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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, July 22, 1897, Image 2

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wonderland. The sight of sacks full of
nuggets and yellow dust brought down
from the Clondyke by men who a year
ago wwre penniless, is what has created
the rush. Outfitting establishments here
are crowded witih business—in fact, can
not handle the cinders that pour in for
campers' outfits. There is also a verit
able boom in rough, heavy cloohing, and
one house has sold out to the last article
its stocks of such goods as woolen un
derwear, heavy canvas clothing, etc.
Today the news spread about the city
that the St. Paul and Tacoma Miil com
pany had voluntarily raised its schedule
of wages to prevent its employes leaving
for the gold fields. Inquiry showed that
this hod not actually been done, but it
was expected to become necessary with
in a few days.
The Alaska fleet sailing from this port
is of course In no wise able to care for
the business that has suddenly grown
to such enormous proportions, and ev
ery idle craft in this part of the sound,
Jit to make the run to the far north, Is
'being hurriedly- fitted out, either to carry
freight or passengers or both. Not a
day passes but that some one who when
last seen was without the price of a meal
e-hows up among his old friends with a
email fortune in gold dust.
John Simpson, who for several years
has worked on the water front as a
•longshoreman, is back among his
friends lavishly spending his quickly
earned wealth. He brought out $85,000
and was out of civilization less than nine
months. He returned on Wie boat pre
ceding the Portland and had been in
California for a'few days prior to re
turning here-.
A strange feature- of the excitement la
that it is not confined to any one class,
but that all kinds and conditions of peo
ple are getting outfits to carry north.
Bankers and real estate men are to be
counted among those who have engaged
passage on outgoing boats. Purchasing
Agent Payne of the Pacific Coast Steam
ship company said today the steamers
Al Ki. Queen and. Mexico will carry not
less than 1500 people on tihelr next trips.
People who cannot get passage on the
next trip of boats are engaging places
ahead as far as August 2S, in order to be
sure of getting into the gold fields. All
accommodations on the steamer Queen,
which will sail for Alaska tomorrow,
and the steamer Mexico, which will sail
Sunday, have been sold. By this is
meant every foot of space on the vessel.
The decks, both under cover and unpro
tected, will be made Into temporary
sleeping quarters, and the hardier of the
adventurers are only too glad to get
this chance to spread their blankets
rather than not get away.
A letter received here from John and
Mrs. Wentzel, well known former Ta
comans, states that a dollar in the Clon
dyke is easier to set thar-a copper in this
city. That their party was averaging
$45 a day to each man, four of them,
when they decided to leave those claims
for the Clondyke. and'since their arrival
have, like all others, struck it rich.
CANADIAN ACTION
NEW YORK, July 21.—A dispatch to
the Herald from Ottawa says: Now that
the Dominion government is in posses
sion of authentic reports corroborative
of the first accounts sent out of the mar
velous richness of the new placer dig
gings in the Yukon and Clondyke re
gions, the organization of the district is
being completed. Two years ago the
Department of the Interior dispatched
a force of twenty Northwest mounted
police to Fort Cudahy. on the Canadian
side of the Alaskan frontier. The offi
cer in command. Inspector Constan
tine, established two posts, one at Fort
Cudahy and one at Forty-Mile Creek,
and proceeded to administer laws and
collect revenues for the customs de
partment. He collected about $15,000 the
first year. Encouraged by the prospects
of revenue, the government in 1595 ap
pointed D. W. Davis, a former member
of Parliament for Alberta, to the posi
tion of Customs Officer for the district,
and his returns, recently received,
swelled the total collections to about
$35,000.
The work of organization was first
suggested to the government by the
North American Trading and Transpor
tation Company, which was anxious- that
the British territory should be adminis
tered so as to guarantee the safety of its
interests. It was not undertaken by
the Dominion authorities, however, un
til the surveying parties then in the field
had, with more or less difficulty, located
the 141 st meridian of west longitude,
which forms the boundary between
Alaska and the Canadian Northwest
Territory, from Mount St. Elias to the
shores of the Arctic. When this had
been accomplished and the selection of
police posts began, grumblings from the
Seattle and other American coast news
papers reached the ears of the govern
ment here. It was boldly charged that
the Canadians were grabbing territory
In Alaska that did not belong to them.
William Ogilvie. chief of the Canadian
International Boundary Survey, set all
doubts at rest regarding the Canadian
posts by reporting that the observations
of the Canadian and American parties as
to the boundary differed only a few
feet —six feet at Forty-Mile and the
same at Cudahy. Since then nothing has
been heard of the alleged grab. Ogilvie
atayed in the country last winter and
busied himself In staking off c laims for
miners in the newly discovered placer
ground, the latter being well in Canadi
an territory, and along the rivers and
creeks flow.ing into the Yukon from the
east —namely, Bonanza. Bowlder, Eldo
rado, Carmacite, Clondyke and Stew
art. Of the mounted police who formed
Constantine's first detachment, not one
re-enlieted upon the expiration of their
terms this spring, so that an entirely
new force had to be sent up this spring.
It was not exported that men would con
tinue to work for the government'at $1
a day when wages ali around them w ere
$10 and $15.
