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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, June 30, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-06-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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TWEN'I Y-SLXTH YEAR. NO. 273.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
■ERALD SUB-AGENCIES—
ADVERTISEMENTS left at the fol
lowing agencies will receive prompt at
" tentlon and will be printed as quickly
and with the same oars as if left at
the main offlee, 222 W. Third street:
r DOWNEY AYE. AND EAST SIDE
th P. COLLETTE, (21 Downey avenue.
OLD WORLD DRUG STORE. 1028
Downey avenue. Phone Flora 242.
WM. H. HARMON, 765 Pasadena aye..
Phone Eaat 68,
VENTRAL AYE. AND VERNON
8. B. BARNEY, t*oß Central aye.
CHICAGO PHARMACY. Central ave
nue and Twelfth street, Phone Weit 182.
T. J. AKET, corner Central and Vernon
avenues. Phone West IS.
MAIN ST. AND SOUTHWEST
B. T. PARKE, PHARMACY, till B.
Main, Phone Blue 2062.
E. VAN DYKE, DRUGGIST, 711 W.
Jefferson St., Phone White 1271.
WESTLAKE GROCERY, corner Al
varado and Seventh its.. Phone Main
1182.
H. L. PARK, DRUGGIST, corner
i ' Thirty-eighth and Wesley aye., Phone
Blue 1301. ,
T. W. BROWN, JR., DRUGGIST. Junc
tion of Hoover, Union and
sts., Phone Blue 1101.
BOYLE HEIGHTS
H. C. WORLAND, 2181 E. First, Sta
tion B. x
T. P. WYLIE, 1977 E. FIRST, Phone
Park 13.
J. M. HARRIS, 1842 B. FIRST, Phone
Park 21.
TEMPLE ST. AND NORTHWEST
DR. H. KALLEWODA. DRUGGIST,
corner Temple st. and Beaudry aye.,
Phone Main 208.
STAR PHARMACY, corner Temple and
Belmont aye.. Phone Main 607.
VIOLE & LOPIZICH. DRUGGISTS,
417 N. Main St., Phone Main 876.
tOS ANGELES—
—SAN FRANCISCO—
A chance for advertisers to reach the
public of both cities on the most ad
vantageous terms ever offered.
We have concluded arrangements
whereby classified advertising may be
Inserted simultaneously in the
LOS ANGELES HERALD
And in the
6AN FRANCISCO POST
For
■ CENTS PER LINE.
8 CENTS PER LINE,
8 CENTS PER LINE,
E CENTS PER LINE
Here ii a rare opportunity for people
having bargains to offer or wants to be
known.
HERALD PUBLISHING CO.,
tf 222 W. Third st.
SPECIAL NOTICES
A FREE CLAIRVOYANT DIAGNOSE
of disease will be given to the poor every
Tuesday at the Magnetic Institute,
northeast cor. Sixth and Spring. En
trance 125 W. Sixth st. Diseases located
without asking questions. Seven years'
successful healing In Los Angeles. Send
fer testimonials. MRS. ESTHER DYE,
magnetic healer. 6-30
WOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oclock
a.m. and 6 and 8 oclock p.m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut off and a fine of $2 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. % tf
FOR CAMPING—GREEN OLIVES. 10
cts.; ripe olives, 1214 ct».; quart Oregon
salmon, flat can, 10 eta.; Pasadena beans,
,10 ots.; corned or roast beef, 1-lb. can,
10 cte., at HOOD'S GROCERY, 333 S.
Main st. I
LIMA BEANS, 8 LBS., 25 CTS.: WHITE
or pink beans, 15 lbs., 25 cts. Your street
car fare paid both ways when you buy
$3 worth of groceries at HOOD'S GRO
CERY. 333 S. Main at. 1
WANTED—EVERY ONE TO KNOW
that Hall Thompson Rheumatism. Liver
and Kidney Cure will cure rheumatism.
Call and get testimonials. 223 N. Spring
st., room 6. 8-1
JWANTED—EXPERIENCED STENOG
rapher wishes to supply places of regular
stenographers taking vacations during
July and August. Address N., box 25,
Herald. 30
THE DAILY JOURNAL, PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 205 New High St. tf
i. CLARK ANDERSON. THE BOY ME
dlum, has returned to the city and will
give sittings daily at the Hotel Portland,
444 ft S. Spring. 7-3
SPECIAL SALE-NO CHARGE FOR
borders with 6c and 7ftc wallpaper.
