OCR Interpretation


The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, June 30, 1897, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-06-30/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

2
rta.lt and manufactured prodttct» alike.
The committee ratea on lead ore (1%
cents per pound) were agreed to—3o to
23
Messrs. Heltfleld, Mantle and Tellei
voted with the Republicans in the af
firmative, and Mr. Allen with the Demo
crats in the negative.
In pig lead, the rate was increased
from 2 to 2ft cents a pound, the duty of
2ft cents on lead in shc*ts, etc., being
retained.
Paragraph ISI (metallic substances)
was changed as heretofore agreed upon
by the finance committee, and the sub
stitute for paragraph IS2 (mica) was
agreed to.
Paragraph 278 (tallow) was changed
from 1 to % cent per pound, the remain
der of the paragraph being unchanged.
Tillman was then recognized for a
speech in support of the following
amendment to the bill:
That there shall be collected a head
lax of $100 on all immigrants coming to
the United States by land or water,
provided that this section shall only re
main in force until silver shall be ad
mitted to our mints for coinage at the
"ratio of 16 to 1, on the same conditions
With gold.
Tillman spoke of the rapid spread o.
pauperism, as shown by the statistics
cf the jails and prisons. It was time,
he said, to keep platform promises, to
do something for labor, to keep bad;
the half million immigrant* arriving
annually. He spoke of the miserable
condition of the coal miners of Penn
sylvania, and read from official reports
saying many of the miners were com
pelled to live like beasts. And this,
exclaimed Mr. Tillman decisively, when
senators are framing their laws for the
protection of American labor and Amer
ican Industry.
Quay remarked that the report from
which Tillman read was made by a
Republican committee, appointed by a
Republican legislature.
"Ar.d I am asking a Kepubllcnn con
gress to protect these people against
competition," declared Tillman. "Will
you do it? Dare you do it, or will you
be satisfied with giving lip service?"
He gave the extent of the slum ele
ment In New York, Baltimore, Chicago
and other places and said that showed
where the big Republican majorities
came from last year. He closed with a
gloomy prediction that if the tide of im
migration wasnot turned back the coun
try would be torn be revolution and
bloodshed and a repetition of the Paris
commune.
Chandler asked why it was that tli/
Immigration bill passed by
majorities in the last congress had Ir
defeated. /ent,
"Because your Republican Png ute( ]
Grover Cleveland, vetoed it,"/
Tillman. /rotestrd
Amid the laughter, Chandl/ dffißn . u .
against having Mr. develop senator
ed as a Republican, wha, man) ha(j
• from South CaroV'ia / p in electing
joined with the Dem^,,,..^
that president as-a Dy, Ilalli whi!e the
"Yes," forgiveness for
galleries roared. Jf 0 llelp me God| ra
that and promi/.
never do It agr arp cross-firing. Till-
After some/ nt wa9 3tn 48.
man's amen£ s in tho affirmative were
The three/ and Tillman.
Butler, Qj[y vo ted for the amendment
When, a hearty laugh, in which the
there Joined.
•* n *Ariff bill was then laid aside, and
TJ p. m. the senate adjourned.
at CONFIRMATIONS
/he senate today confirmed the fol
,wing nominations: Soren Listoe of
Minnesota, consul at Rotterdam, Neth
erlands; T. A. Rooseberry of Susanville,
Cal.. register of the land office at Su
sanville; also the military and naval
cadets recently graduated.
IN COMMITTEE
Hoar Reports Regarding the Senator
From Oregon
WASHINGTON, June 29.—The report
prepared by Senator Hoar in the case
of H. W. Corbett. claiming a seat from
Oregon by appointment by the governor,
has been printed for the use of the com
mittee.
After reviewing the situation in th :
Oregon legislature the re port continues:
"It le clear that whatever may have
been the nature of the organization of
the legislature that it had been dispersed
and oome to an end before March 1, 1897,
when the vacancy in the office of senator
by limit of the term to which Mr. Mitch
ell had been chosen and which he hpld
for six years. Any choice or appoint
ment made after that time must be a
choice or appointment for less than six
years.
"It is well fettled' by a practice which
has existed from the formation of the
government that the vacancies so occur
ring after the beginning of a constitu
tional term may be filled by the legisla
ture. If that be true, they may be filled
by the executive of the state during the
recess of the legislature-. The legisla
ture is only authorized by the consti
tution to fill such vacancies as might
be filled by the executive by temporary
appointment until the next meeting of
the legislature. So if the executive have
no power the legislature has no power.
The executive may make a temporary
appointment and the legislature may
fill that vacancy when it assembles, o>'
or the office must remain vacant for
the rest of the six years. It has been
said that a vacancy does not happen
when it ocurs by reason of the expira
tion of a certain terra, or when the office
has never been filled, but the report hold.
that this position ll not well taken, and
Bays:
"When the term of a representative
expires and the people have failed to
elect a successor beforehand, which oc -
curred very often when a majority wa?
required for an election, the executive
has always Issued a writ of election to
Buch vaciancy as occurs.
