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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, July 21, 1897, Image 1

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TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 294.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS
HERALD SUB-AGENCIES
ADVERTISEMENTS left at the fol
lowing agencies win receive prompt at
tention and will be printed as quickly
and with the same care as If left at
the main office, 222 W Third St.:
DOWNEY AYE. AND EAST SIDE
L. P. COLLETTE, 621 Downey aye.
OLD WORLD DRUG STORE, 102S
Downey aye. 'Phone Flora 242.
WM. H. HARMON, 765 Pasadena aye.
'Phone East 58.
CENTRAL AYE. AND VERNON
S. E. BARNEY, 2605 Central aye.
CHICAGO PHARMACY, Central aye.
and Twelfth st. 'Phone West 132.
T. J. AKEY, cor. Central and Vernon
ayes. 'Phone West 32.
MAIN ST. AND SOUTHWEST
B. T. PARKE. PHARMACY, 3129 S.
Main. 'Phone Blue 2062.
E. VAN DYKE, DRUGGIST, 711 W.
Jefferson St. 'Phone White 1271.
WESTLAKE GROCERY, cor. Alva
rado and Seventh sts. 'Phone Main 1382.
H. L. PARK, DRUGGIST, cor. Thirty
eighth and Wesley aye. 'Phone Blue 1301.
T. W. BROWN, JR., DRUGGIST.
Junction of Hoover, Union and Twenty
fourth sts. 'Phone Blue 1101.
BOYLE HEIGHTS
H. C. WORLAND, 2153 E. First, Sta
tion B.
T. P. WYLIE, 1977 E. First. 'Phone
Park 13
J. M. HARRIS, 1842 E. First. 'Phone
Park 21.
TEMPLE ST. AND NORTHWEST
DR. H. KALLEWODA, DRUGGIST,
cor. Temple st. and Beaudry aye. 'Phone
Main 206.
STAR PHARMACY, cor. Temple and
Belmont aye. 'Phone Main 507.
VIOLE & LOPIZICH, DRUGGISTS,
427 N. Main st. 'Phone Main 875.
LOS ANGELES—
—SAN FRANCISCO—
A chance for advertisers to reach the
public of both cities on the most ad
vantageous terms ever offered.
We have concluded arrangements
whereby classified advertising may be
Inserted simultaneously In the
LOS ANGELES HERALD
—And In the—
SAN FRANCISCO POST.
—For—
t CENTS PER LINE.
I CENTS PER LINE.
8 CENTS PER LINE.
8 CENTS PER LINE.
Here Is a rare opportunity for people
having bargains to offer or wants to be
known.
HERALD PUBLISHING CO.,
« 222 W. Third st.
PERSONAL
PERSONAL—WILL JOS. KLINE OR
the husband of
BERTHA HOLMAN
•end their address to E. B. JORDAN,
110 Montgomery blk, San Francisco. lmo4
PERSONAL—WHEN TIRED TAKING
patent medicine to reduce your flesh, that
only ruins your stomach, see MRS. GOSS.
I also remove superfluous hair. 245V4 S.
Spring st. 8-9
PERSONAL—Dr. DEVAN'S FRENCH
capsules a boon for ladies troubled with
irregularities. No danger; send In time;
SI per box. Room 4, 41514 S. Spring St.
■ 8-14
PERSONAL—FOR RENT, FURNISHED
or unfurnished rooms; desirable location;
prices to suit the times. THE WIN-
THROP, 330H S. Spring st. 7-25
OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE—A BUSINESS PROPOSI
tIon for the investigation of parties look
ing for investments: no trouble to double
four capital. Call or address 308% South
•pring St., room 4. 21
FOR SALE—CHEAP, FRUIT AND
oigar stand; also light groceries and
drink stand: good corner; owner going
east. Corner Ninth and Grand aye. 22
FOR BALE—BUSINESS; HOUSES; FOR
rent; rooms; collections; help free; work.
