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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, July 06, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-07-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 279.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
HERALD SUB-AGENCIES—
ADVERTISEMENTS left at the fol
lowing agencies will receive prompt at
tention and will be printed as quickly
and with the same care as if left at
the main office, 222 W. Third street:
DOWNEY AYE. AND EAST SIDE
L. P. COLLETTE, 621 Downey avenue.
OLD WORLD DRUG STORE, 1028
Downey avenue, Phone Flora 242.
WM. H. HARMON, 765 Pasadena aye.,
Phone East 58.
CENTRAL AYE. AND VERNON
S. E. BARNEY, 2605 Central aye.
CHICAGO PHARMACY, Central ave
nue and Twelfth street, Phone West 182.
T. J. AKEY, corner Central and Vernon
avenues. Phone West 32.
MAIN ST. AND SOUTHWEST
E. T. PARKE. PHARMACY, 3129 S.
Main, Phone Blue 2062.
E. VAN DYKE, DRUGGIST, 711 W.
Jefferson St., Phone White 1271.
WESTLAKE GROCERY, corner Al
varado and Seventh sts., Phone Main
1382.
H. L. PARK. DRUGGIST, corner
Thirty-eighth and Wesley aye., Phone
Blue 1301.
T. W. BROWN, JR., DRUGGIST, Junc
tion of Hoover, Union and Twenty-fourth
sts., Phone Blue 1101.
BOYLE HEIGHTS
H. C. WORLAND, 2133 E. First, Sta
tion B.
T. P. WYLIE, 1877 E. FIRST, Phone
Park 18.
J. M. HARRIS, 1842 E. FIRST. Phone
Park 21.
TEMPLE ST.~AND NORTHWEST
DR. H. KALLEWODA. DRUGGIST,
corner Temple st. and Beaudry aye..
Phone Main 206.
STAR PHARMACY, corner Temple and
Belmont aye., Phone Main 507.
VIOLE & LOPIZICH, DRUGGISTS,
427 N. Main st., Phone Main 876.
LOS ANGELES—
—SAN FRANCISCO—
A chance for advertisers to reach the
public of both cities on the most ad
vantageous terms ever offered.
We have concluded arrangements
whereby classified advertising may be
Inserted simultaneously in the
LOS ANGELES HERALD
And in the
SAN FRANCISCO POST
For
I CENTS PER LINE,
t CENTS PER LINE,
8 CENTS PER LINE,
f CENTS PER LINE
Here ia a rare opportunity for people
having bargains to offer or wants to be
known.
HERALD PUBLISHING CO..
tf 222 W. Third it.
SPECIAL NOTICES
WOTICE —THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oclock
a.m. and 6 and 8 oclock p.m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut off and a fine of 82 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
WANTED—EVERY ONE TO KNOW
that Hall Thompson Rheumatism, Liver
and Kidney Cure will cure rheumatism.
Call and get testimonials. 223 N, Spring
at., room 6. 8-1
I OPEN MY SUMMER SCHOOL THIS
morning in St. Vincent's building, Sixth
and Hill sts. E. P. HOWELL, 462 E.
Fourth St. 6
THE DAILY JOURNAL, PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 205 New High St. tf
J. CLARK ANDERSON, THE BOY ME
dlum, has returned to the city and will
give sittings dally at the Hotel Portland,
444% S. Spring. 7-3
Special sal^no^harge - for
borders with 5c and 7%c wallpaper.
WALTER, 218 W. Sixth St. 8-12
PROF. A.WILHARTITZ, AFTER A PRcT
tracted sickness, is at his studio at 10
a. m. from the 6th Inst. 6
PHYSICIANS
DR. SCHICK, 122 W. THIRD ST. (ELE
vator), late of New York city, treats dis
eases of women by the eminently suc
cessful European method; such as tu
mors, enlarged ovaries, leucorrhoea; no
pain.
CONSULT FREE, DU. UNGER, GER
man army physician and surgeon; spec
ialist in diseases of women; cures can
cers, tumors, piles, ruptures, stones in
bladder; no knife. 107% N. Main. r. 12. 7-7
CONSULT DR. MINNIE WELLS, BPE
cialist, 316 W. Seventeenth St.. corner of
Grand aye. 3-16tf
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
MJDWIG & MATTHEWS, WHOLESALE
and retail fruits and vegetables. MOTT
MARKET, 135 S. Main St., tel. 650. tf
HELP WANTED—MALE
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building.
