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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, June 29, 1897, Image 2

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would benefit only tne beef mutt, which,
he said, controlled almost exclusively
the price of hides used by •Ameaican'
manufacturers of leather goodn. Hides,
he said, had been on the free list since
J872, ar.d during that time the American
producers had been, able not only to
meet all foreign competition, but to
build up a valuable export trade in
leather manufactures This market, he
said, would be threatened by the Imposi
tion of the proposed duty.
Vest of Missouri reviewed the legislai
tlon op leather and hides, and' presetted
a letter written by James G. Blame to
Mr. McKinley, when the McKinley bill
was being framed, protesting agal-nst a
duty on hides as a slap in the face of the
South Americans, and as likely to legis
late the Republican party out of power.
The senator argued that a duty on hides
could not advance the price of emttle in
the west, as hides were only a bi-product
of cattle, and, moreover, the price of
cattle was fixed absolutely, wilth the
powar to put the price down, by t.he Big
Four combination at Chicago. The
senator recalled the circumstance of the
senatorial inquiry into the beef trust, in
which .he participated.
When Vest spoke of oppressive ac
tion by Mr. Armour to compel butchers
to use his dressed beef, Allen of Ne
braska remarked that the evidence
seemed s-uiUcient for an indictment, ar.d
why, then, was not something done to
ward prosecution?
This developed a warm controversy
between Host and Allen as to the right
of federal prosecution for an offense
wholly wlthl.B state lines, which at times
became rattutt personal.
A reference in Mr. Smith's remarks as
to the trusts Lend Stewart of Nevada to
make an extended arraignment of the
money trust, which, he asserted, was
the worst of all trusts.
Stewart' argued also that If there was
to be a protective tariff bill all sections
should share in tb£ advantages it gave.
Incidentally Stewart paid a tribute to
the Chicago platform, and said he sup
ported It throughout.
Allen of Nebraska said that while not
an advocate of a general protective sys
tem, yet he concurred with the view
that if there was to be such a bill every
section should share in the benefits it
gave. He spoke of the benefits of a hide
duty to the farmers.
The discussion branched off to the
prosecution of trusts, Allen and Hoar
discussing the law.
Hoar said that while the question of
trusts could be dealt with to some ex
tent by striking at their imports, as in
the law of 1894, yet he feared that the
most serious phases of the evil must be
dealt with by the states. He showed the
technical legal meaning of the word
"trust," and showed the difficulty in
making the sugar trust an d Standard oil
trust amenable to federal law. He re
garded these monopolies as a menace
to the republic and was hopeful that
some means might be found to check
them, yet he couid not say how they
could be hit. The state could limit their
amount of capital, which would be one
effective means of dealing with them.
Lindsay of Kentucky said that in the
tease of a confessed monopoly, such as
the sugar trust, one effective means of
deialing with it would be to extend to it
no further benefits from tariff legisla
tion. When the point was reached in a
tariff, bill where sugar was to be dealt
with, then it should be so shaped as not
to be tn the beneilt ot the trust.
Hoar replied that the answer to this
was that the policy seemed to be estab
lished .'.hat revenue was to be raised on
refined sugar and it was further desired
that the* business of refining sugar shall
be done in this country rather than
abroad.
A great foreign government was about
the bigge t>t trust that could menace the
trade of the United States, Hoar as
serted. He hoped that some effective
remedy would be found instead of going
on the theo;ry that because a jackal or
a fox preys on our commerce it should
be given to ;i foreign wolf or lion.
Caffery of Louisiana argued that the
sugar trust was within the operation of
the anti-trust lay and he felt that it
was time the- attention of the attorney
general and the United States district
attorneys was called to the frequent
and flagrant violations of the law by
the sugar trust. The senator declared
that the sup sir trust was the most arro
gant and iniquitous trust in the world.
Allen, resuming, declared that the
country was "rotten with trusts," every
article we eat and use and wvar being
controlled by trusts, while congress, the
Judiciary and the executive authorities
are impotent and powerless to act, ac
cording to those, who argue that the
federal laws cannot reach the trusts.
He maintained that the laws are
eufficient if energetically enforced, but
that the authorities have not executed!
them with zeal. The vote was then j
taken on the hide paragraph as amended j
by the committee, and it was agreed to..
S9 to 20. j
One Democrat, Rawlins nf Utah, and
Messrs. Allen, Uutler, Heitfeld, Jones of
Nevada., Stewart, Mantle and Teller,
voted with the Republicans in the affirm- j
ative. The balance of the vote was on
party lines.
The committee presented an amend
ment for the paragraph on band, bolt
ing leather, etc. It was agreed to, SO
to 19.
The glove paragraphs were then taken
up and agreed to without change from j
paragraph 428 to 434. The substitute
previously agreed to by the committee j
for paragraph 434 was offered! by Alien j
and agreed to; also, paragraph 435. This
completed the leather and glove para
graph*
Allison proposed a substitute for par
agraph 420, relating to cattle, as follows:
"Less than a year old. J2 a head; on
all other cattle. If valued at not more
than $14, $3.50 a head; valued at more
than $14 and not more than $25, 26 i>< r
cent ad valorem; valued at more than
$25, 30 per cent." The substitute was
agreed to.
