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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, July 11, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-07-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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Double Sheet
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 284.
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
/toasts ana Lata
won SAME
TTBTTLE 4k LOTTO. LAND AGENTS.
•» Market st. Opp. Palace Motel.
LOOK AT THIS!
.THE GREATEST SNAP——
IN CALIFORNIA.
To* can doable your
money la on* year
or make the best
permanent Investment aver
• OFFERED.
Finest property in the state.
Will pay I per cent net on $60,000.
Can be had now for $21,000.
184 ACRES
IS6 acres full bearing raisin
vineyard; oholoest selections.
8 acres full bearing olives.
12V4 acres diversified orchard.
28 acres grain and pasture.
Located In the beautiful
El Cajon val.ey, 16 miles
FROM SAN DIEGO.
Moat delightful climate.
No Frost*.
No Irrigation
Substantial Improvements.
This Is a bank property.
They want cash
at They don't want ranches.
Don't lose this opportunity.
You will never get
' Another like It
We also have a large
list of most desirable
country properties in California.
See us before purchasing, as
we handle only first-class
PROPERTIES.
TUTTLE A LOFTIS. LAND AGENTS.
620 Market St. Opp. Palace Hotel, tf
FOR SALE-STOP PAYING RENT
when we can sell you a new house for
$700, small cash payment; balance $10 per
month.
$1075—New house, dote In; small pay
ment down; balance $13 per month.
We have a beauty for $790; small cash
payment; balance $10 per month.
$1300—New 5-room house, close In; amall
payment down; balance $13 per month.
These houses are all new and modern;
this beats paying rent. Call at 119 South
Broadway, and let us show you this
property.
11 J. O. LOTSPEICH & CO.
FOR SALE—BUSINESS PROPERTY—
Improved block on corner of S. Spring;
6 store rooms.
Income property on Broadway, near
Second; lot 40x140; $20,000.
$18,500—Lot 70x155, near Fourth and
Broadway.
18000—Choice business block; building
cost $10,000; rent, $600 a year; lot 60x225;
fronts on Second st.
LEE A. M'OONNELL A CO.,
11 111 S. Broadway.
FOR SALE—REDUCED TO $4000, $500
down, balance same as rent; 9 rooms, 3
mantels, 8 washstands, roll-rim bath tub,
floored attic, etc.; most complete and
best constructed houses; open for inspec
tion. Alvaradb St., cor. Orange, opp.
Wetitlako park. 11-13
FOR SALE—S37OO; FURNISHED HOME
on 60-foot corner in Bonnie Brae, between
Seventh and Eighth.
$5000—Home on W. Beacon, with hand
carved grill work, heater, etc.
$7500—Home on Burlington, and cot
tages on Orange, Ingraham, from $2000
to $4500, on easy payments.
MARTIN & KURTZ,
11 Room 228 Byrne building.
FOR SALE—
6-room modern house on W. Ninth St.,
near Pearl, $2600.
8-room 2-story modern house in Bonnie
Brae, $6500.
$3600 buys a modern new 8-room house,
southwest.
LEE A. M'CONNELL & CO.,
11 113 S. Broadway.
FOR SALE—A NICE LITTLE - HOME,
located at Sherman, about 10 miles from
Los Angeles, on the electric line; all set
to lemons and oranges and other fruits;
rustic house; Vii blocks from power
house; price $1500. CREASINGER, 247
S. Broadway. 11
FOR SALE—A REAL~BARGAIN""THIS
time; $3600. $600 cash, new 10-room house
and barn; electric lights, sideboards,
bookcase, complete plumbing, on beau
tiful Knob hill, Westlake; mutt tell. W
N. HOLWAY, 122 W. Third at., Henne
building. 7-25
FOR - NEW 8-ROOM
houses on Thirty-fifth, near Main; on S
Flower, near Jeff erson; on Vermont aye.,
near Jefferson; on Coronado, near West
lake, at prices and terms to suit the
tlme3. M. MACDONALD, 325 Byrne
block. 11
FOR SALE—SIOSO; NEW MODERN COT
tage; 6 rooms and bath; lot 50x150; a
snap; close in; fine view; see this at
once. S. K. LINDLEY, 106 Broadway. 11
FOR SALE—SI6OO; 5-ROOM HOUSE AND
acre of land, with 90 fruit trees In bear
ing; terms, $660 cash, balance In quarter
ly payments of $60 With Interest on de
ferred payments. Address OWNER, box
j>4. South Los Angeles. 14
FOR SALE—ONE OfThe 'BESTLO-
cated lots In the city for sale at half
value; must have cash immediately cause
of sacrifice; if you want to make two
for one see H. C. REES, 208 Byrne block.