WALTER, 218 W. Sixth st. 8-12
FOR SALE—STATE LOAN AND TRUST
Co. stock at 86 cents. 1., Box S, Herald.
tf
HELP WANTED—MALE
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building,
800-302 W. Second street, In basement,
Telephone 609.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Private place, 120; German ranch hand.
120, etc.; pllvate place, $16, etc.; fruit
ranch hand, $20, etc.; married man,
teamster and board men, city; man and
wife, ranoh, $10, etc.; young man, black
smith shop, $1. etc.; man and wife, small
hotel, springs, $26, etc.; shoemaker, 60
per cent; two men logging camp, $30, etc.;
milker, $80, etc.; ranch hand, $1 .etc.; ex
perienced orchard man and wife; Ger
man shoemaker: fruit pickers.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Night porter and bell boy, $16; waiter,
beach, $20, nrst-class baker, $2 day; ex
perienced man for mudbath, $20; cook,
haybaler crew, $20, etc.; ranch cook, $10;
extra waiters, third* fourth and fifth.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
Housegirl, Santa Ana, $16: woman, 30
to 40 years, housework, country, $20, etc.;
housegirl, family two, $16; housegirl,
Sixteenth street, $20; three young girls,
assist, $8, $s and $10; nurse girl, $IJO wk;
German housegirl, $20; two houseglrls,
small town, $16 each; two glrle light
housework, city and beach, (12, etc., each:
two middle-aged women, housework,
country and beaoh, $15 each; Protestant
housegirl, $10.
"WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Two extra waitresses, fourth, $1.60;
girl, assist, boardinghouie. beach, $16;
cook, camp, $30, employer here; seven
extra waitresses, third to fifth. 60 cents
meal; girl, assist. Long Beaoh, $12; exp.
pantry girl, $20. beach.
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
WANTED—A NUMBER OF MEN TO
act as ushers at Bryan afternoon ad
dress, July 6, 1897. Call SILVER RE
PUBLICAN CLUB, 318 W. Second st. tf
WANTED—AGENTS FORIINDUSTRIAL
Insurance: salary and commission; expe
rience not necessary. Apply room 9, 105
E- First. 7-25
WANTED—EQAN'S RESTAURANT. 126
-128 E. Second St.. serves the best 10c meal
In the city; try It and be convinced. 8-11
WANTED—GOOD BOY. APPLY 711 S.
Main st. 7-29
HELP WANTED—FEMALE
WANTED—2 TOUNG LADY MUSICIANS,
one to play piano, the other to sing, for
concert hall in Arizona: $5 each per day.
.REED'S EMPLOYMENT AGENCY, 126
W. First st. 10
SITUATIONS WANTED—MALE
WANTED—YOUNG MAN DESIRES Po
sition as oil fireman In city. Address
737 Central aye.. room 13. 30
WANTED—TO BORROW
MONEY WANTED—S22OO ON HOUSE
worth $5000; first-class security; pay 11
per cent gross. W. N. HOLWAY, room
308, Henne blk.. 122 W. Third-St. 7-4
WANTED—TO BUY LIVE STOCK
WANTED—CALVES AND PAT STOCK.
FRED HUGHES, Durham market, 1067
Temple st. $-24 tf
WANTED—PARTNERS
WANTED—PARTNER WITH $100 TO
join me in a nice little business at Cata
llna island for the summer. R., Box 25.
