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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, August 10, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-08-10/ed-1/seq-1/

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Double Sheet
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 3J4.
OLEOGRAPHS FREE
FOR ADVERTISERS IN OUR CLASSI
fIed columns.
-
THE HERALD WILL GIVE
A HANDSOME OLEOGRAPH
To each person who Inserts an adver
tisement of three lines or more in these
columns'. It*s a pretty picture and will be
an ornament to any household.
SPECIAL NOTICES
ALBERT P.WILSON & SON, THE MOST
competent jewelers, opticians and watch
makers on the coast have opened up at
244 S. Broadway, an 4 are prepared to do
work which is rarely accomplished.
Therefore, if your eyes fil to see and
your .timepieces fail to run, visit the
Wilsons. Their prices are lower than
anybody's for good work. tf
NOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oclock
a. m. and 6 and 8 oclock p. m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut off and a fine of $2 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
FOR RENT-TWO GOOD GROUND
floor rooms, suitable for almost any kind
of business purpose; very central. Call
and see ABC PRESS, 128 S. Broad
way. 15
THE DAILY JOURNAL, PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 205 New High st. tf
SPECIAL SALE—NO CHARGE FOR
borders with 5c and 7%0 wall paper.
WALTER, 21S W. Sixth st. 8-12
MRS. STEER TAKES CARE OF THE
face, hands and feet. 124 W. Fourth. 11-4
ISE GRANT'S SYSTEM TONIC FOR
malaria. 127% W. Second st. 8-16
PRACTICAL CHIMNEY SWEEPER.
FROVA. 826 Keller. 8-14
BATHS
THE LOS ANGELES VITAPATHIC IN
stitute gives faradic, static and galvanic
electricity, vapor, sun and electrical
baths, sheet packs, fomentations, salt
glows, sprays, showers and shampoos;
Swedish and German massage, chro
mopathy. vocuum treatment; read our
big Sunday advertisement on page 20; 15
treating rooms. 35 rooms for patients
and guests. Largest vitapathic insiitute
In California. DR. HARRIMAN, physi
cian in charge. Consultation free. Thurs
day evening meetings free to all investi
gators at 531% South Broadway, Hotel
Delaware. tf
HYGIENIC BATH PARLORS—ELEC
trIc and steam baths; massage, salt
glows and constitutional treatment; for
ladles and gentlemen. 125 W. Fourth St.;
Tel. Brown 142. 8-10
FOR EXCHANGE—REAL ESTATE
FOR EXCHANGE—NICE HOUSE AND
lot at Seattle. Wash.; what have you to
offer? See E. I. BRYANT, 204% S. Broad
way, room 213. vi
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE—PASADE
na business property; what have you to
offer? See E. I. BRYANT, 204% S. Broad
way, room 213. 12
MINING AND ASSAYING
MORGAN & CO., ASSAYERS AND RE
finers and ore testers; bullion purchased;
consulting metallurgists; mines examined
and dealt In. Office, 261 Wilson blk., Los
Angeles Cal. 25-tf
THIS BIMETALLIC ASSAY OFFICE
and Chemical Laboratory, 121 S. Main st.
R. A. PEREZ, E. M.. manager. 12-4tf
MUSIC LESSONS
TONE. TOUCH, TIME AND TECH
nlque taught: also theory and thorough
bass. By A. WILHARTITZ. 212 S. Broad
■ way, room 14. 3. ]()
ATTORNEYS AT LAW~
BROUSSEAU St MONTGOMERY.
Attorneys-at-Law,
403 Bradbury block. Los Angeles, tf
PHYSICIANS
CONSULT DR. MINNIE WELLS, SPE
ciailst, 316 W. Seventeenth St., cor. of
Grand aye. 3-16tf
PLUMBERS
FRANK A. WEINSHANK, PLUMBER
and gasfitter, 240 E. Second st. Tel 136. i
WANTED—MALE HELP
iiummell, nrtos. & CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Rutldlng,
j 200-302 W. Second street, in basement.
, Telephone 509,
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Stable boy, $10 etc.; buggy washer, $20
etc.; stableman, $30 month; orchardist,
! $35 etc.; scraper teamsters. $20 etc.; man
and wife, private place. $30 etc.; colored
man, private place, $15 etc.; man, deliver,
city; beer bottler, $9 week; man and wife,
dairy, $33 etc.: ranch hands, $15 etc.; el
derly man, garden etc., $10 and board:
ship carpenter, $3 day; canvassers; log
setter, sawmill. $1 etc.: etc., etc., etc.