EDW. NITTINGER, 236% S. Spring st. tf
t BELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS
tor cash. I. D. BARNARD. 11l N. Broad
way, opp. Times bldg. tf
FOR BALE—SALOONS AT VERY REA
•onable terms. Apply at 440 Allso at. tf
SPECIAL NOTICES
FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF THE CHlL
dren who have been admitted to the Los
Angeles Orphan asylum, Boyle Heights,
since the last publication:
Frances Soto. 10 years; Mary Doherty,
12 years; Clotilda Montblanc, 12 years;
Jeanne Montblanc, 7 years; Susan Mon
tijo, 13 years; Susan Rubldoux, 11 years;
Rlcarda Rubldoux, 8 years; Louisa Rom
ero, 10 years; Maria Romero, 8 years;
Stella Narr, 12 years; Annie Narr. 10
years; Lillie Narr, 8 years; Bessie Sil
verman, 6 years; Fanny Silverman, 3
years; Stella Simpson, 12 years; Mary
Bauer, 10 years; Rita Valenzuela, 9 years;
Itosita Lugo, 4 years; Roslta Reyes, 12
years; Lucy Alvetra. 4 years.
23 SISTER CECILIA.
E. H. POTTER AND J. R. SNOW, FOR
merly 356 S. Spring St., Riverside, will
open a first-class delicacy and bakery
at 408 S. Broadway, chamber of com
merce building. Thursday. July 22d.
Thanking the public for past patronage,
and hoping for your patronage in the fu
ture, we remain, respectfully, POTTER
& SNOW. 25
NOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oclock
a. m. and 6 and 8 oclock p. m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut oft and a tine of $2 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
MRS. LIZZIE M. WEYMOUTH AND
daughter, Blanche Weymouth, having
left my home I will not be responsible
for debts contracted by them in my name.
E. D. WEYMOUTH.
Dated July 19, 1897. 22
WANTED—EVERY ONE TO KNOW
that Hall Thompson Rheumatism, Liver
and Kidney Cure will cure rheumatism.
Call and get testimonials. 223 N. Spring
St., room 6. 8-1
THE DAILY JOURNAL, PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dpllar monthly. 205 New High st. tf
SPECIAL SALE—NO CHARGE FOR
borders with 5c and 7y.c wall paper.
WALTER, 218 W. Sixth st. 8-12
USE GRANT'S SYSTEM TONIC FOR
malaria. 127% W. Second st. 8-16
PRACTICAL CHIMNEY" SWEEPER.
FROVA. 826 Keller. 8-14
WANTED—MALE HELP
lIUMMELL BROS. & CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building,
300-302 W. Second street, in basement.
Telephone £09.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Sack pller, warehouse, $2 day; man and
wife, teamster and cook, 535 etc.; man,
and wife, private place, $25 etc.; milker,
$30 etc.; $25 etc., and $20 etc.; ranch hand,
$20 etc.; ranch teamster, $1.25 etc.: handy
man, home place, $25 and meals; wood
choppers; families to cut fruit, long job.
near In; sack sewer, $2 etc.; stout boy,
milk and chore. $10 etc.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Bakers' helper, beach, $8 etc.; dish
washer, $6 etc.; head waiter, with refer
ences; baker for delicacy store; camp
copk, $20 etc.; night cook, $7 etc.; ranch
cook. $25 etc.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
Ranch cook. $25 etc.: house girl, Pasa
dena, $25, employer here, 10 a. m. today:
cook, fare Santa Barbara, $25, etc.; girl
light housework, $15 etc.; woman to as
sist, $12 to $15; housegirl. good cook, $20 to
$25; Swedish housegirl. $25 etc.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Clerk for bakery, beach, $5 week, em
ployer here 8 a. m.; cook 15 people, $30
etc., fare paid: 4 waitresses, beach and
country, $20, etc.,and fare; all-round hotei
cook, $35 etc; assistant laundress, hotel,
$20 etc.; cook small hotel. $25 etc.
HUMMELL BROS. & CO.
WANTED—UPRIGHT AND FAITHFUL
gentlemen or ladles to travel for respon
sible, established house in Los Angeles;
monthly $65 and expenses; position
steady; reference. Enclose self-ad
dressed stamped envelope. THE DO
MINION CO., Dept. H., Chicago. 8-3
WANTED — EXPERIENCED HOTEL
clerk, with references for first-class
house. Apply HUMMEL BROS. & CO.,
Second and Broadway. 21
WANTED—RING UP RED 1441, SUNSET
EMPLOYMENT AGENCY, for, reputa
ble, reliable help only. 128 N. Main.
