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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, August 11, 1897, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-08-11/ed-1/seq-1/

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Double Sheet
TWENTY-SIXTH YEAR. NO. 315.
OLEOGRAPHS FREE
FOR ADVERTISKRS~IN OUR CLASSI
fied columns.
THE HERALD WILL GIVE
A HANDSOME OLEOGRAPH
To each person who Inserts an adver
tisement of three lines or more In these
colur.ms. It's a pretty picture and will be
an ornament to any household.
SPECIAL NOTICES
ALBERT P. WILSON & SON, THE MOST
competent jewelers, opticians and watch
makers on the coast have opened up at
244 S. Broadway, and are prepared to do
work which is rarely accomplished.
Therefore, If your eyes fll to see and
your timepieces fail to run, visit the
Wilsons. Their prices are lower that;
anybody's for good work. tf
KOTICE—THE LOS ANGELES CITY
Water Co. will strictly enforce the fol
lowing rules: The hours for sprinkling
are between the hours of 6 and 8 oclock
a. m. and 6 antl 8 oclock p. m. For a vio
lation of the above regulations the water
will be shut on" and a fine of $2 will be
charged before the water will be turned
on again. tf
SANITARIUMS. HOSPITALS. RK
sorts. private homes and all parties pro
pared to accommodate health-seettera
are requested to send addresses.*circu
lars and other information to complete
the "Sanitary and Climatic Directory of
Southern California." Add. J. HORBCH,
M. D., Los Angeles, Cal. 11
FOR RENT—TWO COOD GROUND
floor rooms, suitable for almost any klntl
of business purpose; very central. Cal!
and see ABC PRESS, 128 S. broad-
Way. J5
THE DAILY JOURNAL, PUBLISHING
county official records, real estate trans
fers, mortgages, liens, building news; one
dollar monthly. 2u5 New High st. tf
SPECIAL SALE—NO CHARGE FOR
borders with 5c and 7>,£c wall paper.
WALTER, 218 W. Sixth st. S-12
MRS. STEER TAKES CARE OF THE
face, hands and'feet. 124 W. Fourth. 11-4
VSE GRANT'S SYSTEM TONIC FOR
malaria. 127"4 W. Second st. 8-16
PRACTICAL CHIMNEY SWEEPER
FROVA. 820 Keller. 8-11
BATHS
THE LOS ANGELES VITAPATHIC IN
stltute gives faradic, static and galvanic
electr.city, vapor, sun and electrical
baths, sheet packs, fomentations, salt
glows, sprays, showers and shampoos;
Swedish and German massage, chro
mopathy, vocuum treatment; read our
big Sunday advertisement, on page 20; 15
treating rooms, 35 rooms for patients
and guests. Largest vltapathio institute
In California. DR. HARRIMAN, physi
cian In charge. Consultation free. Thurs
day evening meetings free to all investi
gators at 53414 South Broadway, Hotel
Delaware. tf
VAPOR BATHS AND MASSAGE GIVEN
by Mr:-. Francis, who has physicians'
p ferences. 828*4 S. Spring st., room
11. M>_
FOR EXCHANGE—REAL ESTATE
FOR EXCHANGE—NICE HOUSE AND
lot at Seattle, Wash,; what have you to
offer? See E. I. BRYANT, 201 US. Broad
way, room 213. 12
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE —PASADE-
na business property; what have you to
offer? See E. I. BRYANT. 204V4 S. Broad.
way, room 213, 12
MINING AND ASSAYING
MORGAN & CO.. ASSAYERS AND RE
flners and ore testers; bulliun purchased
consulting metallurgists; mines examined
and dealt in. Office, 261 Wilson blk. Los
Angeles Cal. io-'.t
THE BIMETALLIC ASSAY OFFICE
and Chemical Laboratory. 124 S Main st
R. A, PEREZ, E.M., manager. i2-4tf '
MUSIC LESSONS
TONE, TOUCH, TIME AND TECH
nique taught; also theory and thorough
bass. By A. WILHARTITZ, 212 S. Broad
way. room 14. 0-10
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
11ROUSSEAU & MONTGOMERY,
Attorneys-at-Law,
403 Bradbury block. Los Angeles, tf
PLUMBERS
FRANK A. WEINSHANK, PLUMBER
and gacfitter, 240 E. Second, st. Tel 130.