MEN'S HOTEL, DEPARTMENT
Extra waiters, $1 meal; head cook, $60
J etc.: second cook.'s4o etc.; boy, dishwash
er, $2.50 etc. week; gardener: elderly man;
dishwasher, $5 etc. week, beach: waiters,
$6 week etc.; second baker, $30 etc.; etc.,
etc.. etc.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
German housegirl. $20; yours second
second girl, hospital, $10 etc.; girl, assist,
$3 week; housegirl. 3 adults, $20; elderly
woman, keep house, $20 and f:ire: house
girl, Pasadena, $15: woman, housework,
country, $20; housegirl, Bunkerhttl aye..
$13; German or Swede housegirl. $20; cook,
family. $23; cook, girls' school, $20; nurse
girl, baby, $0.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Starch ironer, laundry, $1.25; also
starcher, $1.25; 2 waitresses, city, $5 week
and room; check waitress, $6 week; wait
ress, .small hotel, country, $20 and fare;
check waitress, $7 week.
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
WANTED—AN EXPERIENCED CAR
rlage trimmer to take position out of
I city. Call or write to E. W. POTTER &
j CO., 129 E. Third St., city. 10_
WANTED—FEMALE HELP
WANTED—A GIRL TO WORK FOR
I board one month: must be recommended.
S., box 24, Herald. 10
WANTED—AGENTS
WANTED—AGENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL
Insurance; salary and commission; expe
rience not necessary. Apply room 9. 105
E. First st. 8-27
WANTED—TO BUY UVE STOCK
WANTED—CALVES AND FAT STOCK.
FRED HUGHES, Durham market. 1067
Temple st. 6-24tf
WANTED—TO BORROW
WANTED — MONEY; $500 ON CITY
property on Adams st. Also $0000. Income
ranch property. See E. I. BRYANT, 204%
S. Broadway, room 213. 12
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
HOUSES AND LOTS
FOR SALE—A SNAP; NEW 5-ROOM
cottage; price, $1000; southwest, on Santa
Monica car line: terms, $200 cash, time
given on balance. L. H. MITCHEL,
agent, 136 S. Broadway. 10
POR SALE OR RENT—LOVELY HOUSE
33—IN BEAUTIFUL ST. JAMES PARK.
Inquire on premises or at 421 W. Adams.
8-17
CITT LOTS
FOR SALE—C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots in his third addition on easy install
ments and build new bouses to suit, pay
able same way. Office 213 W. First St. tf
BUSINESS PROPERTY
FOR SALE—SNAP! BUSINESS COR
ner; the best wholesale corner with large
2-story building, on Los Angeles St.;
must sacrifice; no reasonable offer re
fused: best buy in city. See owner, with
JOHN L. PAVKOVICH, 220 W. First. 10
FOR SALE —WILL SELL AT SACRl
fice, choice business and residence prop
erty. Address P. O. box 906. 9-7
COUNTRY PROPERTY
FOR SALE—A CALIFORNIA FARM
for you; 12 miles from Los Angeles; under
irrigation; soil and climate perfect: half
the price usually asked. See W. H. HOL
ABIRr>. Byrne building. Los Angeles, tf
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR SALE —A COPPER AND GOLD
mine; $5000 cash will handle one of the
largest and best developed gold and
copper mines on this coast; a regular bo
nanza; giving the buyer presidency, vice
presidency, treasury and the naming of
four out of the live directors; gives you
charge of treasury fund and bonds
amounting to about $150,000, quite enough
to puts you immediately in full
charge on a good salary and makes you
general manager of the whole, in which
large profits are assured for all time to
come and owner of 600,000 shares; three
io five men should join the purchaser:
there Is a fortune for each in it. Full
particulars by calling on OLD MINING
CORPORATION, room 19, 336 S. Broad
way, tf
FOR SALE—S3O WILL BUY NO. 1 ONE
ehair barber shop in good growing town;
the only shop in the town; weekly profits
$10; sell on account of changing occupa
tion. Apply to GEORGE DIDDOCK.