300-302 W. Second street, in basement,
Telephone 509.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Man and wife, country, man black
smith, woman cook for 8 men. 850, etc.;
milker, $25, etc.; experienced quartz
miner; stout boy, 83, week; ranch hands,
$20, etc.; boy, shop, $2.50, week; fruit
ranch hand, $17.50, etc.; shoemaker, $12,
week; blacksmith, country, $30, etc.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Two camp cooks, $25 and $20; boy wash
dishes, $2 per week; experienced mud
bath man. $20: hotel waiter, country, $25;
all-round laundryman, Arizona, $3. day.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
Working housekeeper. Arizona, $20 and
fare; laundress, two days. $1.50; house
girl, family of two. French preferred,
$20; colored housegirl, $20: housegirl. $25;
housegirl, Ventura, Santa Barbara,
Pasadena, Fernando, $15. $20 and $25;
working housekeeper, family three. $13.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Second girl, boardinghouse; waitress,
small hotel, beach. $25; waitress. Cata
llna, $20 and $25; waitress, Santa Monica,
Long Beach. San Bernardino and city,
$20 each; chambermaid, city, $15, etc.;
cook, 10 to 20 people, near mines, $30, fare
advanced; experienced pantry girl, $20.
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
WANTED—DON'T BE HARD-UP-I
U)ok Mr. Cole's advice; took agency for
new aluminum goods and other special
ties; all elegant catchy sellers; custom
ers delighted; permanent business; I
make $5 to $10 a day; work 6 hours; no
capital. Write T. WORLD MFG. CO., (14)
Columbus, O. 14
WANTED—IO BOYS; MUST BE WORK
ers; good salary to right boys. Apply at
7 o'clock a. m., 711 S. Main st. tf
WANTED—AGENTS FORI INDUSTRIAL
insurance; salary and commission: expe
rience not necessary. Apply room 9. 105
E. First. 7-25
WANTED—EGAN'S RESTAURANT. 126
-128 E. Second St., serves the best 10c meal
In the city; try it and be convinced. 8-11
WANTED—BOYS WITH BICYCLES I :
Cal. District Messenger Co., First and
Spring. 6
— —
WANTED-REAL ESTATB
* '' "~' *~
WANTED—TO PURCHASE THE BEST
lot spot cash will buy between Pearl and
Union aye and Eighth and Eighteenth
streets. W. M. CASTERLINE, 206% S.
Broadway, Room 13. 4-6
20"ACRES
between Figueroa and Central aye. and
south of Twenty-nfth st. M. MAC
DONALD, 325 Byrne block. 6
WANTED—BARGAINS IN REAL ES
tate; cash customers. PAVKOVICH, 220
W. First st. g
WANTED—TO BORROW
MONEY WANTED—S22OO ON HOUSE
worth $5000; first-class security: pay 11
per cent gross. W. N. HOLWAY, room
303, Henne blk., 122 W. Third st. 7-4
WANTED—TO BORROW $6500 ON NO. 1
partly Improved land near San Gabriel.
W. M. CASTERLINE, 206% S. Broadway,
Room 13. 4.6
1 WANTED—S6OO; A LOAN OF $600 FOR 1
| year, 10 per cent net, on ranch property.
!M. MACDONALD, 325 Byrne block. 6
WANTED—S3OOO; A LOAN OF $3000 FOR
3 years. 8 per cent net, on ranch. M.
MACDONALD, 325 Byrne block. 6
WANTED—TO BUY LIVE STOCK
i WANTED—CALVES AND FAT STOCK
FRED HUGHES, Durham market. 1067
Temple st. 6-24 tf
WANTED — PARTNERS
WANTED—PARTY WITH $100; MONEY
to be used to incorporate a company; 3
fine claims developed. See DAY, 119% S.
Spring, for one week. 4-6
WANTED—MISCELLANEOUS
' ■ " ',''". • ■
WANTED—LIST OF LODGING HOUSES !
for some cash customers; bring them in
and let us sell them for you. C. A. j
RUNELS & CO., 132 S. Broadway. 4-6 '
.
WANTED—A STATIONERY BUSINESS;
will pay cash; value about $400. CREAS
INGER, 247 S. Broadway. 4-6
WANTED—ESTABLISHED
retail; central. Y-28, Herald. 7-3
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE—A GREAT BARGAIN IN A J
well located cigar stand: you can make
the price. CREASINGER, 247 S. Broad- '
way. 4-6 j
I SELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS !
for cash. I. D. BARNARD, 111 North I
Broadway, opposite Times building, tf
FOR SALE—BUSINESS; HOUSES; FOR
rent; rooms; collections; help free; work.
