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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, July 20, 1897, Image 2

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2
ence six weeks without reaching an
agreement."
"The trouble in 1894," retorted Bailey,
"was that we were trying to run Ihe
Democratic party with a lot of mug
wumps In command." (Laughter and
applause on the Democratic side.)
Dingley continued' his efforts to ftc a
time for a vote, the Republicans, during
the discussion, crying: "Vote, vote,
Vote."
"I suggest we wait until sugar stork
goes up a little higher," saldi Bailey, sar
castically. "It has gone up Sfa share
since the agreement w as reported."
All efforts to reach an agreement hav
ing failed, Dingley opened his speech on
the conference report. He took up each
schedule, explaining In detail the
changes made, and following closely the
formal statement given out by the com
mittee.
Concerning the sugar schedule, Mr.
Dingley read from the official statement,
adding brief comments. By the new ar
rangement about $6,000,000 increase of
revenue would be realized, as the in
crease had been placed on raw sugarsat
the point where revenue would be re
ceived and at the same time the beet
sugar industry would receive substan
tia! benefit.
When Mr. Dingley referred to the elim
ination of the stamp tax. Mr. Todd of
Michigan (Dem.) asked him if he "con
fessed" that they had abandoned the
idea rf taxing the stack gamblers of Wall
Btre"et.
"Not at all." replied Mr. Dingley. "We
discovered that the sales on Wall street
could not be followed. No record Is
vkbpt. The machinery of collection would
be too complex."
I Mr. Cooper of Wisconsin (Rep.) want
ed *n explanation of the net result of
tthe change in the sugar schedule.
Mr. Dingley. after a calculation, af
firmed that the refiner of sugar under
the present Wilson law had a differential
of 22% cents per hundred pounds as
against 12% cents In the pending hill as
agreed to by the conferees. As to the
question of revenue to be raised by the
bill. Mr. Dingley pointed out the dim
cutty resulting from the large anticipat
ory Importations. The bill next year, he
calculated, would raise $225,000,000, $73.
--000,000 more than the present law. Over
$40,000,000 had been lost in this year's
revenues by the importations of wool
and sugar and other things, the duty on
■which was raised in the bill, so that he
calculated that the bill this year would
raise $185,000,000.
. Mr. Dingley de-clared that there was
no doubt that the revenue would not
only be ample* to meet the expenditures
of the government, but allow a Repub
lican administration to begin again to
pay off the principal of the public debt,
which had been increased by the late
administration. In conclusion Dingley
received round after round of applause
from his Republican colleagues Ivy pre
dicting as a of the enactment of
this bill a rise of prices and a return
of prosperity.
Wheeler of Alabama. Democrat, open
ed the debate forthe Democrats, criticis
ing the bill as the most vicious and bur
densome ever imposed on the American
people.
Swanson of Virginia, Democrat, a
member of the ways and means commit
tee, to whom Wheeler yielded a portion
of his time, devoted his attention to as
sailing the sugar schedule agreed upon
by the conferees.
Lacey asked Mr. Swanson whether the
trust had not made great profits in 1894
by anticipatory importations, just as
the trust probably would make great
profits now. Their profits were estimat
ed at $15,000,000. Might not this account
for the increased value of the stock, he
asked.
If the trust was to make $15,000,000 out
of the anticipatory importations, Swan
son replied, it was not entitled to a dif
ferential.
"We cannot prevent anticipatory im
portations." said Laceye
"You could do what Secretary Gage
recommends," replied Mr. Swanson.
"You could place an internal revenue
tax on the sugar which has been import
ed. If you want to strike a blow at the
trust why don't you follow the advice
of your secretary of the treasury?"
One of the greatest demonstrations of
the debate occurred when Mr. Danham
of Texas, Democrat, who followed, paid
a tribute to, William- J. Bryan. The
Democrats cheered for several minutes,
and many of the spectators joined in the
demonstration. '
Mr. Kelly of North Dakota, Populist,
thought that if an anti-trust amendment
had been placed in the bill its most dan
gerous fangs would have been drawn.
Mr. Grosvenor of Ohio, Republican, In
terrupted Mr. Kelly to say that the In
crease of the duty on lead ore was
placed in the-senate bill by Populist sen
ators and held in the bill by the Popu
lists on the conference committee.
Mr. Lewis asked Mr. Grosvenor wheth
!er it was not a fact that the duties on
white lead gave the lead trust $3,500,000
of protection.
"I do not know, and I do not care," re
plied Mr. Grosvenor, smiling.
"I knew the latter was true," respond
ed Mr. Lewis with his most debonnair
air. "The Republican party does not care
what outrage it commits."
The house then, at 6 p. m., took a recess
until S p. ra., under the agreement made
early in the day.
At 8 oclock, when the night session be
gan, the galleries were crowded, many
ladieß being present. Dingley stated at
the ouuset that he hoped to secure a vote
by 10 oclock.
Bailey said 10 oclock: was too early,
but he thought the vote could be taken
by 11 oclock. He would not, however,
make a definite agreement upon the
vote.
Thereupon Dingley gave notice that
he would move the previous question not
later than 11 oclock.
In the galleries were many distin
guished personages of both sexes.