30
WANTED—MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED — SALE BUSINESS ; 75
houses; rooms for rent; collections;
help free and work. EDW. NITTINGER,
226& S. Spring St. tf
WANTED—HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR
second-hand furniture by the L. A. AUC
TION HOUSE, 502 8. Main. 2
WANTED—PAIR OF SECOND-HAND
400 or 600-pound platform scales; state
price. 270 N. Fremont aye. 2
WANTED-TO BALE YOUR HAY AND
take baling out in hay. D. F. M'GARRY,
Ninth and Alameda. 30
WANTED—BIKE; WILL PAY IN ROOM
rent. Address P., box 25, Herald. 30
WANTED—ESTABLISHED BUSINESS,
retail; central. Y-28. Herald. 7-3
FOR SALE—LIVE STOCK
FOR SALE—AT A BARGAIN, 25 BUR
ros and 20 horses; the burros large and
solid color; the horses well bred, un
broken, also of dark color; ages, both
burros and horses, from 4 to 7 years; high
In flesh. The stock can be examined at
N. A. Covarrubias' yards, Agricultural
track. 7_g
FOR SALE—ABOUT 1000 ANGORA
goats; also young St. Bernard dog. 227
Bullard block. g
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE—WANT PARTY; BUSINESS
proposition; light easy work; lady or boy
could do It: It will be necessary for you to
have $200 or security for this amount or
don't come. Room 20 Bryson block. 30
FOR SALE-WELL ESTABLISHED AND
centrally located millinery business for
sale or exchange: owner going east; this
is a rare chance. Address 0., Box 25
Herald. j'
FOR SALE-36 BUSINESS, 75 HOUSES
rooms, furnished, unfurnished, for rent'
collections; wanted, help free and work
EDW. NITTINGER, 236 ft S. Spring st. tf
I SELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS
fcr cash. I. D. BARNARD, 111 North
Broadway, opposite Times building, tf
FOR SALE—SALOONS AT VERY REA
sonable terms. Apply at 440 Allso «t. tf
FOR SALE-FRUIT, CIGAR AND
drink stand. 616 S. Main. 7-6
FOR SALE-GROCERY AND ~ FRUIT
business. 816 Temple st. 30-4
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
LUDWIG & MATTHEWS, WHOLESALE
and retail fruits and vegetables. MOTT
135 S. Main st„ tel. 550. tf
CARPET CLEANING
CARPETS CLEANED, SEWED AND
laid at your house. J. MARTIN. 501 W
Eighth st. ' 7-1 '
PLUMBERS
FRANK A. WEINSHANK, PLUMBER
and gasfltler. 240 E. Second at.: tel. US.
THE HERALD
THE ADEN
WRECKED
Most of Her Passengers
Drowned
TWO WOMEN MISSIONARIES
COUNTED AMONG THE OCEAN'S
"VICTIMS
Rescue Come* After Seventeen Days
of Hideous Suffering Aboard
the Disabled Ship
Associated Press Special Wire.
ADEN, June 29.—The steamer Mayo,
sent out by the Indian gavernrnent In
search of the missing steamer Aden,
from Yokohama April 28th for London,
last heard of when leaving Colombo,
June Ist, has returned with the surviv
ors, nine passengers and six of the crew,
the other twenty-five passengers and
thirty-two of the crew being drowned
off the island of Socotoo on the morn
ing of June 9th.
A dispatch to the Dally Mall from
Aden, Arabia, says: Two days after
leaving Colombo the Aden was struck
by a severe monsoon and squalls. 'Day
by day the weather grew thicker and the
passengers became more and more
alarmed. At 3 oclock on the morning
of June 9, the vessel struck on the Ras
radelsla reef on the eastern coast of the
island- of Socotra.
The engine room wasinstantly flooded
and utter darkness ensued. Wild with
panic, the passengers rushed from their
cabins and fled terror stricken to the up
per deck and in the scantiest clothing.
The women and children screamed In
fright and confusion, but the men re
mained cool and retained their self-pos
session and courageously assisted the
officers and crew to do their best to save
the vesel and to Inplre calmness.
But It was soon seen that the steamer
could not survive the shock and that the
only chance for safety lay in the boats.
The storm continued to Increase in vi
olence. The seas washed the decks with
terrific force. Daylight brought no re
lief and only served to reveal still fur
ther the awful situation.
Misfortune followed misfortune. A
lifeboat was lowered only to be swept
away immediately with three Lascars
and the first officer, Mr. Carden. The
gig was dispatched to the rescue with
Mr. Miller, the second officer, but to the
despair of all, both boats were swept
away.
The only remaining lifeboat was then
lowered amid a scene of intense emo
tion. A cry of anguish broke from the
Hps of the men when this half capsized,
throwing the sailors and the stores into
the sea. After great efforts the boat was
righted and the women and children
were lowered Into It, with the exception
of Mmes. Gillet, Pearce and Strain, who
heroically resolved to share the fate of
their husbands, and Miss Lloyd and
Miss Weller, who remained behind.
The boat manned by a European crew
left in a tremendous sea and drifted, rap
idly out of sight.
Vast waves still swept the wreck,
dashing the people about and leaving
them almost prostrate on the deck.
One by one, men, women and*chlldren
grew too weak to withstand the repeat
ed buffetlngs and were washed over
board in sight of those who were mo
mentarily expecting the same fate.
Among the first thus engulfed were Mr.
and Mrs. Strain and their two children.