WANTED—MALE HELP
HUMMELL BROS. & CO.
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank Building.
300-302 W. Second street, In basement.
Telephone DOS,
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Fruit ranch hanil. $25 etc.; ranch team
ster. $20 etc.: scraper teamster. $20 etc.;
man, hay press, 10c etc. ton; elderly man.
ranch. $12 etc.; several families, cut
peaches, ."c box; man and wife, dairy•
$3.* i etc.; milk wagon driver; beer bottler,
i $9 week; butcher slaughter house, $35 and
board; man. sawmill, $1 und board; 4
hoedowns. $1 25; etc., etc., etc.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Shop baker. $9 week; baker's helper.
Randsburg, $15 etc.; first-class broiler,
$50 etc.; second baker, $20 etc.; colored
waiters. $25 etc.; restaurant waiter, $fi:
ranch cook, $15; boy, dishwasher, $2.50
etc.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
Housegirl Santa Monica. $20. employer
here; hous.egirl. $20; working housekeep
er, 2 men, $15; housebirl. $12; also one $20;
German housegirl good heme, $20; house
girl Santa Paula, fare here; housekeeper,
$12, no objection to child, fare paid;
young nurseglrl $7.50: woman, house
work, near city, $15; French second girl,
$20.
WOMEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Waitress, small hotel, country, $20;
chambermaid and wait table, beach, $20
and fare; pantrywoman. restaurant, $4
week, call early; laundry help, city and
beach, $1.25 and $1.50 day.
WANTED — A RESPONSIBLE FIRM
wants ofllce manager at San Francisco:
salary $2000 a year; $3000 cash and best
reference required; commercial refer
ence furnished Address KEELER
KIRKPATRICK, 56 N. Sixth st., Phila
delphia, Perm. 11
WANTED—AGENTS
WANTED—AGENTS FOR INDUSTRIAL
insurance; salary and commission; expe
rience not nectssary. Apply room 9. 105
E. First st. 8-27
WANTED—TO BUY UVE STOCK
WANTED—CALVES AND FAT STOCK.
FRED HUGHES, Durham market, 1067
Temple St. 6-24tf
WANTED—TO BORROW
WANTED — MONEY; J5OO ON CITY
property on Adams st. AlsoSSOOn, income
ranch property. See E. I. BRYANT, 204 V»
S. Broadway, room 213. 12
FOR SALE—REAL ESTATE
HOUSES AND LOTS
FOR SALE OR RENT—LOVELY HOUSE
33—IN BEAUTIFUL ST. JAMES PARK.
Inquire on premises or at 421 W, Adams.
8-17
CITY LOTS
FOR SALE—C. A. SMITH WILL SELL
lots in his third addition on easy install- [
nients and build new houses to suit, pay- !
able same way. Ofllce 213 W. First st. tf I
FOR SALE—SS CASH, $5 MONTHLY; $1S0;
Nir.'th st. lot. fenced, water piped; Mateo
car lino. SIDDAI.L. 404 S. Broadway. 11
BUSINESS PROPERTY
FOR SALE—WILL SELL AT SACRl
fice, choice business and residence prop
erty. Address P. O. box 900. ')-!
COUNTRY PROPERTY
FOR SALE—
TUTTLE & LOFTIS. LAND AGENTS
020 Market st. Opp. Palace Hotel.
LOOK AT THIS!
——THE GREATEST SNAP———
IN CALIFORNIA.
You can double your
money iv one year
or make the best
permanent Investment evevv.
OFFERED.
Finest property in the state.
Will pay S per cent net on $60,C00.