EDW. NITTINGER, 236% S. Spring St. tf
FOR SALE—A SMALL GROCERY
store; no rent; a money-maker; $300. F. H.
PIEPER & CO., 102 S. Broadway. 6
FOR SALE—BIG BARGAIN; BAKERY
running three wagons; price is only $250. !
I. D. BARNARD, 111 N. Broadway. 6
FOR SALE-CHOICE CASH GROCERY;
central; right in town; & bargain; $450.
I. D. BARNARD, 111 N. Broadway. 6 |
FOR SALE-FEED YARD,
coal business; old central stand; $500.
I. D. BARNARD, 111 N. Broadway. «
WANTED-$l2OO FOR HALF~INTEREST
In a manufacturing business. Address
T., box 26, Herald. 8 j
FOR SALE—SALOONS AT VERY~RF.A
sonable terms. Apply at 440 Aliso »t. tf j
FOR SALE—FRUIT, CIGAR AND !
drink stand. 516 S. Main. 7.5
PERSONAL
PERSONAL—WILL JOS. KLINE OR
the husband of
BERTHA HOLMAN
send their address to E. B. JORDAN,
110 Montgomery blk. San Francseo. lmo4
PERSONAL—FOR RENT, FURNISHED
or unfurnished rooms; desirable location;
prices to suit the times. THE WIN
THROP, 330% S. Spring St. 7-25
PERSONAL—ONE HAND READ FREE;
life read from cradle to grave; advice on
business matters, family affairs. 111% W.
Third st. 8-11
— 1
. (For additional classified see Pace Two.)
THE HERALD
NATIONAL
BIRTHDAY
Celebrated by Patriotic
Citizens
WHEN POLITICS CREEPS IN
SILVER SENTIMENT SEEMS TO
CONTROL
Tammany Braves Greet Bryan's Name
With a Roar of Cheers —Many
Fatal Accidents
Associated Press Special Wire.
NEW YORK, July s.—lndependence
Day was celebrated by Tammany Hall
in the usual fashion today. The wlg
j warn's capacity was taxed to the limit.
The usual supply of refreshments was
not dispensed from the basement.
Among the letters of regret that were
read was one from Grover Cleveland and
another from W. J. Bryan.
When the letter from Grover Cleve
land was read his name was greeted
with hisses. It was said that a delega
tion from the Progressive Democratic
league was present to hiss all the gold
men. Bryan's letter was loudly cheered.
Ex-Senator D. B. Hill, pleading a pre
vious engagement to speak at Oswego,
sent a letter of regret, in which he said:
"I have but one practical suggestion to
make at this crisis. The Republican
managers*, in permitting Greater New
York, expected to make it a Republican
city; otherwise it would not have been
created. Democratic division will fill
their expectations. Democratic unity
will disappoint them. The course of the
Democracy is plain. Let us disappoint
our enemies."
IN CALIFORNIA
SAN FRANCISCO, July s.—Among
the most striking features of today's
parade, was that of the troops of cav
alry, artillery and Infantry from the
Presidio with eGneral W. R. Shatter,
Department Commander, in command.
The literary exercises were at Metro
politan Hall in the afternoon, and there
will be a magnificent pyrotechnical dis
play in the evening.
The weather is all that could be de
sired and the city was crowded with
visitors from the surrounding country
j all day.
There were the usual number of small
fires and accidents due to Areworks, but
no fatalities have been reported.
Fresno—There were a much great
er number of people in Fresno today
to celebrate the national holiday than
were here on Saturday to see W. J.
Bryan, and that is saying a great deal.
The streets and parks were literally
thronged with people from the sur
rounding country and neighboring coun
ties as well. The morning parade was a
great success and an immense crowd
listened to the literary exercises in the
park. In the afternoon the crowd was
entertained with splendid bicycle racen,
and a wild west show took place at the
fair grounds.
Oakland—The city of Oakland today
held what was by far the best celebra
tion of the nation's birthday In many
years. There was an imposing parade in
the morning with many interesting fea
tures. Literary and musical exercises
were held at the MacDonough theater
in the afternoon. An excellent display
of fireworks was given in the evening
on Lake Merrltt.
Napa—lndependence day at Napa was
a great success and was ushered in at
midnight with bells, whistles and horns.
