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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, August 09, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-08-09/ed-1/seq-1/

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Single Sheet
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. no. 313.
OLEOGRAPHS FREE
for advertisersin our CLASSI
fIed columns.
THE HERALD WILL GIVE
A HANDSOME OLEOGRAPH
To each person who Inserts an adver
tisement ot three lines or more In these
columns. It's a pretty picture and will be
an ornament to any household.
STATEMENT OF CIRCULATION
I.OS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
1.08 ANGELES DAILY HERALD
LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
LOS ANGELES DAILY HERALD
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
SWORN STATEMENT CIRCULATION
State or California. County of Los An
geles—ss.
L. M. Holt, superintendent of circula
tion of the Los Angeles Dally Herald,
being first duly sworn, deposes and says:
That for the live months from February
1, 1897, to June 3D, 1897 (inclusive), the
total circulation of the said Dally Her
ald was 1,290,635 copies, being an
AVERAUE DAILY CIRCULATION OF
BGO4
That the week-day circulation during
the above time was 1,071,567, being
A DAILY AVERAGE OF 8306 COPIES
That the Sunday circulation during the
above time was 219,059, belnsr
AN AVERAGE FOR EACH SUNDAY OF
10,431
L. M, HOLT,
Superintendent of Circulation.
Subscribed and sworn to before mi this
19th day of July, 1897.
FRANK J. COOPER,
Notary Public In and for the County of
Los Angeles, State of California.
SPECIAL NOTICE^
NOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oclock
a. m. and 6 and 8 oclock p. m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut on* and a fine of 12 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
FOR VENT—TWO GOOD GROUND
floor rooms, suitable for almost any kind
of business purpose: very central Call
and ste ADC PRESS, 128 S. Broad
way. jj
THE DAILY JOURNAL, PUBLISHING
county olliclal records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, Hens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 205 New High st. tf
OX AND AFTER THIS DATS I WILL
not be responsible for any debts con
tracted by Decator Hansbrough. MIRY
E. HANSBROUGH. g
SPECIAL SALE—NO CHARGE FOR
borders with 6c and 7%c wall paper
WALTER, 218 W. Sixth st. S-12
MRS. STEER TAKES CARE OF~THE
face, hands and feet. 124 W. Fourth. 11-4
VSE GRANT'S SYSTEM TONIC FOR
malaria. 127! i W. Second st. 8-16
PRACTICAL CHIMNEY" SWEEPER.
FROVA, 826 Keller. 6-14
WANTED—MALE HELP
HUMMELL BROS. & CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building,
SOO-302 W. Second street, in basement.
Telephone 508,
WANTED—AGENTS
WANTED—AGENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL
Insurance: salary and commission; expe
rience not necessary. Apply room 9, 105
E. First st. 8-27
WANTED—TO BUY LIVE STOCK
WANTED—CALVES AND FAT STOCK.
FRED HUGHES, Durham market, 1067
Temple st. 6-24tf
WANTED—TO BORROW
WANTED —MONEY; 8500 ON CITY
property on Adams st. Also $0000. income
ranch property. See E. I. BRYANT, 204fe
S. Broadway, room 213. 12
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
HOUSES AND LOTS
FOR SALE—SI2SO; 4-ROOM HOUSE AND
lot; street graded; fruit trees; close In,
between Tenth and Eleventh sts., west
of Figueroa St.; a bargain. See E. I.
BRYANT, 204H S. Broadway, room 213. 9
FOR SALE—SS CASH, $5 MONTHLY
$180; Ninth-st. lot; water piped; fenced.
Also cottage, 5 rooms, southwest; $1F
cash, $15 monthly; $800. SIDDALL, 4fK
S. Broadway. 1
FOR SALE OR RENT—LOVELY HOUSE
33—IN BEAUTIFUL ST. JAMES PARK.
Inquire on premises Or at 421 W. Adams.