Can be had now for $21,000.
234 ACRES
18G acres full bearing raisin
vineyard; choicest selections.
8 acres full bearing oliyes.
12t2 acres diversified orchard.
28 acres grain and pasture.
Locuted in the beautiful
El Cajon val.ey, 10 miles
FROM SAN DIEGO.
Most delightful climate.
No Frosts.
No Irrigation.
Substantial Improvements.
This Is a bank property.
They want cash.
They don't want ranches.
Don't lose this opportunity.
—' You will never get
Another like It.
We also have a largo
list of most desirable
country properties in California.
"See us before purchasing, as
we handle only first-class
PROPERTIES.
TUTTLE & LOFTIS. LAND AGENTS.
020 Market st. Opp. Palace Hotel, tf
FOR SALE—A CALIFORNIA FARM
fcr you; 12 miles from Los Angeles; under
Irrigation; soil and climate perfect; half
the price usually asked. See W. H. HOL
ABIR, n Byrne building, Los Angeles, tf
FOR SALE—Id PER ACRE; 40 ACREsT
$240: line land, Antelope valley. SID
DALL. 404 S. Broadway. 11 ,
PHYSICIANS
CONSULT DR. MINNIE WELLS, SPE
cialist, 316 W. Seventeenth St., cor. of
Grand aye. 3-lCtf '
LOST AND FOUND
LOST—MILK ROUTE BOOK. FINDER ■
will please write to A. BRUNOLD, 1807
lowa st. 12
(Additional classified ads on second page)
THE HERALD
LOS ANGELES, WEDNESDAY MORNING, AUGUST tt, 1897
CANOVAS'
FUNERAL
To Be Conducted in Mili
tary Style
ITALIANS IDENTIFY GOLLI
AS A BAD SOLDIER AND WORSE
PRINTER
Possible Effects of the Premier' 3
Death on American Relations.
Fighting in Cuba.
Associated Press Special Wire.
MADRID, August 10.—The Queen Re
gent has decreed that the military hon
ors observed in the case of the funeral of
a Marshal shall bo accorded the remains
of the late Premier of Spain, SenorCan
ovas del Castillo, shot and killed Sunday
by Anarchist Golli. The body of the
Spanish statesman will arrive here on
'Wednesday morning, accompanied by the
widow, the Minister for the Colonies,
Senor Cos-Gayon, and Chief Majordomo,
Duke of Soto, representing the Queen
Regent.
A dispatch from Lucerne, Italy, says
the Italian police have identified Golli,
the assassin of Senor Canovas, as Michel
Anglolino. He is 33 years of age and was
born at Foggia, capital of the province
of that name lm the Apulian plain.
His military record was> limited. He
proved an indifferent and disobedient
soldier, and was sent for three years'
service in the disciplinary battalion. Sub
sequently he became a compositor. In
April. 18!»6, he was sentenced to eighteen
months' Imprisonment for disseminating
anarchist pi opagandas.but after serving
a part of the term he escaped to Spain.
He come? of an honest family. His
father, who is a tailor, Is grief stricken
by the crime of his son.
CANOVAS' FUNERAL
A dispatch from Santa Agueda says
the funeral cortege accompanying the
remains of Senor Canovas left the bath
ing establishment this morning accom
panied by the Duke of Solomayor, repre
senting- the queen regent, and Seno:
Casttllano, minister for the colonies, and
Senor Elduayan.
The coffin, eovpred with wreaths,
among them one from the queen regent,
was borne on a car drawn by four horses,
A detachment of hussars* rendered mili
tary honors and acted as an escort.
A special funeral train waited the ar
rival of the cortege at Zuarraga. Almost
at the very moment of the transfer of the
coffin from the funeral car to the train
a foreigner was arrested at the- telegraph
office. He is s-uspected of being an a>
complice of the assassin.