Rooms U, 12, 13, 14. 21
WANTED—AGENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL
Insurance; salary and commission; expe
rience not necessary. Apply room 9, 105
E. First st. 7-25
WANTED—HUSTLERS ~FOR A SPEC
lalty for merchants; good money In it for
live men. Call at room 317 Lankershim
building. 21
WANTED—IO BOYS; WORKERS: GOOD
salary to right boys. 7 a .m., 711 S. Main.
7-29
WANTED—FEMALE HELP
WANTED-SECOND GIRL. 918 BUENA
Vista st. 21
WANTED SITUATIONS—FEMALE
WANTED—SITUATION AND CARE OF
child by a lady; home more than wages.
P., box 30, Herald. 21
WANTED—TO BUY LIVE STOCK
WANTED-CALVES AND FAT STOCK.
FRED HUGHES. Durham market, 1067
Temple st. 6-24tf
WANTED—PARTNERS
WANTED—PARTNER 'lN A BUSINESS
that will pay $100 per month each. R.,
box 30, Herald. 21
WANTED—TO RENT HOUSES
WANTED—TO RENT 15 OR 20 ROOM UN
furnished house for rooming; also 6
room nicely located cottage southwest.
See FRED L. SEXTON, 266 Wilson blk.
... 21
WANTED-MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED-GRUB STAKE TO PROS
pect the Ctondyke country; have had 25
years' experience; can furnish best of
references. 0., box 30, Herald. 22
WANTED-TO BALE YOUR HAT AND
take payment in hay. M"GARRY, Ninth
and Alameda. 28
WANTED—GOOD EAGLE OR PETA
luma hay press. D. F. M'GARRY, Ninth
and Alameda. 21-2S
(For additional classified see Pace Two.)
THE HERALD
STRIKING
COLLIERS
Request the Good Offices
of McKinley
NO ACTION IS AT ALL LIKELY
UNTIL MORE DEFINITE PLANS
ARE MADE
While the Situation Shows But Little
Change the Likelihood of
Trouble Increases
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, July 20.—The pres
ident today received, the. resolution
adopted yesterday by the Pittsburg
council asking, him to use his good offices
in the settlement of the coal strike, but
has not. yet sent a reply. He has also
received many communications and sug
gestions on the subject, but it Is Improb
able that he will take any action in the
matter in, the absence of some definite
plan for the settlement of the strike.
The cabinet meeting today discussed
this matter informally.
WON'T WORK
STEUBENVILLE, 0., July 20—The
Dillonvale' and Long Run miners held
a monster meeting in the school house
yard at Long Run today and voted
unanimously not to work a stroke until
they got their price.
WON'T QUIT
CANONSBURG, Pa„ July 20.—Boone
mine, of the Canonsburg Commercial
company, and the mine of Cook & Son at
McGovern., which resumed operations
thiis morning, run all day without ex
periencing any trouble. These mines
will be operated in full tomorrow. The
visit of the strikers yesterday had no
effect upon the miners here, as they
claim they were fooled'last year and will
not come out again. It is rumored this,
jvening that the miners are gathering
again to come over to the mine tomor
row, 600 strong, and that others from
Tom's Run are going to join them.
MEETINGS STOPPED
COLUMBUS, July 20.— J. R. Sover
eign, Master Workman of the Knights of
Labor, arrived today from Pocahontas.
W. Va., where he spoke for ten minutes
to the miners, when the Mayor, by proc
lamation, stopped all public meetings or
assemblages of more than three persons
in any public place within the corporale
limits, on the ground that they were in
imical to the public peace. President
Ratchford copied the proclamation for
future use.
IN WEST VIRGINIA
WHEELING, W. Va., July 20.—The
strike situation shows no change this
morning. A few men who struck yes>
terday went back to work today, while
others came out. The New River and
West Virginia Central regions are
working full time. Debs will speak at
Rynesville tonight and spend, today ar
ranging a campaign with organizers and
local strike leaders.
TROUBLE AHEAD
ST. LOUIS, July 20.—Having succeed
ed' in getting the miners at O'Fallon,
111., out, the army of strikers that has
been marching from town to town per
suading men at different points to quit
work, left this afternoon for Belleville,
which it will reach about sundown.
Trouble Is feared at Belleville, as the
miners at work have declared their in
tention of net stopping work, while the
marching strikers say they will force
them to do so.
