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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, July 26, 1897, Image 2

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the scope of Its legislation, dwelt upon
a number of Important subjects, both
tn and out of executive sesMon. One of,
those which attracted world-wide at
tention was the arbitration treaty ne
gotiated by President Cleveland with
Great Britain. After exhaustive con
sideration, despite the great pressure
brought to bear upon the senate by re
ligious and commercial bodies, the
treaty w as rejected.
The Hawaiian treaty of annexation
negotiated by President McKinley was
still unacted upon when, congress ad
journed.
In open session, after much debate,
the senate passed the Cuban belliger
ency resolution, a bankruptcy bill in
cluding both voluntary and involuntary
features, and the "free homes" bill.
But none of these important ques
tions received consideration in, the house.
The following minor bills and Joint
resolutions became laws, managing to
escape objections from any member:
Authorizing the secretary of war to
receive for instruction at the military
academy at West Point Carlos Guiter
rea of Salvador; to amend an act en
titled "An act to provide for the entry
of lands in Greer county, Oklahoma;
to give preference rights to settlers and
for other purposes," approved January
18, 1897; re-appropriating $10,000 not ex-
pendedi for the relief of the Mississippi
river flood sufferers, at El Paso, Texas;
authorizing foreign exhibitors at the
Transmtssisslppl and International ex
position to be held in Omaha, Neb., dur
ing 1898 to bring to the United States
foreign, laborers from their countries re
spectively for the purpose of preparing
for and making exhibits; to provide for
the Immediate repair of dryi dock num
ber three at the New Tork navy yard;
making appropriation for the improve
ment of the Mississippi river and to sup
ply deficiencies in appropriation for the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1897, and
three bills authorizing the construction
of hridees across the Pearl river in Mis
sissippi; the St. Louis river between
Minnesota and' Wisconsin, and across
the Clinch river in. Tennessee.
COMMITTEEMEN
"Whom Czar Heed at Last Deigned to
Appoint
WASHINGTON, July 25.—The full
membership of the more important house
committees, as announced, by Speaker
Reed at the close of the special session
of congress is as follows:
Foreign Affairs— Robert R. Hitt of Illi
nois. Robert Adams, jr., of Pennsyl
vania, Lemuel E. Quigg of New Tork,
Robert G. Cousins of lowa, William A.
Smith of Michigan, J. P. Heatwole of
Minnesota, Richmond Pearson of North
Carolina, Frederick H. Gillett of Massa
chusetts, Charles L. Hendley of Indiana,
Republicans; H. A. Dinsmore of Arkan
sas, Francis Newlands of Nevada. Silver
Republicans; Champ Clark of Missouri,
Johm S. Williams of Mississippi, Albert
S. Berry of Kentucky, William Howard
of Georgia, Democrats.
Additional Member Ways and Means-
George B. McClellan, Democrat, New-
York.
Appropriatlonssr-Josephi G. Cannon of
Illinois, Henry H. Bingham of Pennsyl
vania, William W. Grout of Vermont,
Stephen A. Northway of Ohio, William
A. Stone of Pennsylvania, Mahlon Pit
ney of New Jersey, James A. Hemen
way of Indiana, James J. Belden of New
York, Samuel S. Barney i>* -n.-t.oonein.,
William H. Moody of Massachusetts,
Samuel J. Push of Kentucky, Repub
licans; Joseph D. Sayers of Texas, Alex
ander M. Dockery of Missouri, L. F.
Livingston of Georgia, Thomas Mcßae
of Arkansas, John M. Allen of Missis
sippi, Democrats; John C. Bell of Colo
rado, Populist.
Judiciary—David B. Henderson of
lowa, George W. Ray of New York, Case
Broderick of Kansas, Thomas Upde
graff of lowa, James A. Connelly of Illi
nois, Samuel W. McCall of Massachu
setts, John J. Jenkins of Wisconsin,
Richard W. Parker of New Jersey, J. R.
Overstreet of Indiana, Warren R. Baker
of West Virgina, D. A. Alexander of New-
York, Republicans; William L. Terry of
Arkansas, David A. Dearmond of Mis
souri, Samuel W. T. Lanham of Texas,
William Elliott of South Carolina, Oscar
W. Underwood of Louisiana, David H.
Smith of Kentucky, Democrats.
Banking and' Currency—Joseph H.
Walker of Massachusetts, Marriott Bros
sius of Louisiana, Henry U. Johnson of
Indiana, Henry C. Van Voorhiesof Ohio,
James T. McClure of Minnesota, Charles
N. Fowler of New Jersey, George Spar
ling of Michigan, E. J. Hill of Connec
ticut, John N, Southwick of New Jersey,
John W. Prince of Illinois, John M.
Mitchell of New York, A. M. Capron of
Rhode Island, Republicans; Nicholas N.
Cox of Tennessee, Democrat; Francis G.
Newlands of Nevada, Silverite; J. F.
Stallings, Daniel Ermentrout of Pen.nt
sylvania, John W. Maddox of Georgia,
Democrats.
Coinage-, weights and measures—Chas. ]j
Stone, Pennsylvania; James H. South
ard. Ohio; Edward S. Miner, Wisconsin;
E. J. Hill, Connecticut; Thomas TJpde
graff, Iowa; Jacob Tost, Virginia; Wil
liam C. Lovering. Massachusetts; L. X.