Senora Canovas watched by the body
of her husband for two nights., rue night
with Senor Cas-telar and the other w'th
Senor Castello. She absolutels" refused
to take either food or rest, but discussed
all the details of the funeral and broke
down today on the road to the Zummar
raggara, when a severe nervous* fit was
happily relieved"! by a flood of teats.
At the special request of Senora Ca
novas), the remains will lie in state at
the private instead of the official resi
dence of the deceased. The govern-
ment plan was for a lying in state at the
official residence.
The queen regent has ordered a special
maps' tomorrow for the repose of hit'
soul.
President McKinley has cabled to thr
Spanish government the condolences of
the United States government and the
people.
It is understood that Gen. Martinez
Campos is willing to go to Cuba should
the cabinet decide to recall Weyler. it
is also rumored that Gc-n. Polavleja, for
mer governor of the- Philippine.", will be
Invited to succeed Weyler. Hut these
■•ire only rumors, and thus far there Is
ro Indication of abrupt changes either
in the- administration of Cuba or in the
constitution of the cabinet.
The government has decided to try the
assassin by court martial. He has de
fiantly cVclared that other startling
crimes will follow. The police and gov
ernment de'tectlvee are acting with great
vigilance and the government Is in com
munication with foreign capitals on the
question of surveillance of anarchists.
CUBAN COMMENT
HAVANA, Aug, 10.—The official an
nouncement of the assassination of
Senor Canovasj del Castillo, the Spanish
premier, was published today in the
official gazette and the other local news
papers. As a mark of respect for the de
ceased statesman the stores are closed
and the stock exchange and' produce ex
change have suspended business. The
leading thoroughfares are being h-ung
with black drapery and other signs of
mourning are displayed! about the city.
The news of the premier's murd***i w as
a great shock 'at.d a surprise to all
cl a seas, and' expressions of sorrow are
everywhere to bo heard.
The dying exclamation of Canovas.
"Long live Spain." Is' the subject of con
siderable comment fn the newspapers.
They all print editorials expressing
great sorrow at the death of the-Spanish
minister and the great losspustalned by
the Spanish nation-, and' dwell upon the
public and private virtues of the de
ceased statesman while regretting his
disappearance In these critical times.
The future is referred 1 to almoet with
apprehension, aMhough the people are
ae-ked! to trust in the patriotism- of the
Spanish statesmen and the loyalty of
Spaniards in both hemispheres! In order
to prevent further trouble for Spain.
The appearance of the afternoon edi
tions of the papers of Havana with the
detail* of the assassination was most
eagerly awaited.
POSIBLE EFFECTS
ST. PAUL, Minn., August 10.—Senator
Davis, Chairman of the Foreign Rela
tions Committee of the Senate, was asked
what would be the probable effect of Se-
tor Canovas* death on these relations.
He replied: "Spain meets a great loss
SENOR CANOVAS DEL CASTILLO, THE LATE SPANISH PREMIER
in the death of Senor Canovas. He was
the mainstay of the Spanish govern
ment, and, withal, was a man of great
ability. It is difficult to say, from this
distance, who will take his place, but It
will not be Sagasta. The Liberals will
hardly come into power as a result of this
assassination. The same party will re
main in power, I believe, and I do not
look for any Immediate change in the
relations existing between Spain and Cu
ba or between Spain and the United
States.
"Spain certainly has no reason to find
fault w Ith the treatment accorded her by
the United States. Surely, no country
with a colony standing in the relations
to another country that Cuba stands to
the United Sates has ever been treated
as well by the other country interested
as has Spain by the United States. We
have enforced our neutrality laws, even
to the extent of arresting and imprison
ing our own citizens who are charged
with filibustering. We have allowed the
destruction of millions of dollars'worth
of American property, and the Spaniards
in Cuba have even arrested our citizens
and put them in prison. No country ever
received more lenient treatment at the
hands of any nation than Spain has re
ceived at the hands of the United States.
I do not think, however, that Spain can
hold Cuba. I do not think she will ever
conquer the islands. I believe that Spain
will be worn out at the end of the next
dry season, and that she will have to
give up the island."