Misses Lloyd and Weller, the missiona
ries; Mrs. Pearce's baby with Its Chi
nese nurse, and then Captain Hill,
whose leg was broken but who had
borne himself calmly and bravely. He
was washed overboard with several of
the native crew.
The storm abated slightly on the morn
ing of the 10th, and those who were* able
to move began to search for food, hun
ger until then having failed to assert it
self over more acute privations. This
proved a task of the greatest danger, as
big seas were still sweeping the vessel.
The fourth engineer, while trying to
procure water, was struck senseless and
almost washed overboard before he
could be dragged' to a place of safety.
It was five hours before he was restored
to consciousness. Mr. Pearse was only
saved: from being washed overboard by
the prompt action of his dauntless wife.
The search for food resulted in their
getting very little of it, and this was
shared out equally, and In very small
portions. No vessel was sighted until
the 13th, and then the distress siignal
was not seen. On the 17th, and again on
the 20tih other vessels were .sighted, but
the signals either were not seen or were
Ignored.
On June 26th, when thing* were in
their worst form and the food supply
was almost exhausted, liteeere. White,
Kalt, Gave and Valpy bravely ventured
across the deck to the store room and
got a fresh supply. That evening two
steamers were sighted. One proceeded
without paying any attention to the dis
tress signals. The other anchored un
der the lee of the 'Island. As soon, as
she was sighted, a Lascar mounted the
rigging and signalled her. In reply
candles burned in her port .holes, and at
daybreak on the 26th a suspense of
seventeen days was relieved by the spec
tacle of the steaimer rounding t>he point
and heading towards the wreck. She
dropped anchor about a mile away.
, A very heavy sea was still running, but
the wind had moderated slightly. With
heartfelt Joy, mingled with the tears of
the men and hysterical sobbing of the
women, they saw the lifeboat lowered.
It took her throe-fourths of an; hour to
reach the wreck. Everyone rushed to
the broken side of the ship. It was the
lifeboat of the Indian government
steamer Mayo, and In charge of Lieu
tenants Dobin and Goldsmith.
.They skillfully avoided the tremen
dous wash and ssoured all of the. sur
vivors In two of the ship's boaab. Every
attention was paid to them on board the
LOS ANGELES, WEDNESDAY MORNING, JUNE 30, 1897
Mayo. Their health is Improving, and
they will sail homeward tomorrow
(Wednesday) on the steamer India.
Burning Tar Starts a Disastrous Con
flagration
SAN FRANCISCO, June 29.—A very
disastrous fire occurred on the water
front between 3 and 4 oclock this after
i noon. While laying block pavement
upon the new Folsom street wharf oc
cupied by the Oceanic Steamship com
pany and recently constructed at a cost
of $50,000, some workmen upset a pot of
boiling tar and in a few minutes the
whole wharf was in flames. A general
alarm was rung In and the entire firs
department responded, but owing to a
stiff breeze which was blowing off the
bay little could be done to extinguish the
flames. Fortunately, very few ships
were moored at the wharf, but a 9 it was
the American ship Commodore was con
siderably damaged before she could be
towed into the bay and the flameswhich
had caught her bows extinguished.
The little schooner Katie Mack burned
to the water's edge before a tug could be
summoned, and was a total loss. The
damage will reach fully $40,000, of which
$30,000 will fall on the state, for the
wharf, and. $8000 on the Commodore and
the balance on the Katie Mack.
BRYAN'S MOVEMENTS
The Silver Leader Finds His Services
in Demand
LINCOLN, Neb., June 29.—William J.
Bryan left this morning for Hastings,
in company with several state officers,
to participate in the ex-Con gTessman
McKetghan memorial services. From
that point Mr. Bryan will go to Salt
Lake, and thence to California. He will
be in the latter state for four days, be
ginning next Saturday, and will speak
at a •monster celebration In Los An
geles next Monday. He will also visit
Oregon before returning to Salt Lake to
attend the transmlssissippi congress, of
which he is president. After that meet
ing he will be joined by Mrs. Bryan, and
will go to Yellowstone park to visit for
a month.
PORTLAND, Me., June 29.—The will
of the late John B. Curtis of Deerlng,
Me., has been filed for probate. The
estate is estimated at two millions and
with the exception of small bequests
will all go to charity. Much of the prop
erty le in the West. Mr. Curtis was
born In Bradford. That town is gener
ously remembered with a bequest of
$20,000 for a free public library. Other
beneficiaries are the Portland Widows
and Society Home for Aged Women ar.d
Home for Aged Men, the general hospi
tal, Portland Fraternity, Paine Mem
orial Corporation of Boston, the Port
land Institute and the Public Library.