Littauer, New York; D. W. Mills, Illi
nois; William M. Mclntyre, Maryland,
Republicans. Richard P. Bland, Mis
souri; Sam B. Cooper, Texas, Democrats.
Charles S. Hartman, Montana, Silver
Republican. Rice A. Pierce, Tennessee,
Democrat. Samuel Maxwell, Nebraska,
Fusion. Edwin It. Riagtly, Kansas,
Populist. Charles F. Cochran, Missouri,
Democrat, and H. B. Ferguson, New-
Mexico, Democrat.
Interstate and foreigmcommerce—Wil
liam P. Hepburn, Iowa; L. Fletcher,
Minnesota; James Sherman, New York;
I. p. . Wagner, Pennsylvania; Cha3.
F. F. Joy. Missouri; John B.
Corlin, Michigan; Charles G. Ken
nrett, New York; James F. Stewart,
New Jersey; John Simpklns. Massachu
setts; John A. Barham, California; R. B.
Hawley. Texas; J. R. Mann, Illinois, Re
publicans. William McAleer, Pennsyl
vania; Robert C. Pavy, Iowa; Wiiflam
Hirarchinson, Illinois; William G.
Adamson, Georgia; Robert W. Davis,
Florida, Democrats.
Rivers and harbors —Warren B
Hooker, New York; Henry A. Cooper,
Wisconsin; T. E. Burton, Ohio; William
E. Barrett, Massachusetts; W Reeves,
Illinois; B. B. Dovener, West Virginia;
Rosweil B. Bishop. Michigan; Ernest F.
Ateheson, Pennsylvania; Page Morris,
Minnesota, Republicans. Thos. Catch
lngs, Mississippi; Rufus E. Lester.
Georgia; J. H. Kankerd, Alabama:
Philip D. McCulloch, Arkansas; Albert
S. Kerry, Kentucky; Stephen M. Sparks
man, Florida; Thomas H. Hall, Texas,
Democrats.
Agriculture—James W. Wadsworth.
New York; V. Warner, Illinois; E. S.
Hendy, Connecticut; Edward Faurhing.
Wisconsin; William B. Baker, Mary
land; David! b. Wilber, New York;
Horace G. Snover, Michigan; William
Lorimer, Illinois: Thomas H. Tongue
Oregon; William Qonne 11, Pennsylvania;
George H. White, North Carolina, Re
' publicans, John S. Williams, Missis
: sippi; John D. Clary, Kentucky, Demo
crats. Jerry Simpson. Kansas, and A.
IG. Shuferd, North Carolina. Populists.
J, W. Stokes. South Carolina; John
i Lamb. Virginia, and T. Y. Callahan,
j Oklahoma, Democrats.
Military affairs—John A. Hull, Iowa;
Ben F. Marsh. Illinois; M. Griffin, Wis
consin; John H. Kelsam, New York; L.
F. Fenton, Ohio; R. B. Mahan, New-
York; Hugo Belknap, Illinois; J. H. Mc-
Donald, Maryland; Walter A. Brown,
Tennessee, Republicans. William Sul
ser. New York; C. Martin. North Caro
lina; Nicholas Cox, Tennessee, John J.
Lentz, Ohio; James Hay, Virginia;
Thomas M. Jett, Illinois; M. A. Smith,
Arizona. Democrats.
Naval affairs—Charles A. Boutelle,
Maine; S. G. Hilborn, California; Mel
ville Bull, Rhode Island; Francis H.
Wilson, New York; G. E. Foss, Illinois;
A. G. Sayton, West Virginia; J. H.
Southward, Ohio; 11. C. Loudenslager.
New Jersey; R. B. Hawley. Texas; T. S.
Butler, Pennsylvania, Republicans. A.
J. Cummings, New York; Adolph Mey
er, Virginia; Paris C. Tate, Georgia; T.
S. Plowman, Alabama; Robert T. Bo
dine, Missouri, Democrats.
Postofflces and postroads—Eugene F.
Loud, California: John H. Ketcham,
New York; George- W. Smith, Illinois;
John. J. Gardiner, New Jersey; N. D.
Sherry, Connecticut; W. Lorimer, Illi
nois; J. H. Brownell, Ohio; W. T. Foote,
jr., New York; Henry H. Brigham,
Pennsylvania; Samuel M. Clark, Iowa;
J. B. Strode, Nebraska, Republicans. C.
A. Swanson, Virginia; Henry A. Ogden,
Louisiana; Daniel Ermentrout, Penn
sylvania; John A. Moon, Tennessee; Wil
liam A. Love,, Mississippi; James M.
Griggs, Georgia; H. B. Ferguson, New
Mexico, Democrats,
Public lands —John F. Lacey, lowa,
William R. F.ilis, Oregon; S. S. Barney,
Wisconsin; M. H. Kulp, Pennsylvania:
F. C. Stephens, Minnesota; C. D. Shel
don, Michigan; D. E. Mills, Illinois; F.
M. Edsy. Minnesota, Republicans. John
C. Shafroth, Colorado, Silver Repub
lican. Rudolph Kleburg, Texas; James
H. Lewis, Washington; JamesD. Camp
bell, Illinois; Marion Devries, California:
David Meekson, Ohio; M. A. Smith, Ari
zona, Democrats.
Indian affairs—James S. Sherman.
New York; Charles Curtis, Kansas; S.
