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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, July 13, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-07-13/ed-1/seq-1/

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Double Sheet
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 286.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
HERALD SUB-AGENCIES—
ADVERTISEMENTS left at the fol
lowing agencies will receive prompt at
tention and will be printed as quickly
and with the same care as If left at
the main office, 222 W. Third street:
DOWNEY AYE. AND EAST SIDE
L. P. COLLETTE, 621 Downey avenue.
OLD WORLD DRUG STORE. 1028
Downey avenue, Phone Flora 242.
WM. H. HARMON, 765 Pasadena aye.,
Phone East 58.
CENTRAL AYE. AND VERNON
S. E. BARNEY, 2605 Central aye.
CHICAGO PHARMACY, Central ave
nue and Twelfth street, Phone West 132.
T. J. AKEY, corner Central and Vernon
avenues, Phone West 32.
MAIN ST. AND SOUTHWEST
E. T. PARKE, PHARMACY, 3129 S.
Main. Phone Blue 2062.
E. VAN DYKE, DRUGGIST, 711 W.
Jefferson. St., Phone White 1271.
WESTLAKE GROCERY, corner Al
varado and Seventh sts., Phone Main
1382.
H. L. PARK, DRUGGIST, corner
Thirty-eighth and Wesley aye., Phone
Blue 1301.
T. W. BROWN, JR., DRUGGIST, Junc
tion of Hoover, Union and Twenty-fourth
sts., Phone Blue 1101.
BOYLE HEIGHTS
H. C- WORLAND, 2138 E. First, Sta
tion B.
T. P. WYLIE, 1977 E. FIRST, Phone
Park 13.
J. M. HARRIS, 1542 E. FIRST, Phone
Park 21.
TEMPLE ST. AND NORTHWEST
DR. H. KALLEWODA, DRUGGIST,
earner Temple st. and Beaudry aye.,
Phone Main 206.
STAR PHARMACY, corner Temple and
Belmont aye., Phone Main 507.
VIOLE & LOPIZICH, DRUGGISTS,
427 N. Main St., Phone Main 575.
LOS ANGELES—
-SAN FRANCISCO—
A chance for advertisers to reach the
public of both cities on the most ad
vantageous terms ever offered.
We have concluded arrangements
whereby classified advertising may be
Inserted simultaneously in the
LOS ANGELES HERALD
And in the
SAN FRANCISCO POST
For
I CENTS PER LINE.
8 CENTS PER LINE,
I CENTS PER LINE,
( CENTS PER LINE
Here is a rare opportunity for people
having bargains to offer or wants to be
known.
HERALD PUBLISHING CO.,
tf 222 W. Third at.
SPECIAL NOTICES
IfOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oclock
a.m. and 6 and 8 oclock p.m. For a vio
lation of the abo'.e regulations ths water
will be shut off and a line of $2 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
WANTED—EVERY ONE TO KNOW
that Hall Thompson Rheumatism, Liver
and Kidney Cure will cure rheumatism.
Call and get testimonials. 223 N. Spring
St., room 6. 8-1
THE DAILY JOURNAL, PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 205 New High st. tf
SPECIAL SALE—NO CHARGE FOR
borders with 5c and 7%c wallpaper.
WALTER, 21S W. Sixth st, 8-12
PERSONAL
PERSONAL—A YOUNG MAN OF EDU
cation, refinement and character, loyal
and '.rue-hearted, would like to hear from
a true lady of similar qualifications, un
der 35, amiable, dark eyes and of pleasing
appearance. Address RALPH ABER
CROMBIE, general delivery, city. 11
PERSONAL—WILL JOS.~KLINE~"oR
the husband of
BERTHA HOLMAN
send their address to E. B. JORDAN
110 Montgomery blk, San Francisco. lmo4
PERSON A 7. —WHEN TIRED TAKING
patent medicine to reduce your flesh, that
only ruins your stomach, see MRS. GOSS.
I also rc-movo superfluous hair. 2-15% S.
Spring st. S-9
PERSONAL—FOR RENT, FURNISHED
or unfurnished rooms; desirable location:
prices to suit the times. THE WIN
THKOP, 330% S. Spring «i. 7-25
PERSONAL—ONE HAND READ FREE:
life read from cradle to grave; advice on
business matters, family affairs. 111% W.