8-17
CITY LOTS
FOR SALE —C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots In his third addition on easy install
ments and build new houses to suit, pay
able same way. Office 213 W. First St. tf
BUSINESS PROPERTY
FOR SALE—SNAP! BUSINESS COR
ner; the best wholesale corner with large
2-story building, on Los Angeles St.:
must sacrifice; no reasonable offer re
fused; best buy in city. See owner, with
JOHN L. PAVKOVICH, 220 W. First. 10
FOR SALE—WILL SELL AT SACRl
fice, choice business and residence prop
erty. Address P. O. box 906. 9-7
COUNTRY PROPERTY
FOR SALE—S29O PER ACRE, 6TO IE
acres with water, In Fruitland, near city
limits, all choice, rich soil as can be
found; best for berries; mortgage fore
closed: must sacrifice at less than half
its value. JOHN L. PAVKOVICTI, 220
W. First St. 9
FOR SALE—A CALIFORNIA FARM
for you; 12 miles from Los Angeles; under
Irrigation; soil and climate perfect: half I
toe price usually asked. See W. H. HOL
ABIRT>, Byrne building. Los Angeles, tf
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE—A COPPER AND GOLD
mine: $5000 cash will handle one of the
largest and best developed gold and
copper mines on this coast; a regular bo
nanza; giving the buyer presidency, vice
presidency, treasury and the naming of
four out of the five directors; gives you
charge of treasury fund and bonds
amounting to about $150,000, quite enough
to operate; puts you immediately In full
charge on a good salary and makes you
general manager of the whole, in which
large profits are assured for all time to
come and owner of 600.000 shares; threc
to five men should join the purchaser:
there is a fortune for each in it. Full
particulars by calling on OLD MIXING
CORPORATION, room 19, 350 S. Broad
way, tf
FOR SALE—SSO WILL BUY NO. 1 ONE
chair barber shop in good growing town:
the only shop in the town; weekly profits
$10; sell on account of changing occupa
tion. Apply to GEORGE DIDDOCK.
Hemet, Cal. 10
FOR SALE—I WANT A PURCHASER
for rooms of fine furniture; bedding,
dinir.fr room, glass and silver, tables, etc.
Call at 633 S. Main st. JOHN RICH
ARDS. 9
FOR REN?-TWf) GOOD GROUND
• floor rooms, suitable for almost any kind
of business purpose; very central. Call
and see ABC PRESS, 128 S. Bread
way. 15
| FOR SALE—A WHOLESALE AND RE
tail cigar business; complete outfit for
the manufacture of cigars; a good in
vestment. Address T., box 24, Herald. 13
FOR SALE—BUSINESS; HOUSES; FOR
rent; rooms; collections: help free; work
EDW. NITTINGER, 236% S. Spring St. tf
I SELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS.
I. D. BARNARD. 11l North Broadway, tf
FOR SALE—SALOONS AT VERY REA
sonable terms. Apply at 440 Aliso st. tf
FORjEXCHANGE —REAL ESTATE
FOR EXCHANGE—NICE HOUSE AND
lot at Seattle, Wash.; what have you to
offer? See B. I. BRYANT, 204 M: S. Broad
way, room 213. 12
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE—PASADE
na business property; what have you to
offer? See E. I. BRYANT, 204% S. Broad
way, room 213. 12
FOR EXCHANGE — GLENDORA,
frostless, 20 acres, $1700, water piped
CORTELYOU & GIFFEN, 404 S. Broad
way. 9
EXCHANGE— MISCELLANEOUS
FOR EXCHANGE-GOOD DIVIDEND
payIng mining stock for 20 to 40 acres
good alfalfa land, with water, near city,
suitable for slock raising. Address 1.,
box 63. Herald. 8
LOST AND FOUND
FOUND—A BAY' MARE, 4 YEAF OLD,
with leather halter. OLSON, Green
Meadows. 9
PLUMBERS
FRANK A. WEINSHANK, PLUME
and gasfltter. 240 E. Second at. Tc; 126
(Additional classified ads on secon page)
THE HERALD
THE WIVES
OF MINERS
Take a Hand in the Pend
ing Struggle
A PLUM CREEK MASS MEETING
BRINGS OUT ANOTHER HU"N
--« DRED WORKMEN
Plans Are Laid Which Will Soon Stop
All Work at the De Armitt
Mines
Associated Press Special Wire.