F. Fischer, New York; W. Eddy, Min
nesota; Alexander Stewart, Minnesota;
J. F. Lacey, Iowa; Horace G. Snover,
Michigan; Charles B. Landis, Indiana,
Samuel J. Barrows, Massachusetts; H.
P. Packer, Pennsylvania; Charles E.
Pcarce, Missouri, Republicans. John S.
Little, Arkansas; W. A. Jones, Virginia;
E. B. Lewis, Georgia; J. H. Stephens,
Texas; W. T. Zerrer, Indiana; M. E.
Benton, Missouri; M. A. Smith, Arizona,
Democrats.
Territories—W. S. Knox, Massachu
setts; P. B. Low, New York; Case Brod
erick, Kansas; Loren Fletcher, Minne
sota; M. Griffin, Wisconsin; W. T, Foote,
jr., New York; J. A. Hemenway, Indi
ana; W. S. Mesick, Michigan, Republic
ans. William McAleer, Pennsylvania;
A. J. Hunter, Illinois; John A. Moon,
Tennessee; John W. Crawford, Texas;
James M. Griggs, Pennsylvania; M. A.
Smith, Arizona, and H. B. Ferguson,
New Mexico, Democrats.
Public Buildings and Grounds—David
H. Mercer, Nebraska; J. D. Hicks, Penn
sylvania; S. G. Hilborn, California;
Charles W. Gillett. New York; George E.
Whue, iinnois; - ... ...
souri; E. C. Burleigh, Missouri; George
W. Weymouth, Massachusetts; B. F.
Howell, New Jersey; C. P. Dorr, West
Virginia, Republicans; J. F. Bankhead,
Democrat; H. E. Skinner, North Caro
lina, Populist. J. S. Little. Arkansas;
Robert Broussard, Iowa; W. D. Brant
ley. Georgia, Democrats.
Pacific Railroads—H. H. Powers, Ver
mont; W. P. Hepburn, Iowa; A. B.
Weight. Massachusetts; W. C. Arnold,
Pennsylvania; G. W. Farish, Indiana;
W. S. Kirkpatrick, Pennsylvania; D. M.
Hurley. New York; F. J. Clark. New
Hampshire; W. B. Shattuck, Ohio, Re
publicans. James B. Maguire, Califor
nio; W. Carmack, Tennessee; W. H.
Fleming, Georgia; J. I. Slayden, Texas;
W. V. Sullivan, Mississippi; J. A. Coon
ey, Missouri; Democrats.
Invalid Pensions—George W. Ray,
New York; C. A. Sulloway, New Hamp
shire; W. S. Kerr, Ohio; V. Warner,
Illinois; H. C. Brewster, New York;
Henry R. Gibson, Tennessee; J. C.
Sturtevant, Pennsylvania; E. S. Heney,
Connecticut; L. A. Barber. Maryland;
S. W. Smith. Michigan, Republicans.
George B. McLennan, New York; R. B.
Myers, Indiana; J. W. Botkin, Kansas;
J. A. Gorton, Ohio, Democrats. Curtis
Castle, California, Populist.
Immigration and Naturalization—Lo
renzo Sanford. Ohio; Charles N. Fowler,
New Jersey; R. B. Mahaney, New York;
S. W. McCall, Michigan; M. N. Johnson,
North Dakota; Edward E. Robbins,
Pennsylvania; Joseph A. Graff, Illinois,
ftepublicans. Stanyard Wilson, Kansas;
C. J. Olney, Virginia; Henry Pepper,
Virginia, Democrats. William I. Green,
Nebraska, Populist.
Labor—John J. Gardiner, New Jersey;
Joseph H. Walker, Massachusetts; J. I.
McCleary, Minnesota; William Lorimer,
Illinois; J. K. Showalter, Pennsyl
vania; A. C. Cochran, New York;
I. B. Barber, Maryland, Repub
lican. V. J. Robert, South Carolina;
W. R. Strode. New Hampshire; W. A.
Young, Virginia; Ferdinand Bruekman,
Michigan; Thomas W. Simms, Tennes
see, Democrats.
Militia—B. F. Marsh, Illinois; C. Case
Broderick, Kansas; George Spalding,
Michigan; I. J. Fenton, Ohio; Warren
Miller, West Virginia; C. E. Burleigh,
Maine; E. E. Robbins, Pennsylvania;
S. J. Barrows, Massachusetts, Repub
licans. R. Kleberg, Virginia; John Ver
stage, New York; John Fowler, North
Carolina; W. L. Stark. Nebraska; and
Charles K. Whell, Kentucky, Demo
crats.
(This list is probably correct in the
main, but many are misspelled and some
1 do not appear in the roster of the house.
—Ed.)
ZANTE CURRANTS
One Great Question Simply Gets More
Mixed
SAN FRANCISCO, July 25.—1f the
bill as it passed the senate is the same as
was reported by the conference com
mittee, on which subject there were no
advices to the collector, the customs of
ficials have already found one provision
which is likely to cause trouble to im
porters until it has been adjudicated by
ihe courts. It is undoubtedly the re
sult of an oversight, but on that account
will not prove any th? less troublecome.
