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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, July 22, 1897, Image 1

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Double Sheet
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 295.
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS
HERALD SUB-AGENCIES—
ADVERTISEMENTS left at the fol
lowing agencies wiii receive prompt at
tention and will be printed as quickly
and with the same care as If left at
the main office, 222 W Third it.:
DOWNEY AYE. AND EAST SIDE
L. P. COLLETTE, 621 Downey aye.
OLD WORLD DRUG STORE, 1028
Downey aye. 'Phone Flora 242.
WM. H. HARMON, 765 Pasadena aye.
'Phone East 58. •
CENTRAL AYE. AND VERNON
S. E. BARNEY, 2605 Central aye.
CHICAGO PHARMACY, Central aye.
and Twelfth st. 'Phone West 132.
T. J. AKEY, cor. Central and Vernon
ayes. 'Phone West 32.
MAIN ST. AND SOUTHWEST
E. T. PARKE, PHARMACY, 3129 S.
Main. 'Phone Blue 2062.
E. VAN DYKE. DRUGGIST, 711 W.
Jefferson st. 'Phone White 1271.
WESTI.AKE GROCERY, cor. Alva_
rado and Seventh sts. 'Phone Main 1382.
H. L. PARK, DRUGGIST, cor. Thirty
eighth and Wesley aye. 'Fhone Blue 1301.
T. W. BROWN, JR., DRUGGIST,
Junction of Hoover, Union and Twenty
fourth sts. 'Phone Blue 1101.
BOYLE HEIGHTS
H. C. WORLAND, 2133 E. First, Sta
tion B.
T. P. WYLIE, 1977 E. First. 'Phone
Park 13
J. M. HARRIS, 1842 E. First. 'Phone
Park 21.
TEMPLE ST. AND NORTHWEST
DR. H. KALLEWODA, DRUGGIST,
cor. Temple st. and Beaudry aye. 'Phone
Main 206.
STAR PHARMACY, cor. Temple and
Belmont aye. 'Phone Main 507.
VIOLE & LOPIZICH, DRUGGISTS,
427 N. Main St. 'Phone Main 875.

LOS ANGELES—
-SAN FRANCISCO—
A chance for advertisers to reach the
public of both cities on the most ad
vantageous terms ever offered.
We have concluded arrangements
whereby classified advertising may be
Inserted simultaneously In the
LOS ANGELES HERALD
—And in the—
SAN FRANCISCO POST.
—For—
8 CENTS PER LINE.
8 CENTS PER LINE.
8 CENTS PER LINE.
8 CENTS PER LINE.
Here Is a rare opportunity for people
having bargains to offer or wants to be
known.
HERALD PUBLISHING CO.,
tf 222 W. Third St.
PERSONAL
PERSONAL-WILL JOS. KLINE OR
the husband of
BERTHA HOLMAN
send their address to E. B. JORDAN,
110 Montgomery blk, San Francisco. lmo4
PERSONAL—WHEN TIRED TAKING
patent medicine to reduce your flesh, that
only ruins your stomach, see MRS. GOSS.
I also remove superfluous hair. 245% S.
Spring st. 8-9
PERSONAL—Dr. DEVAN'S FRENCH
capsules a boon for ladies troubled with
irregularities. No danger; send in time;
$1 per box. Room 4, 415% S. Spring st.
, S-14
PERSONAL—FOR RENT, FURNISHED
or unfurnished rooms; desirable location;
prices to suit the times. THE WIN
THROP, 330% S. Spring st. 7-25
PERSONAL—T. H. LACY OFTiuiiNTSME
would like to hear from his wife, Cora E.
Lacy of Los Angeles. 22
MINING AND ASSAYING
MORGAN & CO., ASSAYERS AND RE
llners and ore testers; bullion purchased;
consulting metallurgists; mines examined
and dealt in. Oliice, 261 Wilson blk., Los
Angeles Cal. - 23-tf
THE BIMETALLIC ASSAY OFFIOE
and Chetnioal Laboratory, 121 S. Main st.