The weather was perfect. The decora
tions were elaborate, and the city was
thronged at an early hour by thousands
from adjacent towns and cities.
Redding—The Fourth of July was cele
brated In this city by a parade and ap
propriate exercises. The Red Bluff
hose team defeated Redding by four sec
onds.
Vallejo—The celebration here today
was one of the greatest In the history of
Vallejo, no less than 10,000 people being
on the street sat one time. The feat
ures of the day were the parade, literary
exercises and fireworks display. The
parade was made up of veteran firemen
of-San Francisco, two companies of
militia from Benicia and marines and
sailors from Mare Island, the Vallejo
fire department and muslness men.
San Luis Obispo—The largest crowd
ever known for six years at a public
demonstration in this county assembled
in this city for the Independence day
celebration. After an imposing parade
literary exercises took place. Rev. J. C.
Eastman was president of the day, and
W. H. Whelan orator.
Monterey—Last night there was adis
turbance here over the display of a
Portuguese flag beside an American en
sign, instead of below It, ovfer Mr. Ortln's
grocery store. Patriotic citizens took
down the Portuguese flag, but, finding It
flying a second time, took it down and
burned It. Ortin has notified the
Portuguese government.
ASSOCIATED DEMOCRATS
i WASHINGTON, D. C, July 5—A pa
| trlolic celebration was held here today
I under the auspices of the National As-
I sociation of Democratic Clubs and the
I Democracy of the District of Columbia
I and continuous sections. Addresses were
delivered by Senator J. W, Daniel, of
Virginia, and Hon. J. C. Sibley, of Penn
sylvania. Shorter speeches were made
by members of Congress and other rep
resentatives of the original thirteen
States. A letter of regret from W. J.
Bryan was read and suitable resolutions
adopted.
GEORGE AND ALTGELD
NEW YORK, July s.—Ex-Governor
J. P. Altgeld of Illinois addressed two
thousand people at the Academy of
Music in Brooklyn under auspices of the
Democratic League of Kings county.
Henry George presided.
BAYARD'S ORATION
PHILADELPHIA, July 6.—The one
hundred and twenty-first anniversary
LOS ANGELES, TUESDAY MORNING, JULY 6, 1897
of the signing of the Declaration of In
dependence was celebrated today in
front of Independence Hall, under the
auspices of the Society of the War of
1812, of Pennsylvania. Hon. Thomas F.
Bayard, exMinister to England, was the
orator of the day.
IN PARIS
PARIS, July s.—The American cham
ber of commerce gave its third Inde
pendence day banquet at the Grand
hotel this evening. Covers were laid for
500, and the company Included many
ladies. Among the guests were M. Ribot,
former premier; M. de Crais, represent
ing M. Hanotaux, the foreign minister,
who was unable to attend, and, Chaun
cey M. Depew and M. H. de Young, who
formally presented Gen. Horace Porter,
the American ambassador. Ambassador
Porter presided. M. de Crais, M. Ribot,
Mr. de Young and Mr. Depew made
speeches that were loudly applauded.
THE DAY AT LONDON
LONDON. July s.—Three hundred
citizens of the United States, residents
of London andi vicinity, sat down to the
annual dinner of the American society
in London this evening to celebrate In
dependence today.
MANY MISHAPS
Ranging Erom Sudden Death to
Burned Eingers
EUREKA, July 5.—A terrible accident
occurred here today, in which two men
were fatally Injured. Prof. George Wes
ton,aeronaut, and his assistant, H. Scot
ton of Aberdeen, Wash., were fearfully
crushed while the former was attempt
ing an ascension and parachute Jump.
When the balloon was inflated and re
straining ropes were oast off it shot up
sixty feet with Scotton entangled in the
ropes. He was dropped to the earth and
sustained fractures and bruises from
which he will die. Weston clung to the
parachute and a strong wind carried
him with terrific force through the tops
of some trees and he, too, dropped to
earth, crushed and mangled in a terri
ble manner.
ANDERSON, Ind., July 5.—A stranger
with a lighted cigar gave Madison coun
ty probably the most extensive Fourth
of July display in its history.
The Trenton Oil Company, drilling
north of this city, had Just opened, a
mammoth reservoir, when he appeared
with his lighted cigar. The gas Ignited.
The flames shot forty feet into the air
and could be heard for miles. The der
rick was burned down in a minute.
There were no valves on the casings
and there is no way to shut off the gas.
All methods known., except the cannon
snuffing, have been tried, but the pres
sure is too strong. The cannon will be
used tomorrow. A ball will be fired
across the casing. It will blow out In
stantly. This is only used in extreme
cases. The outfit is gone and much ad
jacent property Is damaged.
A MISSOURI MISHAP
MACON, Mo., July s—At the Fourth
of July celebration at Ethel In this
county a badly aimed Roman candle
struck an immense package of explos
ives In the midst of the crowd attending
the festivities. A number of people
were struck by the flying fireworks and
several seriously Injured. Mists King
was probably fatally injured by a sky
rocket.
INSTANTLY KILLED
NEW BEDFORD, Mass,, July 5.—
Henry Stone, formerly president of the
Chicago, Burlington and Quincy rail
road, and president of the Chicago Tele
phone company, was instantly killed at
Nonquitt this morning by an explosion
of fireworks.
FIVE LIVES LOST
CHICAGO, July 6—Patriotism
claimed five lives today and there was
an unusually long list of maimed and
injured people as a result of the Fourth
of July celebration. The dead:
James W. Keane, found dead In his
back yard, struck in the head by a stray
bullet.
Charles Smith, frightened by the ex
plosion of a giant firecracker and fell
out of a second story window.
John Hoffuter, killed by the explosion
of powder In a glass bottle which he
held in his hands.
.John Thomas, killed in exactly the
same manner as Hoffuter.
William Allen, clothing fired by fire
crackers, causing fatal burns.
About forty people were slightly in
jured during the day.
A HORRIBLE DEATH
SAN FRANCISCO, July s.—There was
a fatal accident at the city fireworks dis
play at the end of Haight street tonight.
Edward J. Matthews, 22 years old, a
driver for the Delong Brothers' dairy
on McAllister street, while watching the
display, was instantly killed by the ex
plosion of a mortar, and his companion,
Miss Hildenberg, was badly lacerated
on the face, and receiving a shock to
her system which the doctors say may
affect her mind.
A battery of mortars which had been
placed on the lot near Clayton street wasi
to be fired, and two employes, Will Mar
tin and Voller, set fire to the fuses of the
battery. Without a single warning
one of the 36-inch mortars exploded, and
the death-dealing fragjnents of iron
were hurled in all directions. By a
strange fatality the two men who were
engaged in setting Are to the mortars
were uninjured while the unfortunate
young Matthews, who was standing
fully fifty feet away, in the middle of
Clayton street, was struck on the fore
head by a piece of the flying iron, and
the whole top of his head was carried
away. Death was instantaneous.
Miss Hildenberg, who was on the arm
of the unfortunate man, was badly cut
on the face, and when the police ran to
her assistance she presented a fearful
sight. The brains of her companion cov
ered her from head to foot, and mingled
with the blood which flowed from the
severe wounds which she had sustained.
A BAD FIRE
SAiN FRANCISCO, July 5.—A fire to
night destroyed several small houses on
Sacramento street near Jones, causing
a loss of $10,000 and rendering thirteen
families homeless. The fire was caused
by an explosion of fireworks in the back
yard of one of the houses. One of the
tenants charges the owner of some of
the property with having started th?
fire but little attention is paid to the
charge.
SAN FRANCISCO, July s.—The old
monitor Comanche, with the naval bat
talion on board, was anchored today oft
EI Campo and her crew was engaged in
target practice with the Hotchkiss guns.
A COSTLY SMOKE
Naval Drill
SEIZURES
OF SEALERS
Said to Threaten Serious
Complications
CORRESPONDENT 8 ' GLASSES
MAKE MOLE HILLS APPEAR AS
MOUNTAINS
No Jingoism Is Intended and the
United States Contemplates
No Change of Policy
Associated Press Special Wire.
CHICAGO, July 5.—A special to the
Times-Herald from Washington says:
President McKinley has sent a dispatch
to the Marquis of Salisbury, the British
Premier and Secretary of State for For
eign Affairs, which will probably cause
that nobleman as much perturbation of
spirit as did Secretary Olney's dispatch
of July 20, 1895, In which England was
diplomatically but firmly told that ehe
must arbitrate the Venezuela boundary
dispute.
The present dispatch will doubtless be
regarded in England as offensive in
tone and manner and its publication will
probably cause a display of feeling
across the water, but in the United
States Mr. McKlnley's course will doubt
less be warmly approved.