11
FOR SALE-NEW COTTAGE, 6 ROOMS,
hail, mantle, bath, hot and cold water,
modern; fine lot, fenced: $1250 cash; $50
balance monthly. M'LEAN, E st., Pico
Heights. ' ii
BEN WHITE i*fw. FIRST (W., HAS 20
houses arid lots in different locations;
terms, $50 to $100 cash, balance like rent;
buy yourself a home. Office, 235 W. First
street. 11
FOR~SALE—S26 CASH, $12 MONTHL,Y,
new 5-room cottage, or will exchange for
land. H. E. SIDDALL, 404 S. Broad
way. 11
FOR" AND LOT ON
Third St.; 40 rooms; all modern Improve
ments. 326 Boyd St.. Los Angeles. 7-17
BALANCE TO SUIT, T LOT
60x175, with 4-room cottage. BEN
WHITE, 235 W. First tt. 11
WANTED—TO SELL A NlCELY>UR
nished rooming house. Inquire 481 E.
Third st. 11 |
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
City Lots
FOR SALE—
$6000—The finest lot on Ocean aye., San
ta Monica, with house.
16500—Grand lot and 12-room residence,
Ooean aye., Santa Monica.
WsOOO—The finest 300 lots, southwest, on
electric car*.
1116,000—The best bargain In a business
block in Los Angeles.
180,000—Stock ranch of 7000 acres.
140,000—Lemon grove, 100 acres, In bear
ing.
.2000—Beautiful oottage, 2 mantels,
flowers, berries, fruits; No. 223 E. Twen
ty-fourth st.
WIESENDANGER,
U 431 S. Broadway.
FOR SALE—IIBOO LOT ON BURLING
ton; 11000 lot on Ninth; $900 lot on Tenth,
near Pearl; $625 lot on Central aye., near
Southern Pacific depot; $560 lot on Ceres,
bet. Fifth and Sixth; and one in Menlo
Park tract, $380. MARTIN & KURTZ,
room 228, Eyrne bldg. 11
FOR SALE—WE HAVE SOME OF THE
ohoicest lots In the Westlake park dis
trict that can be sold at prices considera
bly below the market; if you are looking
for oholce residence property call on us.
HTNTON & WHITAKER, 123 W. Second
street. 11
FOR SALE—SIOSO; LOT 60X165 TO 18 FOOT
alley, west side of Westlake aye., near
Sixth at.; a big bargain; call and sec
this: sewer, sidewalk. S. K. LINDLEY,
106 Broadway. 11
FOR SALE—33 LOTS IN BONNIE BRAE
tract for sale at a great bargain; all
sewered complete; nearly all graded,
curbed, sidewalked and stone guttered.
See CLARK & BRYAN. 11
FOR SALE—SEVERAL VERY CHEAP
lots in the Wolfskin tract. I would hurt
adjoining owners' feelings by quoting
such low figures. G. C. EDWARDS, 230
W. First st. 11
FOR SALE—C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots In his Third addition on easy Install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Office, 213 W. First st. tf
FOR SALE—(IOB) $1600. TWO LOTS IN
the Rowly tract, $800 each; terms, $200
cash; balance on time at 8 per cent net.
M. MACDONALD, 325 Byrne block. 11
A—sB2s—LOT 50X160, SAN PEDRO, NEAR
Eleventh St.; big bargain. BEN WHITE,
235 W. First st. 11
FOR SALE—BEST RESIDENCE LOT
on W. Seventh st. car line; low. 727 E.