R. A. PEREZ, E. M„ manager. 12-4tf
PHYSICIANS
CONSULT DR. MINNIE WELLS, Spe
cialist, 816 W. Seventeenth St., cor. of
Grand aye. S-lltf
SPECIAL NOTICES
FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF THE CHlL
dren who have been admitted to the Los
Angeles Orphan asylum, Boyle Heights,
since the last publication:
Frances Soto. 10 years; Mary Doherty,
12 years; Clotilda Montblanc, 12 years;
Jeanne Montblanc, 7 years; Susan Mon
tijo, 13 years; Susan Rubldoux, 11 years:
Rlcarda Rubldoux, S years; Louisa Rom
ero, 10 years; Maria Romero, 8 years;
Stella Narr, 12 years; Annie Narr, 10
years; Lillie Narr, 8 years; Bessie Sil
verman, 6 years; Fanny Silverman, 3
years; Stella Simpson, 12 years; Mary
Bauer, 10 years; Rita Valenzuela, 9 years;
Rosita Lugo, 4 years; Rosita Reyes, 32
years; Lucy Alvetra, 4 years.
_23 SISTER CECILIA.
B. H. POTTER AND J. R. SNOW, FOR
merly 356 S. Spring St., Rlversjde, will
open a first-class delicacy and bakery
at 408 S. Broadway, chamber of com
merce building, Thursday, July 22d.
Thanking the public for past patronage,
and hoping for your patronage In the fu
ture, we remain, respectfully, POTTER
& SNOW. 25
NOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and S oclock
a. m. and 6 and 8 oclock p. m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut oft and a fine of $2 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
MRS. LIZZIE M. WEYMOUTH AND
daughter, Blanche Weymouth, having
left my home I will not be responsible
for debts contracted by them in my name.
E. D. WEYMOUTH.
Dated July 19, 1897. 22
AUCTION SALE OF HORSE, HARNESS
and buggy; to be sold Friday morning,
July 23d, at 10 oclock, cor. of Adams and
Main sis.; mortgage sale of R. R. Gove.
J. W. HORN, auctioneer. 22
WANTED—EVERY ONE TO KNOW
that Hall Thompson Rheumatism, Liver
and Kidney Cure will cure rheumatism.
Call and get testimonials. 223 N. Spring
St.. room 6. 8-1
THE DAILY JOURNAL, PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 205 New High st. tf
SPECIAL SALE—NO CHARGE FOR
borders with 5c and 7%c wall paper.
WALTER, 218 W. Sixth st. S-12
USE GRANT'S SYSTEM TONIC FOR
malaria. 127% W. Second st. 8-16
PRACTICAL CHIMNEY SWEEPER.
FROVA, 826 Keller. 8-14
WANTED—MALE HELP
UUMMELL BROS. & CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building,
300-302 W. Second street, in basement.
Telephone 509.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Two men, sawmill, $1 etc. day; fireman,
stamp mill, $3 day; young man. cream
ery, $18 etc.; sack sewer, $2 and board;
barber, country; 2 boys, $3.50 week; fam
ily, cut fruit, 8c box; fruit ranch hand.
$20 etc.; Swiss milker, $25 to $30 etc.; 12
-horse teamster, haul grain, $35 etc.; wood
choppers, $2.50 cord; wood-splitters, 90c
cord; ranch hands, milk, team, etc., $20
etc.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Cook, delicacy store, $12 etc.; pastry
cook and baker. $50 etc.; second cook, res
taurant, $12; dishwasher, $15; another.
$10 etc.; bootblack, $5 week; hotel and
restaurant help call.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
Housegirl, Perris, $16; housegirl, $20;
Pasadena; housegirl, Ventura, $15; nurse
girl, $16 to $20; girl assist, $10; good cook,
$25; first-class Swedish girl, $25; house
girl, good cook, $20 to $25; middle-aged
woman, housework, $3 week; woman
with child. $12 to $15.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
First-class waitresses, beach, $20; lady
canvasser, $20; woman cook, $35; waitress,
beach, $6 week; woman cook, Nevada,
$30; waitress, do chamberwork, country,
$20; 3 starch iropers, $L5O day; check
waitress, city, $7 week.
HI'MMELL BROS. & CO.
WANTED—UPRIGHT AND FAITHFUL
gentlemen or ladies to travel for respon
sible, established house in Los Angeles;
monthly $65 and expenses; position
steady; reference. Enclose self-ad
dressed stamped envelope. THE DO
MINION CO., Dept. H, Chicago. 8-3
WANTED—A FEW GOOD ROAD SALES
men for specialty to merchants.
