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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, July 23, 1897, Image 1

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Double Sheet
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 296.
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
HOUSES AND LOTS
FOR SALE —$2000; EASY TERMS; BEAU
tiful cottage home, No. 223 E. Twenty
fourth at., near Main St.; well built, taste
fully decorated, large windows, two man
tels, bath, beautiful grounds, 50-foot lot,
flowers, fruit and berries: a lovely home
for a small family. WEISENDANGER
CO., 431 S. Broadway. 30
FOR SALE OR RENT—LOVELY HOUSE
33 —IN BEAUTIFUL ST. JAMES PARK.
Inquire on premises or at 421 W. Adams.
8-17
CITY LOTS
FOR SALE—C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots in his Third addition on easy install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Office, 213 W. First st. tf
BUSINESS PROPERTY
FOR SALE — WIESENDANGER, 431
S. Broadway:
$126,000. Business property, income.
$8600.
$11,000. Business lot, income $950.
$17,000. Business property, income
$1400.
$21,000. 300 lots on electric cars, s. w.
$5500. 10 acres, trees, alfalfa, good
house: south city limits.
$5000. 12-room residence. Santa Monica.
$30,000. Stock ranch, 7000 acres.
$1000. New house, 6 rooms, bath, barn.
$150. Lot near Central aye. cars. 25
COUNTRY PROPERTY
FOR SALE—OWING TO DEATH OF
late owner, an elegant ranch, together
with growing orchards and sundry
tracts of valuable land, are offered at
very low prices In order to effect a quick
sale and wind up estate. Write for par
ticulars to C. ISEARD, San Luis Rey,
Cal. 8-6
FOR SALE—BARGAIN; THE FAMOUS
Lewis tract, near Garvanza, consisting
of 103 large lots, now offered for sale as a
whole or in lots; will also trade for Oak
land, San Francisco or Los Angeles prop
erty. For full particulars inquire of L.
M. CORWIN, Highland Park, Cal. 7-26
FOR SALE—A CALIFORNIA FARM
for you; 12 miles from Los Angeles; under
irrigation: soil and climate perfect: half
the price usually asked. See W. H. HOL
ABIRD, Byrne building. Los Angeles, tf
FOR SALE—AT SANTA MONICA, REAL
estate and insurance business; long es
tablished. Apply to M. H. KIMBALL, 216
Utah aye. 23-25-27
FOR EXCHANGE—REAL ESTATE
TWO ACRES SET SOLID TO FRUIT:
soil unexeeled; new, modern 7-room
house, with cement cellar, at Burbank;
will trade for city property; price $2500;
excellent for chicken ranch; abundance
of water. BEN WHITE, 235 W. First
street. 28
FOR EXCHANGE—A NEW 10-ROOM
house, a fine home, commanding beauti
ful view: will accept eastern city prop
erty. Pasadena land or lots or clear land.
AMERICAN BUILDING CO., 122 West
Thlro st., Henne building. 25
WANT ACREAGE OR OTHER PROP
erty in exchange for handsome, new,
modern S-room cottage. Wolfskin tract:
$3000: mortgage $1200. What have you?
BEN WHITE, 235 W. First St. 23
FOR RENT—HOUSES
FOR RENT—WIESENDANGER, 431 S.
Broadway:
$10. Cottage 5 rooms, bath, 649 Gladys
aye.; water free.
$15. C rooms, bath, barn, 926 Towne
aye.; also same 932 Towne aye. 26
FOR RENT—WIESENDANGER CO., 431
S. Broadway.
$10—Cottage 5 rooms, bath, 649 Gladys
aye.; water free.
$12—0 rooms, bath, barn. 926 Towne aye.;
also same, 932 Towne aye. 23
FOR RENT-1019 S. OLIVE
house; 9 rooms, bath. Apply room 351
Wilcox building, corner Second and
Spring sts. tf
FOR RENT—ROOMS
FOR RENT—"HOTEL LOUISE," NEW-
Iy furnished rooms; prices to suit, by
day, week or month. 5205. Broadway. 7-23
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE—AN OPPORTUNITY TO SE
cure the best lunch rooms in the city;
$400 required. Address E., box 26, Herald'
23
FOR SALE—BUSINESS: HOUSES; FOR
rent; rooms: collections: help free; work.
EDW. NITTINGER, 236% S. Spring st. tf
FOR SALE—GOOD PAYING AGENCY
business, $250; goods handled direct. Ad
dress Box 29, Herald office. 23
I SELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS.
t D. BARNARD. 11l North Broadway, tf
FOR SALE—SALOONS AT VERY REA
sonable terms. Apply at 440 Aliso st. tf
PERSONAL
PERSONAL-WILL JOS. KLINE OR
the husband of
BERTHA HOLMAN
send their address to E. B. JORDAN
UP Montgomery blk, San Franc.'sco. lmo4
PERSONAL—WHEN TIRED TAKING
patent medicine to reduce your flesh, that
only ruins your stomach, see MRS. GOSS.
I also remove superfluous hair. 245' A S.
Spring St. S-9
PERSONAL—Dr. DEVAN'S FRENCH
capsules a boon for ladles troubled with
irregularities. No danger; send in time;
$1 per box. Room 4. 416V4 S. Spring st.
, 8-14
PERSONAL—FOR RENT, FURNISHED
or unfurnished rooms; desirable location;
prices to suit the times. THE WIN
THROP. 350.;, S. Spring st. 7.05
FOR SALE—LODGING HOUSES
FOR SALE—A FIRST-CLASS ROOMING
house; the best corner in Los Angeles: 55
rooms; house always full; party is going
to England; anyone who wants a good,
paying house come and investigate. 104
X. Los Angeles st. 22
PHYSICIANS
CONSULT DR. MINNIE WELLS, SPE
clallst, 316 W. Seventeenth St., cor. of
Grand aye. a-16tf
SPECIAL NOTICES
FOLLOWING IS A LIST OF THE CHlL
dren who have been admitted to the Los
Angeles Orphan asylum, Boyle Heights,
since the last publication:
Frances Soto, 10 years; Mary Doherty,
12 years; Clotilda Montblanc, IS years;
Jeanne Montblanc, 7 years: Susan Mon
tijo. 13 years: Susan Rubldoux, 11 years;
Ricarda Rubldoux, 8 years; Louisa Rom
ero, 10 years; Maria Romero, 8 years;
Stella Narr, 12 years; Annie Narr, 10
years; Lillie Narr, 8 years; Bessie Sil
verman, 6 years: Fanny Silverman, 3
years; Stella Simpson. 12 years; Mary
Bauer, 10 years; Rita Valrnzuela, 9 years;
Rosita Lugo, 4 years; Rosita Reyes, 12
years; Lucy Alvetra, 4 years.
23 SISTER CECILIA.
B. H. POTTER AND J. R. SNOW, FOR
merly 356 S. Spring st„ Riverside, will
open a llrst-class delicacy and bakery
at 408 S. Broadway, chamber uf com
merce building, Thursday, Jury 22d.
Thanking the public for past patronage,
and hoping for your patronage in the fu
ture, we remain, respectfully, POTTER
6 SNOW. 25
NOTICE—THE LOS> ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oclock
a. m. and 6 and 8 oclock p. m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut off and a fine of $2 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
WANTED—EVERY ONE TO KNOW
that Hall Thompson Rheumatism, Liver
and Kidney Cure will cure rheumatism.
Call and get testimonials, 223 N. Spring
St., room 6. 8-1
THE DAILY JOURNAL. PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 205 New High st. tf
SPECIAL SALE—NO CHARGE FOR
borders with 5c and 7Uc wall paper,
WALTER. 218 W. Sixth St. 8-12
ISE GRANT'S SYSTEM TONIC FOR
malaria. 127% W. Second st. 8-16
PRACTICAL CHIMNEY SWEEPER
FROVA. 826 Keller. 8-14
THE KETTLEDRUM REOPENED. 334 S.
Broadway. 27
WANTED—MALE HELP
HUMMELL BROS. & CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building,
300-302 W. Second street, in basement.
Telephone 509.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Two balers. 20c. ton; harvester driver,
$1.50. etc.; grain hauler, $1.50 .etc.; 3 men,
pull beets, $15. etc.; boy, mill,, $3 week:
butcher and sausage maker. Arizona, $40,
etc.: sack sewer on thresher. $2; baker.
60 per cent or take shop; woodchoppers.
$2.50; 12-horse teamster, $35, etc.: 2 ranch
hands, milker and teamster, $20, etc,
each; barber.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
First-class cook, $50; cook. country. $25:
all-round cook. $40: dishwasher. $20; Troy
shirt machine man. $12 week; first-class
baker, $12 week; second cook, $12 week.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
Middle-aged woman. $4 week; German
house girl, $20; house girl, Pasadena, $20:
Ventura, $15; girl, assist, $10; good cook,
$25: girl, 15 years, assist. $8.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Restaurant waitress, city. $4 week;
chambermaid, country. $15: 2 waitresses,
beach, $20: also one. $6 week: extra wait
resses, beach. 50c. and fare paid; good
cook, Santa Barbara. $25; restaurant
cook, Pomona. $25 and room; cook, Ne
vada. $30; waitress, do ehamberwork. $20;
2 girls, waiting and ehamberwork, same
place, $20, etc., each.
HUMMELL BROS. & CO.
WANTED—UPRIGHT AND FAITHFUL
gentlemen or ladies to travel for respon
sible, established house in Los Angeles:
monthly $65 and expenses; position
steady; reference. Enclose self-ad
dressed stamped envelope. THE DO
MINION CO., Dept. H., Chicago. S-3
WANTED—RING UP RED 1441, SUNSET
EMPLOYMENT AGENCY: only reliable,
reputable male and female help supplied;
free register for all employes. 12S N. Main
street. 23
WANTED—AGENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL
insurance; salary and commission; expe
rience not necessary. Apply room 9, 105
E. First St. 7-25
WANTED—TWO GOOD COOKS. TWO
second girls. 523 W. Washington St.,
phone west 91, Station F. 24
WANTED—IO BOYS; WORKERS: GOOD
salary to right boys. 7 a .m., 711 S. Main.
7-29
WANTED—FEMALE HELP
WANTED—TEN LADIES TO TAKE
home light work; instructions, $1. 416 S.
Main st., room 2. 23
WANTED SITUATIONS—FEMALE
WANTED-EMPLOYMENT NEEDED
by good cook and housekeeper; small
family preferred. MRS. M. A. E.. 412 W.
Second st. 23
WANTED—TO BUY LIVE STOCK
WANTED—CALVES AND FAT STOCK.
FRED HUGHES, Durham market. 1067
Temple st. 6-24tf
WANTED—TO RENT HOUSES
FOR RENT—TWO FINE PALMISTS
rooms; business free. 111% W. Third
street. 28
WANTED-MISCELLANEOUS
WANTED—TO BALE YOUR HAY AND
take payment in hay. M'GARRY, Ninth
and Alameda. 23
FOR SALE—LIVE STOCK
FOR SALE-3 PROOF JACKS, LARGE
size, brown and mouse color. Address San
Gabriel postofflce, or W. W. GARNER.
Garvey ranch. San Gabriel. 8.7
FOR SALE—CHEAP, TWO FINE STAN
dard bred horses; would make an excel
lent team. Address LTniversity P. 0.; 96,
or call sec. 8., race track. 25
FOR SALE—BEST LADIES' OR FAMILY
mare in city: sound, safe, city broke, sin
gle, double or saddle; weight about 1100;
7 years old. 1000 E. Main. 25
WATCHMAKING
REMEMBER, YOU GET A GUARANTEE
worth something when you have your
watch repaired by W. J. GETZ, 336 South
Broadway. , tf
(For additional classified see Page Two.)
THE HERALD
RICH MAN,
POOR MAN,
Beggar Man, Thief; Doctor,
Lawyer,
—.— j
MERCHANT, POLICE CHIEF
WITH DIVERS AND SUNDRY
OTHER MEN
Desert Their Business to Seek Their
Fortunes in the Arctic Gold
Fields
Associated Press Special Wire.
SEATTLE, July 22.—At 3:57 oclock
this afternoon the North American
Transportation company's steamer
Portland sailed from Seattle to St. Mi
chael's. Alaska, from which point her
passengers will be transferred to Yukon
river steamer and carried to the famous
Clondyke gold fields. By actual count
t here were 128 passengers-, a few of whom
were women. It can be stated almost
positively that unless something unex
pected happens, the Portland's passen-
gers will reach Dawson City at the junc
tion of the Yukon and Clondyke rivers,
without experiencing any hardships
worth mentioning. Every person on the
Portland, with the possible exception of
a stowaway or two, has a ticket through
to the gold fields, and the transportation
company has given its- word to get them
;here as soon as possible.
Michael Kelly, one of Seattle's old
timers, who has made a big strike out
of the Clondyke. said as the steamer
pulled away from the wharf that "the
gang would reach Dawson City all
right." hut he shook his head on
proposition of their having an easy time
to secure work or good claims.
Among her passengers are several well
known men. Ex-Governor McGraw,
who for many years was president of
the First National Bank of Seattle, Gov
ernor of Washington for the four years
ending January last and later a candi
date for United States Senator to suc
ceed W. C. Squire, goes-to the Clondyke
to seek fortune. Gen. M. E. Carr, form
erly Brigadier-General of the State mi
litia and whose law practice is the larg
est in the Stale, is also a passenger. Capt..
A. J. Balliett, at one time Yale's greatest
oarsman and football player, leaves a
handsome law practice to seek gold on
the Yukon.
The departure of the Portland was a
sight worth going miles l to see. She was
-■eheduled to get away at 12 oclock. but
owing to one delay and another the time
slipped away until it was almost 4 oclock
before the last toot of the big whistle
was given and the lines were cast off
and taken aboard. There is always a
last accident. The steamer was just
beginning to feel the impulse of the
screw when a big trunk was hustled
through the crowd. It was doubtful if
it could be gotten aboard, and the inter
est of the crowd in the "last act" was
pronounced. Some bet $5 tnat the trunk
would fall Into the water and others
that it would go through to Dawson all
right. In the midst of the speculation
some thoughtful one on board shoved
a plank to the wharf and in a-second
two big 'longshoremen grabbed the trunk
and slid It over the water and It was
landed.
This being over the crowd paid atten
tion to the actual departure.
Every point of vantage on the Port
land was taken up and one acquainted
with a good percentage of the passen
gers had no trouble in picking out many
representative men. There were poli
ticians, attorneys, merchants, athletes,
sports and theatrical people. It Is an
actual fact that within the next two
months Dawson City will be supplied
with an "opera house" and one, if not
two newspapers. Owing to the fact that
newspapers cannot be sent to or from
that far-off place in the mall, the news
papers published there will be small
enough to put in ordinary letter envel
opes.
There was not much' cheering when
the steamer left the dock. Those on
board waved their handkerchiefs, held
out their hands and shook them at their
friends. One party of jolly gold hunters
were singing. On the wharf there-were
mothers, wives and sisters, sad at heart.
In many cases tears were flowing. The
sky was almost cloudless and as the
steamer got fairly under way a band
of doves circled near as if to bid her
Godspeed.
H. D. Wheeler and his-son-in-law, Ed
M. Culbertson. who went to the Clon
dyke last spring, have each written let
ters home to their wives, giving some
very important additional news of the
mines and of the trip. From the letters
It is learned that Thompson, a Nanaimo
miner, was accidentally shot by a com
panion and r.ow sleeps In a new-made
grave on the Yukon trail. Al Oldts is in
the party of Mr. Wheeler and Mr. Cul
bertson. Following is a part of Mr.
Wheeler's letter:
Dawson City, June 3, IS97.—We ar
rived In this beautiful city, consisting of
tents and shacks, the first day of June,
about 3 o'clock. We found everybody
out of grub; sold some bacon for $1 a
pound, butter $2 a pound; could have
sold all the provisions we had at the
same rates, but let a little go. However,
the boat came in today with a large
amount, so provisions will be somewhat
cheaper. The mines are something Im
mense. Suppos l ; nothing like it was ever
discovered before. Men that were dead
broke count their gold by the fifty and
one- hundred thousands. Everything is
taken so far as heard from.
We have not been here long enough to
decide what we shall go at, but will find
something to do. Wages were $15 a day
all winter and men worked all winter.
Everybody has money and all the busi
ness is done with gold duet or nuggets.
If a man buys a drink he takes out his
LOS ANGELES, FRIDAY MORNING, JULY 23, J897
sack of gold and the bartender weighs
out the price. By the way, I have already
started my sack. I have some dust, also
a good sized nugget. We may lease a
mine or work a couple, of months before
prospecting."
The lettre from Mr. Culberson also
tells of the trip. He gives more particu
lars of the death of Thompson. He
says that one of the coal miners had
been "monkeying" with a 44-caliber
colt's revolver and shot Thompson In
the stomach. Thompson lived about
four hours and died at 4 a. m., Sunday,
May 15th.
Mr. Culbertson tells of a great strike
between the towns of Dawson City and
Clondyke City. They are on opposite
side 6of the Clondyke river. The Daw
son people call the rival town "Louse
town." Mr. Culbertson, goes on to say:
"We heard stories about the mines
that will scarcely be believed. One claim
washed 1 out over $150,000 in one day and
others as high as $90,000 and $100,000.
Some have had to clean up the boxes as
high as three times a day, but this clean
up does not represent one day's work,
but the wash for the whole winter.
"The Bonanza claims of course are all
taken up and the creeks where the rich
finds have been made are taken up clear
up to the top of the mountains, but we
hope to get hold of something that will
satisfy us before long, for there are as
good lish in the sea as ever were caught,
they say.
"Al will probably go up to 'Too Much
Gold' creek tomorrow and get a location
there. They had a stampede and I was
informed 1 by a friend; who was there
that there were claims located there by
men who were not entitled to them, and
that he would put me on to one."
THE FOOD QUESTION
SAN FRANCISCO, July 22— The
Alaska Commercial company's steamer
Bertha arrived from Oonala&ka today
with five hundred tons of concentrates
from the Apollo mine at Unga and a bar
of bullion from the same source, but
brought no gold from the Clondyke re
gion.
Captain Hayes, of the vessel, speak
ing of the- Clondyke boom, said that the,
facts that the gold fields are 2000 miles
from St. Michael's and that the difficul
ties of transportation are Innumerable
cannot too forcibly be impressed upon
intending prospectors. The newspapers
will be responsible for the loss of many
lives and a great deal of suffering and
hardship If they did not advise the pub
lice that the river Yukon, now that the
mountain torrents have ceased running.
Is very low and consequently much of
the 5000 tons of supplies now awaiting
transportation cannot possibly be con
veyed to their destination for some time.
Messrs. Sloss of the Alaska Commer
cial company are equally frank. One
of the firm said: "What we most fear
is that the excitement may cause many
' people to rush northward without prop
erly considering how they are to live
through the winter after they get there.
We have now about 5000 tons of provis
ions on the Yukon and are securing as
large additional quantities as possible,
but we are not able to say w r hether the
supply will be equal to the demand nor
when the supplies will reach their dcs
■ tination with any certainty. Thestern
; ' wheel steamer with which the Excelsior
is to connect will be the last to make the
! Yukon river trip this season. It WIT?
i reach Dawson City with a barge in tow
j about September ar.d must immediately
return, as the river usually freezes over
early In October.
"11 is for this reason principally that
we have declined to carry more than the
usual complement of passengers on the
Excelsior this trip. We could easily
have constructed accommodation for
another hundred but preferred to utilize
the space for supplies to fe*ed those al
ready there ar.d on the way."
STRIKES NEW YORK.
NEW YORK, July 22.—The World
says: The Clondyke gold fever has
reached this city. At all the ticket
agencies and railroad offices inquiries
are being made about rates.
"What will it cost to send my son to the
new gold fields?" a well dressed woman
| inquired of C. E. Lambert, the genera!
j passenger agent of the West Shore Rail
; road.
Mr. Lambert gave her the figures and
she promised to return.
"She is only one of a dozen who have
been to see us this week," said Mr. Lam
bert.
The first expedition from this city fo.
the Yukon gold fields will leave early
this week. The details have been ar
ranged at the office of former Judge
George Curtis. The party is to com
prise William H. Edwards, a young law
yer in Mr. Curtis' office, a son of Billy
Edwards of the Hoffman House; John
W. Edwards, a Brooklyn druggist; Dr.
James W. Broston of Brooklyn, and
Charles Edelman. a civil and mining en
gineer of this city.
In addition to scientific and gastro
nomical supplies furnished pro rata,
each man will put $1200 into a common
fund. Every detail has been carefully
arranged and all that remains to do y is
to engage passage on the Pacific coast
steamship Queen, which will sail from
San Francisco August 7. This will be
attended to by Judge Curtis, who Is in
the metropolis of California on legal
business. All supplies will be purchased
at San Francisco and the party will leave
the Queen at Juneau and go overland to
the Clondyke district.
Speaking to a reporter, one of the
members of the party said: "There Is
one thing in favor of the Yukon district
and that is yie abundant suppiy of fresh
fish. We will have plenty of fishing
tackle, and every article necessary to es
tablish a comfortable home. The doc
tor will look after our physical welfare.
Dr. Clark, too, is a pharmacist, and he
can compound the doctor's prescriptions.
We will have the best equipment experi
ence can suggest, and we shall be well
supplied with weapons to use in self
defense if necessary."
Dr. Edwards, who has visited Alaska,
has prepared a list of meats, saccharine
and farinaceous food products, together
with fresh and dried fruits and pickles.
To thi? will be added tea, coffee, choco
late, spices, etc., and the supply is based
on a total of seventy ounces of food for
each man daily.
"This amount," said Dr. Edwards
"maybe reasonably assured as the quan
tity necessary to the maintenance of i
man's perfect health in a latitude such
as the Yukon. We intend to take along
a good supply of spirituous liquors as
they will be of great value to us."
Each of the party is in excellent spirits
and confident of success.
W. B. Fasig, a prominent horse mar.
(Continued on Page Three.)
A SUDDEN
TEMPEST
Floods a Whole County of
Ohio
TRIFLING LITTLE STREAMS
INSTANTLY CHANGED TO RAG
ING TORRENTS
1
The Night Filled With the Cries of
Dying People Whom Aid Could
Not Reach.
Associated Press Special Wire.
YOUNGSTOWN, 0., July 22.—At 7
o'clock tonight a terrific cloudburst
struck this town. Hooding the entire val
ley and causing great damage to prop
erty, both In theicity ar.d along the rail
road lines. Alany people are supposed to
be drowned. The entire county east ar.d
west for twenty miles was flooded and
the damagt will be norrr.ous, the rail
roads being the heaviest losers.
The Erie railroad west of Warren four
teen miles and north of Sharon for the
same distance, was entirely flooded, and
orders were Issued to discontinue a.i
trains. Many residences were flooded
and the occupants were taken away by
the police and fire departments.
On every railroad leading into the city
come reports of extensive washout and
bridges swept away and railroad officials
say the loss will be the heaviest they
have ever known.
At 10:30 tonight came the first tangible
evidence of the damage done by the
storm. Along Crab creek, running into
the city from the east, along the Lake
Shore ar.d Erie roads, and emptying into
the Mahoning near the Lake Shore de
pot, a cloudburst occurred about ten
miles out and the water did not begin to j
rise much in the city until after "9
o'clock. At about 10 o'clock the water
came down the valley Into the city and
formed into a flood, sweeping everything |
that was not fastened before It. The j
Crab creek was not twenty-five- feet wide
and the flood spread it out to about 2000
feet. It rose quickly and in less than
ten minutes the water was up to> the sec
ond stories- of all the dwelling houses in i
the flood district and was still rising.
It is a certainty at 11 o'clock that none
of the people escaped from the houses.
The whole district was covered with
darkness, except on small places where
an electric light shone. Ftrcrnen, police
and others were quickly out but were
I powerless to rescue anybody, as not a i
boat of any kind was to be had in that \
portion of the city. The cries of the
people in the houses were heartrending
to those who stood at the water's edge
and were forced to retreat slowly on
account of the gradually rising water.
Cries for help were heard continually,
but the crowd on the shore could do
nothing in the way of giving it. Police
and firemen went at once to another
part of the city after boats.
It was midnight before boats reached
the scene of the floods. The boats were
manned by firemen, who could not make
much progress on account of the swift
and dangerousi current. Nine families
were taken out of the second story win
dows within a half hour and many peo
ple were picked up clinging to debris.
Nothing definite will be known as to the
loss of life until tomorrow morning.
At midnight the water commenced to
recede rapidly and the creek will likely
be back in its natural course by morn
ing.
BEER STAMPS
A Strong Demand Pending Action on
the Tariff
WASHINGTON, July 22.—There has
been a heavy run on collectors of inter
nal revenue In all of the larger cities of
the country by brewers, who ate pur
chasing beer stamps In large quantities
at the 7% cents discount allowed under
existing law, in anticipation of the final
passage of the tariff bill, which repeals
the discount now allowed.
The requisition received from collec
tors yesterday w asthe largest in the
history of the bureau, aggregating over
$1,200,000, and today these figures have
been largely exceeded, the requisitions
aggregating $1,600,000. The policy of the
bureau has been to order statements of
all kinds only as fast as they were re
quired to meet requisitions and-maintain
a proper supply in the vaults, and no
steps were taken to prepare for any
such run as has developed. In conse
quence the supply of stamps in the
vaults is running very low and It has
been found necessary to cut down the
requisitions from collectors so that suffi
cient stamps might be kept on hand to
meet the legitimate demands of the
trade.
Would Prefer Earp
SAN FRANCISCO, July 22.—Representa
tives of George Dixon and Dal Hawkins
met today to select a referee for the light
tomorrow night. A number of names were
presented by both sides, the most prom
inent of which was Hiram Cook. A vote
was taken by the representatives of the
two pugilists and the club, which resulted
in the selection of Cook. This was made
known to Hawkins, who immediately re
plied that he would not light with Cook
acting as referee, as there had been some
dispute of long standing between Cook and
Hawkins. The club, however, says that
Hawkins will be obliged to abide by the
selection made at today's meeting.
A Laborer's Death
I SAN FRANCISCO. July 22.—John Ander-
I son, a laborer, was crushed to death today
i near Army and Folsom streets. White
driving a load of sand down an embunk
j ment. the cart tipped over .throwing him
j against a fence. He died soon after.
An Aged Priest
TROY, N. V., July 22 —Rev. Father Hav
ermans. the oldest Catholic priest In the
United States, died today. He was born in
Holland, March 23, 1806.
INDEX
OF THE TELEGRAPH NEWS
Forest fires raging near Chico and
Folsom.
Colonel Crocker's will is read; not
one cent is left to charity.
Utah youngsters make a great day
at the Mormon state pioneer jubilee.
The British ship Comliebank driven
back to port at San Francisco by a
mutinous crew.
The situation in the coal mining
regions shows little change, except
that the strikers seem more inclined
to violence.
A monument to General Logan
dedicated at Chicago with imposing
ceremonies and in the presence of
many thousands of people.
The Pittsburg ball game put up
some specialty features, including
slugging the umpire and pelting him
with eggs; other games; turf results.
Another pigeon caught bearing a
north pole message; it is very con
clusively proven that the birds were
not released from Andree's balloon.
A tremendous cloudburst sweeps
down on Youngstown, 0., flooding the
whole country. Many lives are lost,
and much damage done. The disaster
happened at night and details cannot
be learned.
The steamer Portland sails from
Seattle with cabins crowded and every
berth taken by eager gold seekers;
reports come down of mines of more
than fabulous richness; fears are ex
pressed that food supplies cannot be
provided for the people who are now
swarming into the Alaska diggings.
Allison attempts, but unsuccess
fully, to secure the fixing of a time
for final vote on the tariff bill, and
gives notice that hereafter the sen
ate will not adjourn except on an aye
and nay vote. Democrats continue to
denounce the bill on general princi
ples. The house lays the foundation
for a reform of the currency system.
HIS MUTINOUS CREW
DRIVES CAPTAIN STORMS BACK
TO PORT
The Ringleader Is Arrested, But Will
Wot Be Prosecuted on Account
of the Expense
SAN FRANCISCO, July 22.—The Brit
ish ship Comliebank, which sailed from
this port this morning for Rio de Ja
neiro with a cargo of wheat, returned
this afternoon with the police flag fly
ing. Shortly after the towboat cast off
Mate Marshall issued orders which the
sailors refused to obey. Capt. Storms
appealed to them, but was told by the
men that no work would be done until
the watches were set. This the captain
refused to do, and the sailors, under
the leadership of one Elliott, adjourned
to their quarters to discuss the matter.
Mate Marshall went to the forecastle to
reason with the men and was set upon
by Elliott and one or two other mem
bers of the crew and dreadfully beaten.
Capt. Storms went aft on hearing the
noise and was met by Elliott, who drew
a sheath-knlfe and ordered the captain
to hold off If he valued his life. Capt.
Storms again tried to reason with the
men, but was told that the vessel was
hound for an infectious port and that
the men had resolved not to go on the
trip. Capt. Storms ordered the ship
about and returned to San Francisco.
Elliott was placed under arrest, but
Capt. Storms will not prosecute, as the
proceedings would delay the sailing for
a long time.
Elliott arrived here on the steamship
Carrodoc from Calcutta and was ar
rested for Insubordination, but was re
leased. On the trip from Calcutta he
several times beat the mate almost to
death, and swore on several occasions
to kill the Carrodoc's captain and the
crew.
Utah Stock Troubles
SALT LAKE, July 22.-A special to the
Tribune from Price, Utah, says: Yester
day a posse of sheep owners, headed by
John Reader, left Vernal In search of the
MeKee brothers, who were under suspicion
of having bound the Erlekson brothers to
a tree and maliciously killing a large num
ber of sheep several days ago. The posse
returned today with the four MoKee
brothers, all of whom are lodged in jail
at Vernal, heavily guarded. The men
have been positively Identified. Jeff Wileox.
who returned to Vernal today from Raw
lins. Wyo., says he met tn Brown's park
Butch Cassldy, the leader of the notorious
gang and about ten members of the gang
and had a long talk with them. It is
thought the gang may make an attempt to
deliver the MeKee brothers. There Is
strong talk of a large party starting out
to exterminate this gang now that they
have been located.
Militia in Camp
SANTA CRI'Z. July 23.—Today Tripe
hill was the scene of a skirmish drill and
target practice of the Fifth regiment, which
was witnessed by Gen. Warfleld and staff.
This was the first time any regiment has
had target practice according to the new
regulations. San Jose made the best ave
rage score and Santa Cruz the best official
score. The target practice was satisfac
tory to the officers, who consider that the
men did well for their first trial under the
new regulations.
Too Much Rain
ADA, Minn., July 22.—Long continued
rains, amounting to about live Inches, com
ing at a time when the ground was
thoroughly soaked, have flooded half of
Norman county. The grain that was
waving four feet high, is now underwater.
The water rose rapidly at Ada that peo
ple were rescued In boats. The damage
amounts to a terrible disaster and is es
pecially severe on farmers who had trou
ble last year from floods.
Ten Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
ALLISON'S
ATTEMPTS
Fail to Fix the Time for a
Final Vote
WHEN DEMOCRATS GET TIRED
—.—
the tariff ]3jxl will be
passhed
|
Hereafter the Sen p.te Will Not Ad
journ Except by Aye and Nay
Vote—Session Notes
Associated Press Si leclal Wire.
! WASHINGTON, July 22.—Shortly be
! fore the senate adjourned today Senator
i Allison, in charge of the tariff Bill, made
| a strong effort to, have a time fixed for
j the final vote on t;he tariff conference re
port. Failing in this, Mr. Allison gave
notice that the stession tomorrow Would
'be protracted with a view to secure a
vote. It was the first definite move
ment made thus far toward bringing the
debate to a clone. Allison's first propo
sition was for a vote at 5 oclock tomor
row, but this w as objected: to by Pettus
of Alabama. Then he proposed a vote
some time before adjournment tomor
row, which was objected to by Morgar*.
The suggest!' in of Saturday at 1 oclock
met with a like objection from Morgan.
The Alabama senator explained his last
objection by saying that he thought all
debate on the :report would be exhausted
tomorrow; thtit it was needless to make
an agreement In advance. Finding that
there was no disposition to reach an
agreement, Allison Anally gave notice
that hereafter, while the report was
pending the senate would not adjourn
at 5 oclock without an aye and nay vote.
The debate on the report today was
participated in by Senators Chilton.
Jones of Arkansas and Pettigrew, in
opposition, while Aldrich took frequent
occasions to defend the report against
the criticism of the senators.
The credentials of the new senator
from Tennessee, Thomas B. Turley, who
succeeds the late Senator Harris, were
presented to the senate by his associate.
Bate. Turk'.y was then escorted to
the vice president's desk, where the oath
of office was duly administered.
Tillman offered a resolution, releasing
the committeie on contingent expenses
from further consideration of the reso
lution for the investigation of alleged
senatorial sugar speculation. Before
anything could be said Jones of Nevada
presented a report from the committee
on the same resolution.. Tillman was
quickly on his feet asking that the report
be read.
Galllnger objected, the presiding officer
holding that a single objection was suf
ficient to prevent the reading.
Then Mr. Tillman moved that the re
port be rea-d. On a viva voce vote the
motion was lost and the resolution went
to the calendar.
Mr. Allison askea that the tariff con
ference report be taken up, but was met
with several measures which senators
desired to have hurried through in an
ticipation of the adjournment of con
gress. Without further delay the con
sideration of the tariff report was re
sumed.
Chilton of Texas took the floor for a
speech against the bill as a whole. .Con
cerning sugar, he said it was so cun
ningly devised as to make It difficult to
determine the benefits conferred. The
main point was as to the loss suffered by
the people, and after a calculation Chil
ton concluded that the sugar trust would
be enabled to charge the people 1 cent a
pound more for sugar than under the
present law. He said the agricultural
schedule ought to be taken as a "fraud
schedule," as It was designed to be de
ceptive. In connection with Chilton's
discussion of the agricultural schedule
Mr. Tillman was drawn into a vehement
argument on the benefit of an export
bounty on agricultural bounties. The
South Carolina senator declared that the
Imposition of such a bounty was the
most effective means of destroying the
entire protective system, for If the farm
er got one drop of blood into his mouth
he would want to "swallow the whole
carcass," and it would end In a scramble
overturning the whole system.
Proceeding, Chilton took up the Demo
cratic position on free raw material,
urging that raw wool and other raw
products were entitled to exactly the
same consideration as manufactured
woolen goods, but neither of them should
be benefited as against the interests of
the whole people. He said he would not
hold out to his constituents the delusive
hope that they were to receive a part of
the benefits of protection.
Chilton spoke for more than two hours
and received many congratulations as
he closed his remarks.
Jones of Arkansas followed in criticis
ing the bill In detail. He assorted that
there had been no fair and freeconfer
: ence. but a mere outward formality of
i conference which the s-nate out of self
respect ought to repudiate by rejecting
the report. The senator referred to the
full meeting of the conferees. Democrats
and Republicans, and related the futile
efforts of the Democratic conferees tose
\ cure a hearing.
Mr. Jones asserted that It was the first
time in the history of the country that
such arbitrary action had been taken by
a conference committee.
"Vote it down," suggested Mr. Allison.
"The report is a mere recommendation
to the senate."
"Yes," declared Mr. Jones, "the senat»
owes it to its dignity to respect the re
: port."
Aldrich, one of the Republican con
-1 ferees, interrupted to say that the course
of this conference committee was the
same that every conference committee
had followed.
Aldrich declared that Republican sen
ators were responsible for the pending
bill and it was to be expected that
i amendments by Democratic conferees
would not be engrafted on the bill.
Jones insisted that the course of the

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