BRAZIL, Ind., July 20.—The block
coal miners have decided to abandon
their local order and join the United
Mine Workers of America. One hundred
and seventy-five families of miners have
been given relief. Many more applied for
relief, but did not receive anything, as
what rations there were on hand have
been exhausted.
THEY DIDN'T DO IT
WHEELING, W. Va., July 20.—Not
withstanding the break among the min
ers in the Fairmont district, large quan
tities of West Virginia coal is passing
through Wheeling for the west and the
lakes. There has been no repetition of
the driving of spikes in the frogs on the
Wheeling and Lake Erie, which occurred
on Monday, and the miners of the East
ern Ohio district are strenuous in de
nouncing any knowledge of the act. So
far there is no clue to the perpetrators.
TROUBLE FEARED
PITTSBURG, Pa., July 20— The at
tention of the miners of the Pittsburg
district Is now riveted, on the Allison
Boone and Enterprise mines near Can
onsburg. The Boone and Allison mines,
which were closed yesterday by the own
ers to prevent trouble between their men
and the marching strikers, resumed to
day with nearly a full force. No attempt
was made to start up at the Enterprise
mine. The strikers' fear that if these
mines continue in operation it will in
duce the Enterprise men. to go back to
work. The program of the strikers Is to
make another march on the Allison mine.
The leaders said this morning more than
2000 diggers would be massed in the
Panhandle district and another march
made on the mine. Tonight the miners
of the Panhandle disltrict were gathered,
above Brldgevllle and it will not be sur
prising if 1000 miners are found on the
Washington pike in the morning. The
men in the Miller's and Tom's Run dis
tricts are all idle and' have plenty of
time to make another march. They were
supplying themselves with several days.'
rations, and if the proposed march is
made tbey will srtay about the offending
mines for several days.
Just at this stage of the strike sensa
tional developments are expected. The
men are beginning to feel the pangs of
hunger and want and. are in a condition
bordering on desperation.
The coal markets were quiet today.
Much coal was offered at 11.25 a ton.
Slack took a big; Jump and sold for 85
LOS ANGELES, WEDNESDAY MORNING, JULY 21, 1897
cents a ton. Before the strike it sold at
40 cents a ton. There are hundreds of
tons of slack coal at the mines in the
Pittsburg district, but the miners' offi
cials will not permit any of it to be
loaded.
DEBS DISCOURAGED
CINCINNATI, July 20 —A special to
the Commercial Tribune from Wheeling
says: Changes that have an. important
bearing upon the coal strike situation
In West Virginia came today. The state,
taken as a whole. Is against the strike
for financial reasons, and all who hay
struck have been brought under the
pressure of organizations and agitators
from elsewhere.
Generally they have been shamed into
striking. In the Fairmont region. Debs
admits that he is sorely discouraged.
The Fairmont managers declare that if
the Watson men. about 1000 in number,
can be kept at work, the other mines will
also work Thursday as usual. Deb;: 1
spoke at Riversvilie tonight to the Wa;
son men, but he was not so successful
as at Fairmont, and r.o union was- or
ganized. Tomorrow he will speak at
Worthlngton and MinersAille to more
of the Watson men.
It transpires today that Debs has been
shadowed by two Plnkerton men anj
that he has been threatened with death
if he goes to Kanawha. He will go,
however, on. Thursday.
Sixteen hundred cars of coal were
shipped today, the biggest shipment in
seven years. There have been threats of
holding up trains at Kenova ar.d over
in Ohio, and more watchmen have been
placed at dangerous places.
MINERS MASSING
PITTSBURG, July 20—Reports from
Cambrldgevllle late tonight that the
miners are massing at that point with the
intention of making a raid on the mines
at Canonsburg, where the men returned
to work today.
Provisions for several days are being
prepared and it is expected a determined
siege will be the result. The sheriff of
Washington county has- been notified
that trouble is expected and he is-making
preparations to meet any emergency
that may arise.
BIRMINGHAM, Ala.. July 20—The
disagreement between the coal miners
and operators in this district was ended
%>day by compromise, the operators
agreeing to pay the miners 37V» cents per
ton, a reduction of 2% cents. Tomorrow
about 4000 men, who have been on strike,
will resume work.
High Tariff Makes Possible Another
CHICAGO, July 20.—The Tribune says:
The glucose trust will have a little
brother one of these days, soon. He will
probably be called for short the "Syrup
Trust."