Hemet, Cal. 10
FOR RENT—TWO GOOD GROUND
floor rooms, suitable for almost any kind
of business purpose; very central. Call
and see ABC PRESS, 128 S. Brcud
way. . 15
FOR SALE—A WHOLESALE AND RE
tall cigar business; complete outfit for
the manufacture of cigars: a good in
vestment. Address T., box 24, Herald. 13
FOR SALE—BUSINESS; HOUSES; FOR
rent; rooms; collections; help free; work.
EDW. NITTINGER, 236% S. Spring St. tf
FOR SALE—TAMALE AND SANDWICH
wagon; cheap; furnished; doing good
business. Apply 520 S. Spring st. 10
t SELL OUT ALL KINDS OF BUSINESS.
I. D. BARNARD, 111 North Broadway, tf
forsale-saloo"ns~at very rea
sonable terms. Apply at 440 Aliso st. tf
DENTISTS
ADAMS BROS., DENTAL PARLORS,
239% S.Spring St.: painless extracting, 50c;
rulings; plutes. from $1; all work guar
anteed; established 12 years. Hours. 8-5;
Sundays. 10-12. Telephone, black 1273. tf
FRANK STEVEN r s7~324% S. SPRING
open days and evenings: also Sundays:
electric light. Tel. Black 821.
(Additional classified ads on second page)
THE HERALD
THE MINER
IS HUNGRY
But He Shows No Sign of
Yielding
FAMILIES ARE FAMISHING
WHILE STRIKERS KEEP WATCH
ON MINES
The Campaign of Mass Meeting and
Marching to Be Conducted With
Renewed Vigor
Associated Press Special Wire.
PITTSBURG, Pa., Aug. 9.—Appeals
for food and provisions were numerous
at the headquarters of the miners' offi
cials today It appeared as if there w-as
a wail from every section of the dis
trict, and miners in pe-rsnn were present
to ask that fhe suffering ones be looked
after. Secretary Warner was kept busy
answering the-appeals. He said tonight
that he had sent more than $ICOO worth
of provisions into various parts of the
district. The appeals are now coming
in from the families, the heads of which
are at the various mining camps using
their influence to keep other men from
working. *
A series of meetings are to be held all
over the district. It ie expected to keep
up the interest in every section and
strengthen every point where there is
the least indication of weakness. The
Vigils on the mines of fhe New York and
Cleveland Gas Coal company are to be
kept up and the vigor increased from
day to day. .
The following was issued by Patrick
Dolan, the president, and Secretary
Warner today:
"There will ho a mass meeting of all
the miners at Cannonsburg Wednesday,
August 11th, at 10 a. m. All miners of
the above named places will call meet
ings and prepare to go. The meeting
will be addressed by the ddetrict officials
and. others. Every miner is requested to
attend."
The campaign in Westmoreland coun
ty will begin at Irwin Wednesday. At
2 p. m. a monster meeting will be held.
It is expected that Eugene V. Debs,
Mrs. Mary Jones, M. P. Carrick, Patrick
Dolan and others will make addresses.
A march is to lie made from Turtle
Creek. There will be a number of brass
bands in the procession. The strikers
desire to awaken an interest In that
section, as they claim the mines that
are working are an injury to their
cause.
At the Instigation of Thomas- E. Sut
ton of Willocks, Henry Ulrich, Emi!
Nager, Henry Huser and Gustav Rings,
miners, were commlttedi to jail for a
hearing before Alderman J. V. McMas
tere on various charges today. Ulrich
is charged with aggravated: assault and
battery, Nager with assault and- battery
and Huser and Rings with unlawful as
semblage. The arrests are the result of
an altercation at Willocks, July 26th,
on account of the strike. Warrants are
out for a number of others.
Early this morning the miners of West
Elizabeth made a march on the mines
of the Elizabeth Mining company, for
merly operated by Homer & Roberts.
About fifty men were going to work.
After a consultation the men- asked that
they be allowed to finish loading a flat.
They agreed to go out as soon as it
was loaded, which will take several
days. The officials of the company
made an effort this afternoon to get per
mission- from the mining officials to con
tinue work on a 69-cen.t basis. This was
not given ,andi it Is expected that the
mine will be idle as soon as the flat is
loaded.
IOWA MINERS
OTTUMWA, la., Aug. 9.—At a meet
ing of the lowa miners here today It was
decided not to strike in sympathy with
the easterners, but it was l voted to as
sess all men 25 cents per week for their
aid. The meeting was poorly attended,
only one-fourth of the miners in the
state being represented. Another meet
ing is called for August 19th at Oska
loosa.