CUBANS TAKE TOWNS.
KEY WEST, Fla., .August 10—Juan
Anson Quintero, the insurgent leader
who surrendered lately at Plnar de]
Rio, was taken from his home in Cerro,
Havana, at the order of Inspector Cu
bas, to the outskirts of the city at Juras
del Monte and there macheted.
The Cubans of Key West have made
no demonstration over the death of
Canovas.
Marta Ee-peranza, a town in Santa
Clara province, was attacked again by
insurgents!, who entered- the town at 3
p. m., and left at 4 a. in., sacking all the
stores and taking merchandise, clothes,
drugs, money, etc. The Spanish force
made resistance, but the insurgents de
feated- them with little trouble. The
Spanish less was heavy. The Cubans
lost one dead and several wounded. The
forces of Gen. Montanto came to the
aid of the town, arriving one day late.
They took arms and ammunition from
the guerrillas, who remained in the town
although most of them had, Joined the
insurgents. Then they burned about
thirty houses belonging to Cubans.
Calixto Alverez attacked and sacked
the towne of La Encrucijadn, Crusoe;
and Placetas. The Spanish forces mad-e
no resistance. These towns are In the
pacified province of Santa Clara.
NOT A FILIBUSTER
WASHINGTON, Aug. 10.—The gov
ernment will order the release- of the
schooner Blanche Morgan, now detained
■at Bridgeport, Conn., as a suspected fili
busterer.
HOFFMAN'S MURDER
"Little Evidence Connecting Figel
With the Crime
SAN FRANCISCO, August 10.—Police
man Colen continued his story when the
Figel examination upon the charge of
murder was res timed, be fore Judge Camp
bell today. He reiterated his statement
made at the Coroner's inquest as to the
rinding of Isaac Hoffman upon the floor
of the office, when he responded to the
alarm sounded by Watchman Ferren
bach. He described most minutely ihe
exact location and condition of every
thing in the office, and then gave way to
E. F. Schutte, an employe of Hoffman,
Rothschild & Co., who stated that Figel
left the store on the evening of June Ist
at 5:45 p. m. Before leaving, he told the
witness that he had lost his key to the
side entrance on Battery street.
E. F. Schutte testified that although
he had worked for Isaac Hoffman for
eight years, and had been very intimate
with his employer, he had never known
of the dead merchant carrying a weapon.
Wilness was positive that Hoffman had
never carried a pistol. He testified his
relations with Figel had always been,
cordial, and stated that he had fre
quently lent Figel money. Witness
stated that; Rothschild, one of the part
ners, had never approved of Figel, and
had informed witness since Huffman's
death when he came into the Arm that
he wished Figrl discharged. Policj
Captain Moran. Officer Ludd and Detec
tfre Crockett testified to the finding of
Hoffman's body, Its position when found,
and described the bloodstains in the of
fice.
A Steamer Record
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 10 —News has
just been received here that the record
for the fastest transpacific trip was
mads by the royal mall steamship Em
press of Japan on her last voyage from
Vancouver to Yokohama, the time con
sumed being ten dayu three hours and
thirty-nine minutes. The distance cov
ered, was 4270 knots. Heretofore tba
quickest passage was made by the Pa
cific Mail steamer China from San Fran
cisco to Yokohama, in ten days eleven
hours and forty-eight minutes.
OFFICERS PUZZLED
Little Evidence in the Schofleld Mur-
der Case
SAN JOSE, Aug. 10—Mrs. Schofleld
maintains her non-committal position
regarding the murder of her husband
Irving Mann still declares that after
the shooting Schofleld expressed no
opinion as to who fired the shot,at night.
On the morning of the murder Mrs. Scho
fleld said the same thing, but later stated
that he accused Budd Mann. The shot
gun found by Schofield's body was not
cocked. The officers are suspicious or
the orderly manner in. which everything
was arranged when they arrived on the
scene. No new evidence has been dis
covered, and ex-District Attorney Scheji
ler, who is acting for Mrs. Schofleld. says
the defendants will be discharged or
their preliminary examination.