PITTSBURG, Pa., Aug. B.—Although
today was considered a day of rest
among the strikers, probably the most
effective work among the Plum creek
miners was performed, and as a result
the strikers have been assured that con
siderably less than 200 men will be at
work tomorrow at the mine. A large
masss meeting was held' at Camp Isola
tion at Plum creek this evening, which,
in addition to about 1000 others, was at
tended by about 200 women, the wives
! and daughters ot the miners who are
latUl at work in the Plum creek mines.
Notwithstanding the fact that deputies
visited the homes of these people this
morning and advised them not to attend
the meeting, nearly every wife, brother
or husband with her, attended. Because
of the many restrictions put on the stri
kers, they have hitherto been unable to
,get a chance M argue their cause with
the Plum creek workmen, and the occa
sion given them today wias taken advan
tage of to the fullest extent. The'unu
sual opportunity today was the result of
missionary work of the wives of the
strikers from McDonald, Finleyvllle and
Carnegie. These women have been work
ing assiduously during the past week
and secured the promise of the wives of
the working miners to attend the meet
ing and bring their husbands. The re
sult of the meeting was the assurance
from nearly a hundred men that they
would join the strikers tomorrow Their
plan is for the men to work until they
receive their twenty days' pay, which
will be given thiem tomorrow, leaving
only eight days' wages back, which,
judging by the action of the company in
the case of the Sandy creek strikers
yesterday, will be refused them. If this
plan does not miscarry t he strikers think
it will be only a question of a very short
time until the De Armitt mines'are tied
up completely.
The meeting today was inaugurated
by religious services and singing by a
choir of jubilee singers, after which Mrs.
Mary Jones, the Chicago agitator, spoke
for about an hour, putting the case very
plainly to her wompn auditors. She
placed the responsibility for the success
or failure of the strike on the wives and
made a decidedly favorable Impression.
An epidemic of typhoid fever in a mild
form is raging in the vicinity of Camp
Determination at Turtle creek, sixty
cases .having developed among the citi
zens of that borough. The campers have
not been attacked as yet, and as a pre
cautionary measure the health officials
have ordered extra sanitary measures.
Bad water and lack of sewerage in the
borough is assigned as the cause of the
disease. Five deaths have resulted up
to date.
Only twenty-five strikers were in
Camp Determination today, but toward
evening it began to assume its normal
condition by the return of the men who
had gone to freshen their appetites ard
otherwise prepare for the new week's
work. Before morning the usual com
plement will be on hand and the forces
are to be divided into three bands, who
will march, to the three pits and guard
them at close range as the deputies will
■jermit.
TODAY'E DEMONSTRATION
WHEELING, W. Va., Aug. S.—The
proposed de-monsitration against the
working miners at Boggs' Run will take
place tomorrow. The Glen-dale men have
joined the strike and Elm Grove is also
out. The leaders have seen the success
following the deimonstrations in the
Pittsburg district, and realize that ef
forts of every kind have failed to bring
out the bone of contention here —the
Boggs' Run men.
At Bellaire a miners' aid store has
been established for the aid of strikers
who are in destitute circumstances. A
daily canvas's of the town replenishes
Ihe store. A trades assembly committee
is to canvass Wheeling for aid of the
local strikers tomorrow. The reports in
c-ii culation that there would be evictions
at some of the company houses across
the river are without foundation. It is
not likely that such a step will be at
tempted, as it would result in trouble.
OHIO OPERATORS
NORTH LAWRENCE, 0., Aug. B.—
The miners of the Massillon district are
on their way to Wadsworth to induce
men at work to stop there. About 2000
men will be there at daybreak.
A NEW UNION
PARKERSBURG, W. Va„ Aug. 8.-
After the meeting at Tyrconnell last
night strike agitators organized a min
ers' union, and it is claimed that nearly
all the Tyrconnell miners signed the list.