"We think, therefore," conclude! the
report, "that the governor of Oregon
Was entitled to make the appointment,
and that Mr. Corbett is entitled to the
seat."
DUTIES FIXED
The Senate Finance Committee has
fixed the duty on coal at G7 cents per
long ton. This rate applies only to coal
shipped from countries which do not Im
pose higher rate s on American coal ar.d
therefore affect,* Canadian coal only.
The Committee decided to restore paint
nlgs to tho dutiable list, returning to the
House program, but it is not definitely
Fettled whether the rate shall be 20 or
25 per cent. The Senate Finance Com
mitter took crude gypsum roc-k from the
free list and imposed a duty uf $1 per
ton.
A HOUSE BILL
Crumpaoker Hopes to Stop Hawaiian
Annexation
"WASHINGTON, June 20.—Represen
tative Crumpacker of Indiana has in
troduced in the House a resolution for
a Constitutional amendment providing
that hereafter no non-contiguous terri
tory shall be annexed to the United
States except in pursuance of a treaty
negotiated by the President, concurred
in by two-thirds of the houses of Con
gress and ratified by the Legislatures of
three-fourths of the States, and no con
tiguous territory except by treaty con
curred in by two-thirds of each house,
the vote of concurrence not to be taken
in the House of Representatives until
two years have elapsed from the time
of taking the vote in the Senate.
A Japanese Demand
BAKERS FIELD, June 29.—Sheriff
Borgwardt leaves tonight for the desert
mines to investigate an extraordinary
case. Some time ago two Japanese cooks
were run out of Johannesburg on ac
count of race prejudice. They reported
the case to the Japanese consul at San
Francisco, demanding damages and pro
tection in their treaty rights. Consul
Funakoshi has called on the cherlff to
investigate the matter. It is reported
that the case has been laid before Sec
retary Sherman.
HAWAIIAN ANNEXATION
STRONGLY FAVORED BY 'FRISCO
MERCHANTS .
i' Chamber of Commerce of the Torth
ern Metropolis Asks Con/ ss
for Prompt Actio/
[ j SAN FRANCISCO, JIT 29 ~~ The San
I Francisco chamber o *' 6mm " cc toda *
■! adopted a memorial/ Presentation to
t ' the senate and. ho/ of representatives
1 respectfully bu./ rsenlljr P«»«onins
1 congress for t/» )r,ompt annexation of
. the Hawai!ajr* puWlc ' Tn * memorial
, Jfllows:
i proceeds aar
i "While true that Pacific coast in
> , M _ )tß 3mand, we respectfully plead
i jj/llan annexation on the broader \
- ro /of national policy, prestige, ar.d
.yntrcial necessity, We protest •
' c ?frj3t the possibility of this great
3 Ji'or.ghoul in mid-Pacific being permit
/ed occupation by any foreign power as"
'a constant menace to our country.
"Every consideration demands prompt
territorial annexation. If we object to '
Hawaiian annexation we should con
sistently cede Alaska to Great Britain. '
But' we are confident that every intelli- I
gent American, unbiased by prejudice 1
or personal interests, will support the
policy of the administration in the an- •
nexation of this friendly isiami repub- I
lie, which has these many years sought ■
to be incorporated with the' American '
nation. i
"As a political and commercial neces- I
sity. we also pray that the United' States
government will aid and facilitate the
connection, by Pacific cable, the Pacific (
coast and these islands." (
The chamber also adopted art address i
to the citizens of the Pacific coast, set- ]
ting forth at great. length the advant- j
ages which would accrue to the Pacific t
coast if Hawaiian annexation were an j
accomplished fact.
The address concluded with a request j
for support ar.d indorsement! of the ]
chamber's action by the commercial or- j
ganizations of the Pacific coast. (
IRRIGATING WATER
Is More Important Than Bights of
Irrigators
DENVER, Col., June 29.—A special to
the Republican from Silver City, N. M.,
says: Argument on the order to show
cause, etc., in the case of the United
States vs. the Rio Grande Dam and Irri
gation company, v>as resumed this
morning. Mr. W. A. Hawkins, leading
counsel for respondents, occupied the
morning In a presentation of the case in
behalf of hisclier.ts. He cited.numerous
reports showing that even the flood wa
ters of the river rarely If ever reach the
portion of the stream which it is claimed
has been navlgatled. He also shows
that while complainants claim that the
river is susceptible of navigation ar.d
has been navigated near its mouth, there
is no allegation and no evidence What
ever that it is being navigated at this
time. In the course of his argument he
read from the geological reports a state
ment to the effect that the river is not
susceptible of being made navigable,
even by a system of locks and dams.
He also showed that the act of congress
conferred upon the secretary of the In
terior the absolute right and in fact
made it a positive duty, acting purely in
a ministerial capacity, to grant to the
first applicant the right to the reservoir
sites named by law. and that conse
quently defendant* have a vested right
to their site by virtue of having been the
first applicants therefor. Judge S. It.
Newcomb of Las Truces. N. M., made:
the closing argument. No decision is
expected for several days.