The Republicans still pursued the tac
tic*; they had adopted during the day
session. None of them claimed the floor
and the minority were compelled to put
forward their speakers. Therefore, after
McDowell of Ohio and Berry of Ken
tucky, both Democrats, made brief
speeches, Bailey, the Democratic leader,
who had been reserving his speech for
the close, took the floor. He made a
carefully prepared argument, dealing
more with the general principles in
volved than with details. Time and
again in the progress of his remarks the
Democrats were aroused by his elo
quence to a high pitch of enthusiasm,
Just before the close of Bailey's remaik.-s
the most sensational incident of the do
bate occurred. He had been assailing
the doctrine of free raw materials as
a comparative innovation in the Demo
cratic creed. In order to demonstrate
that it was a product of ClevelandSfim,
he sent to the clerk's desk and had read
an. extract from a newspaper comment
ing on the fact that in the Forty-ninth
congress Senator Mills, then a member
of the house, McMillan of Tennessee and
two other Democratic members of the
ways and means committee had voted
against free wool. McMillin jumped to
his feet and demanded to know whether
it was charged that he had'voted against
free wool.
"William E. Morrison told me so with
his own lipi." replied Mr. Bailey, fac
ing Mr. McMillin, whose face was
Hushed. "Not only that, but he said and
Senator Mills voted against some reduc
tions in the metal schedules."
"Since the gentleman has s.?en fit to
attack uny record and to. misrepresent
me—" began Mr. McMillin. but Mr.
Balky quickly disclaimed any purpose
of attacking him. "I desire to commend
your action then." said he.
The disclaimer being accepted, Mr.
McMiliin hotly asked in turn why Mr.
Bailey had voted In the ways and means
committee against the woolen schedule
of the present law when It w as offered as
a substitute for the high rates in the
pending measure. "
A wave of applause ran over the Dem
ocratic side at this question, but it was
di owntd in a perfect storm of applause
of approval that greeted Mr. Bailey's
reply that never as long as he was In
congress would he vote for BO per cent,
on woolen goods and no duties on raw
wools. The Republicans and the gal
leries joined in this demonstration.
"How could the gentleman from Ten
nessee," he continued, when the ap
plause had subsided, "vote for free wool
in the face of the Chicago platform
which he helped to defend?"
"The Chicago platform did not take the
back track on the principle of tariff for
revenue." replied Mr. McMillin.
"I'll prove that it did," answered Mr.
Bailey. "Is Mr. Robertson of Louisiana
in the house?" he asked. looking about
him. Rut Mr. Robertson was not pres
ent and Mr. Bailey proceeded to argue
that the Chicago platform did return to
the "old Democratic theory."
He said the present Democratic organ
ization sought to rescue the party from
those who were wrecking it. When the
party was making new recruits the
wreckers had deserted it.
When he repudiated the "Cleveland
heresy," and announced the doctrine
that "all taxes should be laid for reve
nue," the Democrats in sympathy with
him cheered lustily.
McMillin, who had twenty minutes,
consumed this time In denouncing the
sugar schedule, which, he said, had add
ed $12,000,000 to the price of sugar cer
tificates today, and in replying to Bai
ley's remarks about his record. Any
statement from any quarter that he
ever advocated a duty on woo], McMlllir,
declared, was unjust to him and Incor
rect. He had been consistent.
Payne and Dingley successively took
the floor for some closing remarks. Th-:
former devoted his time to a defense of
the sugar schedule. He figured out a
differential in favor of the refiner In the
present law at the prices prevailing In
1894 of 52% cents per 100 pounds. Tak
ing Swansea's illustration of the 92 de
gree sugars, Payne figured on the basis
of the amount of raw sugar refined
(HHi pounds) that the refiner under the
present law had a differential of .314 per
100 pounds againsit .173 of differential in
the proposed schedule.
Dingley openly avowed that the sched
ule gave a slight additional protection
to refined sugar about tne same time it
pas>sed raw sugar along the line. Trust?,
he said, could not be eradicated by epi
thets.
"The way to break down the trustp."
he cried, "is to establish a beet sugar
factory in every congressional district
in the country and make competition.
That is the way to clip the wings of ttr
trusts "
Amid a storm of cheers Dingley then
demanded the previous question on the
adoption of the conference report. The
demand Was sustained by a viva voce
vote, and the vote on the adoption of the
report followed by yeas and nays.
Considerable excitement occurred
while the vote was being taken. When
the speaker announced fhe vote, ISS
ayes, 118 nays, the Republicans broke
Into loud cheers. The house then, at
12:17 a. m., took a recess until Wednes
day.
ZN CONFERENCE
Four Hours' Discussion Resulted in
an Agreement
WASHINGTON, July 19.—The tariff
bill was pushed through the conference
ence stage today after two hours discus
sion before the committee—Republicans
and Democrats—held In the senate
finance committee room this morning.
At the outset the Democratic conferees
asked until Tuesday morning to go over
the report, saying this course was pre
ferable to going over it with the Repub
licans. To test this question Vest of
Missouri moved an adjournment until
tomorrow, which was defeated by a
strict party vote. The Democratic con
ferees then offered amendments to the
report, but were met by the statement
that it would merely consume time to
urge amendments as they would be re
jected.
Representative Wheeler of Alabama.
Democrat, offered amendments placing
cotton bagging and cotton ties on the
free list; also, a substitute proposition
for rebates on these articles. These and
other amendments were withdrawn,
however, as there was no prospect of
favorable action on them. Shortly be
fore noon Dingley moved that the report
be submitted to the two houses.