First st. 11
A-$290-LOT 50X150, HINTON AYE.;
street graded. BEN WHITE, 235 W. First
street,. 11
Business Property
FOR SALE—
Sixty feet on Broadway, between Fifth
and Sixth sts., at a price that will show a
large profit for the next few months.
Los Angela* at., near First St., 110 feet
or lesa at $400 per foot.
HINTON & WHITAKER,
11 123 W. Second st.
FOR SALE—SI9,OOO ; 73VfeX165 FEET ON
Hill st., opp. the Masonio hall and ad
joining the new Santa Monica railroad
terminal; house of seven rooms. T. E.
ROWAN, 4 Bryson blk. 11
FOR SALE—WE SELL THE EARTH
BAS SETT ft SMITH, Pomona. Cal. 6-26tf
Country Property
FOR SALE—WISEMAN'S LAND Bu
reau, 235 W. First St., school and govern
ment land headquarters. Established 1885.
School lands, $1.26 acre, easy terms. Gov
ernment locations, $20 up. Lands in al!
counties in California. The cheapest,
safest, surest and best investment in
America. No residence on land or culti
vation required unless desired by pur
chaser. Women as well as men take
school lands as a hctme or Investment.
Insurance, bonds, mortgages and stocks
that cost much more, never did nor never
will equal school lands as an Investment.
Fortunes are made yearly and school
lands near markets never retrogade In
price. Now is your opportunity to se
cure land in Southern California. We
have no opposition. The lends are dally
growing scarcer. Don't delay. Send
stamp for our new book. 11
FOR SALE—(C) $26,000, 20-ACRE ORANGE
orchard; fine M-room house; large sta
ble and outhouse*; finest orchard and
handsomest place on Magnolia aye.,
Riverside; large income paying; all nec
essary farm tools, horses, carriages, etc.
Also 20 acres, half In alfalfa, half in
raisins; price $4000; all clear; terms, half
cash; balance, good, clear, acceptable
property at cash valuation; here's a bar
gain; don't all come at once.
M. MACDONALD,
11 ' 525 Byrne block.
FOR SALE—OWING TO DEATH OF ,
late owner, an elegant ranch, together
with growing orchards and sundry
tracts of valuable land, are offered at
very low prices in order to effect a quick !
sale and wind up estate. Write for par
ticular to C. ISEARD, San Luis Rey,
Cal. 8-6 ,
FOR SALE—BARGAIN; THE FAMOUS :
Lewis tract, near Garvanza, consisting I
of 103 large lots, now offered for sale as a
whole or in lots; will also trade for Oak
land, San Francisco or Los Angeles prop
erty. For full particulars Inquire of L.
M. CORWIN, Highland Park, Cal. 7-26
FOR SALE—FRED L. SEXTON. 266 1
Wilson blk., offers some special bargains ,
at this time in alfalfa ranches, business ■
blocks, walnut groves and city resi- .
dences; a number of good farms in the !
famous peat lands; if you want to buy '
see me. 12
FOR SALE-UO5) $800, 5-ACRE FRUIT
ranch at Garden Grove; 4-room house,
hard-finished; large barn, corrals, etc.;
an alfalfa patch for cow, etc. M. MAC
DONALD, 325 Byrne block. 11
FOR SALE-CHEAP 6 TO 40-ACRE
tracts, improved and unimproved. In
Lankershim ranch, also La Canada, Ana
helm and elsewhere. G. C. EDWARDS
230 W. First st. 11 '
FOR SALE-HOUSE AND LOT IN SAN
Bernardino; fine new frame building; 1
acre ground; barn, chicken house; all
modern Improvements. 32C Boyd st., Los
Angeles. 7-17
FOR SALE-10, 20 OR 40 ACRES OF !
foothill land, improved or unimproved
also 1000 acres..Dß. JOHN T. SCROLL, '
1401 S. Main St. 11-14 ' 1
FOR SALE—LONG BEACH LOT, $150, ON i
monthly payments of $5, or will trade.