Last evening there were assembled at
the Commercial Exchange representa
tives of nearly all the leading makers of
syrups and jams—known to the trade as
"mixers" —in the country. The meeting
was held behind closed, doorrs, but it
was learned that a committee of three
was appointed to confer with C. B. Mat
thleson of the Glucose Trust. The com
mittee met Mr. Matthieson, but he was
mon-commltal.
"Wait until after August 1," said he,
"and I will be able to talk with you."
He had only Just reached Chicago, he
explained, and had not yet got settled
in his new position.
The meeting adjourned at a late hour
to be reconvened in August at the call of
the Chairman, C. B. Bliss of Kansas
City.
A Large Foreign Demand Leads to
SAN FRANCISCO, July 20.—There
was considerable excitement and an un
usual amount of business at the local
Produce Exchange today, the continued
foreign demand for wheat sending the
price of that staple booming. To begin
with Liverpool options showed a marked
advance and Chicago reports only served
to Increase the excitement. December
wheat, which has risen from 121 on July
Ist, opened at 135, rose to 136 and closed
at 135%. An hour later 1' shot up to 138.
closing at 137%. May o; ;ned at 138 and
closed at 141; while December steadily
rose to 139, and closed strong at 138'^.
Since very little of the new crop has ye:
passed out of the hands of the California
farmers, there is much jubilation at the
existing state of affairs, as they will de
rive most of the benefit of the rise.
Prince Henry Must Fight With
NEW YORK, July 20.—The Herald this
morning says: The Count of Turin, who
has challenged Prince Henry of Orleans
for the remarks he uttered at the ex
pense of the Italian officers recently re
leased from captivity in Abyssinia is a
prince, of the royal Wood and therefore of
Prince Henry's rank.
Prince Victor Emanuel of the house of
Savoy-Aosta, Count of Turin, was born
at Turin in 1870 and is therefore 27 years
old. He is the son of the late Duke of
Aosta, a nephew of King Humbert and a
maj«r in a cavalry regiment. The Count
of Turin's challenge created a rather
anomalous situation for the Count, being
the brother of the Duke of Aosta, is the
brother-in-law of Prince Henry's cousin.
Princess Helen, whom the Duke of Aosta
married in 1895.
MARION, Ohio, July 20.—A succession
of terrible electrical storms, with heavy
rainfall, passed over this city and vicin
ity. George Stout, while driving a mow
ing machine, was killed by lightning.
Charles Seller and William Sontag, me
chanics, returning from work, were
struck down on the street. They may
recover. Four men near Bradburn, 15
miles from this city, were killed.
PHOENIX, Ariz., July 20.—Chief Just
ice Truesdale and Associate Justice
Doane were sworn in today before re
tiring Chief Justice Baker. Judge
Sloan qualified ysterday at Prescott.
The administration of the oath of office
to Chief Justice Truesdale was made
very impressive, the entire bar being
in attendance.
Italy Is Anxious
ATHENS, July 20.—1t is laid here that
Italy has proposed coercive measures
against Turkey, , V » v
A SYRUP TRUST
Big Trust
WHEAT RISES
Higher Prices
CAN'T REFUSE
Count Turin
Killed by Lightning
Arizona Officers
SUNDAY'S
STEAMER
The Last Regular Boat
. for Clondyke
TALK OF PRIVATE CHARTERS
IT MINERS TO THE
CAMP
Transportation Companies Are Mak
ing Preparations for a Tremend
ous Rush Next Spring
Associated Press Special Wire.
SAN FRANCISCO, July 20.—The ex
citement over the recent di<>< overie» of
gold in Ala*ka still continues here and
when the steamer Excelsior sails for SI.
Michael's Sunday she will carry all the
miners' supplies she can hold. The Ex
celsior will be the last steamer to sail
thir year from San FrancHco to connect
with the Yukon steamers, but there is
already talk of chartering another
Ftthmer to take up a crowd of miners.
No more news from the Clondyke re
gions will be received until the steamers
leaving here and Seattle have returned.
A BIG BUSINESS
CHICAGO. July 20.—1n expectation of
greatly increased traffic to Alaska the
American Trading and Transportation
company, with headquarter* in the Old
Colony building, has been reincorporat
ed with an Increase of capital stock from
$100,000 to $450,000. The incorporation
was licensed today by the Secretary of
State. Charles A. Weare of Chicago is
president of the company.