AUBURN, June 29.—0n Saturday last
Chris A. Wagner, a well-known hop
man, was arrested? In Sfrtramento on a
requisition from the governor of Wis
consin to Detectives Broderick and Mc-
Manus of Milwaukee. The charge was
embezzlement, preferred by Milwaukee
parties. On Sunday, while the officers
were en route east with their prisoner,
they were detained at Auburn by a writ
of habeas corpus. The proceedings were
held-today before Judge Prewitt, who
upheld the writ, holding that the gov
ernor of Wisconsin could not extradite
if the crime was not committed in Wis
consin, but in California.
ST. HELENA, June 29.—Captain M.
G. Richie, a pioneer of 1850, died here
this afternoon of cancer of the liver. He
was Identified with mining in the early
days and was at onfe time president of
the Vancouver National bank. He was
a prominent Mason.
RED BLUFF, June 29.— G. W. Balis,
who came to California in 1851, locating
in Amador county, where he engaged, in
mining, died today. He came to this
county in 1871 and has since engaged in
farming. He was a native of New York,
aged 71 years.
OAKLAND, June 29.--J. J. Collins,
one of the bondsmen of Ah Tuen, the
defaulting Chinese lottery agent, has a
novel defense in the suit commenced by
City Attorney W. A. Dow against him
self and Mary Kelly. He says that Ah
Tuen is dead and if necessary offers to
produce his body in court encased in
the rough casket In which it was bur
ied. City Attorney Dow and the police
officers interested in the case do not
believe that Ah Tuen is dead.
Confessed to Perjury
SAN FRANCISCO, June 29.—During
the hearing of supplementary proceed
ings in the matter of the insolvency of
Louis Gompertz, a butcher, in Justice
Carroll's court, today, Louis Ososke, a
youth in the employ of the insolvent, ad
mitted that he had committed perjury
in testifying that a receipt for $30 bear
ing hissignature was a forgery and that
in fact he had received the money and
divided it with Gompertz. He was im
mediately ordered into custody.
SAN FRANCISCO, June 29.—Five Chi
nese are on trial in the United States
district court for mining by the hy
draulic process without complying with
the Camlnettl act. The arrests' were
made at Gold Run. Placer county. The
defense Is that they were simply sluic
ing. The case will.go to the jury to
morrow.
Stabbed a Negro
RED BLUFF, June 29—Joseph Scott,
charged with having stabbed a colored
man named Holman in a drunken row
three weeks ago, today pleaded guilty
to a charge of assault with a deadly
weapon, to which his charge was re
duced from assault lo murder, and was
fined $150 in the superior court.
SANTA CRUZ, June 29.—The exam
ination of George Plyter, M Sehoedd*
and H. Bradley for alleged mayhem has
been 9et in the justice court for July f,
Charles Harris, their alleged victim, is
Improving, and his physician expects
to have him out in a week.
A Small Boy Killed
SANTA CRUZ, June 29.—Louis, tho
E-year-old son of M. B. Borges, was
killed yesterday by being run over by
a wagon near Blanco, Monterey county.
A 'FRISCO FIRE
Millions for Charity
A Prisoner Released
Two Pioneers Gone
A Novel Defense
Chinese Mining
The Mayhem Victim
RAILROAD
RESOURCES
Strainet to Accommodate !
ft* Rush
SLEEPING CARS 8 Y SCORES ;
ADDED TO ALL THE 1 -V: ST:ERN
TRAINS ,
The Yellowstone Hotel Managers Cry '
Enough and Order the Sale
of Tickets Stopped
Associated Press Special Wire.
KANSAS CITY, Mo., June 29.—The
rush of excursionists to the Christian
Endeavor convention in San Francisco
is already straining the resources of the
union depot and officials at this point.
Kansas City being the natural gateway
for this traffic from the east and south,
there is every indication of the biggest
crush of excursionists that hasever been
known here. The baggage department
Is already overrun and the prospects
are that excursionists who do not carry
a liberal supply of raiment In hand
satchels will be sorely Inconvenienced
on reaching the coast.