This provision is in relation to the duty
on currants. Section 261 of the schedule
provides that the duty on "apples,
peaches, currants, etc.," shall be 25 cents
a bushel. But section 263 provides that
the duty on a number of fruits, In
cluding- "currants, Zante or other," shall
jbe 2 ecnts a pound. Which la to govern
will be a question that Importers will
undoubtedly raise.
THE MOURNERS
Men Who Barely Missed Getting an
Office
WASHINGTON. July 25.—The fol
lowing nominations failed of confirma
tion:
T. V. Powderly of Pennsylvania to be
commissioner of immigration: Thomas
Fltchie. New York, to be commissioner
of immigration for the port of New
York; Charles S. Johnson, Alaska, to be
United States district judge for the dis
trict of Alaska; Charles S. Nichols of
Illinois to be agent for the Indians for
the Colorado River agency in. Arizona;
Edward F. Fox, to be register of the
land office at Clayton, N. M.; I. B. Sbep- '
ard of Alaska to be commissioner In I
and for the district of Alaska,
THE QUEEN'S THANKS
Extended to the Loyal Britons in
America
NEW YORK, July 25.—Through the
British consulate here, Queen Victoria
has sent her thanks to all her subjects
111 this country who celebrated her Ju
bilee.
Jubilee services were held in th church
of St. John the Evanglist In this city and
the rector, Rev. Dr. De Costa, has re
ceived the following letter:
"Sir—l have the honor to inform you
that I haye today rerjived a dispatch
from the Marquis of Salisbury, in which
his lordship states that he has been com
manded to express the queen's gratifi
cation at the manifestations of rspect
and attachment displayed toward her
majesty on the occasion of the spcial
commemorative services held in New
York on June 20 to celebrate the sixtieth
anniversary of her majecty's accession
to the throne. (Signed)
"A. FERCY BENNETT,
"Acting Consul General."
RAILROADS IN CHINA
COME VERY EXPENSIVE, AND
ALSO SLOW
No Work Done Yet Beyond a Prelim
inary Engineer's Report and
Expense Estimate
SAN FRANCISCO, July 25— W. W.
Rich of Minneapolis, chief engineer of
the Minneapolis, St Paul and Sault
St. Marie railway, was a passenger on
the steamer China, from the Orient.
Mr. Rich has Just concluded several
months' stay in China, where he has
been engaged in making a reconnols
sance of the territory lying in the route
of the proposed Peking and Hankow rail
road for the information of the Chinese
government.
Speaking of his work in China, Mr.
Rich said: "I was simply employed to
make an examination and make an en
gineer's report on the proposed line, with
traversed the 'enfif e'c'oUrtrVy TflSift.
Peking and Hankow, but I made no sur
vey. The line, when completed., will be
about 700 miles long, and will run
through a country partly level and
partly hill. It will be very difficult of
construction, and would call for many
difficult engineering feats, solely on ac
count of the many rivers and streams
that cut up the entire country. I made
an estimate of the cost, but I would
rather not say anything about the mat
ter, for the reason that my business
with the Chinese government is of a
confidential nature."
Mr. Rich was unable to say whether
the Belgian syndicate that had beer,
credited with securing the concession for
the construction of the road would, carry
out the undertaking.As yet'no work has
been done beyond that which he himseU
has performed at the solicitation of the
Chinese government.
WESTERN SERVICE
DENVER, Col., July Santa Ft
Railway company today inaugurated a
train service which enables the Denvei
morning newspapers to reach all points
in Southern Colorado, Western Kansas,
New Mexico, Western Texas and parts
of Arizona ahead of any eastern or
western newspapers. In fact, the Den
ver newspapers will reach The' Needles,
in California, several hours before the
San Francisco papers. The train from
Denver to connect at La Junta with the
trains for both the east and the west on
the Santa Fe's main line now leaves
this city at 3:50 a. m. Heretofore it has
left here at 8 p. m. and remained in Colo
rado Springs over night. The new ser
vice is of great advantage to the people
of California and the southwest.
Pumped Him Out
NEW YORK, July 25.—Enoch Inger
soli, said to be a cousitnof Robert Inger
soll, tonight attempted to commit sui
cide in a drug store at Bath Beach,
Brooklyn, by taking an ounce of lauda
num. Mr. Ingersoll was in a despondent
mood on account of some trouble, the
nature of which he would not disclose.
After several hours' hard work by phy
sicians, Mr. Ingersoll was restored to
consciousness.
Drunk or Despondent
SAN FRANCISCO, July 25.—George J.
Moore, son. of the president of the Pa
cific Mutual Life Insurance company,
shot himself in a shooting gallery. The
bullet entered his body a few inches be
low the heart and passing downward
penetrated the left lung and lodged in
the abdominal cavity. His chances of
recovery are about even. His wife
claims he was under the influence of llej
uor when he fired the shot.
A Famous Advertiser
KANSAS CITY, Mo., July 25.—8. E.
Reese, aged 48, advertising solicitor on
the Journal, and one of the beet known
men In his line in the west, died' here to
day. Mr. Reese was formerly president
;of the St. Louis Grain Exchange, and
I came here in 1883.
Upset the Skiff
BRAD DOCK, Pa., July 25.—Richard
Clair and James Scoonover, young men,
were drowned In the Monongehala river
here this afternoon by the upsetting of
their skiff.
Dr. Daniel Dead
NEW YORK, July 25.—Rev. Malcolm
McGregor Daniel, aged 62, died at his
home in Brooklyn today of a complica
tion of diseases.
LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, JULY 26, 1897
RATHER FISHY
McNally Swims the Eng
lish Channel
HIS RECORD BREAKING PACE
CONTINUED FOB FIFTEEN LONG
HOURS
Diamond Medal Bowing at San Fran
cisco—Record Pistol Shooting.
Sprinter's Record
Associated Press Special Wire.
LONDON, July 25.—Pat McNally, who
was scheduled to make an. attempt to
swim the English channel on Juiy 4, tel-
egraphed to the Associated Press today
from Calais that he made the crossing
yesterday. He says he started from
Dover at 11:30 in the morningand wasin
the water fifteen hours, in which time he
covered thirty-five miles. He landed at
2:30 oclock In the morning at a point
three miles from Cape Grlznez.
McNally left the admirality pieT at
Dover in the presence of a crowd at 11:20,
Intending to go merely for a trial swim.
A lugger manned by two local sailors
accompanied him. McNally's trainer,
Brown, of Boston, and one London jour
nalist, were also on board 1 the accompa
nying boat. McNally swam steadily at
the rate of one and one-half miles an
hour. Four miles out the temperature
had fallen to 62 degrees, and the weather
was foggy. Si miles out the fog lifted,
and all circumstances were so perfect
that McNally announced, his Intention to
cross the channel. He had been heading
direct for Calais, but a strong west cur
rent had drifted him to a position nearly
off Folkestone. He. now took refresh
ment, consisting of beef extract and gin
ger and a long piece of American
chewing tobacco. He swam almost con
tinuously with a breast stroke, with oc
casional changes to a side stroke for re
lief, but never swam on his back, which
he explains interferes with the action of
the muscles.
At 4 oclock the Varne lightsbip was
seen by the swimmer. One and a half
hours later he passed' the Varne, which
proved' Captain Webb's greatest diffi
culty when he attempted to swim the
channel. At 10 oclock McNally began
to show signs of eqhaustion, but contin
ued. From this time until 2 oclock the
temperature of the air grew lower. Mc-
Nally suffered severely, the swelling of
his hands giving his great trouble, and
he was seized with cramps' in his legs,
neck and arms and the passage of his
nose and' mouth became swollen so that
breathing was difficult.
At 2:30 he had reached a noint. within
commenced to splash wildly. He was
blinded by the salt water, and they tried
to persuade him to get into the boat. He
immediately became unconscious, but
upon being rubbed, gradually revived.
Owing to change of tide the boat had
great difficulty in reaching Calais, It
arrived there, however, at 5:30 oclock.
McNally quickly recovered from his
exhaustion and crossed to Dover by the
mid-day boat. Tonight he looked fairly
well.
BAY BOATMEN
SAN FRANCISCO, July 25—The sec
ond race for the diamond medal of the
Dolphin Boat club was won today by
Will O. Patch, president of the club,
Alexander Pape, his competitor, had his
boat swamped off Powell street_wharf
when leading by a length, and' was com
pelled to swim to the shore, a distance of
100 yards.
A PISTOL RECORD
SAN FRANCISCO, July 25.—The
shooting today at the targets of the
Columbia Pistol and Rifle club excels
all previous records on the military tar
gets of California. In. the-rifle competi
tion for the Glindemann medal, on Co
lumbia target, Creedmoor count, out of
a possible 50 two scores of 49 were made,
one of 48 and seven of 47. The two scores
of 49 were made by Ed Hovey and C. F.
Waltham, but according to Creedmoor
rules the former won.
In addition to this, in the competition
for the diamond pistol medal, J. E. Gor
man reduced the state record formeriy
held by Charles Dais, from 34 to 30.
FAST SPRINTING
ST. CLOUD, Minn., July 25.—JamesH.
Maybury, a local sprinter, yesterday ran
150 yards in 14 2-5 seconds, reducing the
world's record 1-5 of a second.
ON THE DIAMOND
Results of League Games Flayed
Yesterday
CHICAGO, July 25.—Dahlen was In his
old place at short today and his bril
liant work won the game. Score: Chi
cago, 1; Louisville, 0.
CINCINNATI, O.—Over 14,000 people
saw the Reds defeat the Brooklyns in
two games here this afternoon. Score:
First game—Cincinnati, 7; Brooklyn, 4.
Second game—Cincinnati, 11; Brook
lyn, 4.
CLEVELAND—WiIson was invinci
ble until the eighth inning, and in the
ninth the Orioles tied the score, making
seven hits in the two innings. Young
was put in to save the game but after
two were out in the tenth Kelly and
Stenzel doubled, scoring the winning
run. Score: Cleveland, 6; Baltimore, 6.
ST. LOUIS—The Browns and Wash
ington played a double-header at
Sportsman's park this afternoon. Each
won a game. Score: First game—Wash
ngton, 3; St. Louis, 4. Second game—
Washington, 8; St. Louis, 0.
TOURNAMENT TEAMS
SAN FRANCISCO—By a score of five
to two the Santa Cruz team proved vic
torious a second time over the Fresno
Republicans at Central park today
There was a crowd of about 5000 pres
=nt.
SACRAMENTO—The California Mar
kets had no trouble defeating the Cork
ers of this city today In the tournamen
game. The home team had a very weak
battery, while the visitors were strong
it all points. The score was 15 to 6 in
favor of the Markets.