THOMAS & WHITING, room 317 Lank
ershim bldg., Los Angeles, Cal. 22
WANTED—AGENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL
insurance; salary and commission; expe
rience not necessary. Apply room 9. 105
E. First st. 7-25
RING UP RED 1441.
mcnt Agency, 12S N. Main. None supplied
but reputable, reliable male and female
help. 22
WANTED—IO BOYS; WORKERS; GOOD
i salary to right boys. 7 a .m., 711 S. Main.
7-29
WANTED SITUATIONS—MALE
WANTED—GENTLEMAN NOW HOLD
ing responsible position in San Francisco,
desires a position in Los Angeles, to be
nearer Interests he owns in Southern
California; good accountant and corre
spondent; age, 42; long experience in San
Francisco wholesale houses; references
and bonds. Address A. R. NORTH, box
26, Herald . 14-18-18-20-22-21-20-28-30-2-4
WANTED SITUATIONS—FEMALE
WANTED—YOUNG GERMAN WOMAN
with girl 6 years old wishes to do cooking
and housework. Call 318 S. Los Angeles
St., room 9. 22
WANTED—TO BUY LIVE STOCK
WANTED —HORSE, BUGGY AND HAR
ness In exchange for a nice corner lot,
and would give or take difference, if any
M. MACDONALD, 325 Byrne block. 22
WANTED—CALVES AND FAT STOCK.
FRED HUGHES, Durham market. 1067
Temple st. 6-24tf
WANTED—TO RENT HOUSES
FOR RENT—TWO FINE PALMIST'S
rooms; business free. 111% W. Third
street. 28
WANTED-MISCELLANEQUS
WANTED—GRUB STAKE TO PROS
pect the Clondyke country: have had 25
years' experience; can furnish best of
references. 0., box 30, Herald. 22
WANTED—TO BALE YOUR HAY AND
take payment In hay. M'GARRY, Ninth
and Alameda. 23
(For additional classified see Page Two.)
THE HERALD
TROUBLES
THREATEN
In the Region of the
Strike
MINERS WILLING TO WORK
ARE DETERRED BY FEAR OF
VIOLENCE
Strikers' Families Are Growing Hun
gry, But Determination to Fight
Is Still Firm
Associated Press Special Wire.
PITTSBURG, Pa., July 21.—Trouble,
and much of it, seems to be in store at
the AlLison mine, three miles west of
Canonsburg. The men want to go to
*»Mrk but are afraid. They fear an ln
vasl|p of the strikers and do not want to
be made targets for a mob that is liable
at any moment to lose control of itself.
The strikers were to have begun their
march tonight, but a telegram from
Bridgeville announces that owing to the
heavy rains of last evening it was de
cided to postpone the trip until tomor
row. The men are fully determined to
carry out their threat of making the
march. They expected to start with 600
men, and be reinforced with about the
same number from Brldgeville and
Tom's Run. The men will start with sev
eral days' rations and expect to be in
shape to watch the offending miners for
several days.
Sheriff Vernon Clark of Washington
county Is fully pepared for any array of
marching strikers that may invade his
domain. It is not generally known that
at 6 oclock last nigfit he had nearly 300
deputies sworn, in, who are available at
any time. From the most reliable infor
mation it was learned that they are all
ready, with the requisite number of fire
arms, and are prepared to do business.
The miners who went to work today
are stricken with fear and anticipate
trouble. The Allison mines had forty
men at work until noon, today, when the
plant was shut down in apparent antici
pation of trouble. During the afternoon
a committee from the Enterprise mine
paid them a visit. The committee want
ed to find out what the situation was.
They decided, that the Enterprise l woufd
not work under the present surround
ings.
At- a committee meeting at the miners'
headquarters in thiscity today the ques
tion was discussed, how it would be pos
sible to march a oody of men to stop the
miners of the New York and Cleveland
Gas Coal company from working. Every
phase of the subject was discussed but
no plan could be hit upon. It was the
general opinion that the mines of this
company are impregnable to attack be
cause of their geographical position.
The expected meeting of the board of
arbitration did not take place tonight,
the absent members not reaching the
city. As soon as they arrive arrange
ments will be made for a general meet
ing of operators.
The situation among the strikers is
practically unchanged. The suspension
is complete, with the exception of the
De Armitt mine, and though considera
ble destitution and suffering is reported
among the strikers and their families
the determination to fight it out is ap
parently as strong as on the first'day of
the strike.