OFFICIAL ACTION
WASHINGTON, July 20.—Commis
sioner Hermann, cf the general land
office, stated today that he will, recom
mend the establishment of two land dis
tricts in Western Alaska, the two offices
to be placed on the Yukon river or its
tributaries, in anticipation of a great
number of contentions over mineral land
locations in various sections where the
discoveries have been made. He says
that this region is practically without
law, and especially as to the settlement
of the gold lands, it will be of indefinite
value to the land In this respect and in
directly to the preservation of law and
order. The offices, It Is probable, will be
located at Circle City and Dawson City.
The general land office is in hourly ex
pectation of petitions and requests for
such action.
A BIG UNDERTAKING
CHICAGO, July 20—P. B. Weare,
Vice-President of the North American
Trading Company, is receiving hundreds
of letters asking Information regarding
the Alaskan gold fields. He said today:
"The boats which sail from Seattle this
morning are full—every passage taken.
That means anyone who wants to go to
Clondyke must wait for the August
boats. And the journey is 7000 miles.
People talk about it as if it was walking
across the street. They don't realize what
Alaska is—what the Yukon is. They
will need a map to convince them of th =
truth that the country of the Yukon and
its tributaries In Alaska and British
America is as large as the whole United
States east of the Mississippi—that it is
longer than a trip to Europe, before they
reach the Bering Sea and the mouth of
the Yukon; that by the time they strike
the Yukon, the Alaskan Arctic winter
will be upon them. By September 20th
the winter settles down and the Yukon
country is frozen solid till next May.
The expense of getting from Chicago to
Seattle is $60 and from Seattle to the
Bering Seaslso. There will be thousand?
of Eastern men who will go, but of course
the coast people have everything In their
favor. One thing must be remembered,
that the Clondyke country Is in the
British domain and will be governed ac
cordingly"
WILL GO BY STEAMER
SAN FRANCISCO, July 20.—Notwith
standing the suggestions of the miners
on the advantages of traveling overland,
the steamer Excelsior, which will sail
on the 28th instant, is booking passen
gers for Dawson City by the score and
will close Its books In a day or so. The
steamer will arrive at St. Michael's early
in August, in time to connect with river
boats running direct to Dawson. The
gold-seekers will reach their destination
about September sth. As the Yukon will
be frozen by October Ist no one who does
not go soon will be able to reach Dawson
City this year by way of St. Michael's.
Hundreds will doubtless make the jour
ney overland from Juneau after the
closing of navigable streams.
The Alaska Commercial Company has
500,000 tons of supplies at St. Michael's
all of which, will be forwarded to Daw
son City before the close of the season.
The North American Transportation
Company has an equal amount of food
and clothing at St. Michael's. A party
of forty men is preparing to charter a
schooner and sail to Juneau, from which
point they intend to make the journey
overland to Dawson City.
It 1b hard to say at this time how many
San Franciscans will leave for the new
El Dorado. Hundreds are considering
the question, but the danger and the
possibilities' of failure will keep many of
them from swelling the population of
Dawson City or any of the new towns
w.hlch will spring up. or from journeying
to possible new fields which may be dis
covered. The problem la a difficult
to solve,but the chancesare that a couple
of hundred will leave here between now
and next spring.
The Walla Walla sails this morning
from here with but few Yukoners. The
Walla Walla will connect with the Mex
ico, which will take most of the miners
bound for Juneau. The Yukon rush has
caused the Pacific Coast Company to
arrange an extra steamer trip, which
will be the George W. Elder, to leave
Portland for Juneau soon, stepping at
Seattle.
A NEW ROUTE
SEATTLE. Wash., July 20.—M. J.
Heney of this city, who returned to
INDEX
OF THE TELEGRAPH NEWS
Forest fires raging in the vicinity
of Oroville and Bed Bluff.
Valley railroad directors meet and
elect Claus Spreckels president; the
Kings river bridge at Beedley com
pleted.
The conference report on the tariff
bill sent to the senate, and discussion
begun; no indication given as to when
a final vote will be taken.
Huntington puts the steamship
China under the Hawaiian flag; with
the annexation of the islands the ves
sel will be entitled to American reg
istry.
A gigantic scheme to counterfeit
{Costa Rican currency spoiled by a
woman's cupidity; high government
officials implicated by a confederate's
confession.
