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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, June 25, 1897, Image 1

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TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 268.
SPECIAL NOTICES
VALLEE DE FRANCE LODGE, U. D„
F. and A. M—The officers and members
ot this lodge are hereby notified to attend
v. special meeting for third degree this
(Friday) evening, June 25, 1897, at half
past 7 at Masonic temple.
The brothers of sister lodges are cor
dially invited. By decision of the lotlge
aforesaid and order of the W. M.
25 E. FLEUR, Secretary.
A FREE CLAIRVOYANT DIAGNOSK
of disease will be given to the poor every
Tuesday at the Magnetic Institute,
northeast cor. Sixth and Spring. En
trance 125 W. Sixth st. Diseases located
without asking questions. Seven years'
successful healing In Los Angeles. Send
for testimonials. MRS. ESTHER DYE.
magnetic healer. 6-30
KOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are bet ween the hours of 6 and 8 oelock
a.m. and 6 and 8 oelock .p.m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut off and a fine of $2 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
THERE WILL BE A CALLED MEET
ing of the News and Working Boys' Home
society at the home of Mrs. E. A. Forrest
er, 909 W. Seventh St.. on Saturday, June
26th, at 2:30 p. m. Members are urged to
be present. Important business will be
transacted. MRS. J. B. BROWN, Sec. 26
HOTICE IS HEREBY OIVEN THAT I
intend to apply to the state board of
prison directors of California to be
paroled from Folsum prison according to
law. ROBERT QUIDDE. 19-25
THE DAILY JOURNAL, PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 205 New High st. tf
SPECIAL SALE—NO CHARGE FOR
borders with 5c and 7ftc wallpaper.
WALTER, 218 W. Sixth St. 8-12
ITOR~SALE—STATE - LOAN AND~TRUST
Co. stock at 85 cents. 1., Box 5, Herald.
tf
HELP WANTED—MALE
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building.
300-302 W. Second street, in basement,
Telephone 509.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Sack sewer. $2, etc.; 3 timber cutters.
$30, etc.: ranch hands, $1, etc.: harness
maker. $30, etc.; boy. ranch, $8, etc.; man
ami wife, ranch, $35, furnished house, wo
man hoard men: elderly man. chores. $10.
etc.; man to drive combined harvester.
$2. etc.; header runner, $2, etc.; Ed Rich
ardson wanted; header wagon driver. $1.
day: German orchard hand. $20. etc.;
camp blacksmith, $1.50; shoemaker, $12,
week; milker, $25 .etc.; Swiss milker. $30.
etc.: harvester runner; 3 men logging
$30; camp cook, $25. etc.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Baker's helper, $30, etc.: waffle cook.
$10.. week: flrst-class steward, $40, etc.;
second cook, do pastry, $R. week: laun
dryman, Arizona. $3. day; all-round cook,
beach. $40; extra waiters.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
House girl. $20; cook, six men, cook
house, $20; young nurse girl, baby, $6;
house girl, cook and mtik, $20; house girl.
$i 5: house girl, family of 2, country, $20;
woman with child, housework. $15; house
girl. French family, $15; second girl, hos
pital, $10, etc.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Girl, chamberwork and pantry, $18:
flrst-class hotel waitress, $25; cook, San
Diego, $25.
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
WANTED—AN ACTIVE MAN OR Wo
man with $300 cash .which will buy $1300
worth of the best and quickest selling
goods In the world that can be easily sold
In 60 clays, with a profit of $1000. Call at
room IS. 431 ft S. Spring st. 25
WANTED—ARE YOU A HUSTLER? I
wnnt a man to handle the advertising on
a big weekly; full swing of the city. X.,
box 28, Herald. 26
WANTED—EGAN'S RESTAURANT. 126
-12S E. Second St.. serves the best 10c meal
In the city: try it and be convinced. 8-11
HELP WANTED—FEMALE
WANTED -A FIRST-CLASS AND
highly educated saleslady for high-toned
ladles' trade; must have large acquaint
ance with society people: fair salary.
Call, afternoon, 400 S. Broadway. 25
SITUATIONS WANTED —MALE
WANTED—SITUATION BY A YOUNG
man; office work preferred, as have had
considerable experience; am a rustler
and can give best of references. Address
Z., box 28, Herald-. 27
wanted-situation bT~a~black*
smlth. V.. box 25. Herald. 25
WANTED — A OENTS
WANTED—ADVERTISING AGENT IN
every town to Introduce Medicated Al
mond Oil Soap: permanent business; good
pay: gives entire satisfaction: 3000 boxes
sold in the past 90 days in this city. C. A.