H. E. SIDDALL,, 404 S. Broadway. 11 ?
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE—2IH
acres at Anaheim. Address OWNER, a
Box 210, Downey, Cal. 27. 4, 11, 18 r
PLUMBERS
FRANK A. WE IN SHANK, PLUMBErI '
and gaafltter. 240 E. Second at.: tel. IM, 1
(For additional classified see Pace Two.) a
THE HERALD
COUNTING
THE DEAD
By Dozens, by Scores, by
Hundreds
THOUSANDS OPPROSTRATIONS
CAUSED BY THE INTOLERABLE
TEMPERATURE
Belief Is Promised, but People Die
While Waiting for Fulfill
ment of Predictions
Associated Press Special Wire.
CHICAGO, July 10.—The fierce heat
under which the greater portion of the
country has sweltered since the first of
July moderated In many localities today
and predictions from' the weather bureau
at Washington, indicate that lower tem
perature will bring general relief with
in twenty-four hours. The records of
protratlons and deaths resulting from
the long heated term approaches in mag
nitude that of a general epidemic. Re
ports from all sections of the country
received by the Associated Press this
evening show that protratlons number
In the neighborhood of 2000, with
fatalities close to 350. In addition to this
there were scores of deaths! resulting
indirectly from the intolerable heat,
the death rate in many of the large
cities showing a fearful increase over
previous years. The central states suf
fered more severely than other sections,
the heat being most deadly In Chicago,
Cincinnati and St. Louis. In the num
ber of fatalities this city heads the list
with 87 deaths, Cincinnati and subur
ban points reporting 65 and St. Louis
42. Throughout the south the heat was
intense, but the death rate was much
lower than in the north.
Eighty-seven people have died from
the effeots of the heat since July 1. In
addition six have drowned while bath
ing' to escape the sizzling rays of the
sun, six have been driven insane and a
large number have committed suleide,
while 347 prostrations, more or less seri
ous, have occurred. The health depart
ment shows a great Increase In mortality
in children and sufferers from chronic
diseases. The average number of deaths
for the past three or four days has al
most doubled.
Late this afternoon the excessive heat
was broken by a smart thunder shower.
The mecury in. five hours fell 20 degrees
and life is once more worth living. Thei
heat in the early part of the day caused
eight deaths and twenty-one prostra
tions, eleven of them being serious,
AT CINCINNATI
CINCINNATI, July 10. — Coroner
Haerr reports 53 fatal cases of sunstroke
here during the past seven days. This
does not include a dozen such fatalities
for the week in Covington, Newport and
other Kentucky suburbs. There were
over 600 protrallons.
Today there were seven fatal cases of
heat prostration here. The dead are:
ARTHUR AFFEY.
EDMUND BORN.
CARRIE SIEKULSE.
PHIL LEDDY.
MRS. EVA RENKERT.
JOHN STETGER.
HYMAN BENJAMIN.
There are in Cincinnati hospitals forty
cases of sufferers from sunstroke. There
are also a total of 368 cases under treat
ment, very largely from accidents super-
Induced by heat. The prostrations re
quiring official attention today were
about 45. The maximum, heat marked by
the weather bureau today was 93 at 1
p. m., and 85 at 6 p. m. The most re
liable instruments on the street level
showed 3 to 4 degrees higher. Ehe mer
cury on the street at 9:30 tonlgrM was 83.
Thunderstorms In this vicinity cooled
the air but little.
AT ST. LOUIS
ST. LOUBS, Mo., July 10.—The hot
spell In St. Louis has lasted thirteen
days, and the weather is still hot and
oppressive. During; this heated term
forty-two persons have died from sun
stroke either on the streets, in ambu
lances or in tihe emergency hospital. The
statistics of prostrated persons who
died in their own homes are not attain
able. During the hot spell 137 cases of
prostration classified as "serious" have
been treated at the city hospitals. There
is no record of those treatediat their own
homes. During the thirteen days the
heat has averaged 96 degrees. Therj
were no deaths and few prostrations dur
ing t/he first Aye days. Today's record
of the sun in St. Louis up to 6 oclock to
night is as follows: Dead, 14; prostrated,
52. Of those prostrated ten are expect
ed to die.