Kern County Taxes
BAKERfiFIELD, June HO —The Kern
Valley Water company began suit here
today to enjoin the tax collector from
selling for delinquent taxes the canal
of the company. In IS9G Miliar gave a
statement to the assessor showing eight
and one-halt miles of canal, valued at
$6500. Assessor Scott added fifteen and
one-half .mile s more andra'iscd the value
to $37,000 Miller claims that the last
fifteen and one-half miles of canal has
been abandoned and has no value. He
tendered the taxes on the basis of hi?
statement, but they were refused and
the tax marked delinquent and adver
tised, hence the suit to enjoin the tax
collector.
Bans Escape Taxation
PAN FRANCISCO, June 29—Accord
ing to a statement made today by Dep
uty Assessor Hugo Herser, the banks of
this city win this, year escape paying
taxes, on about $l(j,0uo.000 worth of mon
ey and solvent credits, jihich will re
duce the amount available for taxable
purposes just that sum and decrease the
,-»tatc and city revenues to the extent of
about $240,000. This has been accom
plished, says Herzer, by the banks con
verting taxable securities into govern
ni. in bonds on which taxes cannot be
levied.
A Broken Bank
TACOMA, June 29 — The Union Trust
and Savings Hank suspended thlsmorn
ir.g. Charles Richardson was appointed
receiver by the court. No statement has
yet been filed. The failure is attributed
to the recent decision of the Supreme
Court invalidating half a million dollars'
worth of city warrants, of which the
bank held one-half.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: WEDNESDAY MORNING* JUNE 30, 1897
BAD INDIANS
Break Away From Their
Reservation
MEMORIES OF JACKSON H^E
INCLINE SETTLERS Tq/pBOMPT
ACTION /
Secretary Bliee Orders for Mil
-1 itary Assistant and the Bound
ing Up A the Redskins
Associated/"" Special Wire.
| WASH*" 01,01 *' June 29.—Three
I Run( j re /Bannock Indians have broken
a\vaß / " om Fort Ha " Reservation In
Kjayi and their actions have alarmed
gJlers in the adjacent territory. The
' /ar Department has been called upon
'for troops.
The news of the outbreak of the In
dians from the reservation came today
in dispatches from the governor of Ida
ho. He telegraphed Secretary Bliss late
last night and today wired urgent mes
sages to Senator Heitfleld. Messrs.
Heitfield and Shoup immediately went
to the interior department, where they
called attention to the situation, and the
dispatches were also forwarded to the
secretary of war. Secretary Bliss car
ried the telegrams* to the cabinet meet
ing, w here they were discussed. A for
mal communication was also made to
the secretary of war asking that orders
be Issued for whatever military as
sistance may- be necessary to aid the
agent. Lieut. F. G. Irwin, U. S. A., in
preserving order and protecting the lives
and property of the settlers, and in re- j
turning the Indians to their reservations, j
iif they are absent therefrom as repre
sented. The agent was notified to make
a further Immediate report.
These Indians are the ones who fig
ured in the Jackson Hole affair some
time ago and had several eklrmlshes
with settlers. A commission isnow ne
gotiating with them, as well as with
some other tribes, for the cession of a
part of their reservation to the United
States. The commission has worked for
many months, but the Indians generally
have been found not to favor the scheme
and the commission's work, so far as it
has progressed, has not been successful.
The Bannock reservation is located down
in the southeast corner of Idaho, near
the Wyoming and Utah boundary lines.
SETTLERS' ACTION
BOISE, Idaho, June 29. —Information
comes from Camas Prairie to the effect
that the settlers threaten to organize
and expel the Indians If they are not
promptly taken care of by the govern
ment. They are burning fences and
turning their horses into the fields of
grain.
The governor has received a message
from Secretary Bliss which says: "I
have telegraphed Lieut. Irwin, acting
agent at Fort Hall, for a full report by
telegraph, and also requested the sec
retary of war to issue orders for mili
tary assistance to Agent Irwin to pre
serve order and protect the lives and
property of the settlers and return the
Indians to their reservation if absent
therefrom as reported."
FIGEL'S FUTURE
Seventeen Criminal Charges to Be
Bitterly Pushed
SAN FRANCISCO, June 29.—Theodore
Figel, formerly bookkeeper for the firm
of Hoffman, Rothschild & Co., was form
ally arraigned today by Judge Camp
bell upon four charges of felony em
bezzlement. His examination was set
for July 6th by consent, Figel mean
while being released upon bail in the
sum of $12,000, with his parents as sure
ties.
After the court proceedings In the
Figel case today Attorney Murphy re
paired at once to his office, where he
began the preparation of five com
plaints. Three of these will charge the
bookkeeper with forgery in having in
dorsed the firm name on the drafts and
checks alleged to have been embezzled,
and two of them charge additional em
bezzlements. Altogether there will
probably be seventeen charges brought
against Figel—eight for embezzlement,
eight for forgery and one for murder.
E. S. Rothchild reiterates his deter
mination to push the prosecution of. tho
embezzlement and forgery charges to
a conclusion. Harry Hoffman, a brother
of the deceased, will verify the com
plaint for murder, but when this will
be filed, whether tomorrow or Thurs
day, has not been decided.