The latest diplomatic fencing between
the two countries arises out of the long
standing fur seal controversy. It will
be remembered that after this country
had asserted exclusive Jurisdiction to
the waters of Bering Sea and Great
Britain had resisted this contention the
matter was referred to a tribunal of ar
bitration which sat in Paris. That
tribunal decided against the United
States so far as it related to its conten
tion of exclusive Jurisdiction, decided
that certain seizures of British sealers
made by the American patrol fleet were
illegal and awarded damages to
owners of those vessels, the amount to
be determined later by sufficient proof,
and made certain regulations for the
preservation of seal herds and the pre
vention of illegal sealing which were to
be Jointly enforced by the United States
and Great Britain. The United States
on its part proceeded in the fullest spirit
and letter of the law to prevent pelagic
sealing, but England, It is aserted, has
not lived up to its agreement and inti
mation to that effect is now conveyed
to the British Government by order of
President McKinley. In the course of
a few days, perhaps early this week, the
President will transmit to Congress a
batch of correspondence bearing on this
question which has recently nassed be
tween the two governments. The cor
respondence is somewhat voluminous,
the most important dispatch bearing
date of May 10th, last, and being in the
form of an instruction from Secretary of
State Sherman to Col. John Hay, our
ambassador In London, a copy'of which
Col. Hay was directed to leave with
Lord Salisbury.
In this instruction, which covers six
or eight pages of the usual State De
partment size, the efforts made by the
United States and Great Britain to car
ry out the terms of the Paris award
are reviewed at length and while it is
claimed that this country has lived up
to the terms of the findings of that
tribunal, the insinuation is made that
Great Britain has been guilty of bad
faith.
The dispatch is nominally signed by
Mr. Sherman as Secretary of State, but
as a matter of fact It is the joint work
of ex-Secretary of State John W. Fos
ter, the special seal ambassador, and
ex-Assistant Secretary of the Treasury
Charles S. Hamlin, the special seal
commissioner. It received the sanction
and approval of President McKinley be
fore It was permitted to leave the State
Department.
Although the dispatch was received
by Lord Salisbury early in May, with
the exception of a formal acknowledg
ment of its receipt no answer has yet
been made by the Foreign Office.
ENGLAND INCREDULOUS
LONDON, July s.—The statements of
the Washington correspondent of the
Daily Chronicle to the effect that corre
spondence is about to be submitted to
congress regarding Bering sea matters
which will cause resentment In Great
Britain charging bad faith In carry
ing out of the terms of the award, etc.,
are discredited here In diplomatic circles.
Previous to the jubilee celebrations
United States Ambassador Hay gave
the Marquis of Salisbury a strong pre
sentation of the case from the stand
point of the United States, but it is
added throughout the entire correspond
ence there was nothing to offend Great
Britain and there have been no com
munications on the subject since the
jubilee.
It is understood the Canadian premier,
Sir Wilfred Laurler. has conferred with
the British government on the seal ques
tion. The interests of Canada are op
posed to restrictions being placed on
sealing, and ac Great Britain is now
cultivating the good will of her colonies
this policy may render it more difficult
for the United States to secure an agree
ment on the subject.
NO CHANGE OF POLICY
WASHINGTON, July s.—The fact
that the state department is prepar
ing for transmission to congress the cor
respondence that it has had since the
Bering sea seal fisheries appears to have
been construed in some quarters and by
the London Chroncile as an Indication
of a purpose on the part of our govern
ment to make a radical change in its
policy in the treatment of that long
standing diplomatic issue, and to seize
on this opposition to announce its adop
tion of a "bold American policy." The
truth is that this particular correspond
ence was called for by congress weeks
ago and has been delayed in transmis
sion principally because Mr. Foster, who
INDEX
OF THE TELEGRAPH NEWS
Hot weather in the east counts its
victims by the soore.
A little Los Angeles boy goes up
with a balloon at Oakland and is killed
by the fall. .
The Populists in conference at
Nashville hold a very interesting
session and use language—also clubs
and fists.
Railroad arrangements to handle
the Endeavor hosts somewhat upset
by the delay at Salt Lake, but the
crowds will reach the western metrop
olis today.
The nation's birthday celebrated
from coast to coast and lakes to gulf;
politics crops in at many places and
Bryan's name invariably arouses
cheers; an unusual number of serious
or fatal accidents.
The big coal strike is formally be
gun, but the exact situation cannot be
known until attempt is made to re
sume work today; the men express
hope of success; public men express
opinions favoring arbitration of labor
questions.