NOT ENCOURAGING
PITTSBURG, July 21.—Chairman Lit
tle, of the Arbitration Board, and Presi
dent DeArmltt of the New York and
Cleveland Gas Coal Company arrived
in Pittsburg this morning from the East,
where they went to secure the co-oper
ation of mine-ownersalong the Pennsyl
vania Railroad. Little said that inter
views with Eastern operators were con
fidential, but he could say in a general
way that the result of the trip was very
satisfactory, and that the success of the
uniformity plan depended now entirely
upon local operators. He will suggest
calling a meeting of operators in. the
near future to confer upon the mat
ter. There were some clauses in the
agreement objectionable, and modifica
tion would be necessary to get a changed
condition. De Armitt refused to talk
further than to report progress, adding
that the situation was by no means dis
couraging.
THE UNIFORM SCALE
CLEVELAND, 0., July 21.—Secretary
Bishop' of the Ohio State Board of Arbi
tration continued his canvass among
the coal operators today. Some he found
willing to sign the true uniformity scale,
or agree to almost anything that is not
manifestly unfair to the operators. Oth
ers were less tractable, and several
lengthy discussions which he had with
this class in the morning threatened to
prolong his stay in Cleveland beyond
his calculations. Bishop said this morn?
ing that he believed, he would leave
Cleveland with the consent of nine local
operators having mines In the Pitts
j burg district. With but one or two-ex
ceptions, perhaps, local operators have
|no confidence that the uniformity scale
will ever be introduced in the Pittsburg
district, and believe It is only a waste of
time to try to introduce it. They are of
the opinion that the best way to settle
the strike Is for the operators' to re
main silent and inactive. This inaction,
he urged, will make the miners uneasy
and will discourage them.
A WILD SCHEME
FAIRMONT, W. Va., July 21.—Two
days have passed without any Import
ant developments. This afternoon Delis
s.noke at Worthlngton and tonight's
meeting at Watson promises to be well
attended. Three hundred men from
Monagh will march down in a body.
Organizer McMahon says that an effort
will be made to bring labor organiza
tions from the whole country to the as
sistance of the miners on. strike. No
plan has yet been formed, but he thinks
LOS ANGELES, THURSDAY MORNING, JULY 22, J897
little effort will be required to get train
men to refuse to work on trains carrying
coal into competitive districts.
IN VIRGINIA
WHEELING, W. Va., July 21.—There
is little change In the local coal mining
strike today. Some of the miners who
struck at the Glendale works yesterday
afternoon returned to work this morning
rather unexpectedly.
There is no change in the situation at
Dillonvale today. There will be a dem
onstration by the miners of this city and
vicinity tomorrow for the purpose of
inducing the men at the Boggs Run
mines to Join the strike.
RAILROAD SCARED
FAIRMOUNT, W. Va., July 21.—The
most important development of the past
24 hours was the embargo laid by the
Baltimore and Ohio railroad on all West
Virginia coal. Orders were issued to
hold all coal at Junction points, as the
railroad wanted to keep a ten days' sup
ply always on hand. The sensational
publications have frightened the roads. !
DEBS' ADDRESS
FAIRMOUNT, W. Va., July 21.—Eu- !
gene V. Debs addressed several hundred
miners at Watson's this evening, many
of them reaching there from Monor.k, a
distance of four miles. He denounced
the reports sent to various papers by
special correspondents to the effect that
he is discouraged. Debs' speech was a
socialistic one and his trip was de
scribed to the men. Debs was seen and
he denounced the refusal of the mayor
of Pocahontas to let Sovereign speak, as
follows: "If it is true we are no better in
the United States than In Russia. Free
speech Is denounced in West Virginia as
it is in Russia. It shows-the desperation
on the part of the operators. It is like
other schemes of the money power. The
end is near. It is cupidity and cupidity
commits suicide. They can force us |
down now, but it is like damming a
stream. You can build the dam higher
and higher, but finally the dam must
break. Pent-up power will some day
destroy. Sovereign's fate will strengthen
the social democracy."
STILL HOPEFUL
COLUMBUS, 0., July 21.—President
Ratchford said tonight, before leaving
for West Virginia, that all statements
that the strike was not progressing fa
vorably should be liberally discounted
as they were Inspired by West Virginia
operators and sympathisers.
AID OFFERED
ST. LOUIS, Mo., July 21.—A special to
the Republic from Mount Olivet, 111.,
says: The business men of this city are
taking steps to aid the miners in their
efforts to secure better wages-. Funds
have been raised and a committee ap
pointed by Mayor Fuchs will be dis
' tribute the money where most needed.
A delegation of 100 miners left here to
night for Coffeen, where they will assist
other delegations In getting the Coffeen
miners to Join the movement.
SEALERS' CLAIMS
The Question Referred to the Supreme
Court
NEW YORK, July 21,—Judge Wallac
of the United States circuit court here
nearly a year ago, In one of the suits
brought by the United States against
the North American Commercial com
pany, awarded the government- $170,257
as rentals and royalties for sealing priv
ileges on the Pribolyff islands, Alaska,
during the year 1894.
The company set up a counter claim
of $200,1000. which they claim had been
made by the order of the secretary of the
treasury restricting the catch that year
to 7500 head. It was claimed that the
provisions of the revised statutes which
applied to lease prior to 1894 allowed a
catch of 16,000, and that the secretary
of the treasury had no right to issue the
order.
The matter was carried to the United
States circuit court of appeals-, which
today referred the question of the coun
ter claim to the United States supreme
court, with instructions, and refused to
give a decisiion.
The Logan Statue
CHICAGO. July 21.—Final prepara
tions have been made for the dedication
of the Logan statue tomorrow. Already
several governors of different states, ac
companied by their staffs, have arrived,
and more are expected tomorrow morn
ing. The various regiments of the regu
lar army which have been detailed to
appear in the parade are all in the city,
with the exception of those at Fort Sheri
dan. The Fourth Infantry will come on
the morning train. Mrs. Logan and her
party arrived from Pittsburg tonight by
the Pennsylvania road .and the members
of Logan's old rt-glment, the Thirty-first
Illinois, have come in to the number
of 150.
SAN FRANCISCO. July 21—Wheat in
the local market made a further ad
vance, both in spot and futures, though
not so sharply as yesterday. At the
opening December sold at $1.42, but
quickly rose to $1.42%. Realizing sales,
however, caused a break at the close and
it receded to $1.4 iy 2 . May sold at $1.44%
and closed at $1.43%. The consensus of
opinion, among the brokers is that while
there may be it drop during the next few
days, prices will be much higher when
the wheat now being sold goes into
stronger hands.
SANTA CRUZ, July 21.—At Camp
Shatter today the morning was devoted
to battalion exercises and regimental
drills. Much attention was given to
skirmish drills. General Warlield re
viewed the regiment this afternoon in
the presence, of a large crowd. Tomorrow
there will be battalion firing at Tripe
hill. Every person entering the camp is
required to salute the colors-. Soldiers
have much amusement in "tossing up"
offenders found guilty of trivial offenses
by kangaroo courtmartial.
STOCKTON, July 21— C. A. Davis,
charged with grand larceny, was ar
rested here this morning for having sto
len a ring worth $100 from a Mr. Hang
don, who had given him a room in his
house in- San Francisco. He was re
turned to that city this afternoon.
NEW LIBERIA, La., July 21.—This
morning at Baldwin, in St. Mary's par
ish, a negro, Jack Davit?, alias Buddy
Jack, was hanged by the aroused citi
zens of the town for criminally assault
ing Widow Marcot.
Wheat Still Rising
Militia in Camp
A Bad Lodger
Louisiana Lynching
MINORITY
PROTESTS
Will Not Cause Any Long
Delay
THE TARIFF BILL CRITICISED
BUT NOBODY TROUBLES TO MAKE
REPLY
The Tariffites Unofficially Agree
Among Themselves to Pass the
Bill on Friday
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON. July 21.—The senate
concluded the formal reading of the tar
iff conference. The debate, was spiritless
In the main. Early in the day Jones of
Arkansas made a protest against the
j conference committee on the ground
I that It had exceeded Its authority In so
amending the paragraph relating to
printing paper as to place a retaliatory
I duty against the countries paying the
j export duty on wood pulp. His point of
! order was debated at much length and
finally overruled by Vice-President Ho
bart. This removed the only obStacle
thus far encountered by the report. The
reciprocity amendment and the aban
donment of the stamp tax on bonds and
stocks developed much criticism.
The first contest arose over amend
ment 650, relating to printing paper. The
conference reported a retaliatory pro
viso, as follows: If any country or de
pendency shall impose an export duty
on wood pulp exported to the United
States there shall be imposed upon
.printing paper when imported from such
country or dependency an additional
duty of one-tenth of one- cent per pound
for each dollar of export duty per cord
so imposed, and proportionately for
fractions of a dollar of such export duty.