John Dutcher, the hired man, is not
In the local jail. He is said to be in the
custody of the Madrone constable.
District Attorney Herrington left here
today ostensibly to hunt In. Monterej
county, but there is a rumor that he will
try and Induce Dutcher to confess.
Clark Johnson, who was arrested in
Fresno, was discharged today, on prov
inf that he was In that city when the
murder was committed.
THE CRAVEN CASE
Notary Cooney Fails to Remember
Very Much
SAN FRANCISCO, August 10—When
the trial of the Angus-Craven case was
resumed for the seventieth day this
morning. Notary Cooney was recalled
and admitted that he had written the
name of James G. Fair in the certificate
of acknowledgement after the deeds
were acknowledged, but upon the same
day, September 25, 1894. He was then
turned over to plaintiff's counsel for
cross-examination.
The attorneys for the Fair adminis
trators! tried to show on cross-examina
tion of Notary Cooney that he had prac
ticed several irregularities in taking
acknowledgements, but didt not suc
ceed in tangling the witness, who said
he could not remember much about the
various acknowledgments exhibited to
him which he had taken three years
ago. All that he was really sure about
was that he had acknowledged, certain
deeds for Senator Fair. He dlid' not re
member what fee Fair paid him, nor
where he had prceured! the notarial
blanks used by him.
A SUIT DECIDED
Justice May Now Proceed to Dig Out
Ore
CARSON, Nev., Aug. 10—The suit of
the Justice Mining company against
John Barclay et al., which has been
pending in the courts for a long time,
was decided in the United States circuit
court today in favor of the Justice com
pany. The suit was Instituted by Just
tlce, claiming a triangular piece of
ground locati-d within the patented
ground of the Justice. Woodville and
Alta companies' ground but has been
worked by Barclay and associates, who
removed considerable ore. The court
awards the Justice company the suit
on two ground.'*—first, because the
ground in contention was located in 1875
by A. Cummlngs, subsequently passe' l
Into the handsor the-Woodville company
and when Justice bought Woodville's
ground the land In dispute was Included
In the deed: seconc'i, the apex of the ledge
In the contended three-cornered piece is
in Justice's ground.
A Medical Expert
WASHINGTON, Aug. 10.—Dr. Joseph
Kinyoun, passed assistant surgeon,
United States marine hospital, has been
designated by the secretary of the treas
ury to represent this government at the
International exposition of hygiene and
sanitary service on shipboard, to be held
in Brussels in September. Dr. Kinyoun
has also been appointed delegate to the
Berlin International conference, to be
held in October, to discuss the leprosy
question. Dr. Kinyoun has been in
structed to visit the several bacteriologi
cal laboratories on the contnent for the
purpose of obtalnirg information for the
use of the marine hospital service as to
the recent advance in contagious dis
eases. Dr. Kinyoun will return to the
United States in December next.
Insane Miners
PRESCOTT, Ariz., Aug. 10.—The in
sane commissioners of this county today
ordered two subjects sent to the asylum
at Phoenix, one named Youree and the
other Cahill. Each had peculiar symp-
INDEX
OF THE TELEGRAPH NEWS
Heavy rain dampens ardor in the
mining regions and the strikers make
little progress.
Kentucky Republicans meet in
state convention, but fail to show
special harmony.
The Hoffman murder case on trial
at San Francisco; little of interest has
yet been made known.
Scientists in session at Detroit
listen to a speaker who roasta the
governor of New York for his adher
ence to the spoils system.
The whaleback steamer carrying
corn for Indian famine sufferers ar
rives at Calcutta and finds the need
greater than was expected.
A freight war results in a two-cent
schedule from New York to Galves
ton, which in turn causes a cut in
rates on California products to Texas.
The body of Premier Canovas to be
buried with military honors; specula
tion as to effects produced on United
States relations with Spain; reports of
lighting in Cuba.