Five of the returned poUcemen are- re
ported to have brought back $200,000 as
the result of their work in thair spare
hours. Constantine's last report, which
has Just been received, says that he Is
building a third post at the mouth of
the Clondyke, which flows into the Yu
kon on the east, about 35 miles south of
Forty-Mile. He asked for a larger force.
In this his suggestion has been antici
pated, as well as in the appointment of
a Gold Commissioner, while a Pacific
Coast firm is being negotiated with for
the supply of a steam launch to ply as
police boat between Clondyke, Forty-
Mile and Cudahy. Ogilvie was ordered to
return to Ottawa last fall, but. instead,
he- determined to remain in the coun
try and forward v full report to the
government of his doings, from which
the following are extracts:
"Starting from here, say December 1,
, It would be February before I reached
Ottawa, and during the- 37 or 40 days-of
this time I would be exposed to much
cold and hardship and some hazard from
Btorms. The Journey has been made, and
I would not hesitate to undertake it
were things more reasonable here and
dog food plenty, but it would take at
* \
least $1000 to equip us with transports
and outfit, which sum, I think, I can ex
pend mere in the interest of the country
by remaining here and making a survey
of Clondyke. a mispronunciation for the
Indian, word or words 'Throndyk' or
Puiek.' which means 'plenty of fish,'
from the fact that it is a famous salmon
stream.
"It is marked Clondyke on our maps.
It joins l the Yukon from the cast a few
miles above the site oft Fort Reliance,
about 00 miles above here. The discov
ery of sold In the branches of this stream
was. I believe, due to the reports of In
dians. A white man named J. A. Car
mich. who worked with me In ISS7, way
the lirst to take advantage of the ru
mor and located a claim In the first
branch, which was named by the miners
Bonanza Creek.
"Carmlch reached his claim in August
He had to cut some logs and get pro
visions to enable him to begin work on
his claim. He returned with a few
weeks' provisions for himself, wife and
brother-in-law (Indians) in the last of
August, and Immediately set about
working his claim.
"The gravel itself he had to carry in a
box on his back from 30 to 100 feet
Notwithstanding this, three men, work
ing very irregularly, washed out $14,200
in eight days, and Carmlch asserts that
had he had proper facilities, he could
have done it in two days.
"A branch ot the Bonanza named El
dorado has prospered magnificently, and
another branch named Tilly Creek has
prospered well. There are about 170
claims staked in the main creek, and
the branches are good for as many more,
aggregating some 350 claims, some of
which will require over 1000 men to work
properly.
"A few miles further up Bear Creek en
ters Clondyke, and it has been prospect
ed and located on. About 12 miles above
the mouth of Bear Creek, Gold Bottom
Creek joins Clondyke, and on it, at a
branch named Bunker Crtek, very rich
ground has been found. On Gold Bottom
Creek and branches there Will be prob
ably 200 or 300 claims. The Indians have
reached another creek very much fur
ther up. which they call Too Much Gold
Creek, on which the gold is so plentiful,
as the miners say in joke, 'you have to
mix gravel with it to sluice it.'
"Up to date nothing has been heard
from this creek. From ail this, we think
we have here a district which will give
1000 claims ot 400 feet ir. length each.
Now, 1000 such claims will require at
least 3000 men to work them properly,
and as wages for working in the mines
are from $S to $10 per day. we have every
reason to assume that this particular
territory will In a year or two contain
10.000 souls at least, for the news has
gone out to the East and an unprece
dented influx is anticipated next spring.
And this is not all, for a large creek
called Indian Creek, Joins the Yukon
about midway between Clondyke and
Stewart rivers, and all along this creek
good pay dirt may be found. All that
stood in the way of working heretofore
has been the scarcity of provisions and
the difficulty of getting them up here.
Indian Creek is quite a large stream, and
it is probable It will yield 500 or 600
claims.
"Further south yet lie the leads of sev
eral branches of the Stewart river, on
which some prospecting has been done
this summer and good indications were
found, but the want of provisions pre
vented development. Now gold has been
found in several of the streams joining
Pelly river and also along the Hootaliqu.
In the line of these finds, further south,
are the Casair goid fields, in British Co
lumbia, so the presumption is that we
have in our territory along the easterly
branches of the Yukon a gold-bearing
belt of indefinite width and upward of
300 miles long, exclusive of the British
Columbia part of it.
"Quartz of a good qualits- is reported
In the hills around Bonanza Creek, but
of this I will be able to speak more fully
after my proposed survey. It is pretty
certain, from information I have got
from prospectors, that all or nearly all
of the northely branch of White river
is on our side of the line, and copper is
found on it. I have also seen a specimen
Of silver ore said to have been picked
up in a creek flowing into Bennett Lake,
about 14 miles down on it, on the eastern
side.
"When it was fairly established that
Bonanza Creek was rich in gold there
was a rush from Forty-Mile, the town be
ing almost deserted. Men who had been
in a chronic state of drunkenness for
weeks were pressed into boats as ballast
and taken up to stake themselves a
claim, and claims were staked by men
for friends who were not In the country
at the time."
SOLVES THE PROBLEM
WILMINGTON Del., July 21—The Yu
kon Mining. Trading and Transportation
Company, (armed here last year, and
which is Just completing final arrange
ments for explorations in the Yukon
district, will shortly put into effect a
plan which will solve the vexatious
problem of shortage of supplies in the
Yukon territory. In 1896 P. I. Packard of
Portland, Or., who is interested in the
company, went to the Yukon district to
locate a route from the coast to Teslin
Lake, the head of the navigable waters
of the Yukon upon which a railway could
be built.