The president requested to use his
good offices in the settlement of the
miners' strike; no action is likely un
til more definite plans are agreed
upon; the situation shows no special
change.
Secretary Bliss issues orders to the
general land office, under which bona
fide purchasers of land from bond
aided railroads will be protected; the
issuance of patents to railroads in de
fault for lands not actually sold is
suspended.
Sunday's steamer from San Fran
cisco is the last regular boat to leave
for the Clondyke gold region, but
already there is talk of private char
ters, and of extra steamers. The
transportation companies are prepar
ing for a tremendous rush with the
opening of the next season.
Seattle on the City of Topeka a week ago,
stated that a new route to the Clondyke
has been surveyed and partly con
structed by the Canadian government.
Pack trains are already running over it.
The route is by the regular passenger
steamers to Fort Wrangle, from which
place the Hudson Bay steamer is taken
to the head of navigation on the Stikeen
river. From this point the government
has cut the trail to a point on the Yukon
river below the rapids.
HAVE THE GOLD FEVER
VICTORIA, B. C, July 20— This city
is full of prospective miners waiting for
steamers to take them north. In short,
the gold fever has struck town and
scores of men are throwing up good po
sitions in order to seek fortunes in the
Clondyke gold fields. John Piercy, a
wholesale merchant, made a somewhat
novel proposition to the Dominion gov
ernment. He has offered to pay $50,000
per annum for a period of five or ten
years for the privilege of collecting the
duty on goods going Into the Canadian
section of the Yukon country. To a
telegram to this effect the Federal au
thorities have not as yet vouchsafed an
answer, but It believed that customs
officers will be sent up there to collect
the duty on American goods which are
being taken into that country, imme
diately.
MORE STEAMERS
PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., July 20.
—Owing to the present rush to the Clon
dyke gold fields and the still greater
rush which Is bound to come next
spring, the Puget Sound Tugboat com
pany has decided to put a steamer on
the Yukon river to carry passengers and
freight from St. Michael's to Circle City
and the Clondyke valley. The company
may operate two steamers on the river
next season. Steamboat here estimate
that, beginning about the Ist of next
April a' large steamer can leave the
Seund for Alaska dally with all the pas
senger' and freight accommodations
crowded. The excitement over the Alas
kan gold fields will give to the shipping
business activity never before known
in North Pacific waters.
UTAH'S JUBILEE
A Monument to Young Unveiled
Amid Cheers
SALT LAKE CITY, July 20.—The city
is crowded with visitors to witness the
first day's proceedings of the pioneer
jubilee. The incoming rush began yes
terday morning, and up to last night the
railroads brought in ten thousand
strangers. By 10 o'clock this morning
thousands of people gathered in the
vicinity of the Brigham Young monu
ment to witness the unveiling exercises.
A prayer written by President Wood
ruff was delivered by Bishop Whitney
and Brigham Young, a son of the famous
apostle, addressed the crowd. The un
veiling of the monument was greeted
with enthusiastic cheers followed by a
salute of twenty guns by the naval le
gion.
Bank Robbers Caught
ODELL, 111., July 20.—Two men en
tered McWillianms' Bank this morning
and, placing revolvers at the head of
Cashier Van Buskirk, ordered him to
throw over the cash and hold up his
hands. -The latter was equal to the
emergency and raised weapons to shoot
the intrduers, when the robbers fled.
Van Buskirk at once gave thealarm and
a crowd of citizens, on wheels, horse
back, in carts and other vehicles, gave
chase. Finally the robbers were sur
rounded by a mob of 100 men, and after
many shots were exchanged without ef
fect, were captured. It is suppostd they
are the same pair who made the attempt
to wreck the Wabash pay car last Sat
urday.
A Bigamist Convicted
SAN JOSE, July 20.—Ira N. Stanley,
marine engineer, formerly of Stockton,
was convicted of bigamy today and sen
tenced to pay a fine of $200 with the alter
native of one hundred days in the county
jail, the jury having recommended him
to the extreme leniency of the court
French Income Tax
PARIS, July 20.—The Chamber of
Deputies today by a vote of 616 to TO
passed the direct taxes bill, for which
M. Cavagnac on Friday endeavored to
substitute tfca income tax proposal,
which the Chamber defeated.