The bill was laid aside at !i oclock.
and after an executive session the sen
ate adjourned.
IN COMMITTER
WASHINGTON, June 28.—The Senate
Committee on Finance today .settled
several vexed question* in connection
vith the tariff. It was decided io leave
the rate of 1% cents on lead ore as fixed
by the Finance Committee, and also to
leave iron ore as originally determined
by the committee ai.d passed by the
House. Til"- committee decided to ad
vance the rate on pig lead to 2>4 cents
per pound. This Is at: increase of % cent
over the House rate, which the commit
tee -did not originally disturb, made
as a compensation for the increase on
lead ore. The tea paragraph was again
passed over for future consideration and
a decision on coal reserved until after
the hearing to be given lo conflicting
Interests tonight.
The mica paragraph (IS2) was rewrit
ten entirely, and as ii will be presented
fixes a rate of 4 cents per pound and
,0 per cent ad valorem on unir.anufac
tured mica. Thorite was added to the
dutiable list (paragraph 131) at 20 per
cent ad valorem. The rate on pine
apples were increased in packages from
C to 7 cents per cubic foot; in bulk from
6 to 7 cents per thousand. The rate on
plain basic phllographlc papers for al
buminizing, etc., (paragraph 394) was
increased from 2 to 3 cents per pound,
and from 10 to 20 per cent ad valorem.
The committee ended a long dispute liy
deciding to take naptha zarin black and
all fast black coal tar dyes from the
free list, adding them to paragraph 144,
which imposes a duty of 25 per cent
It is estimated that this change will
add several hundred 1 thousand dollars
in revenue. A similar gain is expected to
be derived from striking coal tar (505)
from the free list and maklngit dutiable
at 10 per cent. Fashion plates were also
stricken from the free list, as was man
ganese ore. A substitute was written
for the leather paragraph (427), making
many changes. The wording of the new
paragraph Is as follows: Band or belt
ing leather, sole leather, calfskins, tan
ned and dressed kangaroo, sheep and
goat skins (including lamb and kid
skins), dressed and finished, chamois
and 1 other skins and bookbinders' calf-
skins; all the foregoing not especially
provided for in this act, 20 per cent ad
valorem; skins for morocco, tanned but
unfinished, 10 per cent ad valorem;
skins of sheep origin, dressed with the
grain on, $1.50 per dozen skins; skins of
goat origin, dressed with the grain on,
$2 per dozen; skins dressed as suede or
with the exterior grain surface removed,
whether known as mocha or otherwise,
$2.50 per dozen skins; patent, Japanned,
varnished or enameled leather, weighing
not over ten pounds per dozen skins
20 cents per pound and 20 per cent ad
valorem; if weighing over ten pounds
and not over 25 pounds per dozen, 80
cents per pound and 10 per cent ad va
lorem; if weighing over 25 pounds per
dozen, 20 cents per pound and 10 per j
cent ad valorem; piano forte leather and
piano forte action leather, 35 per cent
lad valorem; leather shoe laces, finished j
ior unfinished, 50 cents per gross and j
,20 per cent ad valorem; boots and shoes ,
! made into shoe uppers or vamps or other
forms, suitable for conversion into man
ufactured articles, shall be classified as '
manufactures of leather and pay duty
accordingly.
A substitute was also prepared for
paragraph 434 (gloves), as follows:
In addition to the foregoing rates
there shall be paid on leather gloves
when lined, $1 per dozen pairs; on all
pique or prizam gloves, 25 cents per doz
en pairs; on all gloves stitched or em
broidered with more than three single
strands or cords, 25 cents per dozen
pairs; on all leather gloves with wrist
I openings imported without fasteningsor
parts thereof of any kind, there shall be
a reduction of 25 cents per dozen pairs
from the rates in the preceding para
graph.
Senator Davis today submitted from
the committee on foreign relations an
amendment to the general deficiency
bill to pay $6000 to the families of the
three Italians lynched at New Orleans.
There was a large gathering of Repub
lican senators at the meeting of the sen
ate finance committee at the Arlington
hotel tonight. Most of the time was
spent in discussing the rates to be im
posed on coal, and the provision to fix
them so that a reciprocal arrangement
: may be arrived at with the Dominion of
Canada. No formal conclusion was ar
rived at, the committee deferring final
. action until the meeting tomorrow
morning. Strong arguments were ad
vanced by some of those present in fa
, i vor ot a rate of 40 cents per ton on coal.
After the meeting one member of the
committee advanced the opinion that
the rate to be finally fixed would be 67',i
cents per ton, but that there would be no
provision for a reciprocal agreement-
Three paragraphs relating to plaster
■ rock or gypsum also were discussed.
This product is now on the free list but
western senators are striving for a duty
of $1 per ton. It went over without ac
tion.
NOMINATIONS
WASHINGTON, June 28.—The presi
dent today sent the following nomina
tion to the Senate: State, Soren Llstoe,
Minn., Consul at Rotterdam, Nether
lands.