Third st. 9-11
FOR SALE—LIVE STOCK
FOR SALE—3 PROOF JACKS, LARGE
size, brown and mouse color. Address San
Gabriel postoffice. or W. W. GARNER,
Garvey ranch, San Gabriel. 8-7
HELP WASTED—MALE
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building,
300-302 W. Second street, in basement,
Telephone 509.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Milk wagon driver, $30 etc.; ranch
hands, $21) etc.; sawyer, portable mill, $60
and board; 2 sawmill laborers, $1.50 day:
ranch hand, $17.30 etc.; stout boy, $3
week; chore boy. $10 etc.; blacksmith. $30
etc.; fruit cutters, 20c per 100; boy, learn
nursery; man and wife, blacksmith and
cook, ranch, $50 etc.: straw buck, $1.50
etc.; fruit ranch hand, $20 etc.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Fry cook, $12; dishwasher, beach, $20
etc.; German waiter, $20; dishwasher,
country, $20; boy, dishwasher, $2 etc.;
first-class cook, country, $12 week.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
Girl, assist, beach, $12; house girl, Al
hambra, $12, employer here; nurse girl,
$15; colored house girl, $15; house girl,
family 2, $20; 5 house girls, small families,
near Los Angeles, $12, $15 and $20; young
French nurse girl. $12.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Cook, small boarding house, city, $25;
all-around cook, Catalina, $35; girl, wait
table and counter, $15: experienced check
waitress, $7 week; waitress, small res
taurant, $5 week.
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
WANTED—GOOD NEWS FOR THE UN
employed."The Californian" offers em
ployment for a large number of men.
women, boys and girls during the next
three months. For particulars and sam
ple copies address H. S. SMITH, pub
lisher, Los Angeles, Cal. 13
WANTED—THE SUNSET EMPLOY
ment Agency. 12S N. Main St.; telephone
Red 1441: rooms 11, 12, 13, 14; everybody
in town is going there. Be in the proces
sion or 16 to 1 you'll miss something. 13
WANTED—AGENTS FOHi INDUSTRIAL
insurance; salary and commission: expe
rience not necessary. Apply room 9, 105
E. First. 7-25
WANTED—THOROUGH CITY DRUM
mer to handle desirable side line; give
name and reference. Address D., box 31,
Herald. 13
WANTED—EGAN'S RESTAURANT, 126
-123 E. Second St., serves the best 10c meal
in the city; try It and be convinced. 8-11
WANTED—IO BOYS; WORKERS: GOOD
salary to right boys. 7 a .m., 711 S. Main.
7-29
HELP WANTED—FEMALE
WANTED—A GIRL TO ASSIST IN GEN
eral housework for Santa Monica. Ap
ply at 24S S. Spring St., COLUMBUS
WOOLEN MILLS. 13
SITUATIONS WANTED-MALE
WANTED—YOUNG MAN FROM THE
east wishes position on small ranch;
handy with tools. V., box 30. Herald. 13
SITUATIONS WANTED — FEMALE
WANTED—A POSITION AS COMPAN
ion. governess or nurse with party going
east; fare only compensation. Address
X., box 1, Herald. 15
WANTED—YOUNG GIRL TO HELP
w-ith light housework. Apply 524 E.
Twenty-third st. 14
WANTED—TO BUY LIVE STOCK
] WANTED—CALVES AND FAT STOCK.
FRED HUGHES, Durham market. 1067
j Temple St. 6-24 tf
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE—SI2OO; CONFECTIONERY
and bakery; fine location; good business.
$400—Blacksmith and wagonmaker
shop, including building.
Butcher shops from $250 to $1000.
The best paying livery business in the
city; plenty of boarders.
D. A. VAN VRANKEN,
13 114% S. Broadway.
FOR SALE—AN EXCELLENT OFPOR
tunity for a good business man wishing
to rent a restaurant; suorrounded by the
Southern Pacllic shops, iron foundry and
oil wells. Apply at 902 Buena Vista St. 14
FOR SALE—A $1009 SPRING ST. RES
taurant for $250. See us before 3 p. m.
FRED L. SEXTON & CO., 266 Wilson
blk. 13
fsELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS
for cash. I. D. BARNARD, 111 North
Broadway, opposite Times building, if
FOR SALE—BUSINESS: HOUSES; FOR
rent; rooms; collections,; help free; work.