The dead are:
BAPTTSTE GRIMIMOND.
WILLIAM KOETTER;
WILLIAM SHELLEY.
R. D. WRIGHT.
JOHN ANDERSON.
ALBERT ROBST.
MA'HAJJE BROWN.
MIKE ALGIER.
EMIL PERSON.
MRS. CHARLOTTE BLATTO.
PATICK O'DON'N'ELL.
VARLBMAN BAUER.
DAUGHERTY.
PHILIP BAIN.
Bakers, teamsters, cooks and organ
grinders form the bulk of those pros
trated. The city hospital is swamped
with heat cases. The urgency wards are
packed. This morning Superintendent
Sutter ordered a large number of tents,
wlhich he will have placed on the hos
pital grounds and will transfer all the
heat cases to them.
At dawn this morning the temperature
was 88 degrees; at 3 ociock this after
noon it was 94; this evening It was 96
degrees.
All sorts of things were promised for
tonight, but they were predicted last
night, and the night before than, and the
people have suffered and died. There
are a few little feathery clouds la the
LOS ANGELES, SUNDAY MORNING, JULY ft, 1897
Daring Mr. Bryan's recent visit to this city he sat before the camera, and on Monday last, previous
to his great speech at Fiesta park, was taken in a variety of poses. The above cut is one of the most
characteristic, and faithfully depicts the silver champiou, being his latest and best picture. The engrav
ing is from a photograph by Marceau.
sky tonight, and an apology a breeze
is coming In from Kansas —where it is
hotter than here—but there are no signs
of a cooling storm. This is the thir
teenth day. Men are sullenly vicious
under the strain, women are hysterical
and! children are covered with prickly
heat from neck to heel.
Reports Are Brief—The Aggregate Is
Awful
NEW YORK, July 10—The number of
deaths in New York city from sunstroke
for the week ending at 6 oclock tonight
was fourteen. There were numerous
deaths from heart failure and other dis
eases hastened by the heat. The report
of the bureau of vital statistics Tor the
week ending today gives the number of
deaths at 966, an increase of 135 over the
week previous.
Kansas City, Mo.—Eight deaths were
directly due to the extreme hot weather
which has prevailed in Kansas City dur
ing the past week. Six of these occurred
yesterday, though the hottest day of the
season was Thursday. During the en
tire season previous to the past week
there have been but three deaths from
sunstroke. Today the weather Is cool,
Boston—There has been 1 death from
heat this week, that of Mrs W. J. Ruth
erford, who was stricken yesterday.
Utica, N. V. —There have been four
deaths from the heat during the week.
Washington—The only death from
heat that has occurred in Washington
this summer was that of William Car
roll, a colored hotel porter, on July 4th.
Topeka—The result of the past twelve
days' extreme heat In this city during
which the temperature reached a max!
mum of 104 degrees was twelve prostra
tions and no deaths am far as reported.
St. Paul—During the heated spell in
this city, which ended last night, there
have been reported seven prostrations
and two deaths.
Milwaukee—The number of deaths in
this city resulting from the intense heat
of the past few days Is three, with thir
teen prostrations.
A review of the state outside of Mil
waukee, as far as reported, shows six
deaths and about twenty prostrations.
Syracuse, N. V.—There have been four
deaths from the heat in this city and
Immediate vicinity within the last two
days.
Philadelphia—Since the beginning cf
the present heat wave, only three deaths
have resulted from heat prostrations.
Rochester, N. V.—There were two
deaths from heat this week, both today.
Buffalo —There have been seven deaths
from heat in Buffalo this week. In the
past two days there have been five
deaths from heat In neighboring towns.
Cleveland, Ohio—Since the beginning
of the present heated term there have
been reported In this city thirty-two
prostrations, of which five proved fatal.
The highest temperature reached was
97 degrees on last Sunday.