Organizer Rea said shortly after mid
night that every man in the Flemlngton
district would be out tomorrow. The
general talk indicates that he is right.
STRIKERS ARRESTED
ST. LOUIS, Mo., Aug. 8.--A special to
th! Republic from Hlllsboro, 111., says:
The situation at Coffeen mine is changed
Lac worse. Strikers have arrived
lb re all day from different points, until
SOU men are there and 1000 will be pres
e i by tomorrow morning. A number of
an . s s of strikers were made last night.
prisoners were brought here for
i il. One striker from Mount Olive was
1 uud over to keep the peace, and) in de-
I Xauit Of bail was sent to jail here. This
LOS ANGELES, MONDAY MORNING, AUGUST 9, 1897
has tended to incite the strikers. A num
ber of small fights and difficulties oc
curred today.
Three Persons Arrested Charged With
the Crime
SAN JOSE, Aug :'.-Sheriff Lyndon
has arrested Mrs. Sarah Schofield, Daniel
Doucher and Irving Mann, the 17-year
old son of Mrs. Schofield by her first
marriage, for the murder of Schofield.
Sheriff Lyndon, District Attorney Her
rington, Under Sheriff Benson and other
officers went to the ranch early this
morning and passed the day there mak
ing a thorough examination ot the prem
ises. No trace of any horse having been
hitched out could be found. It was de
veloped that the stories of the three
prisoners do not agree in many details.
During the day the two boys were made
to take a rifle and aim at the place where
Schofield was alleged to have been sit-
ting when the shot was fired at him on
Friday night. There is a powder mark
on the door. The Mann boy held the
gun so that it would have powder
marked the door about three inches be
low where the burns are. Dutcher held
the gun so that it would' fit exactly with
the marks. It was also found that if
Mrs. Schofield opened the door, as she
says she did when the shot was fired, she
would have been within an arm's length
of the man who fired the gun. The
doors are so located that it would have
been impossible for her to have been at
a greater distance. She says she never
saw the man. The moon was shining
brightly and there was an unobstructed
view. The three prisoners were arrest
ed about 5:30 oclock this afternoon. They
took the matter coolly and had nothing
to say. Dutcher is evidently nervous.
He is 19 and Irving Mann 17. Dutcher
bears a bad reputation.
The officers have a rifle found in the
house. They believe it had been recent
ly fired. While the officers are cautious
In their statements they say they be
lieve they have sufficient facts to war
rant an examination. Schofleld's body
is at the morgue here. A formal charge
of murder has been placed against all
of the parties under arrest.
THE CROP PROSPECTS
BASED ON RETURNS MADE BY
COUNTIES
Corn Will Be Short, But Wheat and
Oats Promise a Very Heavy
Yield
CHICAGO, Aug. B.—Tl August crop
report of the Orange Judd Farmer, based
upon county returns from all the princi
pal agricultural counties of the country,
make the condition of the corn crop on
August 1, 86.4, against 88.4 on July 1.
This is below the average for a series of
years and it has been lower but once in
recent years, in 1894. The low condition
a month ago merely reflected disappoint
ment at the backward, condition of the
plant, but the present figure not only
reflects this' continued lateness, but a
further positive damage to the crop.
July was reasonably favorable east of
the Mississippi river and the condition
in) Ohio, Indiana and Illinois advanced
to a point where a moderate crop Is In
dicated. In lowa and Missouri the crop
barely held its own, while in Nebraska
there was a slight falling off. The se
vere decline of the month was- in Kan
sas, where there was a drop of seventeen
points, in Texas, a drop of twenty points,
and in Arkansas of fifteen points. If the
present growth of the crop was normal
the present report might be taken as In
dicating a crop between 1,800,000,000 and
1,900,000,000 bushels, but in seasons' like
the present the final rate of yield is apt
to be less than that Indicated by con
ditional reports and an expectation of
over 1,800,000,000 bushels must be based
upon entirely favorable weather condi
tions during the rest of the season.