Senators Vest, Jones of Arkansas and
Teller vigorously protested against this
amendment, saying it was a new pro
vision not acted upon by the senate and
lies beyond the power of the conference
committee. Teller criticised it as an out
rage and came before the senate saying
in effect: "What are you going to do
about It?"
Jones finally made a direct issue
against the conference committee, mak
ing a point of order against the retalia
tory clause on the ground of its being
new matter. He said he would ask for
a ruling from the chair on the regularity
pt the conference action.
Aldrich, one- of the conferees, defended
the retaliatory clause, saying it was
strictly within the rights of the confer
ees, as the general subject was in differ
ence between the senate and the house.
The conference report must be accepted
or rejected ac a whole, said Aldrich, and
the main question could not be diverted
by appeals for a ruling from the chair.
White of California referred to the se
cret sessions of the Republican confer
ees and ironically read Chandler's re
marks on the Wilson bill, where the New
Hampshire declared that the bill had
been brought forth in the dark and
.should be blasted by legislative light
ning. A lengthy discussion followed on
the powers of the conference committee.
Morgan argued that the committee
had exceeded its powers and that it
could not arrogate to itself the right to
originate new amendments. The pres
ent bill was framed on. purely partisan
lines, declared Morgan, and was de
signed to give benefits to party favor
ites. He referred to the reports that the
"splendid and ponderous speaker" of the
house of representatives had secured a
house victory on the sugar schedule. The
senator thought there might be some
mistake about the speaker's success, for
"notwithstanding his ponderosity," the
harder he sits down on a thing, the
harder it rises; notwithstanding his sit
ting down oti the schedule, up go the
prices. If he can't work the safety valve
better than that he had better retire
from politics."
Vice President Hobart announced his
decision on the point of order, holding
that it was not well taken. It was not,
however, for the chair to determine
whether the matter in the conference re
port was new or relevant. All such
questions were for the senate itself, on
the question of accepting or rejecting
the report.
On hides. Allen of Nebraska asked why
the conferees had provided a drawback
of duty on leather exported made from
imported hides.
Aldrich explained that the house had
insisted on this provision and he felt that
the drawback was payable under the
law without referencu to the provision.
He thought about $500,000 to $700,000 of
revenue would be obtained from the riuty
on hides andnrobabiy half of this would
be paid in drawbacks.
Allen of Nebraska spoke against the
bill, as a whole, and incidentally referred
to the present coal strike, contrasting
it with the promises of prosperity.
Teller and Vest criticised the hide
amendment, the former saying that the
drawback clause was in the interest of
manufacturers, as the western tanners,
who did not export leather, were get
ting no drawback.
Mr. Aldrich answered that the east and
the west stood on the same basis so far
as this legislation was concerned. It
was impossible to build a battleship at
Omaha, but that was due to the geogra
phy of the country and not to any legis
lative discrimination against Omaha
and the west. Aldrich then said that
three of the senate conferees were from
the west and he hotly repudiated the
statement that New England and the
east had been unduly favored by the
conferees.
The conference amendment, omitting
from the free list scientific books and
periodicals, brought out a sarcastic
speech from Mr. Vest.
The reciprocity amendment occasioned
lengthy debate. Mr. Teller inquired why
INDEX
OF THE TELEGRAPH NEWS
Forest fires in the north cause much
damage.
A message from Pole-Seeker An-
Idree is anxiously looked for.
Salt Lake citizens get up lots of en
thusiasm over the jubilee celebration.
Trouble has not materialized in the
mining regions, but the situation
grows more threatening.
Associated liquor dealers object to
jthe Santa Fe order prohibiting rail
i road men from entering saloons.
The executive committee of the na
tional Democratic party meets to
mature plans for breaking up Bryan
ism.
The American Turf congress bars
foreign books on all tracks; racing
Iresults; ball games; general sporting
news.
The senate concludes the formal
reading of the conference report on
jthe tariff bill, and indulges in some
general debate; an informal agree
ment reached for a final vote on Fri
day. The house does nothing.
The last regular steamer to Alaska
will be supplemented by many irregu
lar ones, no less than six leaving
Seattle during the coming week. A
tremendous army will paint "Clon
jdyke or Freeze" on its banners dur
jing the coming month, and many of
the soldiers will freeze.
the president had been restricted to two
years In making reciprocity treaties. Mr.
Aldrich explained that it was the desire
to have our commercial relations defin
itely established within a reasonable
time. It was believed this could be ac
complished within two years.
Mr. Teller said he thought that the
committee was afraid to trust the next
president.
Mr. White criticised the provision that
reciprocity treaties shall be approved by
congress. Congress had the power to
raise or lower duties without waiting to
approve a treaty and he declared that
this provision would arouse criticism on
the mental ability of the congress enact
ing It.
Mr. Allison explained that congress
had no means of negotiating with for
eign governments, so that a treaty was
essential before any reciprocal plan of
tariff reduction could be executed. The
conference amendment striking out the
senate proviso for a stamp tax on bonds
and stocks led to discussion. In answer
to inquiries. Mr. Allison said the point
has been raised that an excise tax must
be levied on a class of articlesas a whole,
while the senate amendment expressly
excepted bonds of bulding associations
and other classes of bonds. This objec
tion was felt to be well taken and the
bond provision was abandoned.
Mr. Alien declared that this was an
other humbie submission to the money
' power.
Mr. Morgan asserted that there were
many reasons beyond the one assigned
for the abandonment of the bond tax.
The main influence was the favoritism
Shown to capital. It was this favorit
ism which was making converts to the
Populist party.
Another influence was the sugar trust,
which had been instrumental in having
the bond tax abandoned as it would af
fect the enormous stock transfers of
the trust.
The formal reading of the conference
report was completed at 5:30 o'clock and
the senate at once went Into executive
session, adjourning soon after.
NOMINATIONS
These nominations were confirmed by
the senate today: Brainerd H. Warner.
Jr.. of Maryland, to be consul atLiepsic,
Germany; Charles H. Isham, of Balti
more, to be a commissioner In and for
the district of Alaska; George Christ,
of Nogales, to b» surveyor general of
Arizona; A. P. Hanson, of Sun Dance,
Wyo., to be surveyor general of Wyom
ing.
IN THE HOUSE
Better Market Wanted for American
Tobaccos
WASHINGTON. July 21.—When the
House met today Mr. Evans of Ken
tucky, from the Committee on Ways and
Means, reported a joint resolution re
questing the President to make such in
vestigations as will elicit the facts in
connection with restrictions on the sale
of American tobacco in foreign countries
under what is known as government
contracts. It also authorized the Presi
dent to enter into negotiations with those
countries with a view of obtaining a
modification of those restrictions.
Mr. Cleary of Kentucky explained
that England and Germany are the only
countries where tobacco could be
shipped except through the govern
ments, and dwelt upon the necessity of
finding a foreign market for the surplus
tobacco raised in Kentucky, Tennessee
and Virginia. The resolution passed.
Perkins (Republican of Iowa) called
up a resolution for printing 2600 copies
of the house digest. This served as an
opportunity for Simpson (Populist of
Kansas) to criticize the mode of pro
cedure in the house. In the midst of
which Dingley moved an adjournment
until tomorrow, which was carried, 153
to 114.
A FINAL VOTE
The Tariff Bill Will Become a Law
Tomorrow
WASHINGTON, July 21.—W r hen the
senate adjourned today the understand
ing was general that a vote would he
taken on the conference report on the
j tariff bill not later than Friday, but
! there was no formal agreement to thfe
; Both Senators Jones and White, who
i have been leading the opposition to the
j bill on behalf of the Democrats.expressed
; the opinion that the vote would not be
i postponed beyond this time.
Senator Allison also stated that while
ihe considers a vote possible tomorrow,
;he felt very confident that it w-ould not
be postponed beyond Friday. In the
event of a vote on the tariff bill on Fri
day, final adjournment Is generally pre
dicted for Saturday.
Ten Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
CLONDYKE
CARRIERS
Wish Their Vessels Twice
as Large
THE PORTLAND SAILS TODAY
WITH EVERY INCH OF SPACE
OCCUPIED
I
Despite the Terrors of the Arctic Win
ter Thousands Prepare for
Prompt Departure
Associated Press Special Wire.
SEATTLE, Wash., July 21.—Tomor
row at noon the steamship Portland
leaves Seattle for St. Michaels, with her
passenger accommodations taxed to the
limit and with a full cargo of provisions.
On the Portland will he the second party
of fortune hunters to leave for the Clon,
dyke since the news of the big finds waa
brought down by the Portland last Sun
day, the first party going on the Al-Kl
Sunday.