This prevailed by a party vote, and
the meeting adjourned. There was little
flash during the discussion, and the
Democratic, members of the conference
contented themselves with a protest
against the report and the manner of
agreeing to it.
A PUBLIC STATEMENT
WASHINKJTON, July 19 -The Repub
lican conferees made a public statement
concerning the conference report, Ir.
which were reviewed the changes made.
Of fugar the statement says:
"The House differential between raw
arid refined sugars and the general feat
ures of the House schedule were pre
served, and the Senate amendments in
creasing the differential to one-fifth ar.d
providing for a reduction of. one-tenth
of the duty on raw sugar not above 87
rlegrees, which would have given a duty
of 1.39 on 88 degrees of sugar and only 1.2 C
on 87 degrees of sugar, were not adopted.
"Iv deference to the wishes of those
interested in the beet sugar production
that the Senate rate of 1.95 on refined
sugar might be retained as an increased
encouragement to this industry, the duty
en raw sugars is Increased seven and
one-half hundredths, so as to make the
increase ore them the same as the in
crease on refined jpugar, and thus leave
'he differential between raw sugar and
refined the same as in the House bill.
"And to meet the objection which had
been urged that the House rates on low
grade sugar show higher ad valorem
than those on higher grades, the duty or.
75 dtgrees of sugar Is reduced .05 of a cen;
and the duty per degree Increased regu
larly from ,03 (as proposed In the jiause
LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING. JULY 20, 1897
bill) to .035, In-order to raise the duty on
raw sugar the same as on refined.
"By this arrangement the duty on raw
sugar of 100 degrees purits r Is raised from
1.75 (as proposed originally by the House)
to 1.825. and the duty on refined sugar
raised from 1.575 (as proposed originally
by the House) to 1.95, thus giving the
same differential of .125 between raw
and refined sugars at this point, orig
inally given by the House.
"As this arrangement will Increase the
revenue over $2,000,000 and at the same
time give additional encouragement to
the production of sugar In thi* coun try.
it is thought to be a desirable consum
mation."
The statement of the Republican con
ferees made the following explanation
of the changes agreed upon by the con
ferees in the schedules other than the
sugar schedule: •
Metals and manufactures of—The re
ductions of duties on some forms of iron
and steel proposed by the senate are ac
cepted in part as proposed and several
new paragraphs arc Introduced not here
tofore spcciflically provided for.
Tin plates are placed at the rnte of
duty provided in the bill as it passed the
house.
The house agrees to the senate amend
ment Increasing the duty on lead ore to
IVi. and on pig lead it is placed at 2%
cents. Nickel ore and nickel matte- are
left on the free list as provided by the
house.
Wood and manufactures of wood—All
sawed lumber except sawed timber ex
ceeding eight Inches square- is left at the
rate of S2 per 1000 feet, as provided by
the house. Planed lumber is also left
at the house rates.
Tobacco and manufactures of—The
duty on wrapper tobacco la 'placed at
$1 S3 per-pound, a compromise between
the house rate of $2 and the senate rat"
of $1.75. and the senate reduction on
filler tobacco is accepted.
The several amendments on lead paint
adjust the rates to the increased duty
on lead. The other amendments In the
chemical schedule concur with the sen
ate in slight reductions of rates on many
chemicals and other articles, including
linseed' oil, olive oils and coal tar dyes,
and an increase on the rateson camphor
and ground drugs. .
Glassware is left in the main at the
rates provided by the house bill.
Cement Is left at the duty provided by
the house bill.
Agricultural products—A compromise
between the house and senate rates on
cattle Is agreed to.
In general the duties proposed on ag
i icultural products are the same a? those
In the act of IS9O.
Oranges and lemons are raised from
the house rate of three-fourths of a cent
per pound to one cent.
Fish are placed at rates a little higher
than thope which were provided by the
act of IS9O. and a little lower than the
house rates.
Spirits, wine, etc.—The senate rates
on spirits, wines, etc., are adopted in
the main.
Cotton and cotton goods—The cotton
schedule as a whole remains the same
substantial! as in the bill passed by the
house.
Flax, hemp and jute and maufacturers
of—The senate changes in flax and hemp
are adopted,.
The senate amendments to place bur
laps, bagging, cotton bagging and straw
matting on the freell*»t are disagreed to
and these manufactures are placed on
the dutiable list at rt diuoed rates.
Wools and woolens—The house rates
on wool of 11 cents on class 1 andtl2 cents
on- eluss 2 are adopted and senate spe
cific rates on carpet wools agreed to,
with a modification raising the- dividing
line so as to place a duty of 4 cents: per
pound on such wools valued at 12 cents
and 7 cents on such wools valued at more
than 12 cents.
The duties on manufactures of wool
are placed at substantially the same
rates as in the act of 1890.
The following is a summary of the
changes made by the conferees in other
schedules:
The conference reduced the senate ad
valorem of 20 per cent on hides to 15 per
cent and added' a proviso as follows:
"That upon all leather exported made
from imported hides there shall be al
lowed' a drawback equal to the amount
of duty paid on such hides, to be paid
under such regulations as the secretary
of the treasury may prescribe."
The act is made operative immediately
upon its passage.