The average condition of spring wheat
is 87.4, a decline during the month of six
points. South Dakota declines 10 points,
due to generally unfavorable conditions
during the month; Minnesota six points,
the result of some rust and blight in the
southern counties. The northern part of
the state is still in good promise. In
North Dakota the early promise is well
maintained. With favorable weather for
harvesting the crop should exceed 230,
--000 bushels.
Threshing shows winter wheat yields
uniformly higher than expected. Re
turns giving neighborhood results so far
as developed makes a general average
for the breadth of 15.6 bushels. Should
the latter threshing confirm these ear
lier yields the crop will equal 362,000
bushels, the largest crop grown with the
single exception of 1891. The quality of
the crop is remarkably high and very uni
form.
The last reports on oats condition was
a trifle lower than a monith ago. The
average Is 86.4, indicating a crop approx
imating 500,000,000 bushels of fair quality,
against 717,000,000 last year of inferior
quality.
THE PEACH CROP
CHAMBERSBURG, Pa., August B.—
The Blue mountain peach belt of South
ern Pennsylvania and Western Mary
land is the only part of the country that
will have more than 20 to 25 per cent of
a crop this year. According to the
views of Col. James R. Gllmore, of
Chambersburg, who has returned from a
tour of the peach states, the shortage
Is especially great in Wisconsin, Onlo,
Delaware and the eastern shore In
Maryland.
SPRINGFIELD, 111., Aug. B.—Gover
nor Tanner has received no further word
from Sheriff Randall of Montgomery-
county, who at an early hour thts morn
ing sent a call for troops at Coffeen.
Governor Tanner sent B. B. Fay, his
secretary, to Coffeen, with instructions
to make a report of the conditions there.
SAN DIEGO, Aug. B—At Camp Abra
,ham Lincoln this morning memorial ser
vices were held, Rev. L. M. Hartley ot
this city officiating. The attendance ot
veterans was large. In the afternoon a
sacred concert was given.
SCHOFIELD'S KILLING
Troops Asked For
Veterans in Camp
EMPEROR
AND CZAR
Meet and Protest Their
Friendship
UNALTERABLE RESOLUTIONS
TO MAINTAIN THE PEACE OF
EUROPE
William Pledges His Whole Strength
to Resist Any Wicked Dis
turber of That Peace
Associated Press Special Wire.
ST. PETERSBURG, Aug. B.—At the
state banquet given by the Russian em
peror and empress to Emperor William
and Empress Augusta Victoria last
night, Emperor Nicholas, toasting his
imperial guests, said: "The presence of
your majesty causes me very lively sat
isfaction. I desire sincerely to thank
you for the visit, which is a fresh mani
festation of the traditional bonds unit
ing us and the good relations so happily
established between our two neighbor
ing empires. It is, at the same time, a
precious guarantee of the maintenance
of the general peace, which forms the
object of our constant efforts and our
most fervent wishes. I drink to the
health of Emperor-King William and
Empress-Queen Augusta Victoria, and
to the health of all the members of their
august family."
Emperor William shortly afterward
raised his glass to his host and said: "I
thank your majesty with a warm heart,
speaking also in the name of the empress
for the cordial and magnificent recep
tion you have accorded us and for the
gracious words with which your majesty
has so affectionately welcomed us. I
especially desire to lay at the feet of
your majesty my most sincere and most
grateful thanks for the renewed mark
of distinction which comes as such a
surprise to me. I mean the enrollment
of myself in your majesty's glorious
navy. This is an especial honor, which
I am able to appreciate to its full ex
tent and an honor which at the same time
confers a particular distinction upon
my own navy.
"It is a fresh proof of the continuance
of our traditional intimate relations.
Founded upon the unshakable basis of
your majesty's unalterable resolution to
keep your people in peace in the future
as in the past, it finds in me also the
gladdest echo. Thus we will pursue the
same paths and strive unitedly, under
the blessing of peace, to guide the in
tellectual development of our peoples.