Henry Ach has withdrawn from active
connection with the prosecution of the
criminal charges against Figel.
OUTING'S EDITOR
Commits Suicide Because His Motor
Wouldn't Work
NEW YORK, June 29.—Franklin Bass
ford, a marine artist and writer, com
mitted suicide by shooting himself in the
right side of the head on board his
launch, the Larita, which was designed
by him and was- at anchor off the foot
of Communipaw avenue, Jersey City.
His act was due to despondency, the re
sult of heavy money losses and the fail
ure of an invention or discovery through
which he had hoped to realize a fortune.
Just before his death he wrote a letter
in which he said that he was ready for a
trial today of the new motive power
which he had discovered, but some one
who wanted to prevent him securing cer
tain patents had tampered with the en
gine of the Larita and undone the work
of months.
Mr. Bassford was 40 years old. His
pictures of the White Squadron have at
tracted attention. He was an enthusi
astic yachtsman and was the yachting
editor of Outing. He derived from his
writings and paintings a large income,
but most of his money was spent in ex
periments- by which he hoped to develop
great motive power by small expendi
ture.
A Negro's Crime
.ST. LOUIS. Mo.. June 29.—A specla'.
to the Republic from Newport says:
Mary Kennedy staggered into her home
this morning with her throat cut. She
bald she went walking last night with
Wils Crabtree and sat down near the
lake. A negro sprang out of the bushes
and struck Crabtree three times on the
head with a club. The negro then eeised
her, carried her into the woods, and
after threatening death if she resisted,
assaulted her. As she subsequently re
sisted, the negro cut her throat twice
and left her for dead. Crabtree was
found at the place described with his
head literally smashed. He is dying.
A Legal Killing
AUBURN, N. V., June 29—Robert J.
Powley was electrocuted at 11:35 this
morning successfully. The crime for
which Robert J. Powley was executed
was the murder of his wife on the night
of March 6th at Niagara Falls, N. Y.
Powley at the time of the murder was
indicted for criminal assault and he bad
been released on his own recognizance.
Some time previous he had been tried
for attempting to chloroform his wife,
the Jury disagreeing on the first trial
and acquitting him on the second. Pow
ley's attorney attempted to prove that
he was mentally irresponsible at the
time of the shooting. Witnesses tes
tified that he had been injured in the
head fifteen years ago and that he had
suffered from sunstroke twice.
FITZ AND SULLIVAN
NOT AT ALL LIKELY TO TRY
CONCLUSIONS
Police Interference Guaranteed, and
John L. Can't Keep Sober Long
Enough to Train
NEW YORK, June 29.—Police Super
intendent McKelvey of Brooklyn said
today: "Fitzsimmons and Sullivan can
not meet in a sparring exhibition or
match at Ambrose Park, or anywhere
else In Brooklyn, July sth.
"I have not been consulted In the mat
ter, but the authorities have decided on
a course of action if any attempt is
made to give such an exhibition.
"I understand that Ambrose Park
holds a theatrical license. Under this
license Fitzsimmons and Sullivan might
give an illustrated lecture. They could
show their knock-out blows, swings,
:ro9s counters and upper cuts, but they
would not be permitted to give an ex
hibition of sparring, either scientific or
otherwise, and they would have to be
mighty careful in presenting their illus
trated lecture.
I "People who go to the exhibition -with
l the expectation of seeing a fight w ill be
! disappointed. I do not know whether
l the managers of the affair will go on
making arrangements, but if they da
Iso there will be a sufficient number of
! policemen on duty to insure the preser
vation of law and order."
JOHN GETS AWAY
NEW YORK, June 29.—The Journal
and Advertiser announces that John L.
I Sullivan has broken away from all train
: ing rules. Says the Journal and Advcr
j tiser: "Sullivan got away from Billy
I Muldoon while they were taking a walk
through the streets of White Plains
Sunday night, and when his trainer
found him again he' had consumed so
| much liquor that he had been put to
bed. Muldoon later drove with him to
his training quarters. Neither of them
will speak of the matter."
COMING CONTESTS
SAN FRANCISCO, June 29.—Tom
O'Rourke of New York, well known in
the sporting world as a manager of pugi
lists, has arrived in San Francisco, ac
companied by three prominent men In
the pugilistic line, viz: Joe Walcott and
George Dixon, both colored, of Boston,
and Jack Everhardt of New Orleans.
Walcott is seeking a match with George
Green, the California welterweight, with
poor prospects of coming to an under
standing at present, while Dixon and
Everhardt will go into training at once
for their contests with Dal Hawkins and
Spider Kelly respectively. '
| Big Joe McAuliffe is again in training.
He is matched to meet Jack Stelzner
before the Pacific Athletic club of this
\ city upon a date not yet agreed upon.
; Although he now weighs in the neigh
| borhood of 210 pounds, he expects to
reduce himself to 190 without much
trouble, and as his opponent only scales
! 175, he will have a decide advantage.
; Under the tutelage of "Young Dutchey"
|he intends to alter his former methods
'in order to accede to those of modern
I times and expresses the opinion that
| heretofore he has never been properly
| trained for a fight.