The changes In the wool schedule
made in conference leave the duties on
disputed items' as follows:
Paragraph 354 —The duty on wools of
the first class Imported washed shall be
twice the amount r.f the duty to which
they would be subjected imported un
washed, and the duty on wools of the
first and second classes which shall be
imported scoured' shall be three times
the duty to which they wouldi be sub
jected if imported unwashed. The duty
on wools of the third class. If imported
In condition for use in carding or spin
ning Into yarns, or which shall not con
tain more than S per cent of dirt or other
foreign substance, shall be three times
the duty to which they would be other
wise subjected.
The conference restored' the house
rates on first and. second'class wools.
Paragraph 358—0n wools of the third
class and on camel's hair of the third
"lass, the values whereof Fhall he 12
cents or less per pound, the duty shall be
4 cents per pound.
Paragraph 359—0n wools of the third
class and on camel's hair of the
third class, the value whereof shall ex
ceed 12 cents per pound, the duty shall
be 7 cents per pound.
Paiagraph 362—Shoddy 25 cents per
pound; or. oils, wool extract, yarn.waste,
thread waste and all other wastes com
posed wholly or in part ot wool and not
specially provided for in this act, 20
cents per pound.
Paragraph 365--On yarns made wholly
or in part of wool, valued at not more
than 30 cents per pound, the duty per
pound shall be two and one-half times
the duty imposed by this act on one
pound of unwashed wool of the first
class; valued at more than 30 cents per
pound, the duty shall be three and one
half the duty imposed by this act
on one pound of unwashed wool of the
first class, and In addition thereto, upon
all the foregoing, forty per cent, ad
valorem.
Paragraph 367—0n blankets and flan
nels for underwear, composed wholly or
in part of wool, valued at not more than
40 cents per pound, the duty per pound
shall be- the same as the duty imposed by
this action upon two pounds of un
washed wool of the first class, and In ad
dition thereto 30 per cent, ad valorem;
valued at more than 40 cents and not
more than 50 cents per pound, the duty
per pound shall be three times the duty
imposed by this act on one pound of un
washed wool of the first class and in ad
dition thereto thirty-five per cent, au
valorem.
Paragraph 370 on ready-made and ar
ticles ot wearing apparel of every de.
scription, including shawls, whether
knitted.or woven, and knitted
every description made up or manufac
tured wholly or in part, felts not woven
and not especially provided for In this
act, composed wholly or in part_of wool,
the duty per pound shall be four times
the duty Imposed by this act on one
pound of unwashed wool of the first
class and In addition thereto sixty per
cent, ad valorem.
Wood schedule—The following was
substituted for the paragraph on hewr.
timber: "Timber, hew-n, eldtd or
squared (not less than eight inches
s-quare) and round timber used for spars
or In building wharves, one cent per
cubic foot."
The paragraph relating to tawed
boards and planka was amended by
striking out the words "white pine" at
SI per 1000 feet, and by restoring the
house rates on all the other Items of the
schedule, making the rate 50 cents per
1000 feet for each side planed or finished;
$1 for tor.gued and grooved, and $1.50 if
planed on two sides and tongued and
grooved. The legislative proviso to this
paragraph Inserted by the senate woe
changed so as to read as follows: "That
if any country or any independency shall
impos? an export duty upon saw log?,
round, unmanufactured timber, stave
bolts or heading bolts, exported in the
United States, or a discriminating
charge on booms-ticks or chains used by
American citizens in tying logs, the
amount of such export duty, tax or
other charge as the case may be, shall
be added as an additional duty to the
duties imposed upon the articles men
tioned in this paragraph when imported
from such country or independency."
Fence posts are reduced from 20 to 10
per cent ad valorem.
The house rate of 3 per cent ad valor
em is restored on casks and barrels, su
gar box shooks, etc.
The houpe rate of 2 cents per 1000 anel
25 per cent ad valorem is restored on
toothpicks, as is the house rate of 10
cents per 1000 on butchers' skewers.
The conference accepted the senate
rate and language on wrapper and filler
tubace-o, except that the rate on wrap
per tobacco was made $1.55 per pound
instead of $1.75. The house rate on im
ported cigars, cigarettes, etc., of $4.f,0
per pound and 25 per cent ad valorem
was restored. The senate made the rate
$-1 per pound and 25 per cent ad valorem
There were no other changes -in the
schedule on imported tobacco.
The conference accepted paragraph
356 as amended by the senate, with the
addition) o£ the words "or plush" before
ribbons In the first line, making plush
ribbons dutiable at $1.50 per pound and
15 per cent ad valorem.
Paragraph 302, in relation to cotton
thread and carded yarn, was amended
by the conference so as to provide that
thread, colored, bleached, combed, etc.,
so as to be advanced beyond the condi
tion of singles by grouping or twisting
nf two or more single yards on all num
bers exceeding 20 and up to 80, are made
dutiable at Vt of a cent per number per
pound, and on thread of the same class
numbered SO and above, 3-10 of a cent
per pound per number. In the original
house bill there was no division, as to
numbers, all being made dutiable at th,
rate of 3-10 of a cent per number per
pound. The senate left the house rate of
3-10 of a cent on the first division ami
provided an ad valorem of 50 per cent on
the second.
The following changes were made in
the free list: The provision allowing cat
tle, horses, sheep or other domestic ani
mals-, straying or driven across the
boundary line of another country for
pasturage purposes, to be brought back
free of duty, is modified so as to con
tinue this privilege for the specified time
ot six months.
The conference restored to the free list
the house paragraph on books and en
gravings imported by authority of the
United' Statesforthe library of congress.