The senate fails to agree on a date
for a final vote on the tariff bill, and
Allison proposes a test of endurance
to begin tonight. An amendment is
adopted taxing stocks and bonds and
the Spooner amendment is withdrawn.
The house waiting patiently for the
return of the bill.
Theatened complications with Eng
land over the sealing question are
possible chiefly in the imagination of
correspondents. The United States
government shows no tendency to
jingoism and intends to make no
change in Its policy regarding the
long discussed question of. seal pro
tection.
conducted the greater part of it, in con
junction with Mr. Hamlin, was absent
in Europe. Now, however, it is in shape
and probably will go to congress this
week. It can be stated that it will not
show any change In the policy of this
government, which has ever since the
first year's experience after the Paris
award regulations showed the ineffi
cacy of those regulations to protect tl a
seals, lost no opportunity to urge an
extension of the rules upon Great Brit
ain. This has been done courteously
at all times and Great Britain has re
sponded in like spirit though, to the re
gret of our government, without con
senting to the modifications desired.
There have been some remonstrances
exchanged; for instance, the British
have protested against what they
termed the abuse of the right of search
on the part of our patrol vessels and on
our part the British have been told that
their refusal to permit the sealing up
of firearms carried by sealers amounted
to an evasion of the spirit of the Paris
award. But in all this there has beer
no exhibition of ill feeling or anything
like jingoism on our part, and while
the recent success of Mr. Poster in se
curing the adhesion of Russia to the ex
tension of the regulations over the en
tire North Pacific ocean beyond the
fortieth degree has strengthened our
positions in the British negotiations, it
cannot be said that there has been any
change in the line of policy that wae laid
down by Secretary Olney in the last ad
ministration.
SEVERE STORMS
Nine Deaths and Tremendous Prop
erty Damage
DULUTH, Minn., July s.—lt is now
known that at lea9t nine persons were
killed by the storms of Saturday
throughout Northwestern Minnesota.
Of these only one was In this vicinity,
he belr.g drowned at Proctor Knott, a
suburb, while trying to escape from a
floating house by means of a floating
sidewalk. The killed are:
JAMES CTJMMINGS, Nemadji; struck
by lightning.
CHRISTOPHER GULLIKEN, carver,
struck by lightning.
CHARLES JORDAN, Proctor Knott;
drowned.
MRS. T. LAROCHELLE, Crookston:
struck by lightning.
WILLIE JAMESON, 10 years old;
struck by falling timbers.
Four Indians at Mora were burned
in, the ruins of a demolished building.
The loss Is now estimated at about
$750,000, a large part of which will be suf
fered by the City of Duluth and thc
railroads centering here.
DIDN'T EXHIBIT
Fitzsimmon-Sullivan Match Placed
Under Police Ban
' NEW YORK, July s.—The exhibition
sparring bout between Bob Fitzsimmons
and John L. Sullivan, scheduled for this
afternoon at Ambrose park, Brooklyn,
did not take place. Martin Julian an
nounced to a large crowd of spectators
that the police had forbidden the con
test and that therefore the principals
had concluded to withdraw rather than
violate the law.
A Mexican Railroad
MONTEREY, Mexico, July s.—Fran
cisco Armendaiz, a millionaire mining
man, is In the City of Mexico making
final arrangements for building a rail
road from Monterey to Matamoras, or,
the Rio Grande border opposite Browns
ville, Texas. The Federal Government
gives the road a subsidy of $8000 per
kilometre and in addition to this sum
the State of Tamaulipas donates the
road $120,000.
It will be an important military line,
giving the Government easy access to
the Rio Grande border.
The Soldier Cyclists
ALLIANCE, Neb., July s—The Twen
ty-fifth Infantry bicycle corpa arrived
last evening after six hours' work. With
favorable winds one run of nine miles
was made in thirty-five minutes. The
first 1000 miles was completed today,
leaving 900 to be covered before reaching
St. Louis.
Twelve Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
SENATORS
WILL SIT
Till Somebody Gets Tired
Out
CANT REACH AN AGREEMENT
ON THE TIME FOB THE FINAL
VOTE
Many Tariff Amendments Proposed
and Voted Down, but a Stamp
Tax Will Be Imposed,
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, July s.—Senator Al
lison, in charge of the tariff bin, an
nounced shortly before the adjournment
of the senate tonight that as no agree
ment had been reached for a final vote
on the tariff bill he would ask the senate
to remain in session tomorrow night at
least until the bill was reported from th*
committee of the whole of the senate.