The senate today confirmed the fol
lowing nominations: Irving B. Dudley
of California, to be minister to Peru;
Thomas C. Dawson of lowa to be sec
retary of the legation of the United
' States at Rio de Janeiro; Frank Dilling
ham of California to be consul at Auck
land, N. Z.; A. W. Sutter to be collector
of internal revenue for the district ot
Kansas; Col. C. H. Carlton. Eighth cav
alry, to be brigadier general; Captain
|C. G. Remy to be commodore in the
j navy, and numerous other naval promo
j tions, and First Lieutenant Herbert
i Dekeane. corps of engineers, U. S. A.,
jto be a member of the California debris •
j commission.
IN THE HOUSE
jllie Roll Call Constitutes the Day's
Business
WASHINGTON, June 28.—The session
of the house today lasted only long
enough to call the roll on Mr. Dingley's
motion .to adjourn. As soon as the jour
nal had been approved the. floor leader
of the majority remarked that as he
was not aware of any matters claiming
the attention of the house today, ho
i would move an adjournment.
Bailey of Texas challenged that state
| ment with the observation that the
bankruptcy bill and Cuban belligerency
fi solution were unacted upon. The op
position applauded when the rising vote
showed them a majority of one, the vote
resulting S3 to 86 against Dingley's mo
tion. Thereupon Dingley demanded the
ayes nnd nays and the roll was called.
The motion was carried, 97 to 88 .
Before the announcement of the vote,
on motion of Steele. Republican, of In
diana. July 10th was set aside as a day
for paying tribute to the memory of the
late W. J. Holman of Indiana.
The speaker announced that this order
would be subject to the action of the
committee on rules.
At 12:4T> p. m. the house adjourned until
Thursday.
The speaker said today that he had
the matter nf the appointment of the
committees under consideration, and
that units.-' something now unforeseen
should occur to change his personal in
clination, he would prepare the list and
submit it prior to the final afljourn
i ment.
Representative Shafroth of Colorado
introduced in the house a measure en
i titled a bill to encourage the economical
administration of the government. It
; provided that: "In order that each of
ficer ar.d employe of the I'nited States
• shall have a direct interest In the eco
; nomical administration of the govern
ment the secretary of tho treasury is
• directed for each month the expenses of
I the governments are greater than the
i receipts to deduct amd retain
■in the treasury from each sal
LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING, JUNE 29, 1897
ary m excess of $200 per month
20 pcr 1 cent thereof, and from each salary
under, 10 per cent thereof." It provides
thart In no case shall the amount deduct
ed be repaid unless at the end of the
fiscal yeetr the receipt* for the year have
exceeded the expenditures. The pres
ent Justices of the supreme court are
the only officials exempted from the op
erations of the act.
County Insurance
SAN FRANCISCO, June 28—San Luis
Obispo Is the first county in the state
to take advantage of the law enacted
at the last session of the legislature
permitting the formation of county mu
tual insurance associations. The act
provides that 25 or more residents
of a county owning property agregat
ing not less than $50,000 may unite for
Insurance purposes. It Is Intended for
the benefit of farming communities, and
so far as California la concerned, is an
experiment. The county associations
are under the supervision of the state
Insairanee commissioner, and today,when
the first application was received under
the new law by Commissioner Clunie.
It was referred by him to the attorney
general to decide if all the requirements
of the act had been properly complied
with.
FIGEL SURRENDERED
WHEN TOLD THAT WARRANT
WAS ISSUED
More Charges of Embezzlement and
Forgery Will Be Followed by
Arrest for Murder
■ "
SAN FRANCISCO, June 26.—Late
j this afternoon E. S. Rothschild, partner
liof the late Isaac Hoffman, who was so
; mysteriously murdeTed on the night of
I June 1, swore out a warrant for the ar
| rest of Theodore A. Flgel, the book
keeper of the Arm ,on four charges of
embezzlement. His attorney immedi
ately telephoned Flgel, who was at his
! country home in San Rafael, and Flgel
ireplied that he would surrender himself
jat once. He arrived at the city prison
!in this city about 7 oclock and surren
dered himself to the chief of police. His
' bond was fixed at $12,000, and the prob
j ability is that he will be released at once.
| Further charges of embezzlement will
I be made tomorrow, and charges of forg-
I cry will be preferred, and subse
j quently a charge of murder probably
I will be placed against his namejpn the
) prison books.
DROVE TOO CLOSE
A Quarrel Follows and Murder Ends
It
SAN MIGUEL, June 28.—Word' was
received this evening of a shooting af
fray in the vicinity of Warthan, Fresno
county, thirty-five miles norterast from
here, occurring last night about 9 oclock,
in which Lloyd Duke, a respected young
man, was fatally shot through the stom
ach with a Winchester in the hands of
Leon Hill, an acquaintance. The men
were In separate conveyances, returning
from the hot springs near War
than, by way of the Fresno hot springs
road. Duke drove ahead, closely fol
lowed by Hill, who at intervals endeav
ored to pass Duke. When upon a nar
row grade Hill drove so close that the
pole of his buggy was liable to go through
the top of Duke's vehicle. An alterca
tion ensued, ending by Duke alighting
and starting towards Hill. Hill then
drew his rifle and fired, the ball passing
through Duke's stomach. With Duke
was a young man named William Tay
lor, who assisted the wounded man into
his conveyance and took him to a neigh
bor's. Hill was accompanied by Lony
Lovell, who was informed by Hill that
he would go to Coalingo and' give him
self up today. The place is inaccessible
and the murderer has good opportunity
to escape. Hill bears a hard reputation
and was drunk at the time. Duke's par
ents are wealthy residents of Los Ange
les.