The paragraph relating to the free in
troduction of books, libraries and rea
sonable furniture of persons from for
eign countries was altered so as to pro
vide that where they were not intro
duced for sale they were to be allowed
free entrance where they had not been
so used for less than one year.
The paragraph in regard to the free
admission of fish caught by American
fishermen was amended so as to include
salmon on the free list, which were
specially excepted by the senate bill as
agreed upon, reads as follows:
"Fresh fish, frozen or packed ice,
caught in the great lakes or other fresh
waters by citizens of the United States."
On hide cuttings the house paragraph
was restored.
Manganese ore was restored to the free
list, as was cocoanut oil.
The house phraseology of the para
graph in regard to ores of gold, silver,
etc., was restored, which has the effect
of making free nickel and nickel matter.
Agricultural schedule: Paragraph 218
relating to cattle, as it passed the senate
was changed somewhat as to rates, $3.75
being fixed as the rate on cattle value d
at not more than $14 per head, instaed of
$3.50, while an advalorem rate of 27%
per cent, was fixed on cattle of a greater
value, instead of 25 per cent, in the sen
ate amendment. The duly on seeds not
specially provided for was made 30 per
cent., the senate rate being 25 and the
house rate 40 per cent.
The paragraph in regard to packed
Ash was l amended as fixed by the senate
so as to be made to apply specifically to
fish In packages.
Paragraph 261 was amended so as to
specifically provide that fresh mackered,
halibut or talmon should be dutiable at
the rate of one cent, per pound as well as
the pickled, or salted article.
Paragraph 262, in regard to apples, etc.,
was amended so as to omit currantsanel
the house rate of two cents per pound
on such dried fruits as apples, peaches,
pears and berries prepared In any man
ner was restored.
The grape paragraph was altered so
as to require the payment of twenty'
ctcte per cubic foot "of the capacity of
the barrels or packages."
Orange and lemon peels preserved, and
cocoanut meat, etc., were restored to the
house rate of two cents per pound.
On ur.shelled Alberts and walnuts the
houre rate of three cents per pound pre
vailed, while on shelled Alberts and wal
nuts the senate rate of five cents per
pound was sustained.
The conference struck out the senate
amendment providing for a duty of two
cents per pound on dead 'game.
Paragraph 282 relating to cocoa was
amended by leaving out cocoanut oil.
The conference made but one change
In the schedule relating to spirits, wines,
et»„ proper. The senate rate of SO cents
per gallon on stiil wines containing less
than 14 per cent of absolute, alcohol in
packages, was changed to 40 cents per
rallon. The house rate was 50 centse
The rate on mineral waters was com
□romf*i>d, being made 20 cents per dozen
on pint bottles, 30 cents per dozen on
mart bottles.
House rate of 40 cents and the senate
rate of 24 cent*
1 - ~~p
There were comparatively few changes
in the sundries schedule. The senate
amendment on bituminous coals, fixing
the rate of 67 cents per ton was accepted
without change.
Paintings, drawings and statuary
were again made dutiable at 20 per cent
ad valorem.
The reciprocity provision as agreed to
by the conference contain® some of the
features of both the senate and the house
bills on this schedule. It also contains
Some retaliatory measures. It sets forth
Its purpose to be that of "equaling the
trade of the United States with foreign
countries exporting to this country the
following article*: Argols, or crude tar
tars, or wine lees crude; brandies or
other spirits manufactuied or distilled
from grain or other material?; cham
pagne or all other sparkling wines; still
wines and vermouth; painting-sand stat
uary.
Tin president is authorized to enter
Into negotiation*! or commercial agree
ments in which the reciprocal conces
sions may be secured in favor of the
United States. He is empowered to sus
pend by proclamation thedutleson these
articles Whenever equivalent conces
sions may be obtained, as follows:
Argols, 5 per cent ad valorem; brand
ies or grain spirits, $1.75 per gallon;
champagne in bottles, containing one
quart, $6 per dozen; containing one pint,
$3 per dozen; containing one-half pint,
$1.50 per dozen; containing more than
one quart, in addition to the $6 rate,
$1.90 per galon.
Still wines ar.d vermouth, 35 cents per
gallon, and other rates In proportion
whete the goods are bottled.
Paintings, etc., 15 per cent ad valorem
The president is empowered to revoke
the concession when satisfied that thf
agreement is not adhered to in good
faith by any other country with which
an agreement shall have been made.
What may be termed the retaliatory
claute of the provision is that which cm-
powers the president to suspend by proc
lamation the provisions of this act pro
viding for the free introduction, of cof
fee, tea, tunquin or tonka beans and
vanilla beans coming from any country
which imposes duties upon productions
of the United States which he may deem
to be reciprocally unequal and unrea
sonable. The rates which he is thus
empowered are: On coffee, 3 cents per
pound; on tea, 10 cents per pound; or.
tonka beans, 50 cents per pound; on va
nilla bean.-. $2 per pound.
The president is required to act with
in two years in securing these reciprocal
trade treaties and they are to be sub
mitted to the senate for its ratification.
Article." are to be reduced to the ex
tent of 20 per cent in these treaties, and
the president isi specifically authorized
to enter into negotiations which will
place certain articles on the free list
for a specified period of five years.