New Orleans—The maximum, temper
ature recorded during the recent heated
term in New Orleans, which was broken
to some extent today by rain., was 97 on
June 22. For several days prior thereto
and thereafter, the mercury registered
about 90. The actual deaths from heat
prostration during that time were fif
teen. Many other deaths, particularly of
children, were in part due to the heat.
Nashville —Five deaths have occurred
in this since last Saturday morning
from sunstrokes and heat prostrations,
and two previous to that day.
Minneapolis—There has been but one
death caused by the heat during the
past week.
Omaha, Neb.—During the recent heat
ed term Fred Carlson and Frank La
tenza died from the effects of the heat,
and four others'were prostrated.
Buffalo —At midnight five additional
deaths were reported, due to the heat.
Th is makes nine deaths in Buffalo today.
St Louis—The intensity c<f the heat
spell was broken here tonight by a show
er and a Wind storm. The thermometer
now stands at 80, a fall of 16 degrees.
Toledo—This afternoon there was a
DEADLY DETAILS
HON. WILLIAM J. BRYAN
decided drop In the temperature and a
fierce wind and rain storm, which par
took of the nature of a cyclone, swept
over the city, doing great damage to
property. No lives were* lost. During
the heated period of the last weeks there
has been a total of ten deaths and twen
ty prostrations.
Grand Rapids, Mich.—There have been
but two deaths due to heat In this vicin
ity since July 1. There has been a large
increase in the death rate among child
ren and the aged.
Peoria, Hl.—During the hot weather
of the last week there have been six
deaths from the heat In Peoria and sev
eral in the surrounding country.
Lincoln, Neb.—Heat prostrations in
Nebraska during the past week have
been numerous, but only three fatalities
have been reported in the city.
Milwaukee—Although the spell of ter
rific heat has been broken, four deauhs
occurred today from recent prostrations.
Detroit —Four deaths in this city are
directly attributed to the heat up to a
late hour tonight.
Louisville —Since the commencement
of the present heated term there have
been seventeen deaths In this city and
about fifty serious prostrations, all due
directly to the intense heat. The aver
age maximum and minimum tempera
ture for the past twelve days were. 95.6
and 76.3 respectively.
Indianapolis—Up to 6 oclock tonight
ten deaths and about fifty prostrations
os a result of excessive heat were re
ported in this city. The highest point
reached by the thermometer during th'!
heated term was 99 degrees.
Pittsburg—The intense heat prevail
ing since the Ist of July is responsible
for twenty-two deaths and forty-seven
prostrations. Scores of others were
slightly affected.
Columbus,Ohio—ln the last sevendays
one man died from heat and one woman
and twenty men were prostrated.
Detroit, Mich.—During the heat there
aye been 160 deaths In Detroit, seventy
one of these being children under 5
years of age. Last week there were but
fifty-nine deaths. The number result
ing directly from the heat In Michigan Is
twelve.
Boston—During the past six days
twenty-seven prostrations by the heat
have been reported, four of which re
sulted fatally,
RELIEF COMING
WASHINGTON, July 10,—The Intense
heat of the past few daya in th« central
valleys, due in part to the stagnation of
the atmosphere, has been broken by a
forward movement of low pressure from
Kansas to the lake region and from the
North Pacific coast to Colorado. A fall
In the temperature of 20 degrees in 24
hours ia reported from Sioux City and
Concordia.
Bryan in Oregon
ASHLAND, Ore., July 10.—Willllam J.
Bryan today delivered an address on
bimetallism before the largest audience
ever assembled in Southern Oregon. His
discussion of the financial question was
frequently Interrupted by enthusiastic
applause. Mr. Bryian left by tonight's
train for the north. He will speak on
Monday In Lebanon.
Sentence Commuted
BOISE, Idaho, July 10.—The board of
pardons' today commuted to life Impris
onment tftie sentence of Frank Smith,
who was sentenced, to Moscow
for the murder of Emll Fox at Genesee,
in January, 1596.
Out of Work
STOCKTON, July 10.— G. A. Beach
shot himself dead in his room alt the
Lancaster hotel In Oakdale this morn
ing. He was without money. He was
about 55 years old snd is Said to have a
son living at Sacramento.