I can, with full confidence, lay this
promise anew In the hands of your maj
esty, and I know I have the support of
my whole people in' doing so, that I stand
by your majesty's side with my whole
strength in this great work of preserv
ing the peace of the nations, and'l will
give your majesty my strongest support
against any one who may attempt to
disturb or break this peace. I drink to
the welfare of your majesties."
The sentence in which Emperor Wil
liam pledged Emperor Nicholas his sup
port against any attempt to break the
peace of the nations was spoken in Rus
sian.
The whole city and the ships lying in
the Neva have been splendidly decorat
ed with flags and flowers today, and the
streets have been crowded.
Emperor William and the empress ar
rived at the landing stage at 11 a. m.,
where the municipal authorities present
er them with bread and salt on especially
constructed dishes as tokens of the hos
pitality of the city. With the Peterowski
regiment as a guard of honor they visit
ed the fortress of St. Peter and St. Paul
and placed a wreath on the tomb of
Alexander 111.
Everywhere they were greeted l with
tremendous cheers. Subsequently they
opened the new wing of the German
Alexander hospital, from which they
proceeded to the winter palace.
During the afternoon Emperor Wil
liam received vis-Its from the ambassa
dors and returned them.
JEWISH COLONISTS
Do Not Ask Charity, But Certainly
Need Aid
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. B.—A l large
.number of people assembled this after
,noon in the Naveh Zedek synagogue for
the purpose of devising some scTienu
by which Jewish colonists, now stranded
in this city, could be assisted to reach
.the land offered them in California, Or
egon and Washington. Ephraim Dei
nard, the projector of the colonizatin
scheme,, spoke of the origin, history and
objects of the Jewish Colonization So
ciety of American. He did not want
any charity or donations for his colon
ists, but asked for a loan of sufficient
money to take the people to some land
which had been offered to them in Cal
averas county and in Oregon and Wash
ington.
A letter was read, from Governor Lord
of Oregon inviting the colonists to set
tle in that state; also from the United
states commissioner of land at San An
dreas offering 18.000 acres of good land
in Calaveras county.
Rabbi Levy spoke against sectarian
icolonization schemes. Seventy dollars
was subscribed and a committee ap
pointed to solicit further contributions.
An Actor's Death
CHESTER. Pa.. Aug. B.—Wallace
Campbell of New York, known as "Wal
]y DeForrest." an actor, died suddenly
at the Pennsylvania railroad station
this afternoon. Death was due to pneu
monia.
Paris Exposition Plans
PARIS, Aug. 8. —A hundred projects
for attractions for the Parts expositoin
of 1900 were submitted to the committee
today. They Included the building ot a
INDEX
OF THE TELEGRAPH NEWS
Centennial managers at Nashville
arrange a long list of attractions to
bring visitors to the Tennessee cen- i
tennial. j
The Emperor of Germany and the
Czar of Russia meet and pledge their
undying friendship and profess the
sole design of preserving the peace of
Europe.
The Orange Judd Farmer makes a
crop report based on county returns;
corn will be scarce, but wheat and
oats promise a heavy yield.
A Chicago man lights his cigar and
a coffeecupful of gasoline explodes,
burning three people seriously; the
body of Saturday night's fire victim
recovered.
Mexico financiers are not all afraid
of cheap silver; the largest financiers
hope for improved business, and at
the expense of gold standard coun
tries.
Wives and sisters of the striking
miners take a hand in the pending
struggle, and as a result a hundred
Plum creek workmen go out; fears of
disorder are not realized at any point.
New York Yacht club boats com
plete a double century run without
lowering a sail; Vigilant wins in the
sloop class and Colonia in the
schooner.
Senor Canovas del Castillo killed
by an Italian anarchist; though the
crime was not the result of a political
conspiracy the political results are
likely to be marked. Secretary Sher
man believes the end of the struggle
in Cuba is not far off, and Senator
Morgan prophesies a Spanish republic
as the result of the influences now at
work in Spain.
copy of Bartholdi's statue of Liberty,
in New York harbor, 600 feet high; the
construction of a restaurant under water
to be built of glass; an enormous verti
cal screw with a nut fitted as a cafe;
a reproduction of the Trojan horse capa
ble of holding a thousand people, and
plans for fitting the Eiffel tower with a
spiral railroad and toboggan chute. The
committee decided that none of the
was practicable.
FELTS DIDN'T FLY
Will Start When the, Weather Is
Favorable
COLORADO SPRINGS, Col., Aug. B.—
William B. Felts did not maf c his Jump
from Pike's peak today, but it was not
his fault. With the conditions of clouds
and fog, it would have been a blindfold
leap to certain, destruction.
Felts went up to the summit of the
peak this morning, carrying his im
mense aeroplanes with him. Two hours
were required in adjusting the big wings,
but heavy clouds gathered and a slight
snow fell at the time and convinced him
that a leap from the peak would have
been suicidal.
The leap was postponed, but Felts is
still on the peak tonight, and says h?
will reman there until the conditions are
favorable., when he will sail
Colorado Springs, twelve miles distant.
Great crowds went up the peak toay
to witness the leap of the daring aero
naut and field glasses and telescopes
were in great demand. The crowds were
greatly disappointed on account of the
postponement.
A Horsethief Escapes
MODESTO, Aug. B.—Some time dur
ing last night James Phillips, a pris
oner In the county jail under charge of
stealing seventeen horses from farmers
in this county, broke out of jail. One
iron bar of the tank was sawed off, the
door pried open and the iron screen and
bar of the jail sawed .off on the outside
wall. None of the other prisoners in
the Jail admit knowing anything of the
jail break, and the exact time of Phillips'
escape is not known. Experts on iron
sawing differ as to whether the sawing
was done from the inside or the outside,
so it is not known whether the escape
had confederates. Phillips' conviction
was considered sure, as he was captured
with two stolen horses.
The Medicos' War
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. B.—The re
gents of the state university will meet
tomorrow in regular session, and will
hear the report of the. committee on the
proposed affiliation of the Hahnemann
hospital medical college with the medi
cal college of the university, and thesup
porters of both institutions are exerting
every effort to attain their ends. Thi
Hahnemann party has brought a strong
pressure to bear to secure affiliation, and
this is now being combatted by the alum
ni of the Toland medical college.
A Scorcher's Crime
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. B—Mrs. Eliz
abeth Arkwright, a music teacher re
siding at 1521 Pine street, was taken lo
the city receiving hospital today, suffer
ing from a fracture of both bones of her
right leg, the result of being run into
by a recklessly ridden bicycle. The bicy
clist, a youth named Fred Preston, was
taken to the city prison, charged with
battery.
The Tailors' Strike
NEW YORK,Aug.B.—Peace for the first
time in ten days pervaded the headquar
ters of the striking pantsmakers, never
rip pantsmakers and knee-pants mak
ers' unions. It is expected that most of
the strikers will resume work tomorrow
morning. Over 3500 employes out of the
union who went on strike are prepared
to resume work under the conditions
stipulated by their respective unions.
A Bicycle Cruise
OAKLAND. Aug. B—E. G. Wilbur, ar,
Oakland wheelman, and his wife, will
start tomorrow from High street for
Los Angeles on a pair of bicycles sup
plied with sails. The inventor declares
,he will reach the southern metropolis
,ln four days. He says the invention has
proved satisfactory in a series of tests
made on the windy roads In the Pied
mont hills.
Eight Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS
PREMIER
CANOVAS
Falls by tne Hand of An
Assassin
AN ITALIAN ANARCHIST
Claims His Act to Be Just
Vengence
IS NOT A POLITICAL CRIME
BUT POLITICAL EFFECT WILL BE
,GREAT
Secretary Sherman Sees the Early
End of the Cuban War—Senator
Morgan Frophesises a
Spanish Republic
Associated Press Special Wire.
MADRID, Aug. B.—Senor Canovas del
Castillo, the prime minister of Spain,
was assassinated today at Santa Agueda
by an anarchist. The murderer fired
three shots, two of which struck the
premier in the head and the other in
the chest. The wounded man lingered
unconscious for two hours and died at
3 oclock this afternoon. His wife was
but a short distance away when he fell.
Santa Agueda is noted for its batha.
The place is between San Sebastion,
the summer residence of the Spanish
court, and Vittoria, the capital of the
province of Alava, about thirty miles
south of Billlo. The premier went there
last Thursday to take a three weeks'
course of the baths, after which he ex
pected to return to San Sebastion to see
United States Minister Woodford, when,
that gentleman should, be officially re
ceived by the queen regent.
The assassin was Immediately arrest
ed. He gives the name of Rlnaldi, but
it is believed that his real name is
Mlchaele Angina Golll. He is a Nea
politan.
The murderer declared he killed Can
ovas in accomplishment of a "Just ven
geance" and as the outcome of a con
spiracy. He is believed to have ar
rived at Santa Agueda the same day as
the premier and was frequently seen
lurking in the passages of the bathing
establishment in a suspicious manner.
The remains of Senor Canovas will be
brought here tomorrow. Marshall Mar
tinez de Campos has gone to San Se
bastian to attend the queen regent.
Senor Segasta, the Liberal leader, has
sent the following telegram to the gov
ernment: "I have heard with deep pain
of the crime that has thrown us all in
mourning and I place myself at the or
ders of the government and the queen."
Most of the Liberal leaders have sent
similar messages, placing themselves
at the disposition of the government.
LIFE OF CANOVAS
Senor Antonio Canovas del Castillo,
according to the Dictionaire Universal
dcs Contemporains, was born at Malaga,
February S, 1828. He took the course in
philosophy and law In the University of
Madrid and began his career as a Jour
nalist.
In ISSI he made his debut under the
patronage of Senores Rios, Rosas and
Pacheco, as chief editor of Patria, in
which he defended Conservative ideas.
About this time he published a volume
of lyric poems and a series of historical
papers. He was in doubt whether to
follow a literary or a political career,
but soon found himself turned to politics
by the course of events. In 1852 he was
named deputy for Malaga and'from that
time to his death had never ceased to
occupy a seat in the cortes. In 1854 he
was charge d'affaires at Rome and pre
pared' the historical memorandum on
the relations of Spain with the holy Bee.
which served as a basis for the con
crada. After serving the crown as gov
ernor of Cadiz in 1855, director general
of the administration in 1858 to 1861, and
lastly in that same year as under secre
tary of state for the interior, the queen
called him to the ministry as a member
of the Mon cabinet. In 1865 he held the
portfolios of finance and the colonies in
the O'Donnell cabinet, and it devolved*
upon him to draw up the law for the abo
lition of the slave trade. Shortly before
the revolution of 1868 he became special
ly conspicuous as one of the last to de
fend with energy in the cortes the prin
ciple of blending liberal and conciliatory
ideas with the constitutional monarchy
when all the parties that had supported
this political doctrine had deserted the
parliament. He was banished a short
time before the revolution occurred and
took no part in it.
In the face of triumphant revolution,
after his return from the exile and in the
full constituent assembly of 1868, sup
ported by Senores Eldoiayem, Bugallel
and two others, he hoisted the standard
of legitimate and constitutional mon
archy. This is his greatest title to fame.
His fidelity and ability finally secured
for him the supreme direction of the
Alfonsoist party, and on the proclama
tion of Alfonso XIII as king on Decem
ber 31,1874, Senor Canovas del Castillo
became president of the council and
chief of the new cabinet, called the
cabinet of conciliation. He retired in
September, 1875, because of the de
mands of the extreme conservative
party, but he was called back to the
presidency of the council on December
2d' of the same year and charged par
ticularly with the direction of the first
legislative election.
He was elected to the cortes from tihe
city of Madrid in January, 1876. It de
volved upon him to repress the second
attempt of the Carllsts to bring on a
civil war and to deal with the first inrar
rection in Cuba.
With the exception of an Interval of
A few months he continued to hold Un,

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