The internal revenue amendment re
lating to cigars and cigarettes, made by
the senate, was changed to read as fol -
lows: "On cigars of all descriptions,
weighing more than three pounds per
1000, $3 per 1000; cigars made of tobacco
or any substitute, weighing not more
than three pounds per 1000, $1 per 1000;
on cigarettes made of tobacco or anj
substitute weighing more than three
pounds per 1000, $3 per 1000; on cigarettes
weighing not more than three pounds
per 1000, $1 per 1000."
The senate amendment providing for
a tax on stocks and bonds was stricken
out.
The house rate of 8-10 of a cent per
pound on round iron less than seven
s-ixteenths of an inch in diameter and
bars or shapes of rolled or hammered
iron not specially provided for.
The house rate on iron in slab:?.
FOR RENT—HOUSES
FOR RENT—WIESENDANGER, 431 S.
Broadway:
$10. Cottage 5 rooms, bath, 649 Gladys
aye.; water free.
$15. 6 rooms, bath, barn, 926 Towne
aye.; also same 932 Towne aye. 26
FOR RENT-1019 S. OLIVE ST., 2-STORY
house; 9 rooms, bath. Apply room 334
Wilcox building, corner Second and
Spring sts. tf
FOR RENT—TWO UNFURNISHED
rooms; references. Apply 837 W. Ninth
St. - 20
FOR RENT—ROOMS
FOR RENT—"HOTEL LOUISE," NEW-
Iy furnished rooms; prices to suit, by
day, week or month. 520 S. Broadway. 7-23
FOR RENT—FURNISH!BD~SoX»M¥FOB
housekeeping. 321% W. Seventh st. tf
FOR SALE—LODGING HOUSES
FOR SALE-A FIRST-CLASS ROOMING
house; the best corner in Los Angeles; 55
rooms; house always full; party is going
to England; anyone who wants a good,
paying house come and Investigate. 104
X. Los Angeles st. 22
EDUCATIONAL
WOODBURY BUSINESS COLLEGE, 226
S. Spring st., will conduct special classes
for public and high school students un
der the Instruction of Prof. C. S. Thomp
son of the Seventeenth-street school,
from July 6th to September Ist; tuition
$4 per month; half day sessions; our
regular commercial and shorthand work
continued throughout the summer at
usual rates. Pupils enter any day and
receive Individual Instruction. Rooms
are large, cool and pleasant. Electric
elevator. Write or cull for Illustrated
catalogue. G. A. HOUGH, president; N.
G. FELKER, vice-president.
BOYS' BOARDING SCHOOL (MILL
tary); ideal location in country, mile
west of Westlake park; send for cata
logue or call. LOS ANGELES MILI
TARY ACADEMY, P. O. box 193, city. S-6
FRENCH LANGUAGE; PRIVATE LES
sons. Address PROF. L. GAILLIARD.
£47 E. Fifth St. 7-25
DENTISTS
ADAMS BROS., DENTAL PARLORS.
239% S.Springst.; painless extracting. 50c;
(illitigs; plates, from $1; all work guar
anteed; established 32 years. Hours, S-5;
Sundays, 10-12. Telephone, black 1273. ti
FRANK STEVENS, 324% sTIpR(NO ST.,"
open days and evenings; also Sundays'
electric light. Tel. Black 821.
WATCHMAKING
REMEMBER, YOU GET A GUARANTEE
worth something when you have your
watch repaired by W. J. GETZ, 336 South
Broadway. tf
HYPNOTISM
HYPNOTISM AND PERSONAL MAG
netlsm taught; diseases cured. HYP
NOTIC INSTITUTE. 423% S. Spring. 21
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
HOUSES AND LOTS
FOR BALK-MODERN 6-ROOM COT
tage on East Adams si., near Central
aye.: lias bath, pantry, closets, hot and
cold water; decorated; beautiful lawn
and flowers; street graded and graveled;
cement curb and walks; price only $1500;
one-third cash balance to suit.
LEON ADM ERRILL,
21 240 Brad bury Block.
FOR SALE—S2OOO; EASY TERMS: BBAU
tiful cottage home, No. 223 E. Twenty
fourth st., near Main St.: well built, taste
fully decorated, large windows, two man
tels, bath, beautiful grounds, 50-foot lot.
flowers, fruit and berries; n lovely home
for a small famllv. WEISENDANGER
CO.. 431 S. Broadway. 30
FOR SALE OR RENT—LOVELY HOUSE
SS—IN BEAUTIFUL ST. JAMES PARK,
inquire on premises or at 421 W. Adams.
8-17
CITY LOTS
FOR SALE-C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots In his Third addition on easy install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Olllce, 213 W. First st. tf
BUSINESS PROPERTY
FOR SALE — WIESENDANGER, 431
S. Broadway:
$115,000. Business propertj-, Income,
$$500.
SII.OOO. Business lot. Income $950.
$17,000. Business property, Income
$1400.
$21,000. 300 lots on electric cars, s. w.
|KM, 10 acres, trees, alfalfa, good
house.
$5001). )2-room residence. Santa Monica.
$30,000. Stock ranch. 7000 acres.
$161)0. New house, 0 rooms, bath, barn.
$150. Lot near Central nvc. cars. 25
COUNTRY PROPERTY
FOR SALE—OWING TO DEATH OF
late owner, an elegant ranch, together
with growing orchards and sundry
tracts of valuable land, are offered at
very low prices in order to effect a quick
sale and wind up estate. Write for par
ticulars to C. ISEARD, San Luis Rey,
Cal. 8-6
FbR SALE—BARcXIN ; THE FAMOUS
Lewis tract, near Gurvanza, consisting
of 103 large lots, now ottered for sale as a
whole or in lots; will also trade for Oak
land, San Francisco or Los Angeles prop
' erty. For full particulars inquire of L.