HAMMEL. general advertising agent, 120
W. Fifth St., Los Angeles. 27
WANTED-AGENTS-THE CHANCE OF
a lifo time to make money: any active
man or woman with a small capital can
make from $4 to $12 per day; anyone with
$325 can clear $1000 within two months.
at room 18, 431 ft S. Spring St. 25
WANTED—TO BORROW
WANTED—TO BORROW, $6000 ON
Broadway business lot; all for improve
ment. WIESENDANGER CO., 431 S.
Broadway. «6
WANTED TO RENT—HOUSES
WANTED—TO RENT. HOUSE OR PART
of house (flat) of five or six rooms; ref
erences exchanged. Address, with partlc
ulars, W.i box 2S, Herald, 27
WANTED-TO BUY LIVE STOCK
WANTED—CALVES AND FAT STOCK
FRED HUGHES, Durham market. 1067
Temple st. 6-24 tf
WANTED-MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED—BUSINESS, CLOSE IN,
with lodging rooms In connection: sec
ond-hand or fruit will salt. V., box 2S.
Herald. 26
WANTED-TO BALE YOUR HAY~ANI)
take baling out In hay. D. F. M'GARRY,
Ninth and Alameda. 30
PLUMBERS
jtRANK A. WELNSHANK. PLUMBER
and gasfltter, 210 E. Second St.; tel. 136.
fOtf RENT—HOUSES
FOR SAT,E—THIS MOST DESIRABLE
oorner property, fine location west, this
side Westlake| large 9-room, bath, mod
ern house; finely finished; street graded;
elegaia burn and driveway; sell cheap;
come and see this. HOYT & SUMMERS,
room 20 Bryson block. 23
FOR RENT—IIS. HOUSE, (I ROOMS,
bath; water free; barn; 926 Towne aye.
$10. water free, 5 rooms, bath; 649 Gladys
aye. WIESENDANGER CO.. 431 S.
Broadway. 26
FOR RENT—FURNISHED HOUSES
with 4, 5, 6 and 10 rooms, at $12. $25 and
$35 a month. F. A. HUTCHINSON, 330
S. Broadway. 26
FOR RENT—S-ROOM COTTAGE, ONLY
3 blocks from center of city. WM. MEAD,
121 ft S. Broadway. 27
FOR RENT—6-ROOM COTTAGE, FUR
nlshfcd, $25. Apply at 515 W. Ninth st, 27
FOR RENT—ROOMS
FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS,
from $1.50 up per week; single rooms 25c
and 60c per night; baths free. Russ House,
cor. First and Los Angeles sts. 7-21
FOR RENT—"HOTEL LOUISE," NEW-
Iy furnished rooms; prices to suit, by
day, week or month 520 S. Broadway. 7-23
FOR RENT—NICELY FURNISHED
rooms; housekeeping privilege; good lo
cality. 827 ft S. Spring st. 7-14
FOR RENT—ROOMS, $1 PER WEEK
and up; 20 cents per night. 519 S.
Spring st. 7-18
FOR RENT—FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
housekeeping. !21ft W. Seventh st. tf
FOR RENT-FRESH CLEAN ROOMS,
furnished or unfurnished. 416 S. Hope. 26
FOR~~RENT— ROOMS, $1, ILtS AND $1.80
per week. 311 W. Third at. 30
for rent—pasture
FOR RENT—I4OO ACRES, 9 MILES FROM
Los Angeles, with running water; 200
acres of barly stubble; balance wild oats,
altlllerla and burr clover; horses
brought and delivered; no responsibility
for accidents or escapes. Address SAN
BORN HOWARD, Burbank, Cal., or 150
S. Main st. 6-27
FOR RENT—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR BENT-COOL FRONT ROOMS, JlO
and $12, at HOTEL BALTIMORE, cor
ner Seventh and Olive. 6-27
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE—OR RENT. A SHOE FAC
tory In complete running order, with
power and long-time lease; rent only $10
per month; 5 cents royalty for each pa!r
for the use of the machinery; call quick;
no money down. 402 E. Third st. 27
FOR SALE—36 BUSINESS. 75 HOUSES,
rooms, furnished, unfurnished, for rent;
collections; wanted, helo free and work.
EDW. NITTINGER, 2S6ft S. Sprirg St. tf
fSELL
for cash. I. D. BARNARD, 111 North
Broadway, opposite Times building. If
FOR SALE—NEW SALOON IN PROM
lnent hotel: rent. $75; part sublet for $60.
Apply at 633 N. Main st. 27
FOR SALE—SALOONS AT VERY REA
sonable terms. Apply at 440 Aliso St. tf
FOR SALE—LIVE STOCK
FOR SALE—OR CHANGE FOR LIGHT
oil wagon, one 2-year old Jersey heifer,
fresh in two weeks. MOSHER'S MAR
KET, corner Fifth and Spring. 26
FOR SALE—ABOUT 1000 ANGORA
goats; also poling St. Bernard dog. 227
Bullard block. 8
FOR SALE—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE—TYPEWRITERS CHEAP-
Smith Premier, $40; Remington, $35'
Donsmore, $35; Yost, $25; Caligraph, $23
All rented. ALEXANDER, 301 S.B'dway
6.30
FOR SALE—SO TONS OF UPLAND BAR
ley hay at Gardena at $3.50 per ton. Ad
dress box 16, Gardena postofflce. 26
FOR SALE—UPRIGHT FISHER PIANO,
good as new, chjap for cash. Drugstore,
corner Temple and Belmont aye. 25
FOR SALE—AN ELEGANT LYON &
Healy harp, at a sacrifice. 2530 E. Third
sl - 25
EDUCATIONAL
WOODBURY BUSINESS COLLEGE, 226
S. Spring st., will conduct special classes
for public and high school students un
der the instruction of Prof. C. S. Thomp
son of the Seventeenth-street school,
from July 6th to September Ist; tuition
$4 per month; half day sessions; our
regular commercial ami shorthand work
continued throughout the summer at
usual rates. Pupils enter any day and
receive Individual Instruction. Rooms
are large, cool and pleasant. Electric
elevator. Write or call for Illustrated
catalogue. G. A. HOUGH, president- N
G. FELKER, vice president.
SUMMER LAW LECTURES~UmVER
sIty of Virginia, July 1 to August 31, 1897.
Course Includes 36 lectures by Mr. Jus
tice Harlan of U. S. supreme court. For
catalogue address R. C. MINOR, secre
tary, Charlottesville, Va.
PERSONAL
PERSONAL—FOR RENT, NICELY
furnished or unfurnished rooms, single
or en suite; desirable location; prices to
suit the times. THE WINTHROP. 3Soft
S. Spring st. 7.25
PERSONAL—ONE HAND
life read from cradle to grave; advice on
business matters, family affairs. 111 ft W
Third st. 9 . a '
i ,
MUSICAL
FOR SALE—HANDSOME UPRIGHT
' Grand Bass piano at a great sacrifice
Room No. 31, The Savoy, Fourth and
Hill sts.; call mornings. tf
THE WONDERFUL GRAMAPHONES
for sale at A. G. GARDNER'S, 118 Win
ston st.; also pianos for sale and rent, tt
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
LUCIEN EARLE.
office, Bullard building; entrance, room
420; telephone black 1115. 7-24-97
nROUSSEAU & MONTGOMERY,
Attorneys-at-Law.
40S Bradbury block. Log Angeles. tl
(For additional classified fee Page Twoo
THE HERALD
BOMBARDED
WITH HAIL
Topeka Suffers as by a
Siege
CRACKED SKULLS COMMON
DOGS KILLED AND HORSES PROS
TRATED
Other Sections of the State Beaten by
Cyclones—Middle West Weath
•r Running Amuck
Associated Press Special Wire.
TOPEKA, Kan., June 24—The wors-t
hail etorm known In thls>section of Kan
pas struck this city shortly after 6 oelock
tonight. The shower of hall was ter
rific. Hailstones weighing twelve to
sixteen ounces stripped the trees of then
foliage smashed windows on every
hand, including the finest plate glas*
store fronts, cut down telegraph and
telephone wires, riddled awnings, In
jured many persons and Inflicted un
precedented damage throughout the
city. So great was the weight of ths
falling hail that when it struck the as
phalt pavement, many of the hail stones
rebounded to the height of twenty and
thirty feet. Dogs were struck in tin
streets and instantly killed. Horses
were knocked to their knees, to ris-.
again and dash away in mad fright.
Runaways occurred throughout the
city. When the fury of the storm passed,
those who ventured out found dead
birds everywhere, and on every hand
was the scene of the wreckage of the
storm.
The storm came up from the south
east. Dense, greenish clouds gave
warning of the disaster, and as the day
had been extremely hot and close, many
foresaw a cyclone and sought shelter In
their cellars. The storm came on with
a heavy wind and terrific lightning.
Then came rain, together with a deafen
ing crash of hail that was paralyzing to
the s-enses. So great was the damage to
telegraph wires that the city was cut oft
from the outside world for several hours.
Topeka tonight looks like a city that
has withstood a siege of war guns
There are not a dozen buildings in the
town that are not almost windowless
and many roofs were caved in. The
roofs of many structures also were
pierced. The damage can be Imagined
when it is know that the hailstones
ranged in size from that of a hen's egg
to that of an ostrich egg, and that thirty
minutes after the storm one hailstone
was picked up which measured fourteen
inches in circumference. Surgeons are
busy dressing the wounds of persons
injured in the storm and reports of in
juries continue to be received. Many
were hurt in the runaways on the
streets.
The following are among those most
seriously hurt:
Frank Brainerd, hackman, skull frac
tured.
J. D. Henderson, liveryman, skull
fractured.
Henry White, leg broken In runaway.
Mrs. Mary Hughes, arm broken in run
away.
D. K. Lee, bad scalp wound.
Miss Anna Fenton, head cut.
Fred Holler, head cut.
George Hill, boy, skull fractured.
Charles Johnson, struck on the head
and rendered unconscious.
Policeman Kidney, fingers broken in
protecting head with hands.
• Miss Cornie of Potwin, badly wounded
on head; In hospital.
Hackman Bralnerd is still uncon
scious and will probably die.
The damage cannot be estimated, but
It will amount to thousands. Window
glass is already at a premium here and
tonight three carloads were ordered
from Kansas City. Street car traffic is
stopped and electric lights are out, ow
ing to demoralization of the electric sys
tems.
CYCLONE AT SALINA
SALINA, Kan., June 24.—News has
just reached here of a terrible cyclone
which passed fifteen miles northwest of
this city about 10:30 o'clock last night.
As far as can be heard there are three
dead and a number dangerously injured.
The dead are: Mrs. Anna Geezy, aged
34; Nola Geezy, aged 13; IdaGeezy, aged
9. Four members of this family were
also badly hurt. Geezy was away from
home.
The remainder of the family had re
tired and when the storm struck they
made for the cave. Before they got out
of the house, however, the tornado de
stroyed it. The work of destruction was
not known until this morning, when
neighbors found the dead and injured
members ot the famly lying about the
debris. The three dead were found
about fifty feet east of the house, and
hear them the body of a girl alive, but
buried to the waist in dirt. The other
three were found some distance from
the house. A two-by-four scantling
was driven through one of Mrs. Geezy's
limbs.
At Story's,half a mile east of the Geezy
place.a family was sleping in a basement
with the frame up-right partly up; the
frame work was blown away and some
of the timber was blown on the family
below, but none were killed. The stone
work was uninjured.
ST. LOUIS SUFFERS
ST. LOUIS, Mo., June. 24.—The terrific
wind and rain storm early today was
very destructive in the southwestern
section of the city where several city in
stitutions are located. The poor house
suffered most. One of the buildings,
which sheltered seventy-five inmates,
all cripples, was partially demolished
and glass was shattered in others. When
the roof was taken off, bricks fell in
among the patients, hitting a number of
them, but none were seriously Injured.
The storm also struck the Insane Asy
lum, but little damage was done. The
LOS ANGELES, FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 25, 1897
patients were terror-stricken and yelled
and prayed.
Forest Park, one of the largest In the
country, suffered considerably, trees
being leveled In every direction.
Weather Bureau officials report the
downpour of rain to be the heaviest of
this season. The storm was particularly
severe in the river towns, Keokuk, Alton
and Qulncy suffering. Reports from
Springfield, Decatur, Effingham and
other Hllnonls towns, say the rain was
very heavy.
KANSAS IS SUNSTRUCK
KANSAS CITY, Mo., June 24—The
most Intense heat that has prevailed in
Central Kansas for several years has
been experienced for the past four days,
the thermometer averaging 100, and
finally reaching 104 degrees. Many pros
trations among farm hands are report
ed, and at some points the farmers have
been compelled to abandon harvest
work.
KENTUCKY SHAKEN UP
HOPKINSVILLE, Ky„ June 24 —
During a heavy storm here today, two
earthquake shocks were distinctly felt
Walls of large buildings were shaken
perceptibly to everybody. The shock
occurred at 11:40 o'clock. The vibrations
were from west to east.
THE TEMPERATURE ABATES
NEW ORLEANS, La„ June 24.—The
temperature this morning went down
five or six degrees from yesterday morn
ing and a stiff breeze, followed by a re
freshing shower, helped materially to
lower the Intense heat from which New
Orleans has suffered for the past four
or five days. No deaths have been re
! ported today, but in the twenty-four
hours ending at midnight there were
about ten prostrations.
FRENCH WEATHER
PARIS, June 24.—Today was the hot -
test of the season. Several sunstrokes
were reported and two deaths from heat.
As a contrast to this a heavy snowfall
was reported from Albertsville, Savoy.
Show Increasing Enthusiasm for
LAMAR, Mo., June 24.— W. J. Bryan
spoke here for ten minutes this morning
from the car platform to 1000 peo
ple, while en route to Carthage, and was
cheered lustily. He said that the peo
ple had discovered their ailment, but had
taken the wrong medicine.
"What Is needed," said he. "is a change
of doctors." He spoke of the recent at
tack made upen him by Prof. I IC. Bate
man of Auburn, Me., and said It wa r
unworthy of notice, but stated that an
answer was made in the United States
senate by Senators Allen and Butler
yesterday.
CARTHAGE, Mo„ June 24.—William
Jennings Bryan spoke to a crowd of
15.000 people at the Chautauqua grounds
on bimetallism today, and his utterance:-
were enthusiastically cheered. It was
Bryan day. The- silver champion arrived
this morning and was met at the depot
by several thousand people. After break-
I fast a reception was held. Later thi!-
INebraskan was driven to the Chautau
i qua grounds, riding behind a span of
white horses, and followed by a proces
sion of fifty pure white steeds, mounted
by prominent citizens.
MISSION SAN JUAN
Joyfully Celebrates Its Centennial
SAN JUAN, Cal., June 24.—San Juan
contained the largest crowd In its his
tory today, the occasion being the cen
tennial anniversary of the founding of
the Mission San Juan Bautista. The
program opened with pontifical high
mass celebrated by Bishop Montgom
ery asisisted by twenty priests. Father
MaeE'tres of Monterey delivered a ser
mon. After the religious exerci93s a
procession was formed under the direc
tion of Grand Marshal Thomas Flint, Jr.
ar.d marched to the plaza, where liter
ary exerc's-es were held. An. oration
was delivered by Judge Doolir.g of Hol
lister, and a poem, written by MlssMari
ella Fitzgerald, was read )y Miss Kate
A. Shaefer. When the 1 terary exer
cises' were concluded, the procession
marched to Breen's grove, where the
program included a barbecue and danc
ing. This- evening an open air concert
was given, the festivities being con
cluded with a ball.
A LONG SHUTDOWN
Glass Factories Will Quit Work Next
Wednesday
CHICAGO, June 24.—A1l the manufac
tories of window and flint glass, together
with 95 per cent of the green glass es
tablishments in the country, will chut
down at m-ldnight next Wednesday, and
it Is not unlikely they may remain closed
for the longest period in the history of
the industry.
The window glass blowers have called
a mass meeting to be held in Cleveland
on' July 6. They will theni formulate
their demands, which will be for wage
advances of not less- tan 15 per cent. Job
bers in this city, which is one of the
lairges't distributing points for glass, say
manufacturers with whom they com
municated are, to a man, determined not
to grant any large advance in wages,
and that the result will be a suspension
of the industry until snow flies.
SAN FRANCISCO, June 24.-0. L.
Spaulding, acting secretary of the treas
ury, under date of June 10th, his notified
the collector of customs that the $1 per
capita tax collected from Immigrants
should not be demanded from those in
transit, even if temporarily landed. The
Gaelic brought in thirty-five Japanese pas
sengers on April 10th, and they were de
tained here nine days, pending the depar
ture of the steamer to Mexico. The money
so collected will be returned to the steam
ship company.
MERIDIAN, Miss., June 24.—Elders Ry
dalch. Pomeroy, Parish and Jones, four
Mormon elders from Utah, were run out
of Meridian this afternoon. The elders
yesterday began a house to house canvass
for the purpose of securing converts. This
so aroused the people that when the elders
attempted to hold services they were noti
fied by a committee of citizens that the peo
ple would not allow the privacy of their
homes to be invaded and that the elders
must leave town. They left on the first
train.
TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras, June 24, via
Galveston.—A treaty for the provisional
union of the five republics of Central Amer
ica has been signed by Guatemala.
BRYAN'S HEARERS
Their Leader
Anniversary Day
The Immigrant Tax
Mormons Mobbed
The Greater Republic
PIES FOR
THE POOR
Provided by the Popular
Princess
JUBILEE VISITORS FEASTED
REID AND MILES ARE GIVEN
THEIR SHARE
The Crowds Gathering to Witness the
Tremendous Naval Display to
Be Given Tomorrow
Associated Press Special Wire.
LONDON, June 24.—The Princess of
Wales' Jubilee dinners to the poor to
day were very successful. About three
thousand denizens of the slums were
sumptuously entertained at various cen
ters. The Princess, accompanied by the
Prince of Wales and Princess Victoria
of Wales and Prince and Princess
Charles of Denmark, visited the prin
pal halls. The places visited by the roy
al party were the People's Palace in the
East End, Central Hall, Hclborn and
Weslyan school hotuses.
At the People's Palr.ce the royal visl- j
tors were received by the Lord Mayor
and Lady Mayoress. The guests con
sisted of a thousand ragged children.
After the national anthem had been
sung the children were served with good
roast beef, potatoes, pies, tarts, JeOl
ltee, oranges and ice cream. The fare
at the other places was the same. The
Princess of Wales and party received an
ovation everywhere.
A ROYAL RECEPTION
On behalf of her majesty, the Prince
and Princess of Wales gave a reception
this evening at Buckingham palace. The
occasion was one cf unprecedented
brilliancy, the guests numbering over
1600 and including all the special jubilee
visitors and the admirals, captains and
officers from Spithead.
• An enormous crowd watched the ar
rivals at the palace, while the streets
converging there were filled' with car
l iages. The ball rooms were dazzling.
The guests promenaded the gorgeous
salons- of the palace, while the bands
played dance music.
Among those present were the Duke
and Duchess of York, the Duke and
Duchess of Coburg, the Duke and
Duchess of Fife and the Duke and
Duchess of Teck.
The United States special envoy, Mr.
Whitelaw Reid; Rear Admiral J. N.
Miller, U. S. N.; Gen. Nelson A. Miles,
U. S. A., and their staffs were In attend
ance.
THE NAVAL REVIEW
WINDSOR, England, June 24.—The
lord? of the admiralty and 1 all the ad
mirals of the forelgm ships who are tak
ing part in the naval review off Spit
head on Saturday next, Including Rear
Admiral Miller, IT. S. N., were received
by Queen Victoria at Windsor castle to
day. Each of the admirals was accom
panied by two aides-de-camp, those of
the American admiral being Com
mander William H. Emory, chief of Ad
miral Miller's staff, Lieut. J. Caldwell
and Lleuts. Rogers and Andrews. The
admirals were met at the railroad sta
tion by royal carriages andi were taken
to the castle through a shower of rain.
At the depot and. at the castle for this
occasion detachments of bluejackets
formed' the guard of honor. The British
first lord of the admiralty, the Right
Hon. George J. Goschen, was In full uni
form, and the admirals were ablaze with
decorations and resplendent in full
dress. At the castle they were enter
tained at luncheon in the Waterloo
room and were afterward received by
the queen.
The queen received the adhilrals sit
ting and the spoke very cordially to
Admiral Miller, who then presented the
members of his staff to her majesty.
The naval officers were afterward
shown through the castle.
ON BOARD SHIP
PORTSMOUTH, England, June 24.—
Already there is a big assemblage of
yachts in the Solent to witness the great
naval review of Saturday. Practically
all the warships, British and foreign, are
in line and they present a most impos
ing sight. The American line ships will
carry a full complement of passengers
to the review. On board the New York,
among others, there will be Sir Patrick
Blake, former congressman Bourke
Cockran, Sir Charles Firber, Mr. Knatch
bull-Hugeson, Lord Cecil Manners, Ad
miral Sir George Nares and 450 others,
mostly Americans.
The White Star liner Teutonic left
Liverpool today as an armed cruiser.
She has on board, in addition to her reg
ular crew, who are all naxal reserve
men, twenty bluejackets of the royal
navy, twenty boys from the school ship
Conway and 100 boys from the orphan
age ship Indefatigable.
WELL RECEIVED
LONDON, June 25.—The Daily News
says this morning: Mr. Chamberlain's
address to the colonial premiers yester
day was most favorably received. We
understand it will be printed for them.
A long discussion ensued and at the con
clusion of the conference Mr. Chamber
lain and the premiere were photo
graphed in a group for the queen's Jubi
lee album.
Windsor castle is brilliantly illumin
ated tonight with the changing colors of
Bengal lights. The magnificent specta
cle is visible for a distance of ten miles.
The day was a busy one for the foreign
princes now in the city. They have
called upon each other at the various
houses where they are staying. Large
receptions were given this evening by
the German and Austrian ambassadors
and Lord Frederick Roberts of Kan
dahar gave a special reception to the
Indian officers.
So far as the public are concerned the
fetes are virtually ended. Some illumin
ations will be continued until the end of
the week, but many, together with the.
INDEX
TO THE TELEGRAPH NEWS
Official reports from Cuba announce
an insurgent defeat.
Japanese objections to Hawaiian
annexation as set forth in the protest
filed; England shows small interest in
the matter.
Eastern college men anxious for
fine weather for the big boat race to
day; baseball games and bicycle
races; sporting notes.
Testimony in direct proof of con
spiracy given in the Angus-Craven
1 case. Attorney Aitken details his in
; terview with Mrs. Craven when the
i pencil deeds were shown him.
Confederate veterans hold a re
union at Nashville and seem to enjoy
the occasion; time thins the ranks of
the grizzled soldiers and there will
never be another such parade.
The poor of London given a taste of
princely bounty in honor of the jubi
lee celebration; a royal reception at
night; crowds gathering to witness
tomorrow's tremendous naval dis
play.
Topeka suffers from a hailstorm
which kills dogs, knocks down horses
and breaks men's skulls; all the glass
in the city is shattered; Salina, in the
same state, is beaten by a cyclone
and several people are killed; Mis
souri, Illinois and Kentucky treated
to summer weather gone mad.
The minority in the senate makes a
stubborn but unavailing struggle
against the high rates of the wool
schedule reported by the finance com
mittee; numerous amendments are
proposed and unanimously voted
down. The session of the house made
g-loomy by the report of the death of
Congressman Cooke of Illinois; senate
and house adjourn as a mark of re
spect.
decorations, are already being disman
tled. The very oppressive heat of the
day was followed this evening by a
sudden wind and heavy thunder storm,
which have done much damage in vari
ous parts of the country. The heavy
rain had thoroughly soaked the decora -
tions here, while there have been floods
along the Thames valley and roofs and
steeples have been damaged and tents
destroyed. At Norwich two men were
killed by lightning.
A CANADIAN CRISIS
Senators Invite a Contest Which May
Be Fatal
NEW YORK. June 24.—A dispatch
from Ottawa, Ont., to the Press says:
A political crisis that may result in a
radical change in the constitution of
Canada is imminent. The senate, a
majority of whose members are Tory
derelicts of past federal and provincial
governments, has declined to ratify cer
tain contracts made by the present Lib
eral ministry. The ministry has put
into the estimates items which will en
able them to carry on the contracts
Should the senate defeat them, an ap
peal to the people against the senate
will be Inevitable. The Liberal ministry
have a large working majority in th?
commons, which is the popular branch.
The senators are appointees of former
ministries and hold office for life.
Usually they have recognized their
position and busied themselves with
hearing divorce sUits, formally approved
bills and attending receptions in Rldeau
hall. The Canadian senate, practically
for the first time in its history, has un
dertaken to grapple with the house
elected by the people. The outcome of
the bill will be watched with intens'-
Interest, for it may be the beginning
of the end of the senate.
Unidentified Dead
BUFFALO, N. V., June 24.—The body
of a well dressed, middle-aged man,
whose features were unrecognizable,
was picked up on the Lake Erie beach
near this city today. The body was
dress-ed in a blue serge suit. In the vest
pocket was a gold watch and chain-, at
tached to which was a Masonic emblem.
Gold spectacles bearing a Denver, Col.,
company, were found in. the pocket. The
police believe the body to be that of a
Denver man, and have tele-graphed a
description to the police of that city,
Transvaal Gossip
LONDON, June 24.—The parliamen
tary gossip writer of the Daily News
says this morning that or.-c of the tele
grams from Cecil Rhode® to Miss- Flora
Shaw, to be produce-d at the next meet
ing of the British South Africa Investi
gating committee, instructs Miss Shaw
to Inform Mr. Chamberlain that if he de
slres to retain the British hold upon
South Africa, it would be desirable- to
change the tone of his communications
on- South African matters.
Killed by a Fall
MENDOCINO. June 24.—An accident re
sulting fatally befell a man named Kum
merteldt at Russian gulch. In company
wlth a companion, A. H. Burger, he was
fishing, and while attempting to scale a
cliff of rocks he lost his footing and fell,
striking upon his head on the rocks be
low. He rebounded Into the sea, and
Burger succeeded in dragging his body Into
a cove. The unforunate man's skull was
crushed and death must have been In-
stantaneous. Kummerfeldt was a wealthy
buslness man. who was out on a pleasure
trip. He has a wife and son In Sacramento.
A Big Scheme Nipped
NEW YORK, June 21.—"Baron" Charles
M. Fagenbush. who confessed today that
he had a big scheme almost ready for
swindling hotels when he was arrested here
for a forgery in Denver, "was held in $10.
--000 bail to await the Denver police by
Magistrate Kudlich in the Jefferson mar
ket court today. Fagenbush wanted an
Immediate examination, but Assistant Dis
trict Attorney Lloyd said that was unnec
essary, as the man had been arrested on
a warrant Issued in Denver and ought to
be held for the officers of that city.
An Important Result
CLEVELAND, 0., June 24.—An im
portant result of Mr. Hanna's decisive
victory in the Toledo cohvention will be
the transfer of the state political head
quarters from Columbus and Cincinnati
.to Cleveland. .