On the Portland's passenger list will
be ex-Gov. McGraw, E. M. Parry, a
prominent attorney, and E. M. Baliiett,
once a famous college football man. Mrs.
J. D. Barnes, who was the first white
woman to go into the Yukon by the Dyea
basin, is returning to the north to Join
her husband after a year's absence. She
is called the heroine of the Yukon, and
is known by all the Yukon old-timers.
On board also will be S. P. Weston of
the Post-Intelligencer, who will take
with him a dozen carrier pigeons. Mr.
Weston will come back on the Portland
and will let fly the pigeons at varying
distances, so that the latest news from
the Clondyke will reach the Post-Intelli
gencer and the Associated Press several
days before the ship's'arrival.
At St. Michaels the Portland's passen
gers and freight will be transferred to
river steamers for the 2500-mile trip to
Dawson City.
Next Friday the Pacific Coast Steam
ship company's steamer Queen will leave
Seattle for Juneau and Dyea. She will
have a full list of people who will go into
the Clondyke overland. On Sunday the
Mexico will sail for the same point with
her accommodations all engaged. To
morrow the steamer Islander goes from
Victoria toDyea andiSkagaway bay, andi
the company's representatives here say
she will have all she can carry. Today
a deal was about closed for the pur
chase of the steamers Eliza Anderson
and W. J. Mervin, sound boats, which
will be put on the route. It looks as
thougha daily service to the north would
soon be a reality.
As an incident of the great excitement
here, a special meeting of the city council
was held todaytotake action concerning
the necessity of raising the pay of police
men. So many officers have resigned to
go north that the department is badly
crippled,and it has been found impossible
to get men to take their places at pres
ent wages. The fire department has also
lost several men.
A loan and trust company here has
received a letter from J. L. Jewett of
Clondyke saying he was sending out by
some boat to the mint at San Francisco
enough gold dust to pay off the mortgage
on his home, which is probably the first
application of Clondyke gold to that pur
pose. In his letter Mr. Jewett says: "It
is estimated that 2000 men came into the
Clondyke this spring. There is plenty of
work for all of them, and next winter
many more will be needed. This is the
richest district ever found, and. there will
be millions of dollars taken out during
the next two years."
Seattle itself has had a wonderful
stimulus in business. Stores are crowded
all day long with men buying their out
fits. Some of the big houses receive let
ters daily from other cities to make up
outfits and hold until the senders of the
messages arrive here.
There are hundreds of such cases. Peo
ple are coming in from all the near-by
towns. Last night a party of fifteen ar
rived from Mount Vernon, Skagit
county. EUensburg has sent a delega
tion, and from Ballard, King county, at
least thirty men are giving up their po
sitions to follow the yellow fly north
ward.
A LITTLE ROMANCE
There will be a sequel to a pretty Car.
ladian love story when Joseph Bergevin
arrives at Beauharnois, a small town
up the St. Lawrence not far from Mon
! treal. Several years ago, while but a
boy, Bergevin became exceedingly fond
lof a young woman named Antoinette,
| who also lived at Beauharnois, but her
parents were Stern, his parents were
j poor and Antoinette was pretty, and a
' magistrate of the town was paying some
attention to the simple French maiden.
; They insisted on the customary settle
ment, but Bergevin had it not. How
{ ever, he would go and get it. Antoinette
J promised to be true and the young man
| cam* to this coast in search of the gol
den treasure. He found it not, and some
I months ago left with Edmond Mercier
j and Joseph E. Boucher for the Alaskan
! gold fields. Before he left he told Wil
j liam McArdle of this city that he was
going solely for the purpose of getting
enough money to marry Antoinette and
that if he failed he would never come
back. But he. made the money, and
when he goes back to Beauharnois he
will be able to knock the hopes of that
magistrate into a cocked hat.
Among the passengers on the Portland
that arrived here last week were the
three Frenchmen. Mercier has $45,000,
Boucher has $20,000 and Bergevin ,the
hero of the story, $22,000 at least. In ad
dition to all this they have yet several
claims on the Clondyke which are being
cared for. Bergevin has returned for
the sole purpose of marrying Antoinette.
MEN WILL GO
TACOMA, July 21.—The Clondyke ex
citement here has reached a stage where
every able-bodied man is making 2f
forte to find means to get Into the gold

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