Ten Pages J*
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
TILLMAN'S
THREATS
Thought by Senators to
Be Funny
HE WANTS FREE COTTON TIES
AND WILL FILLIBUSTEB TO
THAT END
Work in the Senate on the Conference
Report on the Tariff Bill—Slow
Progress Made
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, July 20.—The tarlß
conference report was reported to the
senate today but little progress was
made on it beyond the formal reading
of about two-thirds of it. There was no
indication of when the final vote would
be reached. During the day Tillman
Democrat, of South Carolina, openly
threatened a filibuster until next De
cember if cotton bagging and cotton,tie*
are not restored to the free list, but the
threat is regarded es somewhat frac
tious. The sugar amendment occa
sioned a long debate during which Alli
son stated that the conference rate*
were lower than, those of the senate and
largely a concession to the bouse.. Sen
ators Vest, Jones, Berry and White
questioned this statement, urging that
the sugar trust secured larger benefits
from the conference schedule than from
any previously offered. The lumber
amendment also brought out animated
criticism from Senators Teller and Pet
tlgrew. Early in the day the senate
passed a joint resolution authorizing
and requesting the president to take all
necessary steps for the release of the
Competitor prisoners from prison, at
Havana.
Immediately after prayer a message
from the House announced the agree
ment of that body to the conference re
port. Considerable routine business was
disposed of before the tariff report was
called up.
The Vice-President announced In re
sponse to an inquiry by Senator Allen of
Nebraska that the pending Union Pacific
resolution was unfinished business and
would come up at 2 p.m., unless dis
placed.
This drew from Senator Morgan a
statement that It was intended to dis
cuss the tariff report in all its political,
financial and historical bearings. Aside
from this it was proposed to secure con
sideration for the Union Pacific resolu
tion, either by itself or during the tariff
debate, if this became essential. It was
not orderly practice but. said Morgan,
when men were tied up and lashed over
the back they were not disposed to stand
on the niceties of the procedure. It was
more Important he said, to save fifty
millions by the Union Pacific resolution
than pass the tariff bill.
Senator Allison suggested that there
was no disposition to cut off all reason
able consideration of the report. It was
too important, however, to give way to
other questions which might be brought
forward.
The conference report was then read
in detail.
When the first clause was read Sena
tor Jones of Arkansas made an earnest
protest against proceeding on the tech
nical report without an intelligent ex
planation of its meaning. There had been,
no opportunity for the Democratic con
ferees to consider it in committee. It
had been rushed through the House in a
single day, without time for prepara
tion to discuss it there. It was due to
the American people, he declared, that
some explanation be given.
During the reading of the report there
were frequent inquiries by Jones and
brief explanations from Allison, but these
did not cause material delay. Seven
pages of the printed report, covering;
38 pages of the bill, were disposed of In
the first half-hour.
When the item of window glass was
reached Jones read a telegram Just re
ceived from leading window glass deal
ers in New York, saying the restoration
of the McKinley rate would place a duty
equivalent to 140 per cent on this article,
which would be prohibitory and would
stop all revenuefrom this source.
The lumber amendments led to an ani
mated debate. Teller and Vest contended
that the $2 rate on white pine and the
retaliatory clause against Canadian logs
in effect permitted a double tax. Teller
declared that the whole thing was con
ceived in the interests of a few mill men
in Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin,
by which they would be able to raise the
price of pine $3 or J4 per 1000 feet.
The debate was fruitless of result and
the reading of the bill proceded until the
amendments of the sugar schedule were
reached.
Vest said this was the storm center <ii
the bill, and he asked Allison if he ap
proved the statement made by tjje house
conferees that the house differential
and the general features of the house
schedule had been preserved.
Allison responded with an explana
tory statement which was interrupted
by frequent questions. He said the gen
eral effect of the amendment was aa
stated by the house conferees. The sen
ate had provided 1.95 on. refined sugars
where the house gave 1.875, making the
senate differential one-fifth instead of
one-eighth. The house provision wns
now restored and that differential re
tained. Berry interrupted to ask how
much less the sugar trust got from the
conference report than they did front
the senate amendment
Allison answered that under the
schedule as modified, taking the point
of 100, the differential was 12ft cents.
Taking 96 degree sugar, the sugar*
above No. 16, Dutch standard refined,
would receive 1.31 cents per 100 pounds
more than they would have received un
der the house schedule, and somethlHt
less than under the senate schedule. ■
Jones of At kansaw said he would her*

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