CALIFORNIA FRUIT
Finds a Good Market by Co-operative
Methods
OAKLAND, June 29.—The orchardists
of San Leandro have established on inde
pendent lines an Eastern market for the
products' of their orchards and farms.
They have realized handsome returns
by their direct connections, and the ex
periment, they assert, has proved suc
cessful. Shipments have been made
through to Boston, Philadelphia and
Chicago direct.
A cargo of mixed varieties of cherries
sent to Boston this month returned a
gross amount of $1438. The car contained
2014 boxes. Two oars, 4287" boxes, sent
to Chicago returned $3154. The sales are
made from eight to nine daysfafter ship
ment.
Mountains on Fire
LODI, June 29.—A destructive grass
and chaparrel fire is raging in the hills
around Burson, east of here. It has
been burning all the afternoon and Is.
still on. Back firing has been indulged
in to save the town of Burson from de
struction. Several buildings are report
ed to have been burned in the hills.
The narrow gauge train was delayed
this evening to light the flames, which
attacked the track and a trestle. The
lire will do great damage in that neigh
borhood.
Court Commissioners
SAN FRANCISCO, June 29.—United
States Judge De Haven today appoint
ed several commissioners of the distrlc;
court, as provided' for under a late act
of congress. The appointments ail date
from July Ist. Those appointed were:
Patrick Henry Kean of Andreas, Cala
veras county; Henry L. Ford of Eureka,
Humboldt county; N. C. Briggs of Hol
llster, San Benito county.
The Tobacco Trial
NEW YORK, June 29.—The jury in. the
oust of the officials of the American To
bacco Company, indicted for conspiracy
in restraint of trade, belr.g unable to
agree, were discharged this afternoon,
it is understood that ten were for con
viction and two for acquittal.
MUDDY ROADS
Delay Progress of Soldier
Cyclists
EIGHT FEET OF HAILSTONES
SHALLOW COMPARED TO DEPTH
.OF MUD
Gardiner Sports the World* Mile
Handicap Record—Results of
Ball Games—The Races
Associated Press Special Wire.
GILETTE. Wyo., June 29.—Tired end
muddy, the Twenty-fifth Infantry bicy
cle corps, Lieut. Moss commanding, ar
rived here at 2:30 today, en route to St.
Louis. Wild Horse creek, near Avarada,
was a mass of mud. Hail stones which
fell Sunday were drifted seven and
eight feet high. The weather was very
hot and no good water could be obtained.
The corps is making a forced ride to get
out of the Bad Lands.
A NEW RECORD
SPRINGFIELD, 111., June 29.—Arthur
Gardiner of Chicago, in today's races of
the national circuit bicycle meet, broke
the world's one mile handicap record.
There were eighteen starters In the race,
Gardiner, Mortens and W. Coburn being
the scratch men. Gardiner won the race,
his time being 2:05 1-5. The world's pre
vious record was 2:05 3-5. made by Mer
tens this year. Mertens finished sec
ond ar.d Coburn third.
One mile, 2:15 class—E. E. Anderson
won. J. N. Leonard aecond, Tom Davis
third; time 2:21.
Quarter mile, open—Tom Cooper won,
Arthur Gardiner second. Earl Kiser
third; time :32 3-5. L. D. Cabanne fin
ished fourth.
One mile, open—Tom Cooper won,
Gardner second, L.'D. Cabanne third,
A. C. Mertens fourth; time 2:22.
OK THE DIAMOND
Winners of Games Flayed by League
Clubs
PHILADELPHIA, June 29—Wash
ington played a poor fielding game to
day. Score: Washington 9, Philadelphia
10.
Boston —Brooklyn earned more runs
than Boston today yet lost the game.
Score: Boston 6. Brooklyn 7.
Cleveland—Cleveland lost today's
game in the fourth Inning, when Its new
college pitcher, Clark, was batted freely.
Score: Cleveland 3, Pittsburg 9.
St. Louis—Rain stopped the game be
tween Cincinnati and St. Louis in the
third inning today. The score stood 4
to 2 in favor of St. Louis.
New York —New York made two
straight from the Orioles today and won
the game In the second Inning. Hoffer
was easy. Score: New York 3, Balti
more 2.
A COLLEGE GAME
NEW HAVEN, Conn., June 29.—Har
vard 10, Yale 8.
ON THE TURF
Results of Races Run at Sheepshead
Bay
NEW YORK, June 29.—At Sheepshead
the weather was clear and the track.
Results:
Five furlongs—Colonial Dame won,
Jilted second. Kilt third; time 1:03.
Six furlongs—Horoscope won, Sunny
Slope second, Hugh Penny third; time
1:13 1-5.
Five and a half furlongs, Futerlty
course—Varus won. Great Bend second,
Wild Warrior third; time 1:09 2-5.
One mile —Buddha won, Scottish
Chieftain second Imperator third; time
1:42 1-5.
Six and a half furlongs—Cleophus won,
Beldemere second, Brisk third; time
1:20 4-5.
Mile and a sixteenth—Sun Up won,
Deer Slayer second, Counsellor Howe
third; time 1:47 4-5.
Lucien Appleby's Silvebrook year
lings were sold at the Sheepshead Bay
track. They included some of the best
lookers that have been offered in the
east, and the result was some liberal
prices. The price of the brother of Henry
of Navarre, who was generally consid
ered tha pick of the lot, went to James S.
Curtis for $2600.
A Hamburg Fire
HAMBURG, June 29.—A terrible Are
is In progress bhls evening at the Ham
burg electric works, In the Post strasse.
The entire structure will probably be
destroyed, with enormous loss.
PERSONAL
PERSONAL—FOR RENT, FURNISHED
or unfurnished rooms; desirable location;
prices to suit the times. THE WIN
THROP, 330 ft S. Spring st. 7-25
PERSONAL—ONE HAND READ FREE;
life read from cradle to grave; advice on
business matters, family affairs. 111 ft W.
Third st. 9-11
FOR SALE—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE-TYPEWRITERS CHEAP-
Smlth Premier, $40; Remington, $85;
Densmore, $35; Yost, $25: Callgraph, $25.
All rented. ALEXANDER, 301 S.B'dway.
6JSO
WATCHMAKING
HIGHEST PRICES PAID FOR OLD
gold and silver, or taken In exchange for
new goods. W. J. GETZ, Jeweler, 336
S. Broadway. tf
HYPNOTISM
HYPNOTISM AND PERSONAL MAG
netlsm taught; diseases cured. HYP
NOTIC INSTITUTE. 423 ft S. Spring. 7-16
Notice of Stockholders' Meeting
THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE
stockholders of the Sunset Oil Company
will be held on Saturday, July 10th, 1897,
at 10 o'clock a. m.. at the office of the com
pany, room 348 Wilcox block, Lo* Angeles,
Cal., for the election of directors for the
ensuing year and' for any other business
that may properly come before said meet
ing..
7-9 W. S. JAMES, Secretary.
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
I ~
Houses ana Lota
FOR SALE—WE WILL SELL TWO 4
room, one 5-room, new houses, hard
finished, all Improved, street graded,
cement walks, close in and on car line;
always rented: must go, $2000 or less for
cash: clear property; all goes. Also im
proved ranch of 180 acres, cannot bo
beat, with 12-room house, large barn and
out-bulldlngs; plenty of water and fruit
ot all kinds; come and make an offer; we
have more. HOYT & SUMMERS, room
20 Bryson block. 30
FOR SALE—S-ROOM HOUSE, STABLE,
corner lot, close In, for $1500, In smuli
monthly payments or exchange; see
owner, R. VERCH, room 80 Temple
block. 27-30
FOR SALE—HOUSE AND LOT ON
Third St.; 40 rooms; all modern Improve
ments. 828 Boyd St., Los Angeles. 7-17
City Lota
FOR SALE-CITY LOTS, WILSHIRE
Boulevard Tract. We have sold four lots
on the Wllshlre Boulevard, each lot of
125 feet frontage and no house to be built
on these lots costing less than $10,000, to
the following well-known citizens:
F. P. Fay, President Fay Fruit Co.
Judge C. M. Sterry, head of legal de
partment Santa Fe railroad.
Edwin T. Earl, President Earl Fruit
Co.
J. 11. Grant. Standard Oil Trust.
In addition to the above-mentioned 500
feet frontage sold on the Wllshlre Boule
vard, we have sold within the last twenty
days twelve other regular size lots on
our cross streets to parties.'who havo
already started seven houses thereon.
No cottages allowed on the tract and
there are no filled lots. Every possible
improvement and advantage with not a
single offset. If you havo any Idea of
building a house It will pay you to see us
before purchasing your lot.
We must be able to offer superior In
ducements to make so many sales in
these hard times. Why should wo not
be able to tempt?
WILSHIRE COMPANY.
30-4 Office cor. Seventh and Broadway. I
FOR SALE—SI3OO; MUST BE SOLD; LOT
50x130. Burlington aye.. between Sixth and
Seventh: street graded, sewer, cement
sidewalk, easy terms. VICTOR WAN
KOWSKI & CO., 126 W. Second St. tf
FOR SALE—C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots In his Third addition on easy install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Office, 213 W. First st. tf
Business Property
FOR SALE—WE SELL THE EARTH
BASSETT & SMITH, Pomona. Cal. 6-29tf
Country Property
FOR SALE—BARGAIN; THE FAMOUS
Lewis tract, near Garvanza, consisting
of 103 large lots, now offered for sale as a
whole or in lots; will also trade for Oak
land, San Francisco or Los Angeles prop
erty. For full particulars inquire of L.
M. CORWIN, Highland Park, Cal. 7-26
FOR SALE—HOUSE AND LOT IN SAN
Bernardino: fine new frame building; 1
acre ground; barn, chicken house; all
modern improvements. 326 Boyd St.. Los
Angeles. 7-17
FOR EXCHANGE—REAL ESTATE
FOR EXCHANGE - NEW 10-ROOM
house and barn, $6000; accept clear land
or lots here or Pasadena or eastern farm.
AMERICAN BUILDING AND MORT
GAGE CO., 122 W. Third St., llenne build
ing, 7-25
FOR RENT—HOUSES
FOR RENT—HOUSE OF E ROOMS ON
E. Ninth St.; hot and cold water. In
quire M'GARRY &INNES, 216 W. First
st. 30
FOR RENT—ROOMS
FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS,
from $1.60 up per week; single rooms 25c
and 50c per night; baths free. Russ House,
cor. First and Los Angeles sts. 7-21
FOR RENT—AT SANTA MONICA, 3
pleasant, completely furnished house
keeping rooms. MRS. S. STOKES, 217
Second st. tf
FOR
ly furnished rooms; prices to suit, by
day, week or month 520 S. Broadway. 7-23
FOR RENT—DOUBLE PARLORS AND
kitchen, furnished for housekeeping, $16; 1
or five rooms for $22.50. 526 S. Hope st. 30
FOR RENT—NICELY FURNISHED
rooms; housekeeping privilege; good lo
cality. 827 ft S. Spring st. 7-14
FOR RENT-ROOMS. $1 PER WEEK
and up! 25 cents per night. 519 S.
Spring St. 7-18
FOR RENT—FURNISHED ROOMS FOR
housekeeping. 821 ft W. Seventh st. tf
FOR RENT-ONLY 2 MORE ROOMS
left at low summer rates. 317 S. Hill. 30
FOR - RE NT—ROOMS, $ 17~ $L2S~AN b"nT6O
per week. 311 W. Third st. 30
FOR RENT—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR RENT—ONE OF TIIE BEST OF
flces, S. Spring St., bet. First and Second
sts.: furniture can be bought. Address
Z.. Box 30. Herald. tf
—— 1 ■ 1 ■—' — - =
EDUCATIONAL
WOODBURY BUSINESS COLLEGE, 226
8. Spring st., will conduct special classes
for public and high school students un
der the instruction of Prof. C. S. Thomp
son of the Seventeenth-street school,
from July 6th to September Ist: tuition
$4 per month; half day sessions; our
regular commercial and shorthand work
continued throughout the summer at
usual rates. Pupils enter any day and
receive Individual instruction. Rooms
are large, cool and pleasant. Electric .
elevator. Write or call for Illustrated
catalogue. G. A. HOUGH, president; N.
G. FELKER, vico president.
SUMMER LAW LECTURES, UNIVErI
slty of Virginia, July 1 to August 31, 181)7. 1
Course Includes 36 lectures by Mr. Jus
tice Harlan of U. S. supreme court. For
catalogue address R. C. MINOR, secre
tary, Charlottesville, Va.
MUSICAL
FOR SALE—HANDSOME UPRIGHT
Grand Bass piano at a great sacrifice.
Room No. 31, The Savoy, Fourth and
Hill sts.; call mornings. tf
THE WONDERFUL GRAMAPHONES
for sale at A. G. GARDNER'S, 118 Win- ;
ston st.; also pianos for sale and rent, tf •
LOST AND FOUND 1
A—sl REWARD—LOST MONDAY EVE
nlng, red pocketbook containing mem- ;
oranda. M., care J. C. Dutra, 215 North
Spring st. SO
FINANCIAL ' 1
MONET TO LOAN IN ANT AMOUNTS.\
on diamonds, watches, Jewelry, pianos,/
safes, lodging houses, hotels and privates
household furniture; Interest reasonable;)
partial payments#ecelved; money quick; J
private office for ladles. O. M. JONES, I
rooms 12-14, 254 S. Broadway. 28-tf f
THE SYNDICATE LOAN COMPANY, '
138 ft S. Spring St., rooms 6, 7 and 8, loans
money on all kinds of good collateral se
curity; money on hand; private waiting
rooms. Telophone Main 583. QEORCIH
L._MILLS, Manager. 7-12
MONEY - LOANED ON DIAMONDS,
watches, Jewelry, pianos, sealskins, car-,
rlages, bicycles, warehouse receipts and
ail kinds of collateral security; storage ,
free In our warehouse. LEE BROS., 401 j
S. Spring st. tf \
MONEY TO LOAN ON FURNTURB. i
watches, diamonds, pianos, sealskins and
real c te; Interest reasonable; private
oftic i r ladies; business confidential.
C. C. LAMB, 226 S. Spring St.; entranoa,
room 467. 8-21 tf
AMERICAN LOAN COMPANY, 118 ft SO
Spring, over Royal Bakery; loans onf
real estate and collateral of all kinds.) i
warehouse receipts, Insurance policies,
etc.; best of rates; private office for ladles.
7-24 i
MONEY TO LOAN— . |
$100 to $75,000 on city or country real
estate.
LEE A. M'CONNELL,
7-24 113 s. Broadway.
TO LOAN—A BARREL OF MONEY ON '
diamonds, pianos, furniture and all first
class securities; business confidential.
CREASINGER, 247 S. Broadway, rooms
1 and 2. 6-29-tf
POINDEXTER & WADSWORTII, ROOM
308 Wilcox building, lend money on any
good real estate; hulldlng loans made; If
you wish to lend or borrow, call on vi. tf
MONEY TO LOAN, $500 TO $5000, IN SUMS
to suit; no delays. CONTINENTAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION.