DEBS' DEMOCRATS
Abandon the scheme of a Socialist
Colony
MILWAUKEE, Wis., June 28.—Victor
S. Berger, editor of a socialist organ,
gave out a statement tonight on his re
turn from a conlerence with E. V. Debs.
He says the scheme to plant a socialist
colony in the west has been abandoned,
and- to take its- place there will be a
small migration of unemployed* men to
the state of Washington. They will
look for homes there the same as other
settlers, and the cost of transporting
them will be paid through a per capita
tax of 15 cents a month on members of
the Social Democracy, Debs' new party.
Debs will remain in the east, and he
and his associates" will devote themselves
to the cause of socialism through this
party and the ballot.
Found Floating
SAN FRANCISCO, June 28.—Floating
in the bay off the Beale street wharf, his
features made unrecognizable by the
teeth of fishes, the body of a well built
man was found last night by two crab
fishers. It was found that the coat pock
ets cf the dead man were filled with
rocks, making clear, whether suicide or
murder, that it had been intended that
he should never rise to the surface.
Nothing was found that would serve to
establish the identity of the corpse. Two
deep gashes were found in the throat
which look as though they might have
been inflicted by a knife. The dead man
was fairly well dressed in a dark suit of
clothing. The body had evidently been
in the water for six weeks or two months.
Later—The body that was found
floating in the hay off Lombard street
wharf Saturday afternoon has been
identified by the photographs of the
four children found in the pockets as
that of Joseph Calli, a native of Italy.
Not for Robbery
MONTEREY. Mexico, June 28.—The
body of R. L. Illlngworth, a prominent
young English resident, the son of a
wealthy London physician, has been
found In the outskirts of the city, with
a stab wound through the heart. His
watch ar.d a considerable sum of money
on the body were- unmolested. The Brit
ish Consul offers a reward of $1000 for the
capture of the assassin.
The Craven Case
SAN FKANCISCO, June 28.—Owing to
the indisposition of C. S. Wheeler ot
counsel for the plaintiffs in the Angus-
Craven case, the trial of that cause cel'i
bra was postponed today until Wednes
day.
TWO MEN DEAD
And a Third Is Fatally
Wounded
GARRISON WENT GUNNING
FINDING HIS GAME, AND ALSO
GETTING FOUND
Two Prominent Texas Families Bass
a Deadly Feud on a Young
Woman's Seduction
*
Associated Press Special Wire.
DALLAS, Tex., June 28.—One of the
most *ensat<pnal tragedies ever enacted
in Northern Texas took place In the
Methodist Episcopal churchyard In
Pleasant Valley, twenty-two miles
north of this city, In the course of ser
vices yesterday. As a result Augustus
Garrison and Frank Jones are dead and
Thomas Jones probably fatally wound
ed.
The Garrison and Jones families are
among the most prominent planters in
this section of Tcxaa They own ad-
Joining plantations and have been on the
best of social relations for many years.
Augustus Garrison was a married man
and had a daughter 16 years of age,
named Loy. The Jones brothers were
single. Frank Jones for a year or more
had been very partial in his attentiona
to Garrison's daughter. Recently the
girl charged him with having seduced
her under promise of marriage. The
matter became a neighborhood scandal
in Pleasant Valley and Garrison swore
he would have the life of the betrayer of
his daughter.
Mutual friends succeeded in keeping
the men apart until yesterday when the
first meeting between them since the
scandal took place.
The Garrison and Jones families wor
ship at the same church. Just as the
preacher had taken his text after prayer
and the singing of a hymn, Garrison,
who had a seat near the door, stepped to
the doorway, it is believed to get some
fresh air, as the atmosphere in the
room was oppressive. He had no more
than reached the doorway when the
congregation were startled by a fusil
lade of pistol shots. Nearly a dozen were
fired in about as many seconds' time.
When the firing ceased August Garri
son and Frank Jones were lying dead in
front of the church and Thomas Jones
was stretched on the lawn nearby, one
hand clasped on his right thigh and in
his left he held a pistol. His right thigh
in front was shattered by a 42 caliber
bullet that had torn its way downward,
mutilating the flesh for a distance of
six inches.
His statement of the shooting- was
brief and In substance that he and his
brother Frank were approaching the
church door and were within ten feet
of It when Garrison appeared and in
stantly drew his pistol.
His brother Frank, he said, was hit
by the first discharge and before he
could draw his weapon.Thomasdrew his
pistol and opened fire on Garrison in
defense of his brother. Garrison, after
Frank fell, opened fire on Thomas
Frank Jones was shot three times, once
In the region of the heart, once in the
right side and once in the head. Garri
son received but one bullet and that
pierced his heart. Neither man lived
long enough to scarcely realize his fate.
Parties came to Dallas to arrange for
the undertaking details, to report to the
sheriff, and to take physicians to at
tend Thomas Jones, who is not expected
to recover.
The Bell Estate
SAN FRANCISCO, June 28.—Mrs. Te
resa Bell, widow of the late Thomas Bell,
has filed an answer to the petition of her
son, Thomas Frederick Bell, asking that
she be removed from the guardianship
of her minor children and compelled to
account for moneys alleged to have
been received by her in trust for said
children, In which she denlesthe charges
made by her son, ar.d Intimates that he
was induced to make said charges by
the profligate and evil associates whom
he has recently affiliated with. Judge
Slack, before whom the matter came up
this morning, declined to hear it on the
ground that his time was completely
taken up with the Craven case.
Brazilian Fanatics
NEW YORK, June 28. —A dispatch to
the Herald from Buenos Ayres says:
The Herald's correspondent at Rio de
Janeiro telegraphs that the govern
ment troops have attacked the fanatics
who hold the town of Canudos and
forced them to retire to their intrench
ments. Skirmishes continue there and
though the troops are victorious they
have been unable to wrest the town from
the fanatics.
The Herald correspondent at Monte
video telegraphs that the government
has negotiated another loan of £4,000,000
with English capitalists to meet war
expenses.
A Strange Suicide
SANTA CBUZ, June 28.—Last even
ing Mrs. Mary Woodman hanged her
self in a shed attached to her house in
Bonnie Doone. After seeing her five
children safely in bed she went to the
shed, fastened the noose of bale rope to
a hook and used a small box from which
to take the fatal jump. No reason can
he assigned for her act. except tempora
ry Insanity. She left no letters nor gave
any hint of an intention to commit sui
cide. Khe was about 40 years old. Her
husband is row In Kelsey, Mont., en
gaged in building a quartz mill.
Very Thrilling
RED BUD, HI., June 28 —Miss Lillian
Biatr, aged 21, had a thrilling experience
with a burglar early this morning. She
was awakened by a masked man, who
searched her father's clothes and threat
ened to kill her if she man an outcry. He
made an indecent proposal. This so
terrilied her that she. screamed ar.d the
burglar then shot her in the breast, in
ilictii.g a fatal wound. Bloodhounds are
on the trail, and there will be a lynching
if the villain Is captured.
A Free Fight
VANCEBURG, Ky., June 2S—Tom Lo
gan and Wyatt Cooper, enemies'of long
stancling, met at a picnic at Straight
Fork and the former opened. Are, Mil
ling Cooper at the first shot. After he
had fired Aye othef shots Into the body of
his prostrate victim, th* latter's friends
rallied and took up the fight. The shoot
ing became general, with the result that
an unknown man was killed and twenty
others woundec\~iome fatally.
A ROYAL GIFT
A Honster Pair of Horns for Emperor
William
COLORADO SPRINGS, Col., June 28.
Emperor William of Germany I* soon
to receive the largest pair of elk horns
In the world, as a gift from Hans Leiden,
the German Consul of the Netherlands
and the director of the Zoological Gar
den of Cologne.
They have been mounted by Prof. Gus
•Stalnsky of this city and are now on
their way to Berlin, where they will be
formally presented to the Emperor to
be placed by him in his hunting room
or celebration hall.
These monster antlers measure twelve
feet from tip ot beam to tip of beam
across th* skull and have a spread of
sixty-two Inches. They have a beam
length of «7 and 67*4 lnche* respectively,
and the longest prongs are from 22 to
23% lnche* in length. There are twelve
prong* in all and Including the beams
they have a total length ot nearly thirty
feet. The largest elk horns known to
exist prior to these are In the English
Museum In London.
The elk on which the horns grew that
are to be presented to Emperor William
was killed In the White river country in
Western Colorado by an oW French
hunter named Monjeau.
THE WRONG MAN
He Ran to the Rescue Only to Be
Shot
CLEVELAND, June 28.—For some
time past Mrs. Mary Obermlller has
been troubled with burglars. Her
neighbors, Edward Ratcllffe and Wlll
11am Beneke, suggested to her that she
blow a tin horn when the burglars came
again. She blew It this morning. Rat
cllffe and Beneke Jumped out and start
ed for the house. Mrs. Obermlller was
very muoh excited and shot off her re
volver. Ratcllffe and Beneke also shot
off theirs which made such a racket that
it awoke the town and Marshal Lake
wood, who came running to the scene
and emptied the contents of a shotgun
into Ratcllffe. The burglar* existed
merely in the Imagination of Mrs. Ober
mlller. Thirteen buckshot were ex
tracted from Ratcllffe's thighs. He will
live.
Japan Teas
SAN FRANCISCO, June 28.—Among
the passengers on the steamer Gaelic
were a party of Japanese who have come
to this country in behalf of the Japanese
Government and the Central Tea As
sociation of Japan to establish bureaus
for the regulation of the tea business
here.
There is now a bureau In existence In
New Tork and other bureaus will ba
established at Chicago and Montreal.
The tea bureaus will serve about the
same purpose In respect to tea as the
vltlcultural bureaus in the east do In
the regulation of the foreign wine trade.
Mr. Mlzuntanl, one of the party, will be
Installed In charge of the Chicago bu
reau for a period of seven years.
An Italian Fight
SAN FRANCISCO, June 28,-As a re
sult of a fight In. a Dupont street saloon
Joe Crudo will have ro answer a charge
of assault to murder and Paul Galllanl
is in the hospital suffering from a dan
gerous wound im his left breast.
Crudo, Galliani and Mike Valva were
playing cards in the saloon when a dis
pute arose between, Valva and the bar
tender. Crudo backed up the bartender
and Valva struck him. Each drew a
stiletto and Galliani, according to his
story, went to Valva's assistance and In
the struggle to get posseeeion of Crudo's
stiletto Crudo was cut on the cheek and
hip. Crudo got his arm free and stabbed
Galliani in the breast, the stiletto nearly
piercing his heart.
Horseflesh for Europe
PORTLAND, Or., June 28.—A packing
company which built an abattoir at
Llnnton, near this city, and engaged in
the slaughtering of horses some two
years ago, but were obliged to give up
the business on account of not being able
to And a market for the horse meat, have
resumed business again and are killing
from 30 to 40 horses per day. The trade
In horse meat has increased greatly in
Europe, and it Is thought a market for
American horse meat can now be found
there. The choicest parts only are being
salted In casks for shipment, but it is
the intention of the company to engage
in canning before long.
Take to Weeping
SANTA CRUZ, June 28.—Rumors of
an organized lynching party in connec
tion with the alleged Harris mayhem
charges reached Sheriff Besse early this
morning. The prisoners heard of the
rumors and wept like children, but the
Sheriff, beyond taking a few precautions
in case of trouble, gave little credence to
the stories. Beyond the gathering of a
few small crowds of men on the- streets
in the vicinity of the Jail, no demonstra
tion was made.
A Naughty Doctor
URIAH, June 28.—Action was brought
in the superior court this afternoon by
William Lynch of Point Arena against
Dr. Pitts, a resident of that place,.
Lynch sues Pitts to recover 125,000 for
alienating the affectionsof his wife. Mr.
and Mrs. Lynch were married seven
months ago. Lynch alleges that Dr.
Pitts took advantage of his position as
family physician.
Died in Agony
ST. LOUIS, June 28.—Minnie Rose,
aged twenty, whose mind was unbal
anced since the destruction of her home
by a tornado a year ago, while in a
frenzy occasioned by the thunder storm
yesterday took a dose of paris green and
died today in horrible agony.
Feared Conviction
HAZELTON, lowa, June 28.—John
Bradt, who was to have appeared for
trial today on the charge of the murder
of Vitallana Tomalia, shot and killed
himself this morning.
Tired of Life
CHICAGO, June 28.—Guy C. Ledyard,
Jr., Manager of the American Starch Co.,
shot himself through the heart today
with a shotgun. 11l health was the cause
of his despondency.
A Slander Resented
CHINO, June 28.—Mrs. W. R. Post
attempted to commit suicide here lael
night about nine o'clock at her home by
taking chloroform, but it Is thought she
will recover. She became despondent
through charges by .her husband
of being Intimate with another man
and decided to end her life. Mra Post
Is Industrious and well-liked, nearly
supporting her worthless husband.
Swiss Watches
BERNE. Switzerland. June 28.—The
Federal Counoil has refused to ratify
the commercial treaty with Japan owing
to a prohibitive duty placed on watches
and clocks.
A Hunter Killed
SUNOL, June 28.—Edward Louis, pro
prietor of the Louvre, on Park street,
Alameda, was accidentally shot and
killed while hunting near here today.
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
Houses ami Lota
FOR SALB-$8500; IF YOU ARB AFTER
a bargain and want to make gome money,
call for particulars of our new colonial
9-room house on Adams st.: can work tn
a good lot as part payment; very little
money wanted, but house must be sold.
C. A. SUMNER A CO.. 134 S. Broad,
way. 29
FOR SALE-J3000; 7-ROOM MODERN
house, on car line, southwest; will take
half In good mortgage or street Improve
ment bonds.
ERNEST O. TAYLOR,
29 Bradbury bldg.
FOR SALE—THE PRETTIEST 7-ROOM
house In town; No. 33 In the beautiful St.
James park. Inquire on premises or at
421 W. Adams It. 6-29
FOR SALE—HOUSE AND LOT ON
Third St.; 40 rooms; all modern Improve
ments. 326 Boyd St., Los Angeles. 7-17
Business Property
FOR SALE—WE SELL THE EARTH.
BASSETT A SMITH, Pomona. Cal. 6-Mtf
City Lota ... .—
FOR SALE-31300; MUST BE SOLD; LOT
60x160, Burlington aye., between Sixth and
Seventh; Btreet graded, sewer, cement
sidewalk, easy terms. VICTOR WAN
KOWSKI A CO., 126 W. Second St. tf
FOR SALE—C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots In his Third addition on easy Install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Office, 213 W. First sL tf
Country Property
FOR SALE—BARGAIN; THE FAMOUS
Lewis tract, near Garvanza, consisting
of 103 large lots, now offered for sale as a
whole or In lots; will also trade for Oak
land, San Francisco or Los Angeles prop
erty. For full particulars inquire of L.
M. CORWIN. Highland Park, Cal. 7-26
FOR SALE-HOUSE AND LOT IN BAN
Bernardino; fine new frame building; 1
acre ground; barn, chicken house; all
modern improvements. 826 Boyd st., Los
Angeles. 7-17
FOR EXCHANGE—REAL ESTATE
FOR EXCHANGE — NEW 10-ROOM
house and barn, $6000; accept clear land
or lots here or Pasadena or eastern farm.
AMERICAN BUILDING AND MORT
GAGE CO., 122 W. Third at., Henne bulld-
Ing. 7-25
FOR RENT—HOUSES
FOR RENT—HOUSE OF 6 ROOMS ON
E. Ninth St.; hot and cold water. In
quire M'GARRY AINNES, 216 W. First
st. 30
FOR RENT—ROOMS
FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS,
from $1.60 up per week; single rooms 25c
and 60c per night; baths free. Russ House,
cor. First and Los Angeles sts. 7-21
FOR RENT-AT SANTA MONICA, 3
pleasant, completely furnished house
keeping rooms. MRS. S. STOKES, 217
Seoond St. tf
LOUISI7HraW~
ly furnished rooms; prices to suit, by
day, week or month 520 S. Broadway. 7-23
FOR RENT—NICELY FURNISHED
rooms; housekeeping privilege; good lo
cality. 827% S. Spring St. 7-14
FOR RENT-THREE UNFURNIHED
rooms suitable for housekeeping; rent
$G. 514 W. Twelfth st 29
FOR RENT-ROOMS. $1 PER WEEK
and up; 25 cents per night. 619 S.
Spring st. 7-18
FOR RENT—FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
housekeeping. 321% W. Seventh st. tf
FOR RENT—ROOMS. $1, $1.3$ AND $1,50
per week. 311 W. Third st. 30
FOR RBNTumREAL ESTATE
FOR RENT—2 LOTS AT LONG BEACH.
Call at 446 S. Broadway. 29
FOR RENT—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR RENT—ONE OF THE BEST OF
flces, S. Spring St., bet. First and Second
sts.: furniture can be bought. Address
Z„ Box 30, Herald. tf
FOR RENT—AN ELEGANT PIANO. 615
W. Seventh st. 29
EDUCATIONAL
WOODBURY BUSINESS COLLEGE, 226
S. Spring St., will conduct special classes
for public and high school students un
der the instruction of Prof. C. S. Thomp
son of the Seventeenth-street school,
from July Gth to September Ist; tuition
$4 per month; half day sessions; our
regular commercial and shorthand work
continued throughout the summer at
usual rates. Pupils enter any day and
receive Individual Instruction. Rooms
are large, cool and pleasant. Electric
elevator. Write or call for illustrated
catalogue. G. A. HOUGH, president; N.
G. FELKER. vice president.
MUSICAL
FOR SALE—HANDSOME UPRIGHT
Grand Bass piano at a great sacrifice.
Room No. 31, The Savoy, Fourth and
Hill sts.; call mornings. tf .
THE WONDERFUL GRAMAPHOXES
for sale at A. G. GARDNER'S, 118 Win
ston St.; also pianos for sale and rent, tf
LOST AND FOUND
LOST—LADY'S GOLD WATCH, EN
ameled In black; open face. Finder re
turn to 1327 Georgia Bell and receive re
ward. : 29
FINANCIAL
MONEY TO LOAN IN ANY AMOUNTS,
on diamonds, watches, Jewelry, pianos,
aafes, lodging houses, hotels and private
household furniture; Interest reasonable;
partial payments received; money quick;
private office for ladles. G. M. JONES,
rooms 13-14, 264 B. Broadway. IS-tf
THE SYNDICATE LOAN COMPANY.
138% S. Spring st., rooms 6, 7 and 8, loans
money on all kinds of good collateral se
curity; money on head; private waiting
rooms. Telephone Main 683. GEORGE
L. MILLS, Manager. 7-12
MONEY LOANED ON DIAMONDS,
watches, Jewelry, pianos, sealskins, car
riages, bicycles, warehouse receipts and
all kinds of collateral security; storage
free In our warehouse. LEE BROS., 403
S. Bprlng it. tf
MONEY TO LOAN ON FURNTURB,
watches, diamonds, pianos, sealskins and
real estate: Interest reasonable; prlvats
office for ladles; business confidential.
C. C. LAMB, 226 S. Spring st.; entrance,
room 467. g-n tf
AMERICAN LOAN COMPANY, 118% S.
Bprlng, bver Royal Bakery; loans on
real estate and collateral of all kinds,
warehouse receipts, Insurance polloles,
etc.; best of rates; private office for ladles.
7-24
MONEY TO LOAN—
$100 to $75,000 on city or country real
estate.
LEB A. M'CONNELL.
7-34 118 8. Broadway.
TO LOAN—A BARREL OF MONEY ON
diamonds, pianos, furniture and all first
class securities; business confidential.