EDW. NITTINGER, 236% S. Spring st. tf
FOR SALE—SALOONS AT VERY RF.A
sonable terms. Apply at 440 Aliso st. tf
BATHS
THE LOS ANGELES VITAPATHIC IN
stitute gives farudic, static and galvanic
electricity, vapor, sun and electrical
baths, sheet packs, fomentations, salt
glows, sprays, showers and shampoos;
Swedish and German massage chromo
pathy vacuum treatment. Look for our
Sunday advertisement on page 11. Fif
teen treating rooms, 35 rooms for patients
and guests. Largest vitapathic institute
In California. DR. HARRIMAN, phys
ician in charge. Consultation free. Thurs
day evening meetings free to all investi
gators at 534% S. Broadway, Hotel Dela
ware, tf
HYGIENIC BATH PARLORS—ELEC
tric and steam baths; massage, salt
glows and constitutional treatment; for
ladies and gentlemen. No. 125 W. Fourth
St.. Los Angeles, Cal. Telephone Brown
112. 8-10
HYGIENIC BATH PARLORS—ELEC
tric and steam baths; massage, salt
glows and constitutional treatment; for
larlics and gentlemen. 125 W. Fourth St.;
Tel. Brown 142. 13
LOST AND FOUND
LOST OR STRAYED—A LARGE DARK
bay horse about 10 years old. black mane
and tail, short foretop: no white feet or
spots and no special marks; thin build
and good limbs; a suitable reward paid
for his-return; was last seen on'the eve
ning of July 7 near Westlake park. De
liver to owner. F. J. Cressey, 546 S. Al
varado St., Los Angeles. 13
MUSICAL
A. G. GARDNER. PIANO HOUSE.
Pianoß sold, rented and exchanged; rear
of main postoffice. 118 Winston st.
'Phone Brown 295. 13
(For additional classified see Page Two.)
THE HERALD
OCEANS OF
ORATORY
On Southern Pacific Rail
road Claims
THE SENATE WAS SWAMPED
AND ALL BUSINESS CAME TO A
STANDSTILL
The Tariff Steamboat Buns Into the
Snags and Promises to Stick
for Awhile
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, July 12. —A discus
sion of Union Pacific railroad affairs oc
cupied the attention of the senate today.
The deficiency appropriation bill was
taken up early in the day, and Morgan
proposed an amendment designed to
prevent the consummation of an agree
ment made some time since for the set
tlement of the government's claim
against the road. Morgan spoke through
out the day, severely arraigning the
Pacific railroad managers. Late in the
day the entire subject was disposed of
by the withdrawal of the paragraph to
which Morgan had offered his amend
ment. The deficiency appropriation biii
was not completed up to the time of
adjournment.
A resolution Introduced by 'Senator
Butler of North Carolina was agreed to,
directing the secretary of state to se
cure from our diplomatic representa
tives abroad full information as to the
operation of postal telegraphs, tele
phones and savings bank'?. Considera
tion of the deficiency appropriation bill
was then resumed.
The expediency of attaching private
claims to the bill was discussed at some
lengt. Foraker of Ohio had offered an
amendment covering three insurance
claims adjudicated under the Bowman
act.
Hale of Maine made a point of order
against the amendment. The vice pres
ident in deciding, the point held that
"private" referred to such measures as
were for the benefit of individuals with
out application to the general public
For this reason the former amendment
was ruled out as covering private claims
The decision operated to exclude a
large number of private claims which
were to be offered as amendments to
the deficiency bill.
In view of this exclusion of private
claims. Hale secured the adoption of an
amendment appropriating $1000 for ex
tra labor to enable the committee on
claims to examine fully all pending
claims and to report a comprehensive
bill, covering all meritorious claims to
ihe next session of congress.
Gear of lowa offered an amendment
for the payment of a Judgment of the
court of claims for $1,310,427 In. favor of
the Southern Pacific Railroad company.
Allen of Nebraska proposed a modifi
cation of the amendment provding that
the money be retained in the treasury
until the final adjustment of the claims
of the United States against the Union
Pacific and Central Pacific railroads.
White of California took occasion to
say that if this amendment was pressed
in its original form there would be pro
tracted debate and no immediate ad
journment.
Hale appealed to his associates not to
press the amendment, saying he would
move to table it if extended debate re
sulted.
Chandler of New Hampshire also ar
gued that the session might be indefin
itely prolonged If the amendment was
pressed. Thereupon Gear withdrew his
amendment.