M. CORWIN, Highland Park, Cal. 7-S6
FOR SALE—S ACRES OF CHOICE LAND
near South Santa Monica. See E. I.
BRYANT, 204% S. Broadway, rooms 213
and 211. 20
FOR EXCHANGE—REAL ESTATE
FOR EXCHANGE—3 LOTS FOR 6OR 7
room house and lot.
Alfalfa ranch, % mile center Compton,
to exchange for city.
Business property In good Nebraska
town; also house and lot in same place:
want something here. F. A. HOLLEN
BECK, 125 S. Broadway. 20
FOR EXCHANGE—A NEW 10-ROOM
house, a line home, commanding beauti
ful view; will accept eastern city prop
erty, Pasadena land or lots or clear land.
AMERICAN BUILDING CO., 122 Wesit
Third St., Henne building. 25
EXCHANGE— MISCELLANEOUS
FOR EXCHANGE—CIGARS, GOOD
standard brands, for city property. See
E. I. BRYANT, 201 V!. S. Broadway, room
213. 20
FOR SALE—LIVE STOCK
FOR SALE-3 PROOF JACKS, LARGE
size, brown and mouse color. Address San
Gabriel postofflce, or W. W. GARNER,
Garvey ranch. San Gabriel. 8-7
FOR SALE—CHEAP, TWO FINE STAN
dard bred horses; would make an excel
lent team. Address University P. 0., 96,
or call sec. 8., race track. 25
FOR SALE—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE—A GOOD FULL-TONE Up
right piano, Hemme & Long, $110 cash.
139 W. Fifth st. 20
___BAJHS
THE LOS ANGELES VITAPATHIC IN
stitute gives faradlc, static and galvanic
electricity, vapor, sun and electrical
baths, sheet packs, fomentations, salt
glows, sprays, showers and shampoos;
Swedish and German massage chromo
pathy vacuum treatment. Look for our
Sunday advertisement on page 11. Fif
teen treating rooms. 35 rooms for patients
and guests. Largest vitapathlc Institute
in California. DR. HARRIMAN, physi
cian In charge. Consultation free. Thurs
day evening meetings free to all investi
gators at 534'/- 3. Broadway, Hotel Del
aware.
HYGIENIC BATH PARLORS—ELEC
tric and steam baths: massage, salt
glows and con'stitutlonal treatment; for
ladies and gentlemen. 125 W. Fourth st.;
Tel. Brown 112. 8-10
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND—A WATCH ON VERMONT
aye.; owner can have same by proving
property and paying for this ad. MRS.
FURMAN, Vermont aye., below Blew
ett's blacksmith shop. 21
LOST, STRAYED OR STOLEN—ROAN
mare, weight 950 pounds; shod only in
front, and top buggy. Address J. A.
BWALL SHERMAN and get reward. 21
MINING AND ASSAYING
MORGAN & CO., ASSAYERS AND RE
finers and ore testers; bullion purchased;
consulting metallurgists; mines examined
and dealt in. Oiltce, 261 Wilson blk., Los
Angeles Cal. 25-tf
TH X BI M lOTA I, I, IC~ ASSAY OFFICE
and Chemical Laboratory, 124 S. Main st.
R. A. PEREZ, E. M., manager. 12-4tf
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
LUCIEN EARLE. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
office, Bullard building; entrance, room
420; telephone black 1445. 7-24-97
HROUSSEAU
Attorneys-at-Law,
403 Bradbury block, Los Angeles, tf
NimjCAL
A. G. GARDNER. PIANO HOUSE.
Pianos sold, rented and exchanged; rear
of main postofflce. 118 Winston st.
'Phone Brown 295. tf
FRUITS ANDj^EJAjLJS_
LUDWIG & MATTHEWS, WHOLESALE
and retail fruits and vegetables. MOTT
MARKET, 135 S. Main St. Tel. 550. tf
FINANCIAL
MONEY TO LOAN IN ANY AMOUNTS
on diamonds, watches, Jewelry, pianos,
sofas, lodging houses, hotels and private
household furniture; Interest reasonable;
partial payments received; money quick;
private office for ladles. G. M. JONES,
rooms 12-14, 254 S. Broadway. 28-tf
THE SYNDICATE LOAN COMPANY.
138% S. Spring st., rooms 6, 7, and 8. loans
money on all kinds of good collateral se
curity; money on hand; private waiting
rooms. Telephone Main 583. GEORGE
L. MILLS, Manager. tf
MONEY LOANED ON DIAMONDS,
watches, Jewelry, pianos, sealskins, car
riages, bicycles, warehouse receipts and
all kinds of collateral security; storage
free in our warehouse. LEE BROS., 402
S. Spring st. tf
MONEY TO LOAN ON FURNITURE,
watches, diamonds, pianos, sealskins and
real estate; Interest reasonable: private
office for ladies; business confidential.
C. C. LAMB, 226 S. Spring St.; entrance,
room 46". 8-21 tf
AMERICAN LOAN COMPANY, 118% S.
Spring, over Royal bakery; loans on
real estate and collateral of all kinds,
warehouse receipts, insurance policies,
etc.:' best of rates; private office for
ladies. 7-24
MONEY TO LOAN—
$100 to $75,000 on city or country real
es t & t g
LEE A. M'CONNELL.