This promises a test of endurance unless
the opposition to the bill gives way. Al
lison's statement was made after an
other futile effort to have a time fixed,
for the vote.
In some respects the senate made good
progress today, disposing of two amend
ments, that placing a stamp tax being
agreed to with little or no opposition and
without the formality of a vote, while
the Spooner amendment proposing a
tariff investigation was withdrawn.after
a protracted struggle. The amendment
agreed to fixed the following rates on
bonds, etc.: Bonds, debentures or cer
tificates of indebtedness Issued after
September 15, 1897, by any association,
company, corporation, on each $100 of
face value or fraction thereof, 6 cents;
and on each original issue, whether an
organization or reorganization of cer
tiiicates of stock by any such associa
tion, company or corporation on each
$100 of face value or fraction thereof, 5
cents; and on all transfers of shares of
certificates of stock in any association,
company or corporation on each $100 of
face value or fraction thereof, 2 cents.
Exemptions from the stamp tax are
made in the case of state, county or mu
nicipal bonds and the stocks and bonds
of co-operative building associations.
Late in the day several other amend
ments from Individual senators were
voted on. One by Man tie of Montana re
ducing the internal revenue tax on dis
tilled spirits to 70 cents per gallon was
defeated, 23 to 41.
An amendmei t by Mills of Texas, pro
posing a tax of 5 per cent on manufac
tured products, the proceeds to go to
ward reducing the bonded debt, was re
jected, 19 to 38. Also an amendment by
Mills, granting 20 per cent reduction in
duties to those countries admitting gold
and silver to their mints at the rate of
sixteen to one; yeas 16, nays 31. On
this vote Carter voted with the Demo
crats, Populists and Silver Republicans
in the affirmative, and two Democrats,
Caffery and Gray, voted with the Re
publicans in the negative. Mills moved
to amend paragraph 395 by striking out
"books of all kinds," his purpose being
to place books on the free list. Reject
ed, 18 to 28. An effort by Mills to have
the Bible admitted free wasdefeated.
A new paragraph was Inserted In the
free list: Wafers for sacramental use,
or for covering or holding pharmaceu
tical preparations.
A legal discussion ensued as to the
legality of the provision that un
stamped bonds, etc., "shall be utterly
void and shall not be used in evidence."
The stamp amendment as a whole was
finally agreed to In a viva voce vote, no
call for an aye and no vote being made.
The "no" response was light and came
from the Democratic side.
Mr. Allison proposed the amendment
heretofore offered by Mr. Spooner for a
tariff inquiry by three members of tha
board of appraisers.
Mr. Teller took occasion in this con
nection to criticise the committee for
first transforming the house bill and
then going back in substance to the)
house rates. He had tried to learn what
amount of revenue the bill would yield
and he said he would be glad to have
the chairman, Mr. Allison, throw some
light on that subject. This brought
Mr. Allison to his feet for the first defi
nite statement as to the revenue ex
pected to be derived. He said it was
not possible for any expert to make ex
act calculations on the amount of rev
enue the tariff bill would yield. It had
never been done and never would be.
But from the best information, pro
ceeded Mr. Allison. "I believe this bill
will yield $175,000,000 to $150,000,000 the)
first year, from July 1, 1897, to July 1,
1895."
He said the schedules had been gonsi
over at any stage, as successive changes
were made, and he felt that this estimate)
could be safely made. It applied only to
the first year, after which there would
be a much larger yield of revenue.
"How much the second year?" queried
Mr. White.
"It depends," answered Mr. Allison,
"but I will say something over $200,000,
---000."
"How much over the present law?*'
asked Mr. Stewart.
"About $60,000,000," replied Mr. AIIU
eon, "but it will depend upon the condi
tion of our industries. It is not possible
to make more than a general estimate."
Mr. Vest remarked that the average)
ad valorem of the bill would be much
higher than that for the existing law,
the McKinley ad valorem being 49 per
cent, the existing law 39 cents, while the
estimate of the house bill was 57 per
cent.
Allison said the average ad valorem ot
the bill In its final form would be in the
neighborhood of 50 per cent.
Teller of Colorado again got the floor
at this point. He criticised the\esti
mate of the amount of revenue the bIU
would produce, which had been offered
by the majority. He ridiculed Ding-ley's
estimate, and referred to the admission

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