The Wabash road brought in two car
loads of Endeavorers from Decatur, 111.,
this morning and three more carloads
picked up along the route. Tomorrow
morning's Wabash train from St. Louis
will be run in five sections, each section
carrying six to eight sleepers. Tomor
row the Rock Island will have a special
of fourteen sleepers through from New
Jersey and another of eight sleepers
from Ohio points. The Santa Fe took out
twenty-two extra chair cars and sleep
ers today. Tomorrow it will carry a
special of fourteen sleepers from St.
Louis and one of nineteen from Chicago
and the east. Ten sleepgrs were sent to
Topeka today to transport a crowd of
500 Kansans. Thirteen extrasleepers will
come in over the Chicago and Alton to
morrow morning. Nine of them will be
occupied by the Kentucky delegation,
400 strong. The Memphis road will
bring in several carloads of Endeavor
ers from Memphis and Birmingham.
The Union Pacific tomorrow will send
out two special trains of excursionists
from the two Kansas Cities and neigh
boring points. The Missouri Pacific and
Burlington carried several extra cars
west this morning and both roads will
send out special trains in the morning.
Every train west carried extra coaches.
TOO MANY GUESTS
ST. PAUL, Minn., June 29—The Chris
tian Endeavor convention has caused an
unprecedented condition in Yellowstone
park. On June 24th the Yellowstone
Park Transportation and Hotel compa
nies, having closed arrangements with a
number of parties, aggregating 1600 per
sons, for the full park tour, notified the.
passenger department of the Northern
Pacific railway to discontinue the sal?
of park tickets July 17 to 25th inclusive,
and in accordance with this notice the
Northern Pacific has issued to their con
nections a formal circular to that effect.
The Yellowstone Park Transportation
company, whose equipment is the larg
est in the world of the kind, have more
than doubled their normal capacity, bul
notwithstanding this fact the large de
mand for Yellowstone tickets, growing
out of the return of the Endeavor busi
ness to California via Portland and the
Northern Pacific, has finally forced it
to give its connections this notice.
WRECKED TRAINS
The Endeavor Delegates Seem to Es-
cape Injury
CHICAGO, June 29.—A rear-end col
lision between two crowded excursion
trains occurred near West Chicago,
about thirty miles from this city, at a
late hour tonight. The reports received
by the officials of the road up to 2:30 a
m. Indicate that no one was killed, but
that at lease fifteen persons were more
or less injured.
These reports contain no information
as to the cause of the accident. The
trains were running as separate sec
tions of a passenger, and both contained
delegates and' visitors on their way to
the Pacific coast to attend the annual
convention of the Christian Endeavor
ers.
A relief party was made up asi soon as
the news of the wreck was received. It
will be taken to the scene of the accident
on the fast mail train which leaves here
at 3 a. m.
FOUR MEN KILLED
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., June 29. —A
dispatch just received from J. J., Turner,
general manager of the Vandalia rail
road, dated at Terre Haute, contains the
information that one of the Christian
Endeavor excursion trains has been
wrecked west of Terre Haute. He says
no one is injured with the exception of
three postal clerks, and their injuries
are not serious.
It is learned that R. T. Sherman of
Indianapolis, mail clerk on the St. Louis
train, is killed; also, M. P. Coon of In
dianapolis, baggage master of train No.
11, west bound. Sam Parkinson, mail
clerk, of Columbus, and Frank Owens,
fireman, of Terre Haute, are fatally In
jured.
TWO INJURED
SALT LAKE, Utah. June 29.—The
west bound passenger train on the Ore
gon Short Line road went into the ditch
near Glenn's Ferry, Idaho, last night,
caused by a broken axle. One person
was seriously injured and one slightly
injured. The names of the injured are
not given.
Superintendent Calvin and Chief Sur
geon Plnkerton left last night on a
special train for the scene of the acci
dent.
DELEGATES CAUGHT
CHICAGO, June 30.—At 3:10 a. m. the
Northwestern railroad officials in this
city say that one passenger was killed
INDEX
OF THE TELEGRAPH NEWS
The San Francisco chamber of com
merce petitions congress for prompt
annexation of Hawaii.
Weyler wants 60,000 men to put
down the Cuban insurgents; repeat
ed rumors of the captain-general's re
call.
Fitzsimmons and Sullivan are not
likely to meet; police interference is
promised, and Sullivan cannot keep
sober long enough to train.
The platform of the Ohio Demo
crats, while small, is largo enough
to provide standing room for every
patriot; it is a demand for free silver,
and nothing else.