Morgan of Alabama offered another
Pacific railroad amendment providing
that no part of the sinking fund of the
Union Pacific Railroad company held in
the treasury of the United States shall
be used in pursuance of any agreement
between the president of the United
States or any officer of the United States
and Louis Fitzgerald, chairman of the
reorganization committee of the Union
Pacific company or any company or cor
poration.
Morgan spoke at length in support of
the amendment, saying the pending
agreement between the executive
branch of the government and the Union
Pacific reorganization committee was In
llagrant violation of law, amounting to
robbery which, when, fully understood,
would cause amazement among the
American people. At one stage of his
remarks Morgan referred to the house
not being in session tomorrow and was
reminded by Gear that the house would
be In session tomorrow.
"I am delighted to hear that congress
will not be running on one wheel," pro
ceeded Morgan, "and I invite the atten
tion of the house to the fact that by
adopting this amendment it can save
$30,000,000 to the government which
otherwise the government would be
robbed of. These are strong words, but
I use them knowing what they mean.
Let congress adjourn without taking
hold of this transaction and the United
States government will lose $30,000,000
and the people will lose God knows how
much in the future."
Morgan severely criticised the agree
ment made with the reorganization
eomm'ittee.
At another point Thurston of Nebras
ka referred to Morgan's reference to him
as counsel for the receivers of the Union
Pacific road, saying he had not acted in
that capacity since December, 1895, and
while political service might not involve
any question of propriety, yet It was de
sirable to have the facts appear cor
rectly. The receivers and their counsel
were officers' of the court which ap
pointed them, Thurston said.
Morgan made an extended legal argu
ment to show that the Union Pacific
railroad property could not be sold with
out the consent of congress. Thurston
took exception to Morgan's claim that
the government's lien was not confined
to aided portions of the road, but em
braced all its property, whether aided or
not
LOS ANGELES, TUESDAY MORNING, JULY 13, J897
Thurston contended that the United
states supreme court had held the lien
of the government to extend'only to the
mileage aided by the issue of subsidy
bonds.
Morgan spoke for over three hours,
appealing to his associates to support
the amendment and prevent the con
summation of what he regarded as a se
rious menace to the government.
Hale, in charge of the bill, made the
point of order that the Morgan amend
ment was not legislation and not ap
propriate in any appropriation bill. He
agreed, however, to withdraw the point
of order if a vote could be taken without
delay.
White demanded an aye and nay vote,
which promised to bring business to a
halt, as Hale declared there was not a
quorum of the senate in the chamber
nor in the city.
Thurston briefly controverted the
points of Morgan's argument, saying the
pending proposition, was designed to pre
vent the taking of the Union Pacific
question out of the politics of the west
and also to endanger a settlement on a
most advantageous basis. He renewed
the point of order withdrawn by Hale.
The presiding officer, Clark of Wyo
ming, temporarily in the chair, an
nounced that he would submit the point
of order to the senate.
The vote was about to be taken when
Hale withdrew that paragraph of the
bill to which Morgan's provision was an
amendment, thus disposing of the entire
subject.
The bill was then laid aside and at 4:45
the senate held an executive session and
then adjourned.
CONFIRMATIONS
Senate today confirmed nomination of
Sterling A. Campbell of California as
collector of customs at Humboldt; Ar
thur A, Hardy of New Hampshire to be
minister and consul general to Persia.
IN CONFERENCE
The Tariff Conferees Find Navigation
Much Impeded
WASHINGTON, July 12.—The tariff
conferees have struck some snags in
their work. Minor matters are easily
adjusted, but on all important features
of agreement the outlook today is that
several reports will' have to be made be
fore an adjustment can be effected. The
House conferees are standing solidly
by their bill and the Senate conferees
are no less tenacious. Lumber, burlaps
and cotton ties are among the causes of
hostility.
The committee is meeting with Its
greatest difficulty in reaching an under
standing on the wool and sugar sched
ules. On sugar Senators Aldrich and
Jones of Nevada are holding out espec
ially for the senate schedule and are
supported by the entire senate repre
sentation. The house is. just as firm in
their demand for the house rates. The
indications, when the conference ad
journed today, were that a compromise
would be necessary which would split
the difference between the two houses on
the differential on refined sugar and it
was rumored that an agreement to this
effect had been reached.