MINERS WILL MARCH
SPRINGFIELD, 111., Aug. 9. —A State
Register special from Lincoln says the
miners of that city met and decided
unanimously to march Wednesday
morning to Mount Pulaski and endeavor
to get the miners there to strike, and
from there go to Niantic on a similar
mission, and from there to Decatur,
where the delegations from Springfield,
Pana and other places will meet them.
The operators at Lincoln offered their
men work every day in the week—they
having had but two days' work pet
week on an average—if they would re
turn to work. The proposition was de
clined.
MEN PAID OFF
PITTSBURG, Aug. 9.—A1l the min
ers of the New York and Cleveland Gas
and Coal Company are still at work.
They were paid today, but those who
struck did not receive any money, the
company insisting upon the terms of the
contract by which the men agreed to for
feit all reserve In such a case. The strik
ers say that the men promised to quit as
soon as they get their pay, but DeAr
mitt declares that the strikers shall not
take the men out of Plum Creek mine.
The strike is beginning to cause hunger
among the miners' families along the
Wheeling division and in the Panhandle
district. The male members are living
much better in the camps than the wo
men and children at home.
UNDER MARTIAL LAW
ST. LOUIS, Mo., Aug. 9.—A special to
the Republic from Coffeen, 111., say.v:
This town is under martial law. A force
of 235 armed deputies is guarding the
town and particularly the property of
the Coffeen Coal and Copper company.
Sudden Insanity
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 9.—Miss
Mary Hieber of 661 West Wabash aye
LOS ANGELES, TUESDAY MORNING, AUGUST JO, 1&97
nue. St. Louis, became suddenly insane
while traveling on the overland train
which reached this city today. She first
betrayed signs of approaching dementia
yesterday and gradually grew worse un
til It was found necessary to keep her
under surveillance at night. During the
run from Sacramento to Oakland she
made three attempts to jump from the
train, but was restrained. Again while
crossing the bay in custody of a rail
road detective she is now detained at the
Receiving hospital.
HOFFMAN'S MURDER
Testimony Given at the Examination
of Figel
SAN FRANCISCO, August 9.—Tiie
preliminary examination of Theodore A.
Figel, charged with the murder of his
employer, Isaac Hoffman, in his office, on
the evening of June 1, was resumed'be
fore Judge today. After it had
been shown by a brother of the deceased
that when he last saw Isaac Hoffman be
was in good spirits and that he w as not
in the habit of carrying a pistol, Watcii
man H. Ferrenbach was called for the
purpose of showing that shortly before
the tragedy he met Figel, who told him
that he was going back to the ullice for
something which he had forgotten. A
few minutes later be saw Figel and Hoff
man meet and enter the office together.
When he next passed the front of the
store he noticed that there was some
thing amiss with the iron doors, and, en
tering, found- Hoffman in a dying condi
tion on the floor of his office
Captain James P. Horan, property
clerk of the police department, testified
positively that the revolver with which
the killing had been done came to him
spattered witii blood, whioh was still
moist. He stated that the fluit'imust have
been dripping off the revolver. When
shown the revolver which he had
brought into court with him, polished
and shining brightly, he was asked to
explain why there were no traces of the
blood. He replied that he did not know.
Ach offered the revolver in evidence,
but Barnes objected to it being offered
in any other way than for identification
and the judge sustained him.
Will Be Thoroughly Distributed by
SANTA ROSA, Aug. 9.—What prom
ises to he a very interesting legal pro
ceeding over the $65,000 estate of William
Blhler, who died in Sonoma county last
year, was commenced in the superior
court today when William Blhler of
Baden, Germany, filed a contest of the
will which has already been admitted
to probate.
Blhler is the deceased's nephew, and
wants the court to revoke the probate of
the will. He alleges, among other
things, that Blhler was of unsound mind
when he signed the purported will, and
that undue influence was brought to
bear upon Blhler by Pauline and Chris
tian Stengel of Marin, county.. BihLr
owned considerable property in Sonoma,
Solano and San Francisco counties, and
was very well known. Stengel was left
a good deal of property by Blhler.
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 9.—Sheriff
Wheian of this county is In a quandary:
Notary L. D. Craig today attached his
signature to two orders committing A.