Japan preparing for the use of a
gold currency exclusively; the prop
osition to arbitrate the Hawaiian dis
putes heartily welcomed; export du
ties abolished in the interest of the
export trade.
Secretary Bliss issues a grand
motherly warning regarding the dan
gers threatening Alaska gold seek
ers; every departing steamer is
crowded and numerous ancient hulks
are to be rehabilitated for service on
the Alaskan route; Morrison Gulch
miners in Trinity county strike a
pocket which makes Klondyke stories
sick.
Toms of the Alaska gold fever now pre
vailing. Cahill insisted on digging for
treasure in the sand. When approached
and ordered to desist he became very
abusive and uncontrollable. Youree was
taken away under the pretext that he
was going to Alaska.
BUJA WAS FAST
Put On an Extra Spur at the
Finish
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 10.—A war
rant was issued today for the arrest of
Nicholee.' Buja, cashier for the firm of
Scatena & Sons, wholesale fruit dealers
and commission merchants of this city,
charging him with felony embezzlement.
For some time past Buja has been living
a fast life and spending money at a rate
that far exceeded his means', but his
employers trusted him implicitly and
his defalcations might never have been
discovered- had he not attempted to de
stroy the evidence of his crime by
throwing the firm's cash book and'ledger
into the bay. Unfortunately for him,
they lloated into the hands of a fisher
man, who promptly returned them to
the ofilce. Buja, who saw the man bring
them into the store, tied by a rear door
anci has mot since been seen. The amount
of his peculations Is not known, but it
will probably reach into the thousands.
The specific charge against him is the
embezlemunt of $7700 on July 22d.
CONROY CURED
A New York Uxoricide Executed by-
Electricity
DANNEMORA, N. V., Aug. 10.—Frank
C. Conroy, the Ogdensburg wife mur
derer, was executed- by electricity at
Clinton prison today. Conroy was pro
nounced- dead four and a half minutes
after the first shock. He walked be
tween- Fathers Belanger and Cotter until
supported to the chair, his eyes upon the
crucifix and praying. He met his fate
calmly,
On the morning of May 20, 1896, Frank
Conroy returned to his home in Ogdens
burg from Montreal. Walking Into the
house he accused his- wife of unfaith
fulness. Angered at her denials, he
snatched up a carving knife and- hacked
her head, and throat until she was dead.
His two little daughters, aged 5 and 7,
witnessed- the murder.
Miners Want Water
REDDING, Aug-. 10.—The cape of John
K. Williams vs. Princess Hydraulic
Mining - company has been ordered'trans
ferred to the United States circuit court
of the Ninth district. The suit Involves
rights' to the waters of Brandy creek,
which has been used by Williams for
over thirty years. Two weeks ago an
employe of Williams was arrested for
turning the water back into the ditch,
whereupon the plaintiff sued the com
pany for $2500 damages. The corporation
needs the water for hydraulic mining,
hiving built expensive ditches to the
jource of supply. Williams- has been
using the water for both mining and
Concluded Not to
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 10,—Acting i
upon the advice of his attorneys. Messrs.
Reddy, Campbell and Matson. Sheriff'
Whalen today decided not to execute
the commitments isued by Notary L. D.
Craig yesterday ordering Managing
Editor A. M. Lawrence and Business
Manager T. T. Williams of the Examiner
imprisoned in the county Jail until they
answered certain questions relating to
the libel suit Instituted against them
and W. R. Hearst by Claus Spreckels.
State Taxes
SACRAMENTO, ,Aug. 10—The etate
board of equalization was In session to
c'ay. Kern, Santa Clara and San Benito
counties have requested a reduction- in
their assessment rolls and have asked
for a hearing. Kern county'*claim*will
be heard Tuesday, August 17th, the
other two on Wednesday, the 18th.
Reached the Top
CHAMOUNIX, France, Augr. 10—Four
French officers have just made a record
ascent of Mount Blanc, via the route fol
lowed by the famous Alpine guide,
Jacquee Balmal, who is said to have
been the first to reach the summit.