The military cyclists reach Gillette,
Wyo., after a trip over roads of bot
tomless mud, surfaced with eight feet
of hailstones; wheel race results; ball
b mes; turf events.
*>c Aden wrecked off the coast of
inclua and many P assen eTers are lost,
two women missionaries;
the surv
2>rs rescued after seventeen
days of d Sdful Buflerlng
Illinois la workg a great hardsnip
on boys brig ieS) slum armle(j and
other imitation , w whQ are
hibited from we u „ lformß „.
sembling military , raishingß-
Bannock Indians s reßerva .
tion and threatening wU tfa
made a record at Jacksi. jj o j e and
both settlers and national.
tnorities
appreciate the need of act j on
Senators vary the monotony, tftr _
iff debate by stirring up Tillmt, on
his favorite subject; the lead ore
agraph of the pending bill is dispost
of, and a long list of private pensior
' bills reported from committee.
Rates granted Endeavorers promisi
to result in the greatest rush of tour
ists the Pacific coast ever saw; extre
' trains are counted by the score anc
extra cars by the hundred; Yellow'
stone park hotel managers are al
ready overwhelmed and will accepi
no more guests.
in the wreck at West Chicago and twelve
or thirteen were injured. The injured
will be brought to this city and 1 receive
medical attention. The last car of the
first train of excursionists was badly
smashed, and all of those who were in
jured were occopants of this car. Those
who were uninjured were taken on. board
the cars of the first section and pro
ceeded on tehlr journey. An official re
port of the wreck is expected here with
in a short time.
IMITATION SOLDIERS
SLAPPED HARD BY ILLINOIS
LEGISLATORS
They May Wear Green, but Must Not
Imitate TJucle Sam's Arms
and Clothing
CHICAGO, June 29.—The American
Volunteers, Balllngton Booth's religious
organization, will be compelled to
change their uniform because of the en
actment of the military code of Illinois
by the last Legislature. Policemen will
not be permitted to wear overcoats, such
as those worn by army officers. The
Clan Na Gael Guards will be disbanded,
Captain Thomas J. Ford's famous Chi
cago Zouaves will cease to be, the Chi
cago Hussars will be required to drop
their military trappings, while Boys'
Brigades and semi-military companies
throughout the State will be disbanded
or the members fined and imprisoned.
All of these things are owing to the
provisions of the article XI of the mili
tary code, now a law, having received
the signature of Governor Tanner.
For a long time the officers of the Na
tional Guard have been trying to secure
an enactment which should prevent the
indiscriminate wearing of the uniform
and the carrying of arms by independent
military organizations. Now that the
law has gone into effect, iTls found that
it is more sweeping in its character than
ever its framers anticipated.
Primarily aimed at independent or
ganizations, it has accomplished its
desire by making such battalions and
companies as the Clan Na Gael Guards,
Chicago and Aurora Zouaves and the
Chicago Hussars unlawful bodies and
will render It impossible for them to
parade again without assuming the risk
of fine and imprisonment.
It will also stop the wearing of uni
forms patterned after those of the array
by members of secret societies, religious
bodies and the police.
Will Keep Order
FORT GIBSON, L T., June 29.—Tin
recent resistance by freedmen to re
plevin by United States marshals and
, the general unsettled conditions have
induced' the Dawes commission to re
quest the secretary of war to have a
military post re-established here, and
a telegram from General Merrltt to Cap
tain Galbraith for Information in regard
to the incapacity of the old barracks
leads to the belief that definite steps ar?
being taken.
Guilty of Forgery
MARY'SVILLE, June 29.—D. S. Butch
er, who claimed to represent a San
Francisco trade paper, pleaded guilty
this afternoon to a charge of forging
the name of V. Ginannella to a promis
sory note and was sentenced to five years
in San Quentin.
A Banker's Sentence
ST. PAUL, Minn., June 29.—Charles
R. Zsohau, receiving teller of the Ger
man National bank, who yesterday
pleaded guilty to stealing several thou
sand dollars from the bank, was today
sentenced to eight years in the state's
prison.
Ten Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
CHANDLER'S
RED FLAG
Causes Tillman to Forget
His Theme
SOME FAST AND FURIOUS FUN
VARIES MOTONONY OF TARIFF
DEBATE
Much Time Spent in Consideration of
Private Pension Bills—Lead
Duty Disposed Of
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, June 29.—After tedi
ous discussion of the tariff bill
throughout the day, the senate wound up
with a half hour of lively and amusing
colloquy between Senators Tillman cf
South Carolina and Chandler of New
Hampshire. The former had proposed
an amendment to the tariff bill provid
ing a JIOO head tax on immigrants and a
restriction against all those not coming
to the United States to become citizens.