M. Lawrence and T. T. Williams, re
spectively managing editor and business
manager of the Examiner, to the county
Jail until they answered crr'tain ques
tions in cvonnection with the libel suit
instituted by Claus Spreckels, and
handed them to the sheriff for service
upon the newspaper men, but as the
commitment for contempt by a notary
has not been attempted before in this
state the defendants insisted that the
action of Craig was illegal, that official
referred the matter to his attorneys.
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 9.—George J.
Moore, who recently attempted suicide in
a dramatic manner in an Eddy street
shooting gallery, was today arrested as
insane, and is now confined In the in
sane ward of the Receiving hospital.
Since his discharge from the hospital
upon recovering from the effects of his
self inflicted wound, Moore has been up
on a protracted debauch, and having an
nounced his intention to kill his father
and other relatives, it was deemed ad
visable to restrain him. He is a son of
the president of the Pacific Mutual In
surance company.
WINDSOR, Cal., Aug. 9.—Miller and
Hotchkiss are at work building the larg
est cellar in Sonoma county with a ca
pacity for making one million gallons of
wine this season. The association's
winery at this place will operate this
season and 12,000 tons of grapes will be
crushed into wine at Windsor during
the fall. Three fruit dryers are in oper
ation and business is lively.
OAKLAND, Aug. 9.—Charles V. La
due, the youth who was shot by his
sweetheart, Miss Clara Fallmer, on the
night of the 2d instant, died today at his
home in Alameda. The girl, who is 17
years of age, is rapidly recovering from
the wound which she inflicted upon her
self immediately after having shot her
lover, and will be charged with murdir
after the inquest.
WASHINGTON, Aug. 9.— Consul-Ge
neral Hayward, in a report to the state
department, states that during 1896
American vessels numbering 247, of 243,
--983 tons, entered at Hawaiian ports,
while vessels of all other nationalities
numbered 139, of 234,014 tons. These are
the only foreign ports where a majority
of the carrying trade is now under the
American Hag.
TUCSON, Ariz., Aug. 9.—Word was
brought to the city today that Judge M.
R. Slater died suddenly near camp at
Canyon, de Oro. He was missed, search
was made, and the corpse found near by.
Deceased was from Franklin, Indiana,
and came to Arizona under Cleveland's
first administration as special United
States land agen.t.
CAIRO, 111., Aug. 9.—Captain, B. B.
Bradley's towboat Fritz blew up ten
miles below here at 7 oclock this evening.
Ten men are missing and four are badly
scalded, . .
THE BIHLER ESTATE
Legal Processes
The Sheriff Is Timid
Timely Restraint
Sonoma Wine and Fruit
Ladue Is Dead
Hawaiian Commerce
Judge Slater's Death
The Boiler Burst
A CARRIER
PIGEON
Brings News of the Miners
at Dyea
ALL ON BOARD ARE WELL
AND BEADY TO TACKLE THE
CHILCOOT PASS
The Canadian Government Takes Ac
tion to Preserve Order in the
Frozen Mining Begion
Associated Press Special Wire.
PORTLAND, Ore., Aug. O—A carrier
pigeon which was taken to Dyea on the
steamer George W. JSlder returned here
today with the following message:
DYEA, Aug. 7. —Arrived safely here
last night. All well on board.
T. CAINE.
Came took a number of pigeons with
him, and it Is his Intention to release the
others when his party has crossed the
Chilcoot pass.
A SPRING PARTY
PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., Aug. 9 —
Judge Joseph W. Kuhn, an attorney of
this place, proposes to conduct a party of
gold prospectors to the Copper river,
Alaska, in the spring. As that section
of the district is peopled with a hostile
tribe of Indians which has hitherto
been given the go-by by the missionaries
it is considered very hazardous to at
tempt to explore it. The judge has re
ceived hundreds) of letters and many
telegrams from all over the country, and
especially from Texas, from people who
want to go to the Copper river.
NEW MINING RULES
TORONTO, Ont., Aug. 9.—A special to
the Globe from Ottawa says that the
Dominion government has reached sev
eral important decisions in regard to the
Yukon country, and the working of tht
gold fields there.
It has been decided to appoint an ad
ministrator for the district, who will
have entire charge of all the Canadian
officials there, and be the chief executive
officer of the government.
Joseph Walsh, a former commander of
the Northwest mounted police, is to b>
appointed to the position. A party of
mounted police to leave Manitoba next
week for the gold country has been in
creased from 20 to 35. They will take
with them two Maxim guns.
The mining rules' have been amended
in important particulars. At present a
miner is entitled to stake out a claim ot
500 feet tunning along with the stream
and back to the bank. This has been
reduced to 100 feet, and the new regula
tion will go into force immediately. A
court for the administration of civil and
criminal questions of the gold district
has also been decided' upon. Justic;
McGuire of Prince Albert is to preside
over the court.
AROUND THE HORN
NEW YORK, August 9.—The first
ship sailing from New York direct to
Alaska is advertised to leave
this city about August 21st. It is to be
sent by the New York and Alaska Gold
Exploring and Trading Company. The
company has not yet selected its vessel,
but it promises to dispatch a steamship
capable of carrying safely 200 passengers
and 1500 tons of freight. It says the ship
will make the voyage from New York
around Cape Horn to Juneau in fifty or
sixty days. More than fifty names hay,
been listed for the voyage. Not more
than 200 passengers will be allowed to
embark. The cost per passenger, includ
ing berth, meals and transportation of
500 pounds of baggage direct to Juneau
j is to be $175.
DUTY DODGERS
ROSSLAND, B. C, Aug. 9 —The cus
toms officials have discovered a smug
gling scheme on a large scale. The
trail up from the Okanogan country
passes Into Canada at Krugers on Oso
yoos lake, where the custom bouse Is
located, andi then makes a detour into
i the United. States and re-enters the Do
minion at a point several miles east of
the custom house.
The town of Oroo is the headquarters
of the smugglers. Freighters from the
states bringing in produce come up the
trail to Krugers, pay duty on stuff they
have in' their wagons and follow the
road down across the line to Oroo. Here
they pick up big quantities of all sorts
of groceries, principally tobacco and
canned, goods, and follow the road into
Canada again, to which they gain access
without difficulty, as all the goods have
presumably paid duty at Krugers, far
ther back on the line.
A LONG LIST
SEATTLE, Wash., August 9.—The
steamer Willamette, with the largest
number of passengers ever carried by a
single steamer to Alaska, is now on her
way to Dyea. She was scheduled to
leave Friday, but did not get away until
noon today. The vessel carries 815 pas
sengers, 200 head of livestock and over
2000 tons of freight. Several thousand
people thronged the wharf to bid good
by to the Klondyke prospectors.
LOAD TO THE LIMIT
■ SAN FRANCISCO, August 9.—Two
steamers will sail for the north today
with their carrying capacity taxed to
the utmost. The Umatilla will be sent
to Seattle by the Pacific Coast Steam
ship Company and the South Coast will
be also dispatched.
The Umatilla will take away about 300
passengers and transfer them to the City
of Topeka at some Puget Sound*port.
Although the South Coast is not yet
loaded, she is very low in the water and
seafaring men say that with her load in
a rough sea she will have great difficulty
In getting through.
TALK ABOUT KLONDYKE
WEAVERVILLE, Aug. 9.—Great ex
citement prevails at Trinity Center and
vicitnity over a rich strike made by the
Graves brothers and Henry Carter in
INDEX
OF THE TELEGRAPH NEWS
_____
The Rusian and German rulers pay
pretty compliments to one another
and thus cement the peace of Europe.
New York Yacht club boats sail into
port and claim their prizes; wheel
work; baseball games; track and turf
results.
John W. Bookwalter of Springfield,
0., thinks his neighbors lacking in
appreciation; he will sell his property
and go off to play by himself.
Miners' families are beginning to
suffer from hunger, but the strikers
show no sign of yielding; the march
ing movement to be resumed with re
newed vigor tomorrow.
The death of Premier Canovas the
result of his activity against the an
archists; Junta Leader Palma, as a
man, deplores the crime, but as a Cu
ban insurgent he hopes to profit by it.
News of the safe arrival at Dyea of
the G. W. Elder party brought back
by carrier pigeon; thousands more
going up by steamer, sailing vessel or
overland; Canada proposes to keep or
der in the mining region.
the drift claim on Coffee creek. In fout
days they took out three water bucket »
lull of gold, or $68,000, the largest piec.v
weighing twelve thousand dollars. They
expect to take between $150,000 and $200.
--000 out of the pocket. The gold is coarse
Snd lies between walls of porphyry, and
resembles melted gold poured in the
seams.
A GOOD SEASON
PORT TOWNSEND, Wash., Aug. 9 —
A letter received from Cook's Inlet says
there has been a good season there, and
miners who will come down on this
schooner Norman Sund? willforingsl2s,
--000 in gold dust.
SCHOFIELD BURIED
The Officers Gathering Evidence in
the Case
SAN JOSE, Aug. 9.—The funeral of
George Schofield took place today and
was attended by the dead man's friends
and family. Mrs. Schofield was per
mitted to attend the services, which
were held at a k>cal undertaker's estab
lishment;
The accused persons were closeted in
the district attorney's office and later In
the day Daniel Ducher was taken to
Madrone, where he will doubtless be ar
raigned. Mrs. Schofield's attorney is
looking after Duoher's side of the case.
Sheriff Lyndon will send' a messenger
to Fresno tomorrow to bring back Clark
Johnson, son-in-law, who left the Scho
field ranch suddenly just before the
shooting.
There Is still much excitement in the
neighborhood, but the sympathy of the
residents seems to be with Mrs. Scho
field. It Is said that the dead man never
spoke of his family affairs to his neigh
bors, but Mrs. Schofield had frequently
mentioned the troubles which took place
within the Schofield household circle,
and in this way the neighbors came to
feel for her.
Some of Schofield's friends who knew
him before he moved to his ranch speak
well of him. One who knew him when he
kept a hotel in Santa Cruz spoke highly
of him and denied that the dead man
was of a quarrelsome nature.
The officers have established to their
own satisfaction that Mrs. Schofield was'
used to handling firearms and was an
expert shot.
TWO WIVES
Put In Their Claims to Marston's
Estate
OAKLAND, Aug. 9.—Two widows have
appeared to do battle for the estate of
the late H. W. Marston, a well known
manufacturer's agent, who died in this
city on June 3 last. A remarkable'story
was revealed today by the proceedings
in ihe probate court.
Judge Ogden has placed the estate in
the ■ hands of Public Administrator
Knight upon the petition of F. L. Mars
ton, a son of the deceased man, who has
come from Boston to fight the claim of
Mrs. Marston of this city, one of the al
leged widows. The young man repre
sents his mother and declares in his
complaint filed in the superior court
that the California widow is not entitled
to recognition, but that the real widow
is the Boston lady.
It appears that 25 years ago Marston.
whose real name is G. W„ instead of
H. W. Marston, came to California from
Boston. For a time he corresponded
with his wife, but one day she received
notice of his death and letters addressed
to him by her w ere returned unopened.
She became suspicious some years later
and discovered that he was living with
a woman named Harriet Goodwin, who
also claims the estate which is supposed
to be a valuable one. The trial will b(
an interesting one. as both sides seem
determined to fight the matter to the end.
LEGAL BUSINESS
The Schooner Morgan Is Not a Fili
buster
BRIDGEPORT. Conn., August 9.—Th?
schooner Blanche Morgan, Captain
Wasson, which was taken in charge by
government officials Saturday afternoon
while loading ammunition, will probably
be given a clean bill of health and al
lowed to depart. A rumor that arm?
were to be shipped from this port to
Cuba has apparently excited the United
States War Department, and the United
States cutter Fern, since its arrival on
Saturday, has been seeking tracesof any
suspicious foreign-bound vessel. When
the Morgan tied up at Miller's wharf and
commenced to load ammunition. Collec
tor Goddard. in company with officers
from the Fern, boarded the boat. The
statement of Captain Wasson that the
ammunition was being shipped for the
United States forces at Governor's Is
land, did not seem satisfactory, and a
deputy from the Custom House was put
aboard until inquiries could be made.
If the Synod Consents
CHICAGO. August 9.— W. J. Chi
chester, D. D., who has just completed
a successful pastorate of twelve years
in Los Angeles, has accepted the call of
the First Presbyterian church in this
city to succeed D. J. Barrows.
Ten Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
CANOVAS'
KILLING
The Result of Opposition
to Anarchists
THE ASSASSIN CONFESSES
SAYING THAT HE HAS CONE HIS
DUTY
i .
As a Han Junta Leader Palma la
( Sorry,. But as, a Cuban He Hopes
' to Profit
Associated Press Special Wire.
MADRID, August 9.—The assassina
tion of the Prime Minister of Spain,
Senor Canovas del Castillo, who waa
shot and killed by an Italian anarchist,
whose name is believed to be Michelo
Angeline Golli, at the baths of Santa
Agueda yesterday afternoon, was un
doubtedly cold-blooded and premedi
tated.