Ten Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS.
OFFICIAL
WARNING
That the Road to Dawson
Is Rough
BLISS WASTES SOME PAPER
IN CAUTIONING KLONDYKERS
AGAINST COLD
Steamers Oo Crowded, and Ancient
Hulks Will Be Rehabilitated
for Alaskan Service
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, Aug. 10.—Secretary
Bliss has taken cognizance of the rush to
the Klondyke gold fields and Alaska,
and has issued the following warning to
the general public:
To Whom It May Concern.: In regard
to information received at this depart
ment that 2000 persons with 3000 tons of
freight are now waiting at the entrance
to White Pass In Alaska for an oppor
tunity to cross the mountains to ths
Yukon river, and that many more ars
preparing to Join them, I deem it proper
to call attention of all who contemplate
making that trip to the exposure, priva
tion, suffering and danger incident there
to at this advanced period of the season,
even, if they should succeed In crossing
the mountains. To reach Dawson City,
when over the pass, 700 miles of difficult
navigation on the Yukon river, without
adequate means of transportation will
still be before them, and it Is doubtful
if the Journey can be completed before
the river is closed by Ice.
I am moved to draw public notice to
these conditions by the gravity of the
possible consequences to people detained
in the mountainous wilderness during
five or six months of an arctic winter,
where no relief can reach them, how
ever great the need.
(Signed) C. N. BLISS,
Secretary of the Interior.
NOBODY SCARED
SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 10.—Two more
steamers left today for the north with
miners bound for the Klondyke fields.
The Farrallon carried a small number of
passengers and a large quantity of stop
plies, but expects to pick up more at
Seattle and other Puget Sound ports en
route to St. Michaels.
The Humboldt did not sail until some
hours later, but carried 75 passengers,
who will be augmented at Seattle by
about 100 others. Among her passen
gers was ex-Mayor W. D. Wood, of the
latter place, who is at the head of the
Yukon Commercial company, which
chartered the vessel for the purpose of
transporting a specially prepared expe
dition.
ANCIENT HULKS
SEATTLE, Wash., August 10.—The
steamer Eliza Anderson, an, old-fash
ioned side-wheeler, built in Portland,
Or., in the early fifties, leaves today
for Klondyke, via St. Michaels, with
150 passengers. She is a wooden ves
sel and for sixteen years was out of ser
vice. One year of the time the vessel
was lying at the bottom of the sound.
The Eliza Anderson will be conveyed by
the tug Hoiyoke, the latter having in
tow the small steamer Merwin, the
schooner W. J. Bryant and the disman
tled steamer Polly, the latter to be used
as a barge on the Yukon river, plying
between Dawson City and St. Michaels.
The Merwin will also run. on the Yukon.
Nobodiy knows how old the Polly is. Her
original name was "Politkofsky," and
she was included In the purchase of
Alaska by the United States from Rus
sia in ISC7. At that time the Polly was
a Russian gunboat locatediat Sitka. She
was later sold by the United States to
the Port Blakely Mill Company on
Puget Sound. Up to this date nearly
four thousand miners have sailed from
Seattle for the Yukon and about two
thousand more have sailed from other
points north and'south.
SYNDICATE SCHEMES
NEW YORK, August 10.—The Wo
man's Klondyke Syndicate expedition
has been organized in this city. Miss
Helen Varick Boswell is President and
among the patronesses are Mrs. Jennie
June Croly, Mrs. Laura Weare Walter,
Chicago; Mrs. Sarah Ebyrie, Cleveland;
Mrs. William Craighead., Leadington,
0., and Mrs. Sarah Thompson, Dela
ware, O.
The Tribune says: Col. Archie E.
Fisk, formerly of Colorado, now a resi
dent of New York, has organized a syn
dicate in the name of the "Ala-Klone
Expedition," to search for gold in Alas
ka
LONