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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, June 29, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-06-29/ed-1/seq-1/

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TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 272.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
■ERALD SUB-AGENCIES—
ADVERTISEMENTS left at the fol
lowing agencies will receive prompt at
tention and' will be printed as quickly
and with the same care as If left at
the mala office, 221 W. Third street:
DOWNEY AYE. AND BAST BIDS
L. P. COLLETTE, 621 Downey avenue.
OLD WORLD DRUG STORE. 1028
Downey avenue, Phone Flora 242.
WM. H. HARMON, 766 Pasadena are.,
Phone East 68.
CENTRAL AYE. AND VERNON
S. E. BARNEyTIoM Central aye.
CHICAGO PHARMACY, Central ave
nue and Twelfth street, Phone West 112.
T. J. AKEY, corner Central and Vernon
avenues. Phone West 12.
MAIN BT. AND SOUTHWEST
E. T. PARKE,~PHARMACY, 2129 B.
Main, Phone Blue 2062.
E. VAN DYKE. DRUGGIST, 711 W.
Jefferson St., Phone White 1271.
WESTLAKE GROCERY, corner Al
, varado and Seventh sts.. Phone Main
1182.
H. L. PARK, DRUGGIST, corner
Thirty-eighth and Wesley aye., Phone
Blue 1301.
T. W. BROWN, JR.. DRUGGIST. Junc
tion of Hoover, Union and Twenty-fourth
ate., Phone Blue lioi.
BOYLE HEIGHTS
H. C. WORLAND. 2138 E. First, Sta
tion B.
T. P. WYLIE, 1277 E. FIRST. Phone
Park 18.
J. M. HARRIS. 1842 E. FIRST, Phone
Park 21.
TEMPLE ST. AND NORTHWEST
DR. H. KALLEWODA, DRUGGIST,
corner Temple st. and Beaudry aye.,
Phone Main 206.
STAR PHARMACY, corner Temple and
Belmont aye.. Phone Main 607.
VIOLE & LOPIZICH, DRUGGISTS,
427 N. Main St.. Phone Main 876.
LOS ANGELES— *
—SAN FRANCISCO—
A chance for advertisers to reach the
public of both cities on the most ad
vantageous terms ever offered.
We have concluded arrangements
whereby classified advertising may be
Inserted simultaneously In the
LOS ANGELES HERALD
And In the
SAN FRANCISCO POST
For
1 CENTS PER LINE.
8 CENTS PER LINE,
8 CENTS PER LINE,
8 CENTS PER LINE
Here Is a rare opportunity for people
having bargains to offer or wants to be
known.
HERALD PUBLISHING CO.,
tf 222 W. Third St.
SPECIAL NOTICES
A FREE CLAIRVOYANT DIAGNOSE
of disease will be given to the poor every
Tuesday at the Magnetic Institute,
northeast cor. Sixth and Spring. En
trance 125 W. Sixth st. Diseases located
without asking questions. Seven years'
successful healing In Los Angeles. Send
for testimonials. MRS. ESTHER DYE,
magnetic healer. '6-30
IfOTICE—THE LOB ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oclock
a.m. and 6 and 8 oclock p.m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut off and a fine ot 22 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
WANTED—EVERY ONE TO KNOW
that Hall Thompson Rheumatism, Liver
and Kidney Cure will cure rheumatism.
Call and get testimonials. 223 N. Spring
St., room 8. G.i
THE DAILY JOURNAL. PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 205 New High st. tf
J. CLARK ANDERSON, THE BOY ME
dlum, has returned to the city and will
give sittings dally at the Hotel Portland
444H B. Spring. 7 . 8 '
UNUSUAL OPPORTUNITY TO RE
celve the degree of M. D. Address Sld
dall, 414 Clybourn aye., Chicago, 111. 29
■PBCIAL SALE—NO CHARGE FOR
borders with 6c and 7V«c wallpaper
WALTER, 218 W. Sixth St. S-12
FOR SALE-STATE LOAN AND TRUST
Co. stock at 85 cents. 1., Box 6, Herald.
tf
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
LUCIEN EARLE. ATTORNEY
office, Bullard building; entrance, roon
420; telephone black 1445. 7-24-97
BROUSSEAU & MONTGOMERY
Attorneys-at-Law.
403 Bradbury block. Los Angeles. ti
PLUMBERS
FRANK A. WEINSHANK. PLUMBEP
and gasfltter, 240 E. Second St.; tel. 186.
HELP WANTED—MALE
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building,
300-302 W. Second street, in basement, j
Telephone 509.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
House girl, family of 2, $15, O. K. place;
house girl, Pasadena, Santa Barbara,
Santa Ana, Fernando, Ventura county,
Santa Monica, $12, $15, $20, and $25, several
employers In office today; cook, 6 men,
$20, call early; 4 girls, assist In house
work, $8, $10 and $15; house girl, 2 ladles,
$3, week; house girl, who likes children,
$15, city.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Seven extra waitresses, 3d to sth, 50c.
meal; 2 extra waitresses, 2 meals, $1, day;
cook, small hotel, mountains, $20 to $25:
cook, Nevada, $30, employer here, O. K.
place: kitchen helper, boarding house,
$15; waitress, country hotel, $20, go July
Ist; pantry girl, hotel, beach, $20.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Man and wife, $25, etc.; shoemaker. 60
per cent: houseman, $20, etc.; German
ranch hand, $20, etc.; shoemaker, $12,
week; fruit ranch hand, $20, etc.; man,
Starr press, 10c. etc., ton; 2 men logging
camp, $30, etc.. each; Swiss milker, $30,
etc.; man and wife, ranch, $35, etc.;
ranch hands, city, $16, etc.; ranch
hands, $1.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
All-round cook, $10 to $12, etc.; cook,
hay-baler crew, $25, etc.; experienced
mud bath man, $20, etc., month; cook,
country boarding house, $25, etc.; extra
pastry cook, $2, etc.. day.; ranch cook,
$25, etc., month.
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
WANTED—A NUMBER OF MEN TO
act as ushers at Bryan afternoon ad
dress, July 5. 1897. Call SILVER RE
PUBLICAN CLUB, 318 W. Second St. tf
WAITED— AGENTS FOrTiNdIjSTRIAL
Insurance; salary and commission; expe
rience not necessary. Apply room 9. 105
E- First. 7 _25
WANTED—EGAN'S RESTAURANT. 126
-128 E. Second st., serves the best 10c meal
In the city; try it and be convinced. 8-11
WANTED-GOOD BOY. APPLY 711 S.
Main st. 7_29
HELP WANTED—FEMALE
WANTED—LADY TO HANDLE THE
greatest specialty for women ever in
troduced: it is Indispensable; there Is
nothing like It or that can take Its place:
a bright business woman can make $100
a month and all expenses. Address R.
Box 25. 29
SITUATIONS WANTED-MALE
WANTED—YOUNG MAN DESIRES Po
sition as oil fireman In city. Address
737 Central aye., room 13. 30
WANTED—TO BORROW
MONEY WANTED—S22OO ON HOUSE
worth $5000; tlrst-class security; pay 11
per cent gross. W. N. HOLWAY, room
308, Henne blk., 122 W. Third St. 7-4
WANTED—TO BUY LIVE STOCK
WANTED—A GENTLE HORSE AND
phaeton for tha keeping of same; will
give good care and only use about three
times a week in the morning. BOWLER,
Hotel Vincent, S. Broadway. 29
WANTED—CALVES AND FAT~STOCK
FRED HUGHES, Durham market, 1067
Temple st. g-24 tf
WANTED-PARTNERS
WANTED—PARTNER WITH $100 TO
Join me In a nice little business at Cata
lina island for the summer. R., Box 25.
__________ 30
WANTED—MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED—PARTY TO INDORSE A $1200
note with real estate for position worth
$80 per month and security on the busi
ness In return. Address C, Box 26, Her
ald. 29
WANTED—GOOD DOG, CHEAP; MUST
be kind, suitable for children. G. H.
DAVIES, Avalon, Catallna island. 29
WANTED—TO BALE YOUR HAY AND
take baling out in hay. D. F. M'GARRY,
Ninth and Alameda. 30
WANTED—ESTABLISHED BUSINESS,
retail; central. Y-28, Herald. 7-3
FOR SALE—LIVE STOCK
FOR SALE—ABOUT 1000 ANGORA
goats; also young St. Bernard dog. 227
Bullard block. j
FOR SALE—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE—TYPEWRITERS CHEAP-
Sralth Premier, $40; Remington, $35,
Densmore, $36; Yost, $25; Callgraph, $25
All rented. ALEXANDER, 301 S.B'dway
6.30
FOR SALE—A 25-SHIRT WASHING MA
chlrie; for sale, a b-nat cornet. A., Box
25- 29
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE—B6 BUSINESS, 75 HOUSES,
rooms, furnished, unfurnished, for rent;
collections; wanted, help free and work
EDW, NITTINGER, 236VS S. Spring st. tf
I SELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS
for cash. I. D. BARNARD, 111 North
Broadway, opposite Times building, tf
FOR SALE—SALOONS AT VERY REA
sonable terms. Apply at 440 Aliso St. tf
FOR SALE—FRUIT. CIGAR AND
drink stand. 516 S. Main. 7-6
HYPNOTISM
HYPNOTISM AND PERSONAL MAG
netlsm taught; diseases cured. HYP
NOTIC INSTITUTE, S. Spring. 7-16
WATCHMAKING
HIGHEST PRICES PATD FOR OLD
gold and sliver, or taken in exchange for
new goods, w. J. GETZ, Jeweler, 3315
8. Broadway. tr
FRUITS AND VEOE TABLES
I.UDWIG & MATTHEWS. WHOLESALE
and retail fruits and vegetables MOT!
MARKET. 135 S. Main St., tel. 650. tf
CARPET CLEANING
CARPETS CLEANED, SEWED AND
laid ot your house. J. MARTIN, 601 W
Eighth st. 7. g
(For additional classified see Page Two.)
THE HERALD
CHILDISH
SINGING
Is Pleasant to England's
Queen
VICTORIA AT KENSINGTON
REVISITS THE SCENE OF HER
BIRTH
In the afternoon Her Majesty Makes
Her Last Jubilee Appearance
In the Metropolis
Associated Press Special Wire,
LONDON, June 28.—The scene at St.
Mary's abbey, Kensington, today was
exceedingly brilliant, the neighborhood
being lavishly decorated. The marquis
and marchioness of Lome were Includ
ed In the members of the reception com
mittee. The guards of honor, furnished
by the Middlesex volunteers, presented
arms and the band played the national
anthem on the arrival of her majesty.
As soon as the queen's carriage reached
the porch the marquis and marchioness
of Lome approached and greeted her
majesty, after which the chairman of The
vestry presented the address, which was
contained In a morocco case.
Her majesty handed back a written
reply to the address, thanking the sign
ers for their loyal and kind expressions
and adding: "I gladly renew my as
sociation with a place which, as the
scene of my birth and summons to the
throne, has ever had and will have with
me solemn and tender recollections."
Across the gates of Kensington pal
ace was a banner on which waa In
scribed "Home, Sweet Home "
Her majesty saw It and was much af
fected.
Ten thousand children belonging to
the elementary schools of Kensington,
massed behind the railings of Kensing
ton gardens, sang the national anthem,
while the queen was passing.
BACK TO LONDON
LONDON, June 28.—The Queen re
turned to London this afternoon and
made what is most probably her last
Jubilee appearance In the metropolis, for.
with the celebration that closes at Al
dershot Thursday next, the state ap
pearance of her Majesty, It Is said on
fairly official authority, will be finished.
Henceforth, for whatever span of life
may be left to her. Queen Victoria will
confine herself to such work for the
state as can be done at Windsor, Bal
moral or Osborne. All those official
functions, drawing rooms, public cere
monies, opening of town halls, hospitals
and the like, which bring the sovereign
face to face with the people, will now be
relegated to the Prince and Princess of
Wales.
Her majesty reached Buckingham pal
ace at 1:30 p. m., and about E, oclock
entered the grounds to be present at
the garden party, for which 6000 Invita
tions had been Issued. Her majesty was
received with almost reverential greet
ings, and took up her position, to which
she waa wheeled from the palace door,
in front of a small tent near the lake.
The gardens were beautifully arranged
The queen's watermen were In boats on
the lake, the fountains were playing,
refreshment marquees had been erect
ed at convenient spots, and three bands
of music were In attendance. The queen
received many of the prominent guests
in her tent and there took leave of the
special envoys of the foreign powers to
the Jubilee ceremonies and their suites.
Among l the Americans present were all
the members of the United States spe
cial embassy excepting Rear Admiral
Miller.
The queen returned to Windsor at 7
oclock.
MILITARY JEALOUSY
PORTSMOUTH, Eng., June 28.—Much
disappointment la felt among the Brit
ish naval officers to the fact that the
queen did not review the fleet In per
son on Saturday, especially as she goes
to Aldershot on Thursday to review the
troops there.
At the naval review carrier pigeons
with messages for the queen, were dis
patched from the royal yacht Victoria
and Albert by the Prince of Wales. Af
ter telling her majesty of the complete
success of the review, the prince added:
"The only regret la that you were not
here."
The Prince of Wales then signaled the
fleet, expressing his satisfaction at the
magnificent display made, adding: "I
order the main brace to be spliced."
Jiuch pleasure has been expressed here
at a remark made by Rear Admiral J.
N. Miller, U. S. N., to General Davis,
commanding the southern district. It
was: "My advice, sir, to any nation go
ing to war. Is to consult England first."
The United States' special envey,
Whltelaw Reid. gave a luncheon tod/ay
in honor of the Due d'Aurstadt (Marshal
Da-voust), the grand chancellor of the
Legion of Honor, and special envoy of
France. The guests Included the
United States ambassador, Col. John
Hay, and the Hawaiian representative,
S. M. Damon.
A GRACEFUL APOLOGY
LONDON, June 28.—The Canadian
premier. Sir Wilfred Laurier, and a num
ber of other distinguished people were in
the strangers' gallery of the house of
commons today when Thomas Lough,
Liberal member of the West division of
Islington, questioned the government
leader in the house, Mr. Balfour, as to
who was responsible for the bad ar
rangements for the queen'si reception of
the members of the houss of commons at
Buckingham palace on Wednesday last,
and whether it was Intended to make an
apology to them. Mr. Lough's remarks
were greeted with cheers, mingled with
cries from the Irish members of "serves,
you right."
Mr. Balfour replied that the officers' of
her majesty's household, deeply regret
ted, in spite of their best endeavors to
show the utmost respect for the speaker '
LOS ANGELES, TUESDAY MORNING, JUNE 29, 1897
and the members of the house of com
mons, that anything should have occur
red to cause dissatisfaction.
The colonial premiers l have passed a
busy day. Lord. Roaebery gave them a
luncheon, at which most of the Liberal
ex-ministers were present, and subse
quently they attended a garden party,
where they met Mr. Chamberlain, and
they were present at two receptions this
evening, one given by the duchess of
Abercorn and the other by Sir Henri-
Irving at the Lyceum theater.
The Indians Not Anxious to Receive
Allotments
MUSKOGEE, I. T., June 28.—The
Dawes and- Cherokee commissions met
here today. It is said that the Creeks
are now willing to enter into negotia
tions looking toward allotments and a
system of town sites.
TAHLBQUAH, I. T„ June 28.—Th?
commission appointed by the Cherokee
council to negotiate with the Dawes
commission has adjourned until the sec
oud Monday in August, after having
been in session five days. Chairman D
W. Bushyhead expresses the opinion
that at the August meeting the Chero ■
kees will be ready to come to an agree
ment, as the fullblood element is con
vinced that the United States govern
ment will not brook further delay.
Bushyhead, Rogers and Ross have from
the first been In favor of treating with
the Dawes commission, and the plan of
allotment has been stubbornly opposed
by the fullblood element of the Chero
kees from the first.
TOPEKA, Kas., June 28.— J. S. Parks,
state printer-elect, announced today
that the use of type-setting machines
would be abolished in the state printing
office with the beginning of his admin
istration, on Thursday next. During
the session of the legislature union
printers made a strong effort to secure
the passage of a bill prohibiting the
use of machines In the state office. In
this they were unsuccessful, but the.
did succeed in having attached to the
appropriation bill a "rider" which pro
vides that the state printer shall re
ceive but ten cents per thousand "ems"
for machine work. It is claimed that at
this rate the machines cannot be op
erated except at a loss and as a result
they will be thrown out and the state
will pay from 30 to 45 cents per thousand
for hand composition.
NEW HAVEN, June 28.—At the close
of the law school exercises the following
awards of prizes were announced,
among others: Towr.send prize, $100,
to seniors who shall write or pronounce
the best oration at the public anniver
sary exercises at graduation, Joseph
Edwin Proffltt, Floyd, Va.; Jewell prize.
$50, to senior who receives highest mark
at his annual examination, Arthur Ash
ford'Wilder, Honolulu, Hawaii; Munson
prize, $50, best graduating thesis,
Thomas Harper Cobbs, B. A., Washing
ton university, Missouri.
LONDON, June 29.—The Dally Chron
icle published this morning, under re
serve, a letter from Teheran, the cap
ital of Persia, describing a terrible per
secution of the Jews. According to the
correspondent, a mob of fantaical Mos
lems has savagely attacked the Jewish
quarters of the city and is threatening
to exterminate the Jews unless they em
brace Mohammedanism. The govern
ment, although it has- dispatched troops
to quell the disorders, appears to be al
most powerless to stem the tide of fa
naticism.
SAN FRANCISCO, June 28.—Marga
ret Murphy, wife of John Murphy, a
teamster, committed suicide last night
by taking carbolic acid. Mrs. Murphy's
act was the sequel to a quarrel which
she had with her husband. Last evening
about 8 o'clock, when he came home, he
accused his wife of being under the in
fluence of liquor. She retaliated by strik
ing him over the head with a chair.
Murphy left the house shortly after, and
while he was away Mrs. Murphy swal
lowed the poison.
Building Inspectors
WASHINGTON, June 28.— J. W. Rob
erts of Illinois, assistant chief computer
in the office of the supervising architect
of the treasury, has been appointed su
perintendent of construction of the
United States postoffice and court house
building at San Francisco, and Lee Ul
lery of Illinois, a computer in the same
office, has been appolntedasuperintend
ent of construction of the coinage mint
building at Denver. These appoint
ments were made under the civil ser
vice rules.
LEADVILLE, Col., June 28.—Public
gambling has probably received its
death blow here. Acting under orders
from Judge Owers of the district court,
a posse of deputy sheriffs raided eveTy
gambling establishment in the city,
seizing over $1000 worth of tables an*
Implements, which will be destroyed. All
the proprietors of gambling houses were
arrested. The raid has caused a great
sensation, as it breaks up an industry
that has flourished here since 1879.
FRESNO, June 28.—Crazed with Jeal
ousy, because his sweetheart Maggie
Hoffman accompanied another man to
the Opera House last night, Robert F.
Bonsfleld, a young dairyman, swallowed
laudanum this morning and will prob
ably die.
ANNAPOLIS. June 28.—James Smith,
a fourteen-year-old negro, ie In. jail here
charged with attempting to wreck the
Bay Ridge excursion train from Wash-
ington yesterday. He was caught In the
act of placing a railroad tie on the track.
DAKOTA. Ga., June 28.—Durlnga ter
rific thunder storm last night lightning
struck a convict camp near here, killing
four convicts and seriously Injuring ten
others. Twenty escaped during the ex
citement.
MADRID, June 28.—Nine children
have been killed and many other* In
jured by the collapse of a church wall at
Sollno, in the province of Culdo Real
CHEROKEE LANDS
Kansas Composition
Yale Honors
Persian Persecution
A Fatal Quarrel
Death to Gambling
A Jealous Lover
A Juvenile Criminal
Convicts Killed
Children Killed
PROMISES
TO PACIFY
Made by Cuban Captain
General
WEYLER REACHES SANTIAGO
AND REBELS WILL BE TREATED
RIGOROUSLY
The Insurgent Leaders, Garcia and
Gomez, also Propose to Do
Some of the Treating
Associated Press Special Wire.
HAVANA, June 28—Captain-General
Weyler, after a stormy passage on a
coasting steamer from Manzanillo, ar
rived at Santiago de Cuba yesterday af
ternoon. The steamer was met by a
number of tugs having on board the
n/unncipal authorities, provincial au
thorities and General Linares, the mili
tary commander of the district. The
port and shipping were profusely deco
rated In honor of the captain-general,
and he was cheered by large numbers of
people who lined the routes from- the
wharf to the cathedral, and thence to
the palace, ir. spite of the fact that rain
was failing heaivily. At the palace the
captain-general received all the local
civil and military authorities.
Addressing the local authorities last
evening in the palace of Santiago de
Cuba, Captain-General Weyler explain
ed that he was coming to pacify that part
of the Island, and that though he was
strongly desirous of peace, his system
of making war was to be rigorous toward
the "rebels," who refuse to accept the
clemency which Spain, through him, of
fered them.
INSURGENT ACTIVITY
NUW YORK, June 28.—A dispatch to
the Herald from Key West says: Pri
vate advices Just received from Sant
iago province give further details of the
fighting during last week around Gibara
and Banes, between insurgents and
Spanish forces. The advices say that
the insurgents under Gen. Callxto Gar
cia and Col, Torres, numbering between
5000 and 6000 well armed and equipped
men, attacked both of the seaports si
multaneously, but met with a stubborn
resistance from the Spaniards who had
been advised of their coming and wers
prepared. The demonstration against
Banes, which is less than ten leaguts
distant from Gibara, was merely a feint
by the rebels to divert attention and
draw the Spanish forces from Gibara,
which was the only point really to be
attacked and which they knew had been
strongly fortified and garrisoned. The
ruse was partially successful and Garcia
with his forces entered Gibara. His
success, however, was only of short du
ration as he was subsequently driven
out after a hot fight, in which many
were killed and wounded on both sides*
Col. Machado, a veteran of the ten years'
war and who is actively engaged in pro
moting the present struggle, says:
"My advices from Cuba are that Gen
eral Gomez has planned his summer
campaign and put it In operation. Al
ready columns of thousands of well
armed men under efficient leaders will
have been distributed throughout the
different provinces. Gen. Garcia's at
tack on Gibara and other important
operations by our forces will be directed
by Gen. Gomez from Santa Clara, where
he will pitch his headquarters."
CASTELLAR FOR WASHINGTON
HAVANA, June 28.—Senor Santos
Guzman, the well-known leader of the
uncompromising Spanish party In Ha
vana, Is reported to have informed hi?
adherents that Senor Castellar is about
to be appointed Spanish Minister to
Washington, the position now held by
De Lome.
THE FATE OF THE PRISONERS
NEW YORK, June 28.—A dispatch lo
the Journal and Advertiser from Hav
ana says: Consul General Lee has final
ly been officially notified that Ona Mel
ton, the American newspaper corres
pondent; Captain Laborde and othei'6
belonging to the captured schooner Com
petitor, and one or two Americans in
carcerated with them In the Cabanas
fortress will be called for public trial
July Ist. The hearing will go before
civil judges and Judgment will be en
tirely based on the declarations previ
ously made within the wall&of the mili
tary prisons on evidence taken by a gov
ernment official or crown prosecutor,
acting on behalf of the Spanish Admir
alty and War Department. The court
will listen to no new testimony save In
support of the written declaration al
ready riled.
George Ferran, the only witness the
Competitor men were permitted to call
on their behalf, was arrested immediate
ly after his examination and Is still a
prisoner. His sworn statement was that
the vessel was beyond the three mile
limit and had th? American flag at her
masthead when fired upon and seized.
This statement displeased the Spaniards
and Ferran was therefore detained here
and charged with perjury. Consul Gen
eral Lee has as yet received no instruc
tions from Washington as to employing
counsel to defend the men.
A Spanish magistrate said the men
would undoubtedly be found guilty
again and sentenced to death or long
terms of Imprisonment, but he added
"their friends need not fear their being
executed or deported. Our people are
too diplomatic to force America's-hand."
The rebel Generals, Rivera and Bac
calao, will not be shot. Gen. Weyler has
received a cable from Minister of War
Azcarraga, to indefinitely suspend the
court martial sentences of death "pend
ing the close of hostilities," when their
pardon may be expected.
Gen. Weyler himself has 1 taken no
steps to atop the court martial and
shooting of other and less Important
prisoners of war during the last three
days. At Matanzas, at Sagua, at Santa
Clara, Sanctl Spirltus, Cier.fuegos and
INDEX
TO THE TELEGRAPH NEWS
Bookkeeper Figel arrested for em
bezzlement, and a charge of murder
is expected to follow.
Ohio Democrats meet in state con
vention today, Boies of lowa thinks
free silver dead, and wants a new
issue.
A Chicago man attempts to murder
most of his relations, and finds his
aged father-in-law both courageous
and stout.
Emperor William begins his cabi
net reorganization by dismissing the
minister for foreign affairs, Baron
yon Bieberstein.
The seduction of a Texas young
woman leads to fighting by members
of two prominent families; two men
dead and a third fatally wounded.
Victoria, at Kensington, revisits
the scene of her birth and summons
to the throne; later, at London, she
makes her last jubilee appearance in
the metropolis.
Captain-General Weyler arrives at
Santiago de Cuba, and promises to
pacify that part of the island; the in
surgent leaders prepare to resist the
Spanish leader's methods of pacifica
tion.
The low rates made from Chicago
for the Christian Endeavor conven
tion attracts an immense number of
Endeavorers and tourists; everything
on wheels will be pressed into service
to handle the traffic.
Senate debate drifts around among
all the questions of interest to the
country and some that are not, but
fair progress is made with the tariff
bill; the rates on leather are fixed at
20 per cent ad valorem; the commit
tee reaches an agreement on lead ores
and that item will be disposed of to
day.
Pinar del Rio, dozens of executions oc
curred.
At Sagua two Cuban girls, accused of
sending out clothes to their brothers,
fighting under the Insurgent chief
Roban, were convicted of aiding the
rebellion and sentenced by a military
court to respectively six years- and six
months' imprisonment in the African
penal colonies.
LEE'S DENIAL
WASHINGTON, June 28.—The state
department has received a statement
from Consul General Lee at Havana in
which he declares that his son had no
connection whatever with the premature
publication some time ago of the Ruiz
report.
TROOPS PROMISED
MADRID, June 28.—Senor Canovas
del Castillo says that in case Spanish
forces In Cuba should suffer severely
from sickness during the rainy season
the government will send 20,000 addition
al troops to the Island In October, In or
der to maintain the' army at Its full
strength and to inflict the final blow
upon the Insurgents.
DECLINE TO TALK
WASHINGTON, June 28.—N0 official
Information has been received at the
state department in regard to the re
port from Havana that Senator Cas
telar Is to succeed Minister Delome as
the diplomatic representative of the
Spanish government at Washington.
The officials of the Spanish legation de
cline to discuss the report in any way.
INSURGENTS SURRENDER
HAVANA, June 28.—Advices received
from official sources at Sanctl Spiritus
announce the surrender there to the
Spanish authorities of the insurgent
governor, Felix Companion, an insur
gent major, three insurgent prefects,
three Insurgent mall carriers, six in
surgents belonging to the escort of Vel
los, the Insurgent leader, and 84 men
and 344 women and children. Official dis
patches from Trinidad, province of San
ta Clara, say that 390 persons have sur
rendered there to the Spaniards.
Turkish Notes
CONSTANTINOPLE, June 28.—A
fresh attempt on the part of the Sultan
to secure Germany's support for the re
tention of Thessaly has met with re
fusal and advice given to conform to
Europe's wishes on the subject.
LONDON, June 28— The Constanti
nople correspondent of the Standard
says that secret official orders have been
sent Into the provinces to encourage able
bodied men to come into the capital,
with the result that no fewer than 25,000
sturdy ruffians have arrived there and
been provided for by the government.
The Cherry Crop
SAN FRANCISCO, June 28.—Freight
shipments of cherries last week were
over 300,000 pounds, the total being a
little over 3,000,000 pounds for the sea
son. The local freight agent of the
Southern Pacific says the outlook now
Is that all previous seasons' records in
fruit shipments are broken this seaon.
He says there will be more pounds of
prunes than ever before.
Was Kid Afraid?
PHILADELPHIA, June 28.—Kid La
vlgne failed to show up tonight at the
Arena for a fight between himself and
young Griffo. The latter was there,
however, and in place of Lavigne Mar
tin Judge of this city donned the gloves
for a six round go and made a good bat
tle against the Australian. The bout
ended, however, In Grlffo's favor.
Sentenced to Death
SAN JOSE, June 28.—Harry Allender
was brought here today from San Quen
tin to be resentenced on a charge of
murder, the supreme court having af
firmed the verdict of the lower court.
Allender shot and killed Wilburga Flel
ner and V. Crosettl. He appears entire
ly unconcerned about his fate.
An Inspector Coming
DENVER, Col., June 28—Lieutenant
Colonel H. W. Lawton, Inspector Gen
eral of the Southern District of the
United States War Department, is here
en route from Santa Fe to Los Angeles,
which place has been designed as head
quarters of the district
Ten Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
SENATORS'
STRUGGLES
Finally Fix the Rates on
Leather
20 PER CENT AD VALOREM
MARKS THE INCREASE IN SHOH
PRICES
; i ■
The Deoate Drifts About Like a Ship
Without a Rudder, but Pro
gress Is Made
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, June 28—The senate
made good progress on the tariff bill
today, disposing of the paragraphs re
lating to hides, which have been the
source of much controversy. As finally
agreed on the duty on hides is placed
at 20 per cent ad valorem, in place ot
1% cents per pound, as originally re
ported by the fianance committee. The
discussion was protracted, drifting into
a general debate on trusts and from
that back to the sugar trust.