7-24 113 S. Broadway.
TO LOAN—MONEY AT 6 PER CENT IN
terest 'per annum; monthly payments.
MECHANICS' SAVINGS MUTUAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
107 S. Broadway. 25
WANTED — MONEY — I HAVE $5000
worth of Security Loan & Trust com
pany stock: J.mDO worth Ist mort. paper
for sale at a bargain. J. G. KING, 244 S.
Broadway. 25
TO LOAN—A BARREL OF MONEY ON
diamonds, pianos, furniture and all first
class securities; business confidential. -
CREASINGER, 217 S. Broadway, rooms
1 and 2. . 5-29 tf
POINDEXTER & WADSWORTH, ROOM'
308 Wilcox building, lpnd money on any
good real estate: building loans made; If
you wish to lend or borrow call on us. tf
MONEY TO LOAN, $500 TO $5000, IN SUMS
to suit: no delays. CONTINENTAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
126 W. Second St., Wilcox building. tf
TO IiOAN—UNLIMITED AMOUNT FOR
small loans; no commission; light ex
pense. SECURITY LOAN AND TRUST
CO., 223 S. Spring st.
TO LOAN—IF YOU WANT MONEY ON
real estate security I have it in any
amount. WM. F. BOSBYSHELL. 107 S.
Broadway. 5-20 tf
MONEY TO LOAN UPON EASY TERMS
of repayment. STATE MUTUAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASS'N., 151 S.
Broadway. 5-20 tf
MONEY TO LOAN—LOWEST RATES ON
real estate, personal notes or security.
JOHN L. PAVKOVICH, 220 W. First, tf
LIFE INSURANCE POLICIES BOUGHT
for cash. T. J. WILLISON & CO.,
241 S. Broadway, Los Angeles. 7-30
JWEDIUMS_____
MME. LEO, THE RENOWNED FORE
caster and card reader; she tells the past,
present and future; she advlaes you with
a certainty as to the proper course to
pursue in life; she gives lucky charms,
brings the separated together, causes
speedy marriage with the one you love;
tells If the one you love is false or true;
also very successful In locating mines
and minerals; all those In trouble in busi
ness matters, love and family affairs
should by all means consult her; letters
.containing $1 giving age, color of hair
and eyes, married or single, will receive
prompt attention; don't fail to see her;
hours 9 a. m. to 7:30 p. m.; Sunday, 10
a. m. to 4p. m., at 125 W. Fourth. 8-13
MRS. PARKER, PALMIST, CLAIRVOY
ant and medium; life reading, business
removals, law suits, mineral locations,
love affairs, etc. Take Third-st. electrio
car to Vermont aye. and Vine St. Sec
ond house on Vine St., west of Vermont
aye. 50c and $1.00. tf
MRS. WALKER, CLAIRVOYANT AND
life business reading medium; all busi
ness affairs of life looked Into for the ad
vancement of your future. 316% S. Spring
street. 8-9
GRACE GILMORE, CLAIRVOYANT
and card reader, has returned to Los
Angeles; ladies, 25 cents; gents, 50 cents.
328% S. Spring st., rooms 9 and 11. 7-23
MME. GRACE, CARD MEDIUM; THE
wonder of the 19th century; reveals the
past, present and future. 544 S. Los An
geles St., bet. Fifth and Sixth sts. 8-1
MRS. SANFORD JOHNSON, THE
well known independent slate writer and
clairvoyant, gives sittings daily at 833 S.
Broadway. 8-7
MME. RACHEL CARD READER]
tells past, present and future; sittings
daily, 321% S. Spring St., room 11. 9-14
ELLA M. WHITE, TRANCE CLAlR
voyant medium; readings daily except
Sunday, 215 S. Hill st. 6mo
FRANK A. WEINSHANK, PLUMBER
and gasfltter, 240 E. Second St. Tel 136.
IKECTORY OF CALIFORNIA HO
TELS.
GRAND HOTEL—S. F. THORN. Manager.
Cor. Market and Montgomery sts., _
San Francisco.
European Plan.
HOTEL GREEN—J. H. Holmes, manager,
Pasadena.
HOTEL METROPOLE—On Catallna Isl
and.
HOTEL ARCADIA—Santa Monica, a.
Rheinhart proprietor.
HOTEL HOLLENBECK—Spring and Sec
ond streets, Los Angeles.
HOTEL RAMON A—Spring and Third
streets, Los Angeles.
ABBOTSFORD INN—Corner Eighth and
Hope streets, Los Angeles.
HOTEL PORTLAND—I 44 South Spring
street, Los Angeles.
HOTEL BRUNSWICK—Santa Ana; Amer
ican and European plan.
HOTEL HOLYROOD—Riverside, Cal.—B,
Cochrane, proprietor.
THE ROWELL—Main and Ninth streets,
Riverside; E. J. Davis, proprietor.
HOTEL CARLTON—I3 to 27 East Colo
rado street, Pasadena.
HOTEL AVALON—AVALON, Santa Cata
lina Island.
HOTEL BREWSTER—J. E. O'Brien, pro
prletor; Fourth and C sts., San Diego.
HOTEL BELLEVUE TERRACE— Cot""
ncr Sixth and Pearl sts.; F. A. Urban,
i proprietor.

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