CREASINGER, 247 S. Broadway, rooms
1 and 2. 6-2»-tf
POINDEXTER A WADSWORTH, ROOM
308 Wilcox building, lend money on any
good real estate; building loans made; If
you wish to lend or borrow, oall on us. tf
MONEY TO LOAN, $500 TO $5000. IN SUMB
to suit; no delays. CONTINENTAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION.
IM W. Second st., Wilcox building, tf '
TO LOAN—UNLIMITED AMOUNT FOR
small loans; no commission: light ex
pense. SECURITY LOAN AND TRUST
CO., 223 S. Spring St.
TO LOAN—IF YOU WANT MONEY ON
real estate security I have it In any
amount. WM. F. BOSBYSHELL, 107 8.
Broadway.
MONEY TO LOAN UPON EASY TERMS
of repayment. STATE MUTUAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASS'N., 151 8.
Broadway. 6-10 tf
MONEY TO LOAN—LOWEST RATES ON
real estate, personal notes or security.
JOHN L. PAVKOVICH, 220 W. First, tf
MONEY TO LOAN IN SUMB TO SUIT
on Improved property. F. A. HUTCHIN
SON, 330 S. Broadway. 7-12
MONEY TO LOAN ON COUNTRY AND
city property by W. P. M'INTOSH, 209 W.
Third st. 29
t MEDIUMS
MME. LEO WILL REMAIN IN THiB
city fcr a few days only; the renowned
foreoaster and card reader: she tells the
past, present and future; she advises you
with a certainty as to the proper course to
pursue In life; she gives lucky charms,
brings the separated together, causes
speedy marriage with the one you love;
tells if the one you love is false or true;
also very successful In locating mines
and minerals; all those In trouble In busi
ness matters, love and family affairs
should by all means consult her; letters
containing 60 cents In stamps, giving
age, color of hair and eyes, married or
single, will receive prompt attention;
don't fall to see her; hours 9 am. to 7:30
p.m.: Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 616%
W. Sixth St., Los Angeles. 7-13
MRS. PARKER. PALMIST, CLAIRVOY
ant and medium; life reading, business
removals, law suits, mineral locations,
love affairs .etc. Take Third st. eltctrlo
ear to Vermont aye. and Vine et. Sec
ond house on Vine st., west of Vermont
aye. 60c and $1.00. tf
MRS. RAPP, THE CELEBRATED AS
trologlst and forecaster, planet and card
reader; your future foretold scientifical
ly; truth only; terms reasonable. 468% 8.
Spring St., room 10. 7-19
MRS. SAN FORD JOHNSON, THE
well known Independent slate writer and
clairvoyant, gives sittings dally at 833 8.
Broadway. 8-7
GRACE GILMORE, CLAIRVOYANT
and card reader, has removed 218 Seoond
st., Santa Monica; ladles, 26 cts.; gents,
60 cts. 7-28
MME. RACHAEL, CARD READER,
tells past, present and future: sittings
' dally, 324% S. Spring St., room 11. 9-14
ELLA M. WHITE, TRANCE CLAlR
voyant medium; readings dally except
Sunday. 245 S. Hill st. 6mo
AGNES H. PLEASANCE, TRANCE
medium; sittings daily; at 866% S. Spring
Btreet. 7-5
MRS. WALKER OF 316% S. SPRING ST.
will leave today for a week's vacation.
30
PHYSICIANS
DR. SCHICK, 122 W. THIRD ST. (ELE
vator), late of New York city, treats dis
eases of women by the eminently suc
cessful European method; such as tu
mors, enlarged ovaries, leucorrhoea; no
pain.
CONSULT FREE, DR. UNGER, GER
man army physician and surgeon; spec
ialist in diseases of women; cures can
cers, tumors, piles, ruptures, stones in
bladder; no knife. 107% N. Main, r. 12. 7-7
CONSULT DR. MINNIE WELLS, SPE
cialist, 316 W. Seventeenth St., corner of
Grand aye. 3-16tf
DENTISTS
I *
ADAMS BROS., DENTAL PARLORS,
239% S. Spring st.; painless extracting and
filling: plates $5, $S, $10; all work guar
anteed; established 10 years. Hours, 3-5;
Sundays, 10-12. Telephone Black, 1278.
FRANK STEVENS, 324% S. SPRING BT.,
open days and evenings; also Sundays;
electric light. Tel. Black 82L
DR. KENNEDY. DENTIST, 108% N.
Spring St., rooms 2, 6 and 7; painless es>
tractlon.
MINING AND ASSAYINO
MORGAN A CO., ASSAYERS AND RE
flners and oro testers; bullion purchased;
consulting metallurgists; mines examined
and dealt in. Office, 261 Wilson block, Los
Angeles, Cal. 26-tf
THE BIMETALLIC ASSAY OFFICE
and Chemical Laboratory, 124 S. Main st.
R. A. PEREZ. E. M.. manager. 12-4tf
PERSONAL
PERSONAL—FOR RENT, FURNISHED
or unfurnished rooms; desirable location;
prices to suit tho times. THE WIN
THROP, 330% S. Spring st. 7-2$
PERSONAL—ONE HAND READ FREE;
life read from cradle to grave; advice on
I business matters, family affairs. 111% W.
Third st. »-U

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