With the aid of Indians he located the
pass leading direct from the Tagu Inlet
on the Alaska coast to Teslin Lake. This
pass he learned was then known to only
five white men. In October of last year
he returned and made his report to the
company and immediately appliedi for
charters in Alaska British Columbia and
Canada, ail of which were granted last
spring. As an encouragement to the
enterprise British Columbia made the
company a grant of 5,120 acres of land
to the mile of railway to be built, in all
650.000 acres.
In an interview last night Mr. Pack
ard, w ho is here making arrangements,
said that the road would be a great boon
to miners, as it will reduce the cost of
their supplies and remove the present
dangerous delays to their transportation
up the Yukon river.
THE BOOKS CLOSED
SAN FRANCISCO. July 21.—The Alas
ka Commercial Company has closed its
hooks for the Excelsior, which will leave
for St. Michael's on the 28th inst. Scores
(locked to the company's office again to
day, and enough decided to go that way
to make up the 200 which the steamer can
carry.
A great majority go from San Fran
cisco, but a number belong to the inter
ior of the State, which is largely sup
plying recruits for the Yukon. This 200
is but a small part of the California
army which is mustering. Thousands of
San Franciscans long to go, hundreds
have about made up their minds to go,
and score*, and perhaps hundreds, will
go this summer, a majority taking the
Juneau route. A great many will let the
season for travel close with a firm in
tention of going in the spring.
THE FEVER AT CINCINNATI
CINCINNATI, July 21.—At a meeting
held here by a number of well-known
LOS ANGELES HERALD: THURSDAY MORNING, JULY 22, J897
business men P. H. Wilson, a builder,
was elected President, and H. A. Tho
burn, a real estate man. Secretary and
Treasurer. Wilson says the object of the
meeting was to organize a company of
$100, each to pay $1000, proceed to San
Francisco, purchase an iron vessel of
sufficient size to carry men. and, provis
ions which can be bought forsso,oooand
proceed to the Alaskan gold fields. It is
the purpose to hold, the vessel at the
nearest point to the gold fields for head
quarters for the members of the com
pany and employes. An agreement was
drawn up and twelve of those present
signed- it, each agreeing to the payment
of $1000. Others are being solicited.
A DOUBTING THOMAS
T,OLEDO, 0.. July 21— Mr. and Mrs.
Claus Shelmann of Defiance have just
received a letter from their son Fred,
who has been in Alaska since last March,
that discredits the golden stories that
have been exciting the people of the
West for several weeks.
Mr. Fhc-Imann went to Alaska from
Montana last March under contract as
a prospector. A number of men were In
the party and they will all return, fo
Montana this month. Shelmann says
there is absolutely no truth in the fab
ulous stories that come from Alaska and
.hat the gold fields there are practically
barren. He says there is>a great scarcity
of food in that section. The suffering
there and the amount of money neces
sary to be paid to secure the barest ne
cessities of life, he says, should- deter
any thinking man from giving the sub
ject of a trip to that country a second
thought.
STOCKTON STRUCK
STOCKTON, July 21—The Clondyke
fever has struck Stockton and quite a
number have already announced their
intention of starting for the gold fields.
Among others are City Health Officer
Leach, Dr. Ira Ladd, tx-Police Officer
Kuhn and James McLeod. Kuhr hasal
ready secured passage on the steame:
Excelsior.
MORE GOLD RECEIVED
SAN FRANCISCO. July 21.—The
steamer Umatilla, which arrived today
from Puget Sound ports, brought down
almost $200,000 of Alaskan gold, of winch
$136,700 was In, gold dust from Seattle
consigned to Wells, Fargo & Co. There
are several other shipments of gold In
sacks, some of which was' stiipped di
rect from Juneau, and advices from that
place are to the effect that at h ast $750,
--000 of dust is awaiting shipment at vari
ous Alaskan stations.
Among the sensational advices receiv
ed was one from St. Michael's to the ef
fect that over $4,000,000 In. gold, which
has not been included, with the fortunes
recently brought to the coast by miners,
will be shipped through Wells, Fargo
& Co.; other lucky miners having reach
ed- the island since the departure of the
Excelsior and Portland, who have se
cured greater fortunes individually than
those whose stories have already been
told.
Although the capacity of steamers
Portland, which sails tomorrow for St.
Michael's and the steamer Excelsior,
which sails on the 2Sth, is limited to
about 110 passengers, over 1000 applica
tions have been made for berths. Mosl
of the disappointed ones are making ar
rangements to travel to Tacoma by rail
and secure passage on the Mexico and
Topeka, which will sail thence next
week, but many must inevitably wait
until next spring, and their disappoint
ment is sore.
ANOTHER STEAMER
PORTLAND, Ore., July 21.—The Pa
cific Coast Steamship company has
chartered the Oregon Railway and
Navigation company's steamer George
W. Elder and' will put her on the line
between Portland and Alaska in the in
terest of Portland merchants. It is in
tended that the steamer will make her
first trip from Portland to Juneau on or
about July 30th.
THE LAST BERTH
SAN FRANCISCO. July 21.—The lasl
berth on the steamer Excelsior was paid
for today, and a dozen or more disap
pointed ones saw the money of the other
men go across the counter.
Quite a number of women have en
gaged pass-age on the Excelsior. Some
of them are going with their husbands,
but one or two will make the- journey
alone.
At the office of the Pacific Coast Steam
ship company the same activity is being
manifested in the purchase- of tickets.
Over thirty-five persons have- engaged
passage for the next steamer for Victo
ria, connecting at Port Townsend with
the setamer for Juneau. As these steam
ers sail every five days and the overland
route from Juneau is recommended as
the most expeditious, a greater rush is
expected in a few days. Already the
steamer Elder is scheduled to leave
Portland on July 30th for Sitka and Ju
neau and nearly every berth is engaged.
Some are going to leave the city by train
and catch the steamer at Portland or
Port Townsend. *
It is said at the office of the Pacific-
Coast Steamship company that if the
demand for transportation continues an
extra steamer will be placed on the route
About August Ist.
HAD OUGHT TO
LONDON, July 21.—The Daily Mail
has received an anonymous letter with
reference to the probability of a war be
tween England and the United States,
in which the writer says: "England had
ought to take the opportunity of rectify
ing the frontier by annexing Maine, Ver
mont, New Hampshire- and a part of
New York state, thus giving Canada a
seaport, Portland, to which navigation
is open all the year. She ought also to
annex Alaska and the Sandwich
islands."
Christian Conference
SANTA CRUZ, July 21.—At the Chris
tian state convention at Garfield Park
today the report of the trustees- of the
Berkeley Bible seminary was read by
H. D. McAneny. During the year the
seminary had received $21,835 in its en
dowment fund. The present demands of
the seminary are a good working library,
a commodious building and the enlarg
ing of the Berkeley Christian church.
The committee on state work recom
mended an appropriation for founding
an Alameda church, employing a state
superintendent of missions and arrang
ing of the churches in groups so they
can send their pastors into home mission
lieids for a short time.
Terribly Mangled
OAKLAND, July 21.—Frank Bowman,
a Southern Pacific switchman, fell be
neath the wheels of a freight train today
and was terribly mangled. Both legs
were amputated at the hospital. The
chances are even that Bowman will re
cover.
Gold Withdrawn
NEW YORK, July 21.—Gold to the
amount of $100,000 was withdrawn from
the cub-treasury here today for ship
ment to Canada.
BRIGHAM YOUNG'S SONS
LEADS THE UTAH JUBILEE PRO
CESSION
Old Scenes Recalled and Lots of En
thusiasm Shown by the Old and
the New Citizens
SALT LAKE, Utah, July 21.—The en
thuaiaern which took possession of the
city yesterday on account of the Pioneer
celebration was no less pronounced to
day. Everybody was taking a genuine
interest in the great parade which was
to take place at 11 oclock. Thousands
of people thronged, the route of the pro
cession and filled' every window and
place that afforded a favorable view.
Leading the procession between these
living walls of humanity were Director-
General Brigham Young and his corps
of assistants. After Director-General
Young came Grand Marshal Nat M.
Brigham and aides mounted and wear
ing yellow sashes.
Nearly 200 Indians followed, represent
ing the "Oldest Inhabitants."
Jim Bridger's cabin was a unique ar.d
characteristic float. The Fremont
county, Idaho, band followed, playing
elirring airs.
The first house In Utah was a realistic
float that suggested many things not
actually depleted.
The slow ox team of '47 was followed
by an electric car. The first legislative
hall was on wheels and the only sur
vivor of that legislature, Hon. Lorin A.
Farr of Ogden, rode alone In a carriage
behind' the float.
In a stoutly built carriage were fifteen
men representing the Nauvoo Legion.
In an adobe float was to be seen the
press upon which the Deseret News was
printed in 1850. Printers' devils in lurid
eolors'grinned from open doors upon the
spectators.
The typical old overland stage was
crowded with passengers, and rifles and
other firearms protruded In the most
threatening fashion.
Next in line came a banner on which
was inscribed the first message trans
mitted fiver the newly constructed tele
graph line.- It was from Acting Governor
Fuller to President Lincoln.
The Union Pacific engine and- twenty
cars, being the first to enter Salt Lake,
evoked hearty applause as It followed in
the procession with a full head of
steam on.
Many other interesting features repre
senting the early settlement of the west
made up the long line of march, which
was enlivened by numerous bands of
music.
At Saltair pavilion there was a con
cert this afternoon by Chris-tensen's or
chestra, and a beautiful ceremony of the
"Wedding of the Waters."
The proceedings terminated with a
grand ball in honor of "Utah" and her
maids and the county queens.
Tonight a concert and musical contest
was given in the tabernacle, and pioneer
talent amused a large audience at the
Salt Lake theater.
Warehouses Burned
TUBA CITY, July 21.—Three buildings
occupied by Chinese as stores and wash
houses were burned this afternoon at
this place. The business portion of the
town had a narrow; escape. The loss,
with goods, is about $2000; insurance
$500. Loss- on other buildings, $1000, with
no insurance. The fire was caused by a
Chinese smoking.
Hartman Recovering
SACRAMENTO, July 21.—Jacob Hart
man, is recovering from a dose of mor
phine which he swallowed on Sunday.
He had been despondent over the recent
death of two of his children and !s
thought to have taken the poison to end
his grief,
FOR SALE—LIVE STOCK
FOR SALE-3 PROOF JACKS, LARGE
size, brown and mouse color. Address San
Gabriel postofllee, or W. W. GARNER,
Garvey ranch, San Gabriel. 8-7
FOR SALE—CHEAP. TWO FINE STAN
dard bred horses; would make an excel
lent team. Address University P. 0., 96,
or call sec. 8., race track. 23
FOR SALE—BEST LADIES' OR FAMILY
mare in city; sound, safe, city broke, sin
gle, double or saddle: weight about HdO;
7 years old. 1000 E. Main. 25
FOR SALE—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE—JUNIOR MONARCH HAY'
press, $225. P. BRUTTIG, 1130 E. Pico
St. 22-25-26
FOR SALE—LODGING HOUSES
FOR SALE—A FIRST-CLASS ROOMING
house; the best corner in Los Angeles; 55
rooms; house always full; party is going
to England; anyone who wants a good,
paying house come and investigate. 104
N. Los Angeles St. 22
MUSJCAL
A. G. GARDNER, PIANO HOUSE.
Pianos sold, rented and exchanged; rear
of main postoffice. 118 "Winston st.
'Phone Brown 295. tf
WATCHMAKING
REMEMBER, YOU GET A GUARANTEE
worth something when you have your
watch repaired by W. J. GETZ, 336 South
Broadway. tf
I, THE UNDERSIGNED. HEREBYCER
tIfy that I am carrying on and conduct
ing and transacting a dry and fancy goods
business in the Slate of California:
That the principal place of said business
Is at the City of I.os Angeles, In said State
of California, and that I am conducting
and carrying on and transacting said bus
iness under the name and style of "Ville de
Paris."
■ That I have no partner in said business
and am the sole proprietor thereof.
That my full name is Auguste Justin
Georges Fusenot.
That my place of. residence is at Beleve
dere in the County of Marin, in the State
of California.
Dated. July 15th, 1897.
AUGUSTE JUSTIN GEORGES FUSE
NOT.
State of California, County of Los An
geles, ss.
1. T. E. Newlin, County Clerk find tx
offieio Clerk of the Superior Court, do here
by certify the foregoing to be a full, true
and correct copy of the original certificate
showing use of lletitious name in business
under the name and style of "Ville de
Paris." on file in my office, and that I have
carefully compared the same with the
original.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set
my' hand and affixed the seal of the Su
perior Court, this 21st day of July, 1897.
<Seal) T. E. NEWLIN,
County Clerk.
By SAM KUTZ, Deputy. 22-29-5-12-19
LOS ANGELES DAILY lIERALD
I.OS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
LOS ANGELES DAILY lIERALD
LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
I,OS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
Slate of California, County of Los An
geles—ss.
L. M. Holt, superintendent of circula
tion of the Los Angeles Daily Herald,
being lirst duly sworn, deposes and says:
That for the five months from February
1. I.VOT, to June 30, 1897 (inclusive), the
total circulation of the said Daily Her
ald was 1,290,035 copies, being an
AVERAGE DAILY CIRCULATION OF
8604
That the week-day circulation during
the above time was 1,071,567, being
I A DAILY AVERAGE OF 5306 COPIES
That the Sunday circulation during the
above time was 219,059, being
AN AY ICR AGE FOR EACH SUNDAY OF
10,431
L. M. HOLT.
Superintendent of Circulation.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this
19th day of July, 1897.
FRANK J. COOPER,
Notary Public In and for the County of
Los Angeles, State of California.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE—CHEAP, FRUIT AND
cigar stand: also light groceries and
drink stand; good corner; owner going
east. Corner Ninth and Grand aye. 22
FOR SALE—2 LARGE GOLD MINES,
going and largely developed and fully
equipped; also a fine copper mine. M.
MACDONALD, 325 Byrne block. 22
FOR SALE—BUSINESS; HOUSES; FOR
rent; rooms: collections; help free; work.
EDW. NITTINGER. 236!*. S. Spring st. tf
FOR SALE-GOOD PAYING AGENCY
business, $250; goods handled direct. Ad
dress Z., Box 29, Herald office. 23
I SELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS.
I. D. BARNARD, 111 North Broadway, tf
FOR SALE—SALOONS AT VERY REA
sonable terms. Apply at 440 Aliso st. tf
FOR RENT—HOUSES
FOR RENT—WIESENDANGER, 431 S.
Broadway:
$10. Cottage 5 rooms, bath, 649 Gladys
aye.; water free.
$15. 6 rooms, bath, barn, 926 Towne
aye.; also same 932 Towne aye. 26
FOR RENT—WIESENDANGER CO., 431
S. Broadway.
$10—Cottage 5 rooms, bath, 649 Gladys
aye.; water free.
$12—6 rooms, bath, barn, 926 Towne aye.;
also same, 932 Towne aye. 23
FOR RENT-1019 S. OLIVE ST., 2-STORY
house; 9 rooms, bath. Apply room 354
Y\ ki'.-'Hlng, corner Second and
Spring sts. tf
FOR RENT—ROOMS
FOR RENT—"HOTEL LOUISE," NEW-
Iy furnished rooms; prices to suit, by
day, week or month. 520 S. Broadway. 7-23
FOR RENT—2 FRONT ROOMS, HOUSE
keeping. $8. 310 Clay st. 22
EDUCATIONAL
WOODBURY BUSINESS COLLEGE, 226
S. Spring st., will conduct special classes
for public and high school students un
der the instruction of Prof. C. S. Thomp
son of the Seventeenth-street school,
from July 6th to September Ist; tuition
$4 per month; half day sessions; our
regular commercial and shorthand work
continued throughout the summer at
usual rates. Pupils enter any day and
receive individual instruction. Rooms
are large, cool and pleasant. Electric
elevator. Write or call for Illustrated
catalogue. G. A. HOUGH, president; N.
G. FELKER, vice-president.
BOYS' BOARDING SCHOOL (MlLl
tary); ideal location in country, mile
west of Westlake park; send for cata
logue or call. LOS ANGELES MILI
TARY ACADEMY, P. O. box 193, city. 8-6
FRENCH LANGUAGE; PRIVATE LES
sons. Address PROF; L. GAILLIARD,
247 K. Fifth st. 7-25
LOST AND FOUND
LOST—AT TERMINAL BATH HOUSE,
a valuable ring. A liberal reward will
be paid on leaving at room 3, 120V4 S.
Spring st. 22
HYPNOTISM
HYPNOTISM AND PERSONAL MAG
netlsm taught; diseases cured. HYP
NOTIC INSTITUTE, 423% S. Spring. 8-2
LUDWIG & MATTHEWS, WHOLESALE
and retail fruits and vegetables. MOTT
MARKET, 135 S. Main St. Tel. 550. tf
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
HOUSES AND LOTS
FOR SALE —14000: LARGE 2-STORY. S
room house, with baths, closets, cellar:
large lot. tine grounds, stable, lawn, flow
ers, cement walks, streets all- finished;
near electric cars; south part of city In
Woodlnwn tract; easy terms; modern,
up-to-date home und very cheap. M.
MACDONALD, 325 Byrne block. 22
FOR SALE—S2OOO; EASY TERMS; BEAU
tlful cottage home. No. 223 E. Twenty
fourth st.. near Main st.; well built, taste
fully decorated, large windows, two man
tels, bath, beautiful grounds, 50-foot lot.
flowers, fruit and berries: n lovely home
for a small family. W EIS ENDA N G ER
CO.. 431 S. Broadway. 30
FOR SALE-$15,000; 17-ROOM HOUSE,
lot 60x165; close in on Grand aye.; choice
property. M. MACDONALD, 325 Byrne
block. 22
FOR SALE OR RENT—LOVELY HOUSE
33-IN BEAUTIFUL ST. JAMES PARK.
Inquire on premises or at 421 W. Adams.
8-17
CITY LOTS
FOR SALE-C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots in his Third addition on easy Install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Office, 213 W. First st. tf
BUSINESS PROPERTY
FOR SALE — WIESENDANGER, 431
S. Broadway:
$125,000. Business property, income.
$S5OO.
$11,000. Business lot. income $950.
$17,000. Business property, income
$1400.
$21,000. 300 lots on electric cars, s. w.
$5500. 10 acres, trees, alfalfa, good
house; south city limits.
$5000. 12-room residence, Santa Monica.
$30,000. Stock ranch, 7000 acres.
$1600. New house. 0 rooms, bath, barn.
$150. Lot near Central aye. cars. 25
COUNTRY PROPERTY
FOR SALE—LARGE SHEEP RANCH OF
upwards of 22,000 acres on an island off
the coast, with 1200 head of blooded sheep;
no diseases; no herding; no expense ex
cept for shearing; buildings-, corrals,
sheds, boats, horses; complete outfit for
making money; feed enough for 8000 head.
The high tariff on wool in the Dlngley
bill, soon to become a law, makes- this
the best kind of business to engage In.
Can shear twice a year and get good,
long wool. Owner going to Europe, and
Will sell for one-third cost. VAN VRAN
KEN & RUNELS, 114!!.. S. Broadway. 22
FOR SALE-$15,O0O; 23U-ACRE ORCHARD
In Glendale, 7 miles from court house in
Los Angeles; 9-room house, large barn,
corral, etc.; 7 acres in navel oranges: 7
acres in lemons; 9 acres In deciduous
fruits; income over $3000 per annum: easy
terms. M. MACDONALD, 325 Byrne
block. 22
FOR SALE—OWING TO DEATH OF
late owner, an elegant ranch, together
with growing orchards and sundry
tracts of valuable land, are offered at
very low prices in order to effect a quick
sale and wind up estate. Write for par
ticulars to C. ISEARD, San Luis Rey,
Cal. 8-6
FOR SALE-BARGAIN; THE FAMOUS
Lewis tract, near Garvanza, consisting
of 103 large lots, now offered for sale as a
whole or in lots; will also trade for Oak
land, San Francisco or Los Angeles prop
erty. For full particulars inquire of L.
M. CORWIN. Highland Park. Cal. 7^6
FOR EXCHANGE—REAL ESTATE
FOR EXCHANGE—
8 houses, one owner, to trade for coun
try property.
Clear Vernon property to trade for
something near Washington and San
Pedro sts.
6S-acro dairy ranch In Orange county;
S-room house; large barn; for city prop
erty.
4-room, real pretty cottage on Twenty
second St., for Santa Ana suburban prop
erty.
40 acres alfalfa land, close to Santa Ana,
and 100-foot close In business property at
same place for something good in Los
Angeles.
Or anything else in real estate that you
want. Come and see me
FRED L. SEXTON,
22 266 Wilson block.
FOR EXCHANGE—
$3000 —20 acres in alfalfa; small build
ings: water abundant; close In; will as
sume.
$1500—20 acres in Buena Park, with wa
ter; will assume.
$3500—35 acres in Gardena, S-room house,
etc.: good, damp land.
$8000—20 acres very best soil; adjoining
city. JOHN L. PAVKOVICH,
22 220 W. First st.
FOR EXCHANGE-$100.000; 760 ACRES
near Eddy ,N. M.; 500 acres in alfalfa;
20 acres In fruits; fine buildings and large
improvements; abundance of water at $1
per acre per annum: farm well stocked
with hogs, horses, etc., etc.; all clear;
wanted, cattle and cattle ranch or fruit
ranch or ranches. What have you? M.
MACDONALD, 325 Byrne block. 22
TWO ACRES SET SOLID TO FRUIT;
soil uneXceled; new. modern 7-room
house, with cement cellar, at Bur bank;
will trade for city property; price $2500;
excellent for chlckc-n ranch; abundance
of water. BEN WHITE, 235 W. First
street. 23
FOR EXCHANGE —A NEW 10-ROOM
house, a fine home, commanding beauti
ful view; will accept eastern city prop
erty, Pasadena land or lots or clear land.
AMERICAN BUILDING CO.. 122 West
Third St., Henne building. 25
WANT ACREAGE OR OTHER PROP
erty in exchange for handsome, new,
modern 8-room cottage, Wolfskin tract;
$3000; mortgage $1200. What have you?
BEN WHITE, 235 W. First St. 23
FOR EXCHANGE—YOUR EASTERN
property for California and California for
eastern. Call and see me. M. MAC
DONALD, 323 Byrne block. 22_
■' _ BATH i__
THE LOS ANGELES VITAPATHIC IN
stitute gives faradic, static and galvanic
electricity, vapor, sun and electrical
baths, sheet packs, fomentations, salt
glows, sprays, showers and shampoos;
Swedish and German massage chromo
pathy vacuum treatment. Fifteen
treating rooms, 35 rooms for patients
and guests. Largest vitapathic institute
in California. DR. HARRIMAN, physi
cian in charge. Consultation tree. Thurs
day evening meetings free to all investi
gators at 534V4 S. Broadway, Hotel Del
aware, tf
HYGIENIC BATH PARLORS—ELEC
tric and steam baths; massage, salt
glows and constitutional treatment; for
ladles and gentlemen. 125 W. Fourth St.;
Tel. Brown 142. 8-10
___^LJUJWBERS_
FRANK A. WEINSHANK, PLUMBER
and gasfttter, 240 E. Second st. Tel 136.
FINANCIAL
MONEY TO LOAN IN ANY AMOUNTS
on diamonds, watches, Jewelry, pianos,
sofas, lodging houses, hotels and private
household furniture; interest reasonable;
partial payments received; money quick;
private office for ladles. G. M. JONES,
rooms 12-14. 254 S. Hroadway. 28-tf
THE SYNDICATE LOAN COMPANY.
Ut% S. Spring st.. rooms 6. 7. and 8. loans
money on all kinds of good collateral se
curity; money on hand; private waiting
rooms. Telephone Main 553. GEORGE
L. MILLS, Manager. tf
MONEY LOANED ON DIAMONDS,
watches, jewelry, pianos, sealskins, car
riages, bicycles, warehouse receipts and
ail kinds of collateral security; storage
free in our warehouse. LEE BROS., 402
S. Spring st. tf
-—■ —■ i
MONEY TO LOAN ON FURNITURE,
watches, diamonds, pianos, sealskins and
real estate; interest reasonable; private
ofllce for ladies; business confidential.
C. C. LAMB, 226 S. Spring St.; entrance,
room 467. ( S-21 tf
AMERICAN LOAN COMPANY, 118V4 S.
Spring, over Royal bakery; loans on
real estate and collateral of all kinds,
warehouse receipts, insurance policies,
etc.: best of rates; private office for
ladies. 7-24
MONEY TO LOAN—
$100 to $75,000 on city or country real
estate.
LEE A. M'CONNELL.
7-24 113 S. Broadway.
TO LOAN—MONEY AT 6 PER CENT IN
terest per annum; monthly payments.
MECHANICS' SAVINGS MUTUAI.
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
107 S. Broadway. 25
WANTED — MONEY — I HAVE $5000
worth of Security Loan & Trust com
pany stock; $3r>tlo worth Ist mort. paper
for sale at a bargain. J. G. KING, 244 S.
Broadway, 25
TO LOAN—A BARREL OF MONEY ON
diamonds, pianos, furniture and all first
class securities; business confidential.