Tillman made an earnest speech on the
depressed condition of labor, but he was
soon diverted from his theme by Chand
ler. The latter, adopting a style of
mock gravity, directed the discussion
toward Mr. Cleveland's administration.
l Thi9 in time brought from Tillman a
■fHicism of the late president, while
3 ort ndler Protested against the assaults
„„.};■ Cleveland by a member of his
fast F ty - When the fun, had been
1 man a. tur ious for some time the Till
l3_ n ays fdments w ere defeated, yeas
- ing cast*' ne three affirmative votes be-
Tillman. Messrs. Butler, Quay and
disposed of' 1 * the day the senate
committee ra\ lead Paragraphs, the
on. lead ore be.ii? 1 v & cents P er Pound
• other paragraph Freed to, 30 to 23. The
3 paratively of mml nsid&r ed were com
-1 Several hundred p mportance.
a ported today as the lon bills were re
! meeting of the pensiorl ult of the "rat
f the present congress asse mm "' cci since
- them were general Among
c which amend the act of 18\ 11Is ' two of
Reading' of the list consun.
hour, and when it was conclu an
gan of Alabama' commented or? Mor
that the people named in the bili f-a-ct
wait for relief, owing to the ina.cf ust
one branch of congress, and hinted °'
it was a graver question as to whetl
congress was in session or not.
The tariff bill was then taken, up, and
paragraph 189, relating to watch move
ments, clocks, etc., perfected, striking
out the clauses' on watches and jewels
for watchmaking, and confining the
paragraph to those articles not made
of porcelain.
A duty of V,i cents per pound on lead
ore, as reported by the finance commit
tee, was agreed upon, 30 to 23.
The foregoing changes led to extended
opposition from Vest and Jones.
Lodge answered that the watch in
dustry had been revolutionized by
American machinery. We made watches
so much better and cheaper that no hand
made watch could compete with them.
Now the Swiss makers had bought
American machinery and operated it
with comparatively cheap labor. Lodge
exhibited Swiss watches which pur
ported to be of American make, and as
such were invading the American mar
ket.
Pineapples were changed to 7 cents per
cubic foot in barrels and packages and
$7 per thousand In bulk.
Vest asked what climatic and sanitary
reason justified this heavy duty.
Allison responded that Florida pro
duced pineapples and great pressure
had been brought to bear for adequate '
protection.
"Where did the pressure come from?"
asked Bacon of Georgia.
"I cannot give specifications," re
sponded Allison, "but I will say it was
from both sides of this chamber."
The Florida senators, Mallory and
Pascoe, explained the recent develop
ment of the pineapple industry in Flori
da, which led Gray of Delaware to say
in an animated response that it would
have been better had Florida lands been
left in primeval simplicity if their use for
raising pineapples was to be followed by
a tax on the bulk of the people.
Lead ore and lead in pigs were then
considered, Allen of Nebraska speaking
at length against the committee rates.
He argued against the duty of 1% cents
a pound on lead ore, because, as he said,
it would operate to keep out the fluxing
ores of Mexico and Canada that were
necessary to the American smelters,
some of which are located in Mr. Allen's
state.
Carter of Montana explained in re-
sponse to inquiries by Allen that the
house rates had been especially favor
able to white lead, the product of the
lead trust, whereas the senate rates de-
creased the benefits to the trust and in
creased them to the producers of the
ore. He argued that the committee rate*
were essential to equalize the difference
between the wages of lead miners in the
United States and Mexico.
Vest said this was a conflict between
the lead smelters and lead mines, and
both interests were heavily represented
in his state. But his vote would be cast
in behalf of the consumer and not for
either of these conflicting interests. If
his state expected these interests to be
defended as against those of the people,
the great mass of consumers of lead,
then some one must take his place here,
f H would not give a vote, even though
two-thirds of the people of Missouri
were here asking it, if it violated hl3
ideas of Justice and equity. Vest said
he would move later on to reduce the
duty on lead ore from 1% to %. cent per
pound, although he would be glad to go
further and see it on the free list.
Rawlins of Utah discussed the general
doctrine of the tariff, arguing that the
first consideration 'should be revenue
and then the equalization of the burdens
and benefits of the system of raw mate

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