126 W. Second st., Wilcox building.* tf
TO LOAN—UNLIMITED AMOUNT FOR '
small loans; no commission; light ex- \
pense. SECURITY LOAN AND TRUST
CO., 223 S. Spring St.
TO LOAN—IF YOU WANT MONEY ON
real estate security I have It In any
amount. WM. F. BOSBYSHELL, 107 S.
Broadway.
MONEY TO LOAN UPON EASY TERMS
of repayment. STATE MUTUAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASS'N.. 151 8.
Broadway. 6-20 If
MONEY TO LOAN—LOWEST RATES ON
real estate, personal notes pt security.
JOHN L. PAVKOVICH, 220 W. First, tf
MONEY TO LOAN IN SUMS TO SUIT
on Improved property. F. A. HUTCHIN
son. 330 s. Broadway. 7-12
MEDIUMS
MME. LEO WILL REMAIN IN THiB
city for a few days only; the renowned
forecaster and card reader; she tells the
past, present and future; she advises you
with a certainty as to the proper course to
pursue In life; she gives lucky charms,
brings the separated together, causes
speecly marriage with the one you love;
tells If the one you love is false or true;
also very successful In locating mines
and minerals; all those In trouble In busi
ness matters, lovo and family affairs
should by all means consult her; letters
containing 50 cents In stamps, Riving
age. color of hair and eyes, married or
single, will reeelvo prompt attention;
don't fail to see her; hours 9 a.m. to 7:30
p.m.: Sunday. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at 616 ft
W. Sixth st., Los Angeles. 7-1S
MRS. PARKER, PALMIST. CLAIRVOY
ant and medium; life reading, business
removals, law suits, mineral locations,
love affairs ,etc. Take Third st. electrlo
car to Vermont aye. and Vine St. Sec
ond house on Vine st., west of Vermont
aye. 50c and $1.00. tf
MRS. RAPP, THE CELEBRATED AS
trologlst and forecaster, planet and card
reader; your future foretold scientifical
ly; truth only: terms reasonable. 453 ft S.
Spring st., room 10. 7-19
MRS. SANFORD JOHNSON, THE
well known independent slate writer and
clairvoyant, gives sittings dally at 833 S.
Broadway. 8-7
GRACE GILMORE, CLAIRVOYANT
and card reader, has removed 218 Second
St., Santa Monica; ladles, 25 cts.; gents,
60 cts. 7-23
_____^___^__^____„__^_____„___
MME. RACHAEL. CARD READER,
tells past, present and future; sittings
dally, 324 ft S. Spring st., room 11. 9-14
ELLA M. WHITE! TRANCE CLAlR
voyant medium: readings dally except
Sunday. 245 s. Hill st. 6mo
AGNES h" PLEASANCE, TRANCE
medium; sittings dally; at 355 ft S. Spring
street. 7-5
.
MRS. WALKER OF 316 ft S. SPRING ST.
will leave today for a week's vacation.
30
PHYSICIANS
DR. SCHICK, 122 W. THIRD ST. <ELE
vator), late of New York city, treats dis
eases of women by the eminently suc
cessful European method; such as tu
mors, enlarged ovaries, leucorrlioea; no
pain.
CONSULT FREE, DR. lINOER, GER
man army physician and surgeon; spec
ialist In diseases of women; cures can
cers, tumors, piles, ruptures, stones in
bladder; 110 knife. 107 ft N. Main, r. 12. 7-7
CONSULT DR. MINNIE WELLS, SPE
cialist, 316 W. Seventeenth st., corner of
Grand aye. 8-l«tf
DENTISTS
r .. ._ r .,.. ~.| , nrj
ADAMS BROS., DENTAL PARLORS.
239 ft 8. Spring st.; painless extracting and
filling; plates $5, $8, $10; all work guar
anteed; established 10 years. Hours, 8-5;
Sundays, 10-12. Telephone Black, 1273.
FRANK STEVENS, 324 ft S. SPRING 8T„
open days and evenings; also Sundays;
electric light. Tel. Black 821.
UR. KENNEDY, DENTIST, 108 ft N.
Spring St., rooms 2, 6 and 7; painless ea
tractlon.
MINING AND ASSAYINO
MORGAN & CO., ASSAYERS AND RB
llners and oro testers; bullion purchased;
consulting metallurgists; mines examined
and dealt In. Office, 261 Wilson block. Loa
Angeles, Cal. 86-tf
TlUa BIMETALLIC ASSAY OFFICE
and Chemical Laboratory, 124 S. Main st.
R. A. PEREZ. E. M., manager. 12-4tf
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
office, Bullard building; entrance, room
420; telephone black 1446. 7-24-9T
BROUSSEAU & MONTGOMERY,
At torneys-at-La w,
403 Bradbury block, Los Angeles. tf
DRESSMAKING
DRESSMAKER RECENTLY FROM
the east would like a few more patrons.
I 419 W. Second st. 37, 80

xml | txt