SAN FRANCISCO—At the Presidio
ball grounds today the Union Ironworks
team defeated the United States regu
lars In a hotly contested game by a score
of 4 to 2.
AN ANCIENT HOAX
The Bottle Message Sender Flays His
Cruel Joke
SEATTLE, Wash., July 25.—An al
leged message from one of the men on
the ill-fated schooner Lincoln was found
today on the beach just around the
point from West Seattle. The message
was written on a small piece of paper
and had been put in a dark-colored,
round quart bottle. It was signed by
Charles Swanson, no date, and stated
that the Lincoln was doomed and that
"We have taken to the boats five miles
off Campbell Island."
The message closed by saying that as
they left the ship she was Blnklng fast.
The bottle was corked, not sealed, and
the finder, Peter Dahl, a reputable
young man, said that the cork looked
"old." There was a little water in the
bottle.
There Is no official Ist of the twenty
five people who sailed on the Lincoln
from Seattle, March 8, 1896. The Post-
Intelligencer had its reporters collect
all names possible of those who were
aboard. The name "Charles Swanson"
does not appear.
A Big Hotel Burned
UTICA, N. V., July 25.—Fire soon after
midnight this morning almost complete
ly destroyed the spring house at Rltch
fleld Springs. When the Are broke out
there were 160 guests in the house, sev
enty of them from New York and Phila
delphia. Every person In the house, as
far as known, escaped. The night be
fore the hotel was the scene of one of
-the season's most brilliant hops, which
broke up at midnight. Many of the
guests saved their less valuable posses
sions, carrying out bandboxes and leav
ing jewelry and money behind. Theloss
is estimated at about $200,000; insurance,
$73,000. The building will undoubteuly
be replaced.
English Wheat Market
LONDON, July 25.—The weather for
the past week was favorable. Amer
ican wheat in the- market was Is lower.
Flour was slow, but from 6d to Is high
er. Maize was quiet. Mixed American
Maize, September and October delivery,
northerri ports, was quoted 14s, 9d; At
lantic portsfl 14s, 6d, lowest price. Oats
were lower; clipped mixed oats, New
York, were quoted'at lis, 10V4d.
FOR EXCHANGE—REAL ESTATE
A—s2ooo; SNAP; COST $3000: BEAUTIFUL
suburban home at Burbank; 7 rooms and
bath; cement cellar; 2 acres In bearing
fruit; will assume for Los Angeles prop
erty. Improved or unimproved. See BEN
WHITE, 235 W. First St. £6
A—s2soo; EQUITY IN 14-ROOM Busi
ness flat for eastern property, Kansas
preferred, or will take. Texas property;
only $1000 mortgage to assume. BEN
WHITE, 235 W. First St. 26
FOR SALE—LIVE STOCK
FOR SALE—3 PROOF JACKS, LARGE
size, brown and mouse color. Address San
Gabriel postoffice, or W. W. GARNER,
Garvey ranch, San Gabriel. 8-7
FOR SALE—HORSE, WAGON AND
i s___San Fernando
FOR SALE—MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE—TYPEWRITERS: BUY,
sell rent, all kinds; good machines to
rent at reasonable prices. TYPE
WRITER EXCHANGE, 127V4 W. Second
st
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-A FLEUR DE LIS PIN SET IN
pearls. A suitable reward will be given
if returned to OWNER, at the Clarendon
hotel.
MINING AND ASSAYING
MORGAN & CO., ASSAYERS AND RE
finers and ore testers; bullion purchased;
consulting metallurgists; mines examined
and dealt In. Office, 261 Wilson blk., Los
Angeles Cal.__ 25-tt
THE BIMETALLIC ASSAY OFFICE
and Chemical Laboratory, 124 S. Main St.
R. A. PEREZ, E. M., manager. 12-4tt
DENTISTS
ADAMS BROS.. DENTAL PARLORS,
239% S.SpringSt.; painless extracting, 50c;
fillings; plates, from $4; all work guar
anteed; established 12 years. Hours, 8-5;
Sundays, 10-12. Telephone, black 1273. tf
'RANK STEVENS, 321% S. SPRING ST.,
open days and evenings; also Sundays;
electric light. Tel. Black 821.
EDUCATIONAL
WOODBURY BUSINESS COLLEGE, 226
S. Spring St., wlil conduct special classes
for public, and high school students un
der the instruction of Prof. C. S. Thomp
son of the Seventeenth-street school,
from July 6th to September Ist; tuition
$4 per month; half day sessions; our
regular commercial and shorthand work
continued throughout the summer at
usual rates. Pupils enter any day and
receive individual instruction. Rooms
are large, cool and pleasant. Electric
elevator. Write or call for illustrated
catalogue. G. A. HOUGH, president; N.
G. FELKER, vice-president
BOYS'" BOARDING SCHOOL (MlLl
tary); ideal location in country, mile
west of Westlake park; send for cata
logue or call. LOS ANGELES MILI
TARY A_ADEMY_^_^Jbox_^
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
LUCIEN EARLE, ATTORNEY AT LAW,
office, Bullard building; entrance, room
420; telephone black 1445. 7-24-37
BROUSSEAU *
Attorneys-at-Law,
403 Bradbury block, Los Angeles, tf
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
LUDWIG & MATTHEWS, WHOLESALE
and retail fruits and vegetables. MOTT
MARKET, 135 S. Main St. Tel. 550. tf
MUSICAL
A. G. GARDNER, PIANO HOUSE.
Pianos sold, rented and exchanged; rear
of main postoffice. 118 Winston st.
'Phone Brown 295. tf
___PLWIIBJBj>
FRANK A. WEINSHANK, PLUMBER
and gasfltter, MO E. Second at. Tel 19*.
STATEMENT OF CIRCULATION
LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
I-OS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
kOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
State of California, County of Los An
geles—ss.
L. M. Holt, superintendent of circula
tion of the Los Angeles Daily Herald,
being first duly sworn, deposes and says:
That for the live months from February
1, 1897, to June 30, 1897 (inclusive), the
total circulation of the said Daily Her
ald was 1,290,635 copies, being an,
AVERAGE DAILY CIRCULATION OF
8604
That the week-day circulation during
the above time was 1,071,567, being
A DAILY AVERAGE OF 8306 COPIES
That the Sunday circulation during the
above time was 219,059, being
AN AVERAGE FOR EACH SUNDAY OF
10,431
L. M. HOLT,
Superintendent of Circulation.
Subscribed and sworn to before me this
19th day of July, 1897.
FRANK J. COOPER,
Notary Public in and for the County of
Los Angeles, State of California.
FINANCIAL
FOR SALE—S4OOO; HAVING TO LEAVE
here on the Ist of August, I will sell my
interest in a well known corporation for
$4000, and will make purchaser, if a good
bookkeeuer. secretary of the company at
L., box 30, Herald.
)NEY TO LOAN IN ANY AMOUNTS
on diamonds, watches, Jewelry, pianos,
sofas, lodging houses, hotels and private
household furniture; interest reasonable;
partial payments received; money quick;
private office for ladle*. G. M. JONES,
rooms 12-14, 254 S. Broadway. 28-tf
THE SYNDICATE LOAN COMPANY,
138% S. Spring St., rooms 6, 7, and 8, loans
money on all kinds of good collateral se
curity; money on hand; private waiting
rooms. Telephone Main 683. GEORGE
L. MILLS, Manager. tf
MONEY LOANED ON DIAMONDS,
watches, Jewelry, pianos, sealskins, car
riages, bicycles, warehouse receipts and
all kinds of collateral security; storage
free In our warehouse. LEE BROS., 402
S. Spring st. tf
MONEY TO LOAN ON FURNITURE,
watches, diamonds, pianos, sealskins and
real estate; Interest reasonable; private
office for ladies; business confidential.
C. C. LAMB. 226 S. Spring St.; entrance,
room 467. 8-21 tf
MONEY TO LOAN—
$100 to $75,000 on city or country real
LEE A. M'CONNELL,
7-24 113 S. Broadway.
TO LOAN—A BARREL OF MONEY ON
diamonds, pianos, furniture and all first
class securities; business confidential.
CREASINGER, 247 S. Broadway, rooms
1 and 2. 5-29 tf
POINDEXTER & WADSWORTII, ROOM
308 Wilcox building, lend money on any
good real estate; building loans made; if
you wish to lend or borrow call on us. tf
MONEY TO LOAN, $500 TO $5000, IN SUMS
to suit; no delays. CONTINENTAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASSOCIATION,
126 W. Second St., Wilcox building. tf
TO LOAN—UNLIMITED AMOUNT FOR
small loans; no commission; light ex
pense. SECURITY LOAN AND TRUST
CO., 223 S. Spring st.
TO LOAN—IF YOU WANT MONEY ON
real estate security I have it in any
amount. WM. F. BOSBYSHELL, 107 S.
Broadway. 5-20 tf
MONEY TO LOAN UPON EASY TERMS
of repayment. STATE MUTUAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASS'N., 151 S.
Broadway. 5-20 tf
MONEY TO LOAN—LOWEST RATES ON
real estate, personal notes or security.
JOHN L. PAVKOVICH, 220 W. First, tf
,IFE INSURANCE POLICIES BOUGHT
for cash. T. J. WILLISON & CO.,
244 S. Broadway, Los Angeles. 7-30
BATHS
THE LOS ANGELES VITAPATHIC IN
stitute gives faradic, static and galvanic
electricity, vapor, sun and electrical
baths, sheet packs, fomentations, salt
glows, sprays, showers and shampoos;
Swedish and German massage chromo
pathy vacuum treatment. Fifteen
treating rooms. 35 rooms for patients
and guests. Largest vltapathlc institute
in California. DR. HARRIMAN, physi
cian in carge. Consultation free. Thurs
day evening meetings free to all investi
gators at 634V4 South Broadway, Hotel
Delaware. "
HYGIENIC BATH PARLORS —ELEC-
trlc and steam baths; massage, salt
glows and constitutional treatment; for
ladies and gentlemen. 125 W. Fourth St.;
Tel. Brown 142. 8-10
PHYSICIANS
CONSULT DR. MINNIE WELLS, SPE
clalist, 816 W. Seventeenth St., cor. of
Grand s,v», *-!«£
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
HOUSES AND LOTS
«"OR SALE—S2OOO; EASY TERMS; BBAU
tiful cottage home, No. 223 E. Twenty
fourth st., near Main St.; well built, taste
fully decorated, large windows, two man
tels, bath, beautiful grounds, 50-foot lot,
lowers, fruit and berries; a lovely home
for a small family. WEISENDANGER
CO., 431 S. Broadway. 80
FOR SALE OR RENT—LOVELY HOUSE
33—IN BEAUTIFUL ST. JAMES PARK.
Inquire on premises or at 421 W. Adams.
8-17
CITY LOTS
FOR SALE—
HBO—4O-foot city lot, one block from
Central aye. and electric cars; cement
sidewalk, curb, shade trees; water piped.
T. WIESENDANGER, 431 S. Broadway.
______ 24 " 31
FOR SALE—C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots in his Third addition on easy install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Office, 213 W. First at. tf
COUNTRY PROPERTY
FOR SALE—
TUTTLE & LOFTIS. LAND AGENTS.
620 Market at. Opp. Palace Hotel.
LOOK AT THISI
THE GREATEST SNAP
IN CALIFORNIA.
You can double your
money In one year
or make the best
permanent Investment ever
OFFERED.
Finest property in the state.
Will pay 8 per cent net on $50,000.
Can be had now for $21,000.
234 ACRES. -
186 acres full bearing raisin
vineyard; choicest selections.
8 acres full bearing olives.
12% acres diversified orchard.
28 acres grain and pasture.
Located in the beautiful
El Cajon val-ey, 16 miles
FROM SAN DIEGO .
Most delightful climate.
No Frosts —.
No Irrigation —
Substantial Improvements.
This Is a bank property.
They want cash.
They don't want ranches.
Don't loss this opportunity.
You will never get
Another like it.
We also have a large
list of most desirable
country properties In California.
See us before purchasing, as
we handle only first-class
PROPERTIES.
TUTTLE & LOFTIS. LAND AGENTS.
620 Market st. Opp. Palace Hotel, tf
POR SALE—OWING TO DEATH OF
late owner, an elegant ranch, together
with growing orchards and suMdry
tfculars to C. ISEARD, San Luis Rey;
Cal. 8-6
FOR SALE—BARGAIN; THE FAMOUS
Lewis tract, near Garvanza, consisting
of 103 large lots, now offered for sale as a
whole or in lots; will also trade for Oak
land, San Francisco or Los Angeles prop
erty. For full particulars inquire of L.
M. CORWIN, Highland Park, Cal. 7-26
FOR SALE —$300 PER ACRE, 6 TO 29
acres, with water, in Fruitland, near city
limits; all choice rich soli as can be
found; best o£ berries; mortgage fore
closed; must sacrifice at less than half
its value. JOHN L. PAVKOVICH. 220
W. First. 26
FOR SALE—A CALIFORNIA FARM
for you; 12 miles from Los Angeles; under
irrigation; soil and climate perfect; half
the price usually asked. See W. H. HOL
ABIRD, Byrne building, Los Angeles, tf
MEDIUMS
MME. LEO, THE RENOWNED FORE
caster and card reader; she tells the past,
present and future; she advines you with,
a certainty as to the proper course to
pursue In life; she gives lucky charms,
brings the separated together, causes
speedy marriage with the one you love;
tells if the one you love is false or true;
also very successful In locating mines
and minerals; all those in trouble in busi
ness matters, love and family affairs
should by all means consult her; letters
containing $1 giving age, color of hair
and eyes, married or single, will receive
prompt attention; don't fail to see her:
hours 9 a. m. to 7:30 p. m.; Sunday, 10
a. m. to 4p. m., at 125 W. Fourth. 8-13
MRS. PARKER. PALMIST, CLAIRVOY
ant and medium; life reading, business
removals, law suits, mineral locations,
love affairs, etc. Take Third-st. electrlo
car to Vermont aye. and Vine st. Sec
ond house on Vine St., west of Vermont
aye. 60c and $1.00. tf
MME. MAY WILL TELL YOUR FOR
tune by those Napoleon cards; also by
your hand; past, present and future;
tells perfectly true. 520 S. Broadway,
room 43. 26
MRS. WALKER. CLAIRVOYANT AND
life business reading medium; all busi
ness affairs of life looked Into for the ad
vancement of your future. 316% S. Spring
street. 8-9 .
MME. GRACE, CARD MEDIUM; THB
wonder of the 19th centurY; reveals the
past, present and future. 544 S. Los An
geles St., bet. Fifth and Sixth sts. 8-1
GRACE GILMORE CLAIRVOYANT
and card reader, has returned to Los
Angeles; ladle 3, 25 cents; gents, 50 cents.
325% S. Spring St., rooms 9 and 11. 8-2J
MRS. SANFORD THE
well known Independent slate writer and
clairvoyant, gives sittings daily at 833 8.
Broadway. 8-7
MME] RACHEL CARD READER
tells past, present and future; sittings
daily, 321% S. Spring st., room 11. 9-14
TRANCE CLAlR
voyant medium; readings daily except
Sunday. 245 S. Hill St. 6mo
MRS. ALDA, PALMIST, TELLS COR
rectly. 330% S. Spring St., room 22. 8-20
WATCHMAKING
REMEMBER, YOU GET A GUARANTE3
worth something when you have youl
watch repaired by W. J. GETZ, 336 South i
Broadway. tf
HYPNOTISM
HYPNOTISM AND PERSONAL MAG- .
netlsm taught; diseases cured. HYP
NOTIC INSTITUTE, 423% S. Spring. 8-21

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