The house conferees are standingstiff
ly for the house rate on wool, contending
that the seh'ate rates would be most op
pressive upon manufacturers. The sen
ate classification of third-class wools is
especially objectionable to the carpet
manufacturers and Senators Penrose and
Quay have been active during the day in
their efforts to secure an advance to
twelve cents in the value of wool that
may be admitted at four cents. The sen
ate schedules make ten cents the figures
of demarkatlon in value, fixing a duty
of seven cents a pound on all wool above
that price. The Pennsylvania senators
says that under this' classification ninety
per cent, of the carpet wools would be
made to pay seven cents duty and that
the result would be to close out many of
the carpet makers.
There Is a proposition to compromise
the difference by retaining the senate
classification, but allowing a drawback
on all wools which it can be proven are
used in carpet making, on which seven
cents may be paid.
The house is also standing for its rate?
on first and second class wools, which
were reduced by the senate, with a good
prospect of success. There was quite a
movement on the Deimocratic side of the
senate to insure a firm stand for free
burlaps, cotton bagging, floor matting,
cotton ties, etc., placed, on the flrce
list in the senate andi to hold white pine
at $1 per thousand feet. This was be
cause of the report, which was authenti
cated, that the committee had tentative
ly agreed to restore thes2 rate on white
pine and to restore the other articles
mentioned to the dutiable list. These
changes were made in the senate by ma
jorities ranting from one to five voted,
and the supilirters of the senate's action
expressed the opinion that they would
be able to hold all the votes for a motion
to reject the conference report that were
originally cast for the amendments. To
do this they would 1 have to make sure
not only of Senator MeEnery'e vote but
of some Republicans, such as Senators
Carter and Hanslirough. The propo
sition bids fair to develop an interesting
situation in the senate if the committee
on finance adheres to its present de
termination with regard to these arti
cles.
The Currency Commision to Receive
WASHINGTON, July 12.—At the cab
inet meeting tomorrow it is likely that
in addition to the consideration to lie
given the currency measure, the presi
dent's order, now only awaiting his
signature, relative to the consolida
tion of pension agencies, will be brought
up in some form. The Cleveland order
reducing the agencies from eighteen to
nine was to take effect on September 1
next; in all probability the cabinet will
be definitely advisedi and consulted as
to the document. The order as now
framed will merely suspend the carry
ing out of the consolidation order of
the last administration until further no
tice. There is a feeling that in time all
pension payments should be made from
the agency at Washington and the ad
ministration's view is that it might be
better to take this radical action when
any change is made in the system. For
the present, however, the operation of
the old order is simply suspended', con
solidation as provided for being regard
ed as impracticable now and involving
too much cost and inconvenieince. Sec
retary Bliss returned here today and
had a talk with, the president and the
action will undoubtedly closely follow
tomorrow's cabinet session.
CABINET MEETING
Early Attention
STRIKERS
GAINING
Suspension Is Now Almost
Complete
SOME THREATS OF VIOLENCE
VIRGINIA'S GOVERNOR READY
FOR TROUBLE
A Strong Effort Will Be Made to Se
cure an Early Settlement
Through Arbitration
Associated Press Special Wire.
PITTSBURG, Pa., July 12.—Beyond
the strengthening of the miners' lines,
along the rivers, there was) little change
in the strike situation today. The iron
clad contracts which were in force at
several mines in the Monongahela val
ley were' swept out of existence today
and the strike was made general In the
fourth pool. The Chamouni, Apollo,
Jack Jones and O'Neil's Fayette City
mines, which had been running with a
light force of mer» and under ironclads
are Idle. The men, at the Chamout'i
mine were the last to lay down their
tools. The miners along the river are
rejoicing over this victory. The only
mine reported in operation in the re
gion Is the Equitable at Webster. It is
a stock company, comprising about sev
enty-five stockholders, and they are
mir.lng their own. coal.
The men in the StTckel Hollow mines
\>f the Washington Coal company also
went out today, making the suspension
complete in this district except at the
mines of the New York and Cleveland
Gas Coal company, where about 1200
men. are working. No effort has yet been
made to get these diggers out, and th?
miners at other pits who have laid down
their tools are grumbling at the slowness
of De Armitt's men in joining the move
ment. The hotheads are advising dras
tic measures. They have been kept in
check so far, but there isno telling when
the fever will break out and a concert
ed move on Sandy and Plum creek be
made.
The greatest Interest is now manifest
ed in the scheme to arbitrate the strike
question. Labor commissioners and of-
ficial arbitrators of the several states
affected are gathering in this city. The
state of Ohio is the only one which has a
regularly appointed board of arbitra
tion. It exists for just such emergen
cies as this and is naturally emlnently
well prepared for the work. Most of the
others interested are labor commission
ers and industrial statisticians who are
also well able to act in the capacity of
arbitrators from the nature of their
work of keeping In touch with the work
ing classes generally.
All the states, with the exception of
Kentucky and Tennessee, where the
strike is on, will be represented In the
conferences which are to be held here
during the next few days. Invitations
have been sent to the coal operators of
the Pittsburg district to meet the arbi
rators informally and talk over the mat
ter of setling the strike. James Young,
representing the M. A. Hanna mining
interests, came on from Cleveland this
morning and was in consultation with
peacemakers at the Seventh avenue ho
tel. One or two of the smaller operators
dropped in to look over the situation,
but no large conference has yet been
held.
It is expected by the operators that
a number of larger operators will be
gotten together within the next twenty
four hours.* Persons who are well ac
quainted with the warring factions that
exist among the coal operators here say
they will be hard to get together In this
move, although the extreme gravity of
the outlook may have the desired effect.
One of the dissenters is W. P. de Ar
mitt, president of the New York and
Cleveland Gas, Coal company. He de
clares he has nothing to arbitrate and
says the strike is the result of the ma
chinations of politicians.
If the operators can be brought into
line on the conference idea there will
be no obstacles interposed by the miners.
President Ratchford notified the opera
tors publicly a few days ago that he was
ready for a conference at any time. This
afternoon he wired the arbitrators that
the miners' officials would meet with
them tomorrow.
There is a strong indication of a coal
famine confronting the country within
the next ten days. It le claimed by con
servative operators that the marketable
supply at present, which is placed at
10.000,000 bushels, will be only able to
meet the demands of the market for
about a month under ordinary condi
tions. With the scarcity of coal already
prevailing at the lake ports, it is claimed
that the supply will not last over two
wekse at the longest.
In anticipation of such a condition the
coal operators' are not very anxious to
fill orders and are- holding out for the
advance in price that is expected, to re
sult. The only source of supply is from
the river mines, as the railroads are
confiscating fur their own use all the
coal ready for shipment along their
lines. This order was issued. last week
and with the exception of permitting
the railroad operators filling orders for
coaling vessels at the lake ports, no
coal is allowed to leave the district.
With the supply limited lo the Monga
hela district the prospect of a famine is
declared to be a certainty.
There has been a marked increase in
the price of coal within the past few
days, and. it is claimed that a ten cent
rate per bushel in boatload lots will be
reached within the present week. The
retail dealers, as well as the operators
in general concede that a famine is im
minent andi look for prices to advance
beyond the limit reached during the
previous general strike of the miners
in 1894.
COLONEL REND S VIEWS
CHICAGO, July 12.—Colonel W. P.
Rend, the Chicago millionaire coal op
INDEX
OF THE TELEGRAPH NEWS
Senator White introduces a bill to
secure the improvement of San Pedro
harbor.
McKinley's bimetallic commission
ers hold a conference said to be im
portant, though nothing is accom
plished.
The Friar beaten in the Brighton
Beach handicap by Ben Brush; the
Kentucky association racecourse sold;
baseball results.
The big fish of the Republican
political puddle can't attend the
league meeting at Detroit as their
presence is needed at Washington.
More coal miners lay down their
tools and a coal famine seems immi
nent; a strong effort will be made to
settle the matters in dispute by arbi
tration.
The greatest Christian Endeavor
convention closes, and the thousands
of delegates start for home or proceed
to the investigation of California's
famous sights.
Hawaii suggests the arbitration of
I claims made by Japan, and the offer is
promptly declined; the United States
will probably be forced to settle the
question at issue.
The senate swamped by an ocean of
oratory over Southern Pacific railroad
claims, and no business is done; the
tariff conferees strike some snags,
and the bill is likely to be hung up
indefinitely.
erator, has returned from Pittsburg,
where during the past week he has been
In conference with other coal-mine op
erators and with the officials of the min
ers' organization relative to a settlement
of the strike.
Mr. Rend says there is no telling right
now when the strike will end.