Barnato's Palace
NEW YORK, July 10.—A dispatch from
London to the World says: The Bradley-
Martins, it is rumored, have taken Bar
ney Barnato's magnificent unfinished
palace on Park Lane.
INDEX
J OF THE TELEGRAPH NEWS
There is little change of conditions
in the strike region; both sides are
j confident of success.
Tremendous crowds attend the En
deavor meetings at San Francisco,
and the utmost enthusiasm is shown.
Emperor William will visit ths czar
for the express purpose of forming a
Russo-German alliance against Great
Britain.
W. Bussell Ward held to answer
on the charge of adultery preferred
by the San Francisco Society for the
Prevention of Vice.
The question of Hawaiian annexa
tion seems likely to cause serious dip
lomatic friction with Japan, and may
yet lead to an exchange of blows.
Colonial premiers do not consider
the scheme of an English federation
as likely to be realized; back talk on
the sealing question; political and
personal gossip.
The Friar wins the New York Re
alisation, much to the disgust of the
crowd, which backed Scottish Chief;
Cincinnati Oaks won by White Frost,
the favorite; wheel work; results on
the diamond.
Heat prostrations east of the Mis-
sissippi since the Ist of July aggre
gate 2000, while the deaths number
nearly 000; relief is promised, But
fulfillment comes with deadly slow
ness.
THE CUBAN WAR
Cattle Confiscated to Supply Hospit-
als With Beef
HAVANA, via Key West, July 10—
Reports from Artemlsa say that owing
to the great scarcity of meat in the Can
delaria district it has been found neces
sary to confiscate cattle In order to fur
nish supplies for the hospitals.
It is reported from Clenfuegos that
Gen. Gomez has left the island. Col.
Ramoz Ysuohguldio, who Is responsible
for the rumor, say* he has learned
through a confidential communication
that Gomez joined the insurgent leaders
of Las Villas at Jibarlo and told, them It
was necessary to act In order to prove
the existence of the revolution in Las
Villas.
"I will cross the trocha." he said, "to
confer with the government; you march
wee*, Quintin Banderas remaining
here."
News from Jaruco Is to the effect that
there are now 6000 "reconcentrados" in
the city andi many pitiful scenes are wit
nessed there.
Saw the Sights
SANTA CRUZ, July 10.—Large excur
sion parties of Christian Endeavorers,
numbering over 500, arrived here today,
visited the big trees and then spent the
afternoon on the beach and sight-seeing.
They left for San Francisco by special
trains late this afternoon.
A Musical Reform
LONDON, July 10.—The Vatican' has
called upon the French bishops to supply
Information as to the different kinds of
ecclesiastical music in their dioceses and
the pope is preparing instructions on the
subject, with the intention of inaugurat
ing certain reforms.
A Common Complaint
SAN JOSE. July 10.—The board ot
trade here is In a state of disruption.
More than fifty members, prominent
business men, and firms have resigned
in a body. Internal distention is said
to be the cause.
24 Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS
EARNEST
ENDEAVOR
Finds Some Godliness in
San Francisco
ENDEAVORERS IN EARNEST:
WILL STRIVE TO MAKE THE
CITY BETTER
Tremendous Crowds Attend the Many
Meetings and the Utmost En
thusiasm Is Manifested
Associated Press Special Wire.
SAN FRANCISCO, July 10.—This Has
been one of the most eventful days of
the Christian Endeavor convention, for
its varied incidents have demonstrated
to the delegates from far and near that
the people of San Francisco are sincere
in their welcome and that this Is not a>
godless city. This fact wan strikingly
emphasized at the great open air meet
ings held on Van Ness avenue at noon.
For many blocks tihe wide boulevard 1 was :
thronged and the impassioned address
es of men earnest in their faith were re
ceived with marked attention and ap
proval. It was a. matter of civic pride,
not of creed, for nowhere was the ap
plause more generous than at the great
gathering under the shadow of ths
splendid Roman Cathollic churdh of St.
Ignatius.
These assemblies, under a cloudless
sky on one of the finest days of a Cali
fornia year, were even more enthusias
tic than was expected, even by General
Secretary Baer, through whose sugges
tion they were held.
The topic of the c arty morning jjrayer
meetings was "Committee Work Ser
vice." All the churohes were filled. Ths
services were led by the following men,
all prominent In the Christian Endeavor
movement: F. T. Vincent, Seneca, Kaa.;,
W. H. Rice, New, Dorp, L.. r.;,H.JS, Can
tel, New York; Walter M. Jordan, Deer
Lodge, Mont.; F. D. Stackhouse, Denver,
Col.; D. S. Kelley, Emporia, Kaß.; Geo.
K. Burns, Philadelphia; William Staves,
India; J. V. Mulligan, Boise City, Idaho.
The subject of the daily hour for Bible
study was "Philllppians—A Message, of
Joy in the Midst of. Adversity.'' It wai
conducted in a fervent manner by Rev.
Dr. Herbert L. Wlllett of Chicago.
ALL IN EARNEST.
SAN FRANCISCO, July 10.—All tha
Christian Endeavorers now assembled
within our gates are here for a purpose,
and that purpose ie not one of recreation
and pleasure. That all the assembled
Endeavorers take a deep andi pensive
Interest in the proceedings of the con
vention Is manifested by the attendance
at the daily sessions in the big con
vention halls. With them all Is en
thusiasm. Never has San Francisco been
called upon to entertain such a throngof
people as has gathered together for the
1897 convention. There have been reviv
al meetings and religious gatherings and
all sorts of conventions, and there have
been some pretty big political gather
ings in San Francisco, but the Chris
tian Endeavor convention is a revela
tion.
Profiting by their experience at the
previous sessions of the big convention,
whan they came too late to get'within
hailing distance of the Mechanics and
Woodward's pavilions, many Endeavor
ers were up with the coming of day
break, determined to be among the foT
tunate ones In securing seats. All tha
roads seemed to lead to the headquar
ters at Mechanics' Pavilion. By 8 o'clock
they came pouring in from the east,
west, north and south, on foot and In
street cars, until the broad entrances to
the big frame structures were congested
with humanity. The weather was quite
cool —Just cool enough to bring back tha
color which had 1 temporarily been driven
from the cheeks of thousands of pretty
young women by the hardships of a
transcontinental journey. Nine o'clock
saw all the 9000 seats filledi, while sev
eral thousand persons formed a fringe
of humanity about the outer edges and
packed the aisles, until the police and
fire departments cried "Enough" and
barred the doors to further arrivals.
The song service was first on the pro
gram. The vast throng joined' in the
stirring Endeavor hymns with delight
ful effect and with a volume of sound
that carried 1 their voices to the crowds
in the streets, many of whom joined
in the songs of praise. In spite of the
fact that the committee hadi arranged
the most aUractlve programs for the
meetings at Woodward's Pavilion in
order to draw as many people as possible
to that hall, the crowd seems to gravi
tate towards the headquarters at Me
chanics' Pavilion, with the result that
thousands are turned away at every
session. The latter hall has been made
so attractive with decorations and
booths, conducted by hundreds of hand
some young women, something after the
fashion of a charity bazaar, tnat all
want to enjoy the privilege of seeing and
hearing all that Is to be seen and heard.
Notwithstanding the size of the vast
assemblage, the arrangements at the
pavilion are all that the most exacting
could' wish, and all that has been done
for the comfort of the visiting legions
reflects credit upon those who have
given their time and attention to the
great work.
The committees that have had a hand!
in the arrangements of the great Inter-
national gatherings are now receiving
the praise and commendation of 20,000
delighted visitors from every State in
the Union and' from nearly every alien
land where the influence of Christian
Endeavor is felt.
No definite figures have been given out
today as to the total registration, but it
is understood that something over 22,
---000 have appended their names to the
roll of attending delegates. Nineteen
more trains yet to come is the latest anJ
nounoement by Secretary Baer, and the
last oX these will probably not arrive

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