOMB'S PHARMACY, Main and
Fifteenth st«„ Phone W. tt.
B. T. PARKE. PHARMACY, 8129 B.
Main, Phone Blue 2068.
B. VAN DYKE. DRUGGIST, 711 W.
Jefferson at., Phone White 1271.
WESTLAKE GROCERY, corner Al
varado and Seventh sts.. Phone Main
1388.
H. L. PARK. . DRUGGIST, corner
Thirty-eighth and Wesley aye., Phone
Blue 1801.
T. W. BROWN, JR., DRUGGIST, Junc
tion of Hoover, Union and Twenty-fourth
sts., Phone Blue 1101.
BOYLE HEIGHTS
H. C. WORLAND. 2133 B. First, Sta
tion B.
T. P. WYLIE, 1977 B. FIRST, Phone
Park 18.
J. M. HARRIS, 1842 E. FIRST, Phone
Park 21.
TEMPLE ST. AND NORTHWEST
DR. H. KALLEWODA. DRUGGIST,
corner Temple st. and Beaudry aye.,
Phone Main 206.
STAR PHARMACY, corner Temple and
Belmont aye., Phone Main 607.
VIOLE & LOPIZICH. DRUGGISTS.
427 N. Main St., Phone Main 876.
LOS ANGELES— ,
-SAN FRANCISCO— ,'
A chance for advertisers to reach th*
public of both cities on the most ad
vantageous terms ever offered.
W* have concluded arrangement*
whereby classified advertising may be
Inserted simultaneously In t: »
LOS ANGELES HERALD
And in the
SAN FRANCISCO POST
» ' To 7
t CENTS PER LINE, , I
8 CENTS PER LINE,
I CENTS PER LINE,
8 CENTS PER LINE
Here Is a rare opportunity for people
having bargains to offer or wants to be
known.
HERALD PUBLISHING CO.,
tf • " 222 W. Third St.
SPECIAL NOTICES
HOTICE—NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that at the hour of 12 o'clock m. on the
14th day of June, 1897. the undersigned
will sell at public auction to the highest
bidder for cash at the west front door
of the county court house, In the ctty of
Los Angeles, state of California, for ac
count of whom it may concern, sixty (60)
of the first mortgage 7 per cent gold
bonds of the Pasadena and Mount Wilson
Railway company, the same being num- 1
bered from 641 to 600, both inclusive, and
being for Aye hundred (8500.00) dollars
each.with Interest coupons thereon repre
senting Interest from July Ist, 1895. ex
cept on bond 600, which has coupons
' thereon representing Interest only from
January Ist, 1896.
Dated this June 6th. 1897.
THOS. B. CLARK.
1* Auctioneer.
tfOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are bet ween the hours of 6 and 8 oelock
a.m. and 6 and S oelock p.m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut off and a fine of 82 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
MAGNETIC INSTITUTE — REMOVED
from 431V4 S. Spring st. to N. E. cor. of
Spring and Sixth sts; entrance 186 W.
Sixth St.; seven years' successful work
in Los Angeles: send for testimonials;
diseases diagnosed without asking ques
tions: ESTHER DYE, Magnetic Healer.
6-30
THE DAILY JOURNAL. PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 206 New High st. 8
MME. F. E. PHILLIPS HAS REMOVED
her halrdressing establishment from the
Wilson block to her new store, 340 S.
Broadway. 12
GOOD QUALIT YWALL PAPER TOCOV
er 12-foot room, tl; Ingrain, 83, border In
cluded. WALTER. 118 W. Sixth st. »V£!
MRS. BELL DOES GENTLEMEN'S
mending and plain' sewing. 695 8. Spring
at. room 88. Z-8
SPECIAL NOTICES
■"OR SALE— STATE LOAN AND TRUST
Co. stock at 86 cents, 1, Box 6, Herald.
tf
HELP WANTED—MALB
HUMMEL BROS. * CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS
California Bank Building,
600-802 W. Second atreet. in basement.
Telephone 60S.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Orchard hands, 820, etc.; man and wife,
or family, with team and implement*, for
ranch; man and wife, orchard; ranch
bands, 818, 816, 886, etc.; carriage wood
worker, 82.60 day; milker, 830, etc.; berry
pickers; man and wife, dairy, 886, etc.;
partner In laundry; harvester driver;
mountain teamster, 880, etc; German boy,
stable; German shoemaker.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
All-around cook, beach, 840; second
cook, country, 886, etc.; kitchen helper,
810, etc.; man and wife, laundry; cook and
helper for hotel, Randsburg, employer
here.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
•Camp cook, 840, fare paid; German or
Swede house girl, 826; Swedish house girl,
beach, 825; house girl, Pico, Twenty-third
street, Ingraham, Pico Heights, $16, $80
and $25; house girl, family two, country,
820; house girl, two weeks, 86 week; house
girl, Fernando, Garvanza, Claremont,
Pasadena and ToUica, 820 and 826, see
employers here; girls, light housework,
$12 and 816.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Cook, 80 people, 840 to 850. fare paid,
call early; second girl, boarding house,
880; cook, small hotel, city, 826; cook,
railroad hotel, 880; waitress, country, 818,
tare paid; waitress, beach, $15 and fare;
cook, small hotel, country. $30.
HUMMEL BROS. * CO.
WANTED-GENTLEMAN OR LADY
representatives: $60 a month guaranteed
salary to right parties. Call northeast
corner of Thirty-eighth st. and Hough
aye. 12
WANTED—EGAN'S RESTAURANT. 126
-128 E. Second St., serves the best 10c meal
In the city; try It and be convinced. 8-11
WANTED—YOUNG MAN WHO WANTS
work; good salesman. Apply 711 S. Main
st. 13
SITUATIONS WANTED—MALB
WANTED-BOY 1« YEARS OLD. Liv
ing with his parents, desires situation In
a good store; well acquainted with the
city. Address EARNEBT, box 28, Her
ald. 13
WANTED—BY A THOROUGHLY RE
llable man, a situation with mercantile
house, or any position of trust; best of
references given. Address P., Tjox 6,
Herald. 18
SITU A TIONS WANTED — PBMALB
WANTED—A LADY OF ABOUT 40, UN
incumbered and large experience, wishes
situation as nurse, companion or house
keeper in family, rooming house or hotel;
references. Address for four days, A. T„
box 22, Herald. 13
WANTED — ORDERS FOR HOUSE
girls. ORLIN THURSTON. Bmploy
> j6M>nti_Bl8 t B. Broadway, rear. 8-16 '
WANTED — AOBNTS
WANTED—AGENTS: 880 TO 830 A WEEK
sure. No capital needed. New good*, new
plan. Sells at sight. Every family need*
It. HOUSEHOLD SPECIALTY CO., box
424, Cincinnati, Ohio. sat 6 mo
WANTED—GENTLEMAN OF GOOD
appearance and adrress to represent for
eign company. Address E., box 2, Her
ald. 18
WANTED-TO BALE YOUR HAY AND
take baling out in hay. D. F. MoGARRY,
Ninth and Alameda. 13
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE—I WILL SELL A HALF IN
terest In my Downey cigar factory,
which is paying well, to some live man
who is a good salesman. Including a half
Interest In the best patent for curing
tobacco on this coast ever discovered by
man; 36 or 40 acres are set out in tobacco
in this valley and more being set out
every day; success is bound to crown the
efforts of the man. who comes first and
buys. I have so much business to look
after that I cannot give it the proper
attention. If you mean business, come
and see the cigars being made from to
bacco grown in this va+iey. We have over
36,000 cigars on hand; they sell like hot
cakes and give entire satisfaction. B. M.
BLYTHE, Downey, Cal. 13
ONE BUSINESS MAN WANTED IN
every city (not already taken) for ex
clusive sale of manufactured goods; ap
plicant must furnish few hundred dollars
cash capital to carry small stock of sale
able merchandise with which to supply
his own customers after orders are first
secured; $200 monthly profit assured over
all expenses; state references, qualifica
tions, etc. F. E, VAIL, 136-140 Nassau St.,
New York. 16
FOR SALE-36 BUSINESS, 75 HOUSES,
rooms, furnished, unfurnished, torrent:
collections; wanted. h*'.p free and work.
, EDW. NtTTINGER, 236H S. Spring at. tf
I SELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS
fcr cash. I. D. BARNARD, 111 North
. Broadway, opposite Times building, tf
FOR SALE—SALOONS AT VERY REA
sonable terms. Apply at 440 Allso st. tf
WATCHMAKING
EIGHTEEN AND 14-K. WEDDING
rings, guaranteed as represented, W. J.
GETZ, watchmaker and jeweler. 388 S.
Broadway. tf
PERSONAL
PERSONAL—ONE HAND READ FREE;
life read from cradle to grave; advice on
business matters, family affairs. Ulft W.
Third ytt. 9-11
BOARD AND ROOMS
TO LET—CATALINA, FURNISHED OR
unfurnished houses or rooms; board se
cured; property for salej H. HAWVER,
Avalon. 13
LOST AND FOUND
LOST—CLEVELAND FAY MARE, 4
years old. with leather halter. Notify
OWNER. 948 Buckley st. 12
PLUMBERS .
FRANK A. WEINBHANK. PLUMBS*
and gssflvter. 240 E. Second et.: tel. Ist. ;
''' 1 . ■ SBmnssmß^tmmw
(For additional classified *«* Pag* Tw*V)
THE HERALD
FIRED OFF
CANNONS
Spoiled the President's
Morning Nap
JOHNNIES DRESSED IN GRAY
PUT LOYAL LETTERS ON THEIR
BELT BUCKLES
McKinley Arrives at Nashville and Is
Given the Welcome His High
Position Deserves
Associated Press Special Wire.
NASHVILLE, Term., June 11.—At 8
oelock this morning the presidential
tour merged Into the centennial cele
bration of the admission of Tennessee
Into the Union. As early as 6 a. m.,
when the train reached Bowling Green,
a crowd had assembled and an artillery
salute was fired. Although this was
somewhat to the discomfort of thou
who wished to sleep, no great harm was
done and the presidential party, In good
health and spirits, was ready to receive
the greetings, official and popular, at
the Nashville railway station, where
thousands were assembled, many hun
dreds of them being in uniform. The
party was driven speedily to the Max
well house and there provided with ac-
commodations and breakfast. As soon
as breakfast was over the presidential
party was ushered Into carriages from
the Church street entrance of the Max
well house and the line was soon formed,
the press and many gorgeously attired
members of Gov. Bushnell's staff occupy-
Jng three huge tallyho coaches. In the
first carriage were President McKinley,
Mrs. Van Leer Kirkman, president of
the woman's board, and Major J. W.
Thomas, president of tbe centennial
company. In other carriages were the
secretaries and visiting distinguished
guests and the ladles of the party, each
accompanied by a prominent local gen
tleman or lady.
The main procession formed on Broad
street, a very handsome thoroughfare,
the upper end of which Is lined with
handsome residences and beautiful
trees, the grounds of the Vanderbilt uni
versity being especially notable. As a
guard of honor a mounted detachment
of c( nfederate veterans, commanded by
Capt. George F. Hager, ranged them
selves Immediately In front of the preii
ident'e carriage.. They wore the old
timer gray, but the buckles of their belts
bore the Initials "U. S." In the rear of
the line of carriages marched the
battalion of the Sixth Infantry, under
the command of Col. Minor, sent from
Fort Thomss and headed by their little
band, state troops and a particularly
fine looking body of the Cincinnati
police, under command of their chief
made up the uniform part of the pa
rade.
The streets were lined with admir
ing thousands, and as this pre-emlnentjy
1s an educational center, a large portion
of the crowds was made up of students
of both sexes and both races.
As the head of the procession turned
Into the main entrance of the exposi
tion grounds a battery of artillery
boomed forth the national salute of
twenty-five guns. It was within the
grounds and led by the centennial
chimes, which rang forth from the top
ot the administration building, that tbe
enthusiasm reached its climax.
The enthusiasm was shared by the vis
itors to the fullest extent, and to them
was the added Incentive of the beauty
of the buildings and the grounds, which
burst on them for the first time.
The auditorium. In which the exer
cises of the day were held, will seat com
fortably 7600 people, and fully 20 per
cent more than that number were added
today, In the crowds that filled the foyer
and the unseated part of the galleries.
It was hot, but the heat could not check
the joyousness and enthusiasm. A wan
dering band prayed "Dixie" Just before
the last gun of the salute announced the
president's arrival on the grounds, and
that air, loved for its associations by
southerners and for its suggestive melo
dy by northerners, brought out a wave of
hearty- cheers. They were but murmurs,
however, compared to the mighty roar
bursting forth as William McKinley,
president of the United States, with
Mrs. Kirkham. beautifully gowned in.
summery materials, walked down the
aisle and upon the platform. Generous
was the applause given to members of
the cabinet and distinguished visitors,
including Governor Bushnell and staff
of Ohio, while to Governor Taylor a gen
erous outburst was awarded. Commis
sioner of Pensions H. Clay Evans, a na
tive Tennessean, was also the recipient
of hearty cheere. Mrs. McKinley had
wisely concluded not to accompany the
party In the procession, and great was
the disappointment expressed at her
non-appearance. When she did come it
gave rise to one of the most delightful
Incidents of the trip. Governor Bush
nell was In the middle of his speech,
when a cheer, swelling from the back of
the auditorium and thence communicat
ing to the main floor and to the galleries,
showed that some event of extraordinary
Interest was transpiring. A moment
later Mrs. McKinley appeared In the cen
tral aisle, leaning on the arm of James R.
Dunn and accompanied by her aunt, Mrs.
Saxton, and Mrs. John Hill Eakln. the
latter of Nashville. Governor Bushnell
gracefully yielded the floor, and the Im
mer.fi audience was on its feet In a mo
ment, cheering most lustily. The cheers
were redoubled when this gentle lady of
the White House reached the platform
and met the outstretched hands of her
husband,, who hurried to meet and greet
her and conduct her to a seat by his side,
jscretary to the president John Addison
fortcr and wife being Immediately be
her. A huge bunch of roses was
35»4 to Mrs. McKinley. and as she
iU/Mj±A and smiled her thanks th* crowd
again broke into cheers.
JMlAental to the speaking which fol
'lS.;--'',:,, ', v .'. ; .~ - ' * ■ '<*- -.V,
LOS ANGELES, SATURDAY MORNING, JUNE 12, H97
lowed was the applause which greeted
any reference to Tennessee's loyalty to
the Union. And when President Mc-
Kinley declared Tennessee's sons were
now loyal to the core and the Union, a
third of a century ago so nearly dis
rupted, was now bound to stand for all
time, the boom of applause and the roar
of enthusiasm was something long to
be remembered and gratifying to every
northern man present. After the con
clusion of ceremonies in the auditorium,
which were much added 1 to by the music
by Innis' band, the president and some
of his party visited the Parthenon,
which Is the art repository, and the
children's building and then repaired to
the West Side club house, a handsome
structure near the administration build
ing and fronting the Parthenon. In the
ladies' parlor there Mrs. McKinley held
an Informal reception. Later in the
afternoon she and the president gave a
reception to women only at the woman's
building.
During the luncheon the residents in
"Vanity Fair," which is similar in many
respects to the Midway Plaisance at Chi
cago, formed a unique procession and
marched past the club house, from the
galleries of which the luncheon was
served, and a good view could be ob
tained of the camels, Asiatics, China
men and old-time negroeß.
When the luncheon drew to a close
there were general demands for a speech
from one or another of the men of na
tional prominence present, and Gov.
Bushnell, Gov. Taylor, Secretary Sher
man, Congressman Grosvenor, Mayor
McKlsson of Cleveland and Col. Charles
Page Bryan of Illinois responded. All
the speeches were in the light vein suit
able to the occasion, and many lively
sallies and humorous allusions met ap
preciative reception.
From 6 until 7:30 In the evening and
immediately following the reception.by
the president and wife in the woman's
building, the visiting newspaper men
were heartily entertained by their local
brethren In the press building. At 8
oelock a fine display of fireworks over
the lake and on its shores was viewed
by Mr. and Mrs. McKinley and party
from the steps of the Parthenon. The
distinguished sightseers were guarded
by a cordon of regulars, and evidently
greatly enjoyed the exhibition. Their
enjoyment was shared by thousands
who were densely packed in all the
available grounds, bridges, boats, roofs
and galleries.
Not at all inferior to the fireworks
was the illumination of all- the struc
tures by means of search and electric
lights, there being a notable profusion
of the latter. The fireworks over, the
President and Mrs. McKinley returned
to the city, tired and a little worn by
the heat, but ready to accord the day a
high place on the calendar of remem
brance.
THE PRESIDENT'S SPEECH *
President McKinley's speech at the
Tennessee exposition today was as fol
lows:
Officers of the Tennessee Centennial
Exposition, Ladies 'and Gentlemen-
American nationality, compared with
that of Europe and the east, is still very
young, and yet already we are begin
ning to have age enough for centennial
anntversaries in the states other than
the original thirteen. Such occasions
are always interesting, andi when cele
brated- In a practical way are useful
and Instructive. Combining retrospect
and review, they recall what has been
done by state and nation and point out
what yet remains for both to accom
plish In order to fulfill their highest des
tiny. '
This celebration Is of great interest
to the whole country, and of special
significance to the south and west. It
marks the end of the first century of
the state of Tennessee and the close
of the first year-of its second century.
One hundred and' one years ago this
state was admitted Into the union as
the sixteenth member of the great fam
ily of American comimonwealths. It was
a welcome addition to the national
household —a community young, strong
and sturdy, with an honored) and heroic
ancestry, with fond anticipations not
only of its founders but faith in its suc
cess on the part of far-seeing and sa
gacious statesmen in all parts of the
country. I am Justified in saying that
these anticipations have been grandly
realized; that the present of this com
munity of sterling worth is even bright
er than the prophets of the past had
dared to forecast It.
The builders of the state who had
forced their way through the
trackless forests of this splen
did domain brought with them the
same high ideals and fearless devotion
to home and country, founded on re
sistance to oppression, which have made
illustrious the Anglo-American name.
Whether it was the territory of Virginia
or that of North Carolina mattered little
to them. They came willing and eager
to fight for independence and liberty,
and in the war of the revolution- were
ever loyal to the standard' of Washing
ton. When their representatives served
in the colonial assembly of North Caro
lina they chose —for the first time in our
country, so far as I know —the great
name of Washington as the name of
the district tn which they lived, and at
the close of the revolution sought to
organize their country into a state to
be known as the state cf Franklin, in
grateful homage to another of Its most
distinguished patriots. Spain had
sought to possess their territory by
right of discovery as a part of Flordia,
France claimed It by right of cession
as a part of Louisiana, and England as
hers by conquest. But neither conten
tion could for an instant be recognized.
Moved by the highest instincts of self
government and the loftiest motives of
patriotism, under gallant old John Se
vier, at King's Mountain, your forefath
er's bravely vindicated their honor and
gloriously won their Independence.
Thus came the new state, second only
then of the now mighty west and south
west. And it has made a wonderful his
tory for Itself. Tennessee has some
times been called "The Mother of
Southwestern Statesmen." It furnished
us the Immortal Jackson, whose record
in war and whose administration in
peace as the head of the great republic
shines on with the advancing years.
The century has only added to the luster
of his name. Increased the obligations
of his countrymen and exalted him in
their affection. Polk and Johnson also
were products of this great state, and
many more heroes of distinguished deeds
whose names will come unbidden to your
memories while I speak.
Tennesseeans have ever been volun
(Contimied on Pa** Sis.) - |
SPANISH
CABINET
A Fragile Thing and Soon
to Expire
GEN. WEYLER'S RESIGNATION
NOW IN THE HANDS OF PREMIER
CASTILLO
Pending Acceptance the Captain-Gen
eral Prosecutes the War by Per
secuting Cuban Women
Associated Press Special Wire.
LONDON, June 11.—The Madrid cor
respondent of the Pall Mall Gazette says
it ie thought that the cabinet, as at
present constituted, will continue only
during the summer sojourn of the court
at San Sebastian and that on the queen
regent's return to the capital it will be
radically changed.
Senor Canovas del Castillo denies the
report of the retirement of Captain Gen
eral Weyler, but although for the mo
ment he remains at his post, .there Is
the best reason for believing that his
resignation has been received by the
premier to be accepted or not, as the
latter deems beet, according to the cir
cumstances of the moment.
In the meantime General Weyler has
sent a telegram to the premier recom
mending that municipal elections be
held Immediately In Cuba.
WAR ON WOMEN
NEW YORK, June 11.—A dispatch
from Havana to the Journal says: Wey
ler continues the persecution of helpless
Cuban women who have relatives in
the rebel ranks. Senora Sardug, whose
husband is a Cuban leader, lately cap
tured, was dragged from her home and
thrown into the house of detention,
where she will be kept "incommuni
cado" until her husband's courtmartlal
and execution at Cabana castle. Six
insurgents who surrendered to Spanish
authorities at Santiago deCuba and who
expected to be pardoned and paroled
under Weyler's amnesty decrees, have
since been courtmartialed and shot.
The town of Callao, on the western
trocha, was entered by insurgents re
cently. They visited the local Spanish
hospital and confiscated all medicines
and supplies in sight, but did not menac
the Inmates. Dr. Pagura, a wounded
Cuban surgeon from Castillo's staff, who
had smuggled himself Into Havana to
recuperate, was discovered by Spanish
police and sent to the military hospital
of San Ambroslo.
El Commercio, In an editorial com
plimentary to Premier Canovas, says
that, supported by Dupuy de Lome at
Washington, he endeavored to main
tain apparently good relations with the
United States simply to gain time to re
inforce the armada, better fortify the
peninsular and Cuban ports and com
plete dry docks already under way.
HERMIT HARBIN
Comes Back to the World Seeking
Wealth
FRESNO. June 11.— J. N. Harbin, the
hermit of the Sierra Madre mountains,
Mexico, who at one time was associ
ated in mining ventures with the late
Senator Hearst, arrived In Fresno yes
terday on his way to Pine Ridge, where
hie two children, Pope Harbin and Mrs,
Fred Kenyon, reside.
The last time the children saw their
father was on the wedding day of Mrs.
Kenyon, twenty-one years ago. On that
evening the old man left home, and until
about three months ago was mourned
as dead by his family.
The old man is a Mexican warveteran,
and claims that over $4000 as pension
money is due him from the government.
He has, too, in his possession deeds to
some of the most valuable property of
what Is known ae> the Hearst estate. He
states that were Senator Hearst alive he
(Harbin) would want for nothing. As
It Is, he will consult an attorney as soon
as he Is rested from hip long journey and
ascertain his exact legal rights.
At one time Harbin owned all of what
Is now Lake county. The famous Har
bin springs were named after htm.
AN INNOCENT CONVICT
Released After Serving Two Tears; In
Prison
SAN FRANCISCO. June 11.—Next
Thursday Charles Hennessy will be re
leased from San Quentin, where he has
spent the last two years for a crime
which recently discovered evidence
shows he never committed. Just pre
vious to his arrest Hennessy, with two
other men and a woman, went on a
spree. During the night the sailor gave
what he supposed was a 50-cent pieci
to the woman to buy liquor. When he
sobered the sailor discovered that he
had lost $10, and accused Hennessy and
the other men of robbing him, and on
his testimony they were sentenced to
serve twenty years in the penitentiary.
The woman recently swore that the
railo.r had given her the $10 piece and
that she kept the change, after buying
the liquor. On this showing Governor
Budd commuted the sentence, andi on
Thursday next Hennessy will leave the
prison, if he agrees to .return to New
Zealand, his home.
The Eden Colonists
SAN FRANCISCO. June 11.—Private
advices from one of the crew of the brig
Percy Edwards, which sailed' from thi
port some months, ago for. the Solomon
islands with a party of 100 men, who ex
pected to find an Adamless Eden to 00l
onlze, have been received to the effec
that the expedition! has collapsed a
Fiji. After a general row over the dis
tribution of the community property
many of the colonists left the vessel and
sought employment on shore, and th
remainder resolved to take the brig t
New Zealand, where aha will be sol
INDEX
TO TELEGRAPH NEWS
The credit men in session at Kansas
City close their session with an in
dorsement of the Torrey bankruptcy
bill.
Princeton's upper ten experiments
with an air gun as a substitute for a
baseball pitcher. The fans don't think
it was fun.
The Spanish cabinet crisis is still
likely to cause trouble; meanwhile
Weyler continues his war against Cu
ban women.
President McKinley arrives at
Nashville and is welcomed by a
mighty roar from crowds assembled;
gray-headed old ex-"Johnnies" show
their loyalty.
The Minnesota cyclone causes hut
one death, but others are likely to die
from their injuries; the property dam
age is heavy; Denver suffers from a
tempest of rain.
The. day in the senate is spent in hit
ter denunciation, of the sugar trust;
then a vote is taken to amend the sen
ate amendment by still further in
creasing the duty and the amendment
goes, and the trust will rejoice even if
nobody else does.
The Reformed Episcopal general
council adopts a resolution making
the black gown its vestment to be used
on all occasions; therefore Bishop
Cheney resigns all his offices and Miss
Benson serves notice of the discontin
uance of her contribution of 815,000
a year.
at auction and the proceeds are to be
divided.
A DASTARD'S CRIME
Attempt to Dynamite a Soldiers'
Home Governor
LEAVENWORTH, Kan., June 11.—
An attempt was made upon the lives of
Governor J. Smith of the Soldiers' Home,
his wife and daughter, between 4 and 5
o'clock this morning by some dastard,
who is as yet unknown. Dynamite was
employed in the outrage.
The explosion, which all but demolish
ed the Governor's beautiful residence,
aroused the residents of the city and
houses trembled as it undergoing an
earthquake shock.
Mrs. Smith had a miraculous escape
from death, the force of the explosion
being directly beneath her bed chamber.
Besides being cut and bruised by broken
glass and pieces of flying bric-a-brac
and furniture, ertie was completely pros
trated by the frightful shock and Is now
In a precarious condition.
Governor Smith and daughter, Miss
Daisy, occupied rooms on the second
floor, far enough removed from tne ex
plosion to escape the serious conse
quences suffered by Mrs. Smith.
ORDERED CLOSED
An Oregon Banker Concludes to Quit
Business
FOREST GROVE, Or., June 11.—The
Cashier of the Forest Grove Bank has
received by registered mail from Port
land a letter from Anton Pfanner, Pres
ident of the bank, ordering It to be closed.
In the letter was ah assignment to S.
Hughes and A. Hlnman for the benefit
of creditors.
'Pfaimer was last heard of in Port
land early yesterday morning at the
Imperial Hotel. A diligent search for
him since that time has failed to dis
close any trace, of him, and it Is. general
ly believed he has committed suicide.
An Indian Uprising
BOMBAY, June 11.—A dispatch from
Simla, residence of Indian government
officials during the heated period of tho
year, announces serious trouble on the
Northern frontier and the massacre of
a number of British officers and natives,
soldiers in the government employ.
From particulars obtainable at present
it seems that two guns belonging to thu
Bombay mounted batteries, escorted
by 300 men belonging to the First Reg
ment of Sikhs and First Punjab In
fantry, were treacherously attacked In
Tochi valley by a large force of hostile
natives.
Conrad's Successor
WASHINGTON, June 11.—On July
Ist Judge J. K. Richards, ex-attorney
general of Ohio, will succeed Judge
Holmes Conrad as solicitor general in
the department of Justice. Judge Con
rad placed his resignation at the presi
dent's disposal early in March, but was
Induced to remain in office until certain
Important cases in the supreme court
with which he had been prominently
identified had been argued.
Formally Notified
SAN QUENTIN, June 11.—Warden
Hale was formally notified by Governor
Budd this morning of the reprieve
granted Theodore Durrant until July 9.
It is understood that In the meantime
the question as to whether or not the
appeal to the United States Supreme
Court acts as a stay of execution will ba
decided.
Indian Troubles Ended
WASHINGTON, June 11.—A telegram
received at the war department from
headquarters at St. Paul states that all
is now quiet among tne Indians in
Southern Montana, and that it is saf?
to withdraw the troops sent from Forts
Custer and Keogh, which will be done.
Asylum Inspection
STOCKTON, June 11.—Superintend
ent Hatch and Dr. Matthews of the
state lunacy commission will be here
Thursday next on their first trip of in
spection of the state hospital for the
Insane, and will go south Friday to in
spect the asylum at San Bernardino.
Mrs. Lease's Daughter
i WICHITA, Kas.. June 11—Miss Evelyn
Louise Lease, daughter of Mary E.
Lease, has accepted an invitation to de
liver a lecture In July before the Nation
al Chautauqua assembly In Jamestown,
N. Y. this will be her initial appearance
as a lecturer. (
Ten Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
THE DUTY
ON SUGAR
Raised Three-fourths of
One Mill
THE AMENDMENT IS AMENDED
AND THE BATE LIFTED STILL
HIGHER

The Sugar Trust Was Roundly De
nounced, But It Gets the Pro
tection It Wanted
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, June 11.—The first
test vote on the sugar cchedule was
taken late today, resulting In the adop
tion of the Republican caucus amend
ment, changing the house rate of 1.95
cents, by the close vote of yeas 32,
nays 30.
The affirmative vote was made up of
twenty-nine Republicans, one Democrat
(McEner'y of Louisiana), one Silver Re
publican (Jones of Nevada) and one Pop
ulist (Stewart of Nevada). The nega
tive vote was made up of twenty-five
Democrats, three Populists and two Sil
ver Republicans. It was the closest vote
so far taken on an issue of Importance,
and was accepted as showing that any
amendments having the sanction of the
caucus are assured of adoption.
The vote was taken after a day spent
in speeches on the effect of the sugar
schedule. The main speech of the day
came from Allison, in charge of the bill,
and was in the nature of an answer to
the charges made against the sugar
schedule as a whole and a defense of
it. Gorman 'of Maryland spoke against
the schedule and the entire bill, point
ing out that Its effect was to burden the
people without opening to us new mar
kets. White reviewed the records of
Republican senators on the sugar sched
ule during the debate on the Wilson bill,
arraigning them for Inconsistency. Caf
fery of Louisiana and Stewart of Nevada
also spoke, the former against and th*
latter for the schedule, after which th*
vote was taken.
The first paragraph of the sugar sched
ule wVs not finally disposed of up to th*
time of adjournment.
TAKES MUCH TALK
WASHINGTON, June 11.—The con
tinuance of the debate on the sugar
schedule In the Senate today served to
swell the attendance considerably.
Before the tariff bill was taken up
Senator Harris of Kansas introduced a
resolution reciting the status of affairs
relating to the Union Pacifls railroad,
and declaring it to be the sense of the
Senate that the treasury should take
steps to pay off the liens prior to those
of the government and then operate the
road, or, if that was not deemed expedi
ent, to adopt the foreclosure proceed
ings in court. The resolution went over.
The tariff bill was taken up at 12:15 and
consideration of the sugar schedule re-
sumed. '
Senator Jones of Arkansas, Democrat,
began the discussion by placing on the
records the statement of a sugar expert,
showing the price of each grade of sugar
and the rate of taxation of each grade
under the Wilson act and under the pro
posed schedule.
Mr. Turple of Indiana, in behalf ot
the minority of the finance committee,
gave notice of a new amendment to be
offered as an additional paragraph to
the internal revenue provisions placing
a tax of 2 per cent on estates of descend
ants when their inheritance amounts to
$5000 or more, and is not for the benefit
of religious, charitable, educational or
like institutions, the tax to be enforced
for five years from January 1, next.
Then the question reverted to the com
mittee amendment striking out 1 and
875-1000 cents and substituting 1 and
95-100. A vote was about to be taken,
when Mr. Caffery took the floor and read
a newspaper account of the growth and
development of the sugar trust, thus
preventing an Immediate vote.
The extracts read by Caffery were very
long and gave in detail the profits of the
trust by years, its absorption of lesser
sugar establishments and the internal
business affairs of the organization.
Mr. Caffery then took up the question
as to the amount of raw sugar required
to make a pound of refined sugar. He
stated that a reliable expert claimed
that the government figures and esti
mates were furnished by trust officials
and were partisan.
Caffery went on to say that a counter
vailing duty of 38-100 on German granu
lated sugar was ample protection to the
American refiners. The latter held tho
cane sugar Industry in the hollow of
their hand, with complete control of the
American market, with the German
sugars kept out, and, in his judgment,
the differential of 38-100 on German
sugar was ample against them.
Returning to the general features of
the schedule, the senator said this bill
proposed to give more to the sugar trust
than the Wilson bill, and that gave too
much.
"The sugar trust," said he, "Is the only
gigantic trust In the world which rests
entirely on legislation for its support.
By legislation it controls the cane sugar
product of the world and whenever It
thrusts its hand into the legislative hall
there was always a taint, a kind of
malodor arising from its efforts to gat
legislation in its own behalf, and if It
appears from a reasonable showing that
what the trust asks Is too much, tt
should be refused."
Piatt of Connecticut roused Caffery to
another indignant protest against ths
repeated intimations thrown out by th*
other side that he wanted protection for
the sugar producer.
- "Your proposition," said Platt, "la
free trade for the refiner and protection
for the producer."
"I have stated, and I repeat It again/
.replied Caffery, his voice rising until tt
fairly rang through the chamber, "that
sugar is the ideal article for a PiWt i

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