CREASINGER, 217 S. Broadway, rooms
1 and 2. 5-29 tf
I'OINDEXTER & WADSWORTH, ROOM
308 Wilcox building, lend money on any
good real estate; building loans made; if
you wish to lend or borrow call on us. tf
MONEY TO LOAN, $500 TO $3000, IN SUMS
to suit; no delays. CONTINENTAL
rtUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
126 W. Second St., Wilcox building. tf
MONEY TO LOAN—FROM $1000 TO $10,000
on warehouse receipts and other first
class collateral security. VICTOR WAN
KOWSKI & CO., 126 W. Second st. 24
TO IXDAN —UNLIMITED AMOUNT FOR
small loans: no commission; light ex
pense. SECURITY LOAN AND TRUST
CO., 223 S. Spring st.
TO LOAN-IE YOU WANT MONEY ON
real estate security I have It in any
amount. WM. F. BOSBYSHELL. 107 S.
Broadway. 5-20 tf
MONEY TO LOAN UPON EASY TERMS
of repayment. STATE MUTUAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASS'N., 151 S.
Broadway. 5-20 tf^
MONEY TO LOAN—LOWEST RATES ON
real estate, personal notes or security.
JOHN L. PAVKOVICH. 220 W. First, tf
LIFE INSURANCE POLICIES BOUGHT
for cash. T. J. WILLISON & CO.,
241 S. Broadway, Los Angeles. 7-30
v MEDIUMS
MRS. DR. STEWARD (FORMERLY OF
Boston), the renowned medium, hypnot
ist and magnetic healer, has permanently
located In Los Angeles. Dr. Steward
cures all chronic diseases and female
troubles. 1C In trouble come to see her.
She is a practical medium and her advice
on business matters, love and family
affairs, lawsuits, mines, etc., has made
many persons successful and happy. Sho
gives practical and scientific Instructions
in hypnotism, personal magnetism and
develops mediums. Terms reasonable
and satisfaction guaranteed or no charge.
Call early and avoid the rush. If you
come by appointment you don't have to
wait. Office hours, 10 a. m. to 4p. m. and
7 to 8 p. m. 431>». S. Spring St., parlors
2 and 4. 22
MME. LEO, THE RENOWNED FORE
caster and card reader; she tells the past,
present and future; she advlaes you with
a certainty as to the proper course to
pursue in life; she gives lucky charms,
brings the separated together, causes
speedy marriage with the one you love;
tells if the one you love is false or true;
also very successful in locating mines
and minerals; all those In trouble In busi
ness matters, love and family affairs
should by all means consult her; letters
containing $1 giving age, color of hair
and eyes, married or single, will receive
prompt attention; don't fail to see her;
hours 9 a. m. to 7:30 p. m.; Sunday, 10
a. m. to Ip. m., at 125 W. Fourth. 8-13
V FREE CLAIRVOYANT DIAGNOSE
and treatment of disease will be given to
the poor every Tuesday at the Magnetic
Institute, northeast corner Sixth and
Spring. Entrance, 125 W. Sixth. Disease
located without asking questions. Seven
years' successful healing in Los Angeles.
Send for testimonials. MRS. ESTHER
DYE, magnetic healer. th-sun-tf
MRS. PARKER. PALMIST, CLAIRVOY
ant and medium; life reading, business
removals, law suits, mineral locations,
love affairs, etc. Take Third-st. electric
car to Vermont aye. and Vine st. Sec
ond house on Vine St., west of Vermont
aye. 50c and $1.00. tf
MRS. WALKER, CLAIRVOYANT AND
life business reading medium: all busi
ness affairs of life looked Into for the ad
vancement of your future. 316& S. Spring
street. Mv
GRACE GILMORE, CLAIRVOYANT
and card reader, has returned to Los
Angeles: ladies, 25 cents; gents, 50 cents.
32S'a S. Spring st., rooms 9 and 11. 7-23
MME. GRACE, CARD MEDIUM; THE
wonder of the 19th century; reveals the
past, present and future. 644 S. Los An
geles st., bet. Fifth and Sixth sts. 8-1
HUB. SANFORD JOHNSON, THE
well known Independent slate writer and
clairvoyant, gives sittings dally at 533 S.
Broadway.
MME. ~ RACHEIT CARD READER,
tells past, present and future; sittings
daily, 32i'a S. Spring St., room 11. 9-14
ELLA M. WHITE, TRANCE CLAlR
voyant medium; readings daily except
Sunday. 245 S. Hill st. 6mo
MRS. ALDA, PALMIST, TELLS COR
rectly. S3o',a S. Spring St., room 22. 8-20
DENTISTS
ADAMS BROS., DENTAL PARLORS.
239% S.Springst.; pain-less extracting, 50c;
fillings; plates, from $4; all work guar
anteed; established 12 years. Hours. 8-5;
Sundays, 10-12. Telephone, black 1273. tf
frXnkTstkVensTl^^^
open days and evenings; also Sundays;
electric light. Tel. Black 821.
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
LUCIEN EARLE, ATTORNEY AT LAW,
office, Bullard building; entrance, room
420; telephone black 1445. 7-24-97
BROUSSEAU & MONTGOMERY,
Attorneys-at-Law,
403 Bradbury block, Los Angeles, tf
i

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