Ten Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
STUBBORN
STRUGGLE
Over the Tariff Rates on
Woolens
ALL PROPOSED AMENDMENTS
CAREFULLY AND PROMPTLY
VOTED DOWN
House Proceedings Made Gloomy by
the Death of Congressman Cooke
of Illinois
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, June 24.—A stubborn
contest over the dutieson manufactured
woolen goods occupied the attention of
the senate throughout the day. It was
a day of constant roll calls a nd of cross-
Are debate on the effect of the duties In
advancing rates. Many amendments
were proposed to reduce the rates, but
these were rejected by decisive majori
ties. Less than five pages were disposed
of during the day, carrying the senate
through paragraph 370, the first of the
paragraphs relating to carpets. Dur
ing the day Caffery of Louisiana spoke
at length against the protection system
and severely arraigned those Demo
cratic senators who had voted for duties
on wool and other raw materials.
Hale of Maine came forward today
with a surprise in the form of a pro
posed amendment to the senate rule ad*,
mltting to the privilege of the floor of
the senats* only ex-members not inter
ested in any claim or in the prosecution
of the same, or directly interested'in any
bill pending before congress. The text
of the proposed change follows:
"The purpose of the proposed' amend
ment is to prevent ex-senators from
enjoying the privileges of the floor of the
senate for the purpose- of urging or op
posing claims or bills In which they are
employed as attorneys."
Consideration of the wool schedule
was resumed. In reply to Vest asi to the
program for the future handling of the
bill, Allison said it was. the purpose to
complete the wool, silk and tobacco
schedules in the order named, and then
some excepted paragraphs, such as lead,
hides, etc. The purpose, then, was to be
gin with the chemical schedule and con
sider in order such paragraphs ac has
been passed' over.
Caffery of Louisiana was recognized
for a speech on the general subject of the
course of legislation, particularly on
tariff, to restrict Individual effort and
build up giant industries.
Referring to the recent course of sev
eral Democratic senators, Caffery said:
"Sir, we hear senators on this floor be
longing to the Democratic party stating
four propositions: First, that the doc
trine of free raw material is not Demo
cratic; second-, that if one article is
dutied, all ought to be; third, that if pro
tection is going the rounds, Democrats
might as well get the benefits of it by
asking protection for their home indus
tries; fourth, that there is no principle
involved- in a tariff bill, but merely a
question of schedules."
Caffery examined each of these propo
sitions, pointing out what he regarded;
as their fallacies. Veteran Democrats
who were born and will die with true
Democratic faith in their hearts- and
minds, he said, repudiated them; they
looked upon them as an effort to crucify
their creed; and, like the Christian who
embraces the image of his crucified
Savior, as the last hour of mortality ap
proaches, so will they embrace and cling
to, with a love and faith which no soph
istry can destroy, andi no temptation
betray, the ancient doctrine of tariff for
revenue only, as the nearest approach
to that free trade hoped for by the
Democratic party.
"Is it possible," said he, "that we de
nounce plunder only to join the plun
derers, that we point to the straight and
honest path of Democratic duty and then,
tread the primrose path of Republican
wickedness; that we abhor sin and join
the sinners?"
Concerning sugar, Caffery said that tt
had been admitted that the duty was for
the purpose of protecting beet sugar and
not cane sugar. Caffery spoke two
hours, summing up as follows:
"I believe In a tariff on luxuries. I be
lieve in excise tariff; I believe in an in
come tax. I believe in a tariff on im
ports, placed so as to put money in tho
coffers of the government and not in
the pockets of individuals. Ido not be
lieve in protection save for the purpose
of protecting each citizen in the enjoy
ment of legal, constitutional and natural
rights."
In the course of the discussion on wool,
which was then taken up, White of Cali
fornia asked if it was true that thera
was a twelve-months supply of raw wool
in the country.
Alison replied that he had received let
ters stating this to be the case. Actlns
on this statement, Jones moved to post
pone for twelve months the operation of
the specific duty provided in paragraph
346.
When Rawlins of Utah asked Piatt if
the Republican doctrine was that tha
foreigner paid the tax, the Connecticut
senator courteously asked to be excused
from replying' because, he said, senators
who were amply able to uphold the Re
publican doctrine of a protective tariff
were compelled to sit silent in order ti
secure the passage of the tariff bill
within a reasonable time.
Allen took occasion to criticise sena
tors for debating like schoolboys on
technicalities of the bill. It was "rot
and nonsense to sit day after day and
discuss this bi11.., He wanted to see It
passed as speedily as possible that it
might be exposed as the "gigantic fail
ure of the age."
Jones' amendment to postpone the op
eration of the duty twelve months was
rejected, 18 to 27.
Jones offered amendments in several

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