Mr. Rend discussed the strike situa
tion at length, and, continuing, said:
"The strike has grown In size from day
to day, until now it has assumed great
proportions. I expect that within the
next ten days it will have reached the
full maturity and its greatest strength.
Unless speedily settled, it threatens to
be one of the most formidable conflicts
between capital and labor in the entire
industrial history of the country.
"The success or failure of the strike
depends very largely upon the success
during the coming week of the plans of
the miners' officials. They will strain
every effort to close down the mines' of
the New York and Cleveland Gas Coal
Company in the Pittsburg region, and at
the same time organize and bring out
the coal diggers in West Virginia.
"Besides the coal mines in West Vir
ginia there are also large amounts of
bituminous coal being produced in Penn
sylvania outside of Pittsburg. While
coal will be scarce in many places, there
will be no general famine —at least, not
for a while longer.
"It seems to me that the best way of
all is to have a conference of all the
representatives of both the operators
and miners at Pittsburg, and then by
Just concessions on both sides agree
upon terms of peace."
PREPARING FOR TROUBLE
WHEELING, W. Va., July 12.—A great
change has come over the miners of this
State, and the operators do not disguise
their intention to do their best to keep
the organizers from doing effective
work. Meetings were held at Packer,
Elkhorn and Bluefield last evening, but
no definite action was taken.
The Governor and Adjutant-General
are preparing for trouble. Within the
week 500 stands of arms have been re
ceived from the government for the mil
itia, with half a million rounds of am
munition, including Gatling carriages,
The militia will be used as soon as there
Is any reason for it.
MORE MEN OUT
SPRINGFIELD, July 12.—Pursuant
to a decision at yesterday's mass meet
ing the miners in this district struck,
except at the Clear Lake Co-operative
and Spalding shafts.
DANVILLE, July 12.—At today's
meeting of 1200 miners in this district it
was voted to cease all work in the dis
trict.
MOUNT'S SYMPATHY
INDIANAPOLIS, Ind., July 12.—Gov.
Mount said today that his sympathy is
all with the strikers in the present con
test between the operators and miners.
He is investigating his authority as
chief executive to take a hand in the
si niggle, and if he sees his way clear
will appoint an investigating ceimniis
■,?ion.
ALL QUIET
WHEELING, W. Va., July 12 —Devel-
opments across the river in the eastern
Ohio mining district were meager today.
West Virginia coal is parking over the
three coal carrying roads in this vicinity
in large quantities, but so far there has
been no molestation of trains.
At Dillonvilie all Is quiet.
WAGES RAISED
FAIRMONT, W. Va., July 12.—The op
erators of the seventeen mines in this
county which constitute the Fairmount
coal region, of which the result of tho
great miners' strike rests, have an ad
vance of 5 cents a ton to all men. Not
withstanding this advance, the sympa
thies of many of the miners in this re
gion are with the strikers, and many
wish to join the strike.
NOT QUITE CERTAIN
BELLAIRE, Ohio, July 12.—The min
ers at Schick's mines were called up<m
by a committee of two from each of the
mines along the Baltimore and Ohio this
morning, w ho asked them to quit work.
They gave the committee no satisfaction
beyond an indication that they were re
ceiving better pay than, the others were
striking for. Men are gathering in anu
about town. Some are ready to prevent
the miners from returning to work in the
morning and they will camp in the
neighborhood tonight. Secretaries Lew
is and Glasgow have arranged for an
other conference tomorrow.
A Beast Convicted
JACKSON, July 12—A. Marrino Mar
roni was sentenced today to eight years'
imprisonment in Folsom for an assault
upon a child of 11 years.
Ten Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
THRONGING
THOUSANDS
Attend the Last Endeavor
Meetings
EVERY DELEGATE GRATIFIED
WITH THE GREAT SUCCESS OB!
THE CONVENTION
The Sessions Over the Visitors From
the East Will Proceed to
' Sightseeing
Associated Press Special Wire.
BAN FRANCISCO, July 12.—The last
open sessions of the international Chris
tian Endeavor convention were held'
today. The attendance at the morning:
and afternoon meetings was large, and
at night those who managed to obtain
entrance to either of the pavilions were
fortunate, for only 2">,0OO could be ac
commodated, and 10,000 more sought ad
mission. Estimates made by leading
business men agree that the people
brought here by this great gathering will
leave not less than $1,000,000 in the city.