Smith of New Jersey spoke at length
against the duty on hides, while Allen
of Nebraska supported the duty. The
new paragraph was agreed to, 39 to 20,
one Democrat (Rawlins of Utah) and
several Populists and Silver Republi
cans voting with the Republicans in the
affirmative. The incidental debate on
trusts led to a severe arraignment of
the sugar trust by Caffery and Lindsay
and a general discussion of means to
deal with trusts by Hoar.
Among other paragraphs disposed of
during the day were all those relating
to gloves, a substitute for the paragraph
on live animals, iron ore and stained
glass windows.
A resolution was agreed to authoriz
ing the president to invite foreign gov
ernments to participate in the trana
mississLppi exposition at Omaha.
The tariff bill was then taken up. It
was intended to take up paragraphs re-,
lating to hides, but in. the absence ot
Smith of New Jersey, Allison consented
to let the subject go over.
Rapid progress was made, a number
of schedules being adopted. Lead ore
was skipped and the leather schedule
taken up. Smith of New Jersey attacked
Allison's proposed change relating to
hides, making the rate twenty per cent
ad valorem and striking out the 'draw
back proviso.
The paragraph relating to sta'.ned or
painted glass windows was changed
slightly in phraseology, and tha duties
agreed to as reported. On the Iron ore
paragraph the pending provision gave
a duty of 40 cents per ton on Iron ore,
including manganiferous iron, ore and
the dross or residuum from 'Durnt py
rites, with a proviso relating to the ac
count to be taken of moisture In weigh
ing the ore.
Allison offered new amendments,which
were agreed to, adding the first clause
of the paragraph as repot ted, "Man
ganese ore $1 per ton;" also, at the end
of the proviso, "basic slag, ground or un
ground, $1 per ton.
Paragraph 142, card clothing, was
agreed to as In the house bill.
In the paragraph on cross-out saws the
committee made a change-, inserting
steel handsaws, finished or unfinished,
10 cents per pound', and 20 per cent ad
valorem.
In paragraph 137, iron and steel bars,
cold drawn, etc., change was made from
one cent to three-fourths of a cent per
pound in addition to the rates on plates,
etc., and on steel circular saw plates
from %to cent in addition to the rates
for steel saw plates.
Aluminum was changed, making the
rate crude 7 cents; in plates, etc., 12.
On bronze powder the duty on bronze
metal in leaf was increased from 5 to
8 cents per package.
A new paragraph was agreed to, viz.:
Hooks and eyes, 5% cents per pound
and 15 per cent ad valorem.
At Mr. Quay's request the change in
paragraph 137 was reconsidered and one
cent restored as the duty on Iron bars,
etc., in addition to the rates on plates,
etc.
When lead, lead bearing ores, etc., was
reached, Mr. Allison said It was pro
posed to change the paragraph on lead
dross, bullion, etc., from 2 to 2>4 cents.
The paragraph went over at Mr. Alli
son's request.
Mr. Allison proposed'a change in para
graph 426/4, relating to hides, making
the rate 20 per cent ad valorem Instead
of IV4 cents per pound: and also strik
ing out the proviso relating to draw
backs.
The paragraph as amended reads:
"Hides of cattle, raw or uncured,
whether dTy, salted or pickled', 20 per
cent ad valorem."
Smith stated in response to questions
that the proposed 20 per cent advalorem
was much greater than the 1% cents
specific duty, being about 4 cents per
pound by ihe ad valorem rate.
Piatt of Connecticut interposed the
suggestion that he had telegraphed 1 to
the New York custom house in refer
ence to the importation of hides and
had received an answer stating that the
importation in the last eleven months
was 70.000,000 pounds of the value of .
$7,000,000, and the price of French green
hides averaged about 10 cents a pound
and the South American 5 cents. Re
ferring to Cuba, Mr. Smith spoke of the
remarkable fact that a resolution recog
nizing the belligerency of the Cubans
had been passed by the senate and sent
to that catafalque, or to that tomb, the
house of representatives, to be burled by
a Republican house, a Republican
speaker, at the dictation of a Republican
president.
At the dictation of a Republican
president. It was an insult to the
American people, which they would re
buke at the polls next November. Mr,
Smith then turned to his prepared)
speech. His chief argument against
the proposed duty on, hides was that 1%

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