Golli watched for his opportunity to
kill the Spanish statesman, and Bred only
when he had no chance of missing. In
fact, the assassin,who was arrested al
most immediately after the Premier fell
dead at the feet of his wife, declared am
much to the examining magistrate.
The Prime Minister lingered for some
time in coma and passed away with the
cry: "Long live Spain!"
Further details of the assassination
show that Premier Canovas del Castillo
and wife were present yesterday at the
celebration of mass in the chapel at
tached to the baths. After mass the
Premier was reading and conversing
with some reporters, when the assassin
approached and fired three shots at him
with a revolver, hitting him in the fore
head, chest and left ear. Canovas
fell to the ground, crying: "Assassin!
Long live Spain!" The Premier was car
ried to his room andiexpired at 1:30 p. m.,
after extreme unction had been admin
istered by a priest of the Dominican or
der.
The murderer was Immediately seized
by the people in the vicinity and severer
ly handled, and must have been killed
had it not been for the protection of the
civil guards.
The prisoner, who declared he had
killed the Premier "in the accomplish
ment of a Just vengeance," gave the
name of Rinaldi, and claimed that the
deed was the outcome of an extensive
anarchist conspiracy. Later, however,
the assassin confessed that his real
name is Michelo Angeline Golli; that he
Is 26 years of age, a native of Boggi.
near Naples, and that he left Italy and
came to Spain in 1896. After reaching
Spain Golli, according to his confession,
resided at Barcelona and participated in
the doings of various anarchist societies
in that place and vicinity. After so
journing at Barcelona for some time,
Golli visited France and Belgium, and
returned to Spain in July last. After hie
return the anarchists seemed to have
perfected plans for the assassination of
the Prime Minister.
He left Madrid for Santa Agueda at
the same time as Senor Canovasdel Cas
tillo and awaited an opportunity to as
sassinate the statesman. In appearance
Golli Is of medium height, wears a
full beard and spectacles and his de
meanor is that of a quiet, law-abiding
citizen. He said he is satisfied with
having done his "duty," and asserts that
he has no personal grudge against the
Premier, and was merely obeying orders
received from superiors in the secret so
ciety to which he belonged. He frankly
professes the anarchist doctrine, says
he was sentenced in 1895 to eighteen
months' imprisonment in jail at Lucera,
Italy, and claims that he escaped to
Marseilles, from which port he made
his way to Barcelona.
Senora Canovas, wife of the Premier,
who was but a short distance from her
husband when the crime wascommitted,
rushed to his side upon hearing the
shot 9. As the Premier lay dying on the
ground she bitterly reproached the mur
derer for his crime.
Golli, in reply to the agonizing words
of the distracted wife, said): "I respect
you because you are an honorable lady,
but I have done my duty andi am now
easy in mind, for I have avenged friends
and the brothers in Montjuich."
Montjuich Is the fortress of Barce
lona, outside of which the anarchists
sentenced to death for the recent out
rages had been executed) by being shot
in the back. The anarchists recently
executed outside of Montpjuiees were
the last batch of fiends guilty of throw
ing a bomb, on June 7, 1896, in a religioua
procession about to enter the Church of
Santa Maria de Lamar, upon the occa
sion of the Corpus Christi celebration.
Twelve personswere instantly killed and
about fifty others injured, several of
whom have since died from the wounds".
For this crime twenty-fix anarchists
were sentenced to death and many of
them executed. The Spanish newspapers
express great indignation at Golli'*
crime.
It appears this evening that Golli, the
assassin, represented himself as a cor
respondent of El Populo. The prisoner
cannot be tried under the laws provld-
Ing for the trial and punishment of
anarchists, as this law Is so framed that
a person prosecuted under its provis
ions must have used or attempted to use
explosives in the commission or attempt
to commit the crime charged against
him. However, there is no dioiubt Golli
will be summarily tried and sentenced.
The public demands the adoption of
stringent measures against anarchists,
and also against those who are In sym
pathy with them.
Golli has confessed that he killed
Senor Canovas to avenge the Barcelona
anarchists and the insurgent leader,
Don Jose Rizal, who was executed at
Manila, Philippine islands, on Decemb
er 30th last, as the instigator of the
Philippine revolution. Dr. Rizal denied
that he was a rebel leader, but he ad
mi it i d that he had: drawn up the statutea

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