All the leaders of the movement are
pleased with the success of their efforts
and with the outlook for the future of
the society.
On Tuesday the visiting delegates, or
a great majority of them, will attend a.
public reception to which they have>
been specially invited by a committee
representing the citizens of Oakland. It
is expected at least 10,000 will cross the
bay and enjoy the hospitality of the
Oaklanders. With the end of the con
vention the thousands of visitors, dele
gates and others, will take advantage
of the opportunity and the cheap rates
to visit many placesof interest through
out the State. Arangements have been
made for excursions to Monterey, Mount
Hamilton, Yosemite, Santa Cruz Moun
tains, Stanford University arjd other
interesting places, taking in the
southern country as part of their jour
ney.
The rush for tickets for these side trips
was so great this morning that the clerks
could not keep the crowd moving r\s
rapidly as it gathered. At 7 a.m. the
sale of excursion tickets began and from
that hour until evening there was not a
minute's rest for the ticket sellers. For
the next three days the Yosemite route
will have all the stagf-s can carry, and
during the last few days excursionists
have been going to the valley in parties
of 100, made up by the railway company.
While the number of persons seeking
admission at the big pavilions this
morning was not quite so great as on
previous days, still there were packed
houses and the enthusiasm was as great
as at any time since the beginning of the
convention,. In fact it seemed a? if every
one present wished to express his or her
satisfaction with the way the greatest
convention of Endeavorers ever held
has been conducted. There was praise
for the committee of '97; gratification at
the reception all had received at the
bands of California in general and San
Francisco in particular, and thankful
ness for the perfect weather which has)
blessed the entire meeting.
THE DAY'S PROGRAM
Early morning prayer meetings at the
various churches.
Mechanics' Pavilion —Praise service;
devotional exercises; singing; unrolling
the missionary roll of honor; introduc
tion of visiting missionaries; address;
12:00 adjournment.
Woodward's Pavilion—The same pro-
I gram will be carried out.
Noon-day evangelistic service in Y. M.
C. A. Auditorium. Chamber of Com
merce, Palace Hotel and Emporium.
Mechanics' Pavilion--Annual Junior
rally 2:30, praise service; devotional ex
ercises; singing by Chinese choir; exer
| else by San Francisco Juniors; remarks
1 by President Francis E. Clark; adjourn
j ment at 4:30.
Woodward's Pavilion —Practical school
of Christian Endeavor mothodis and ways
of working; open parliament; singing;
prayer service; closing remarks; ad
journment at 4:30.
Mechanics' Pavilion —Closing exer.
cises, 7:30; praise service; devotional ex
ercises; l anthem by choir; sermon: sing
ing; consecration meeting; adjournment
at 9::i0.
Woodward's Pavilion—7:3o praise ser
vices; devotional exercises; anthem by
choir; sermon; sinking; consecration
meeting; closing; exercises; adjuurnment
9:30.
THE LAST DAY
BAN FRANCISCO. July 12.—Early
this morning the last day's work of the
International Christian Endeavor con
vention began. The topic at the prayer
meetings was "Our Asaaolated Mem
bers," the leaders beir.fr John G. Spang
ier of Phoenix, Ariz., Grant Leet of
Washington. D. C. F. F. Tucker of Lin
coln. Neb.. J. (1. Hallimomd of Near
York, A. T. Ringgold of Gardiner, Me.,
L. Merrill of Los Angeles, Rev. S. H,
Woodrow of Providence, R. 1., Rev. B.
M. Long of York. Neb., and Rev. Edward
David of Oakland.
The daily hour for Bible study was
conducted by P/of. Herbert L. Willettof
Chicago, his subject being 'Jesus' Mes
sage of Light and Love," He said, that
the essence of sin is a denial of the life
and reality of the work of Christ; and
argued that love was the essential char
acteristic of God and His children.
Rev. Robert F. Y. Pierce of Philadel
phia spoke at the United Presbyterian
Church on "Children's l Meetings and How
to Make Them Interesting," illustrating
his remarks on the blackboard.
This morning's session of the conven
tion proper in the Mechanics' Pavilion
was opened by Rev. M. Rhodes of St.
Louis. After the usual praise service
devotional exercises were conducted by
Rev. W. H. Scudder of Tacoma. Then
the topic of the morning, "Christian
Endeavor a Missionary Force," was
taken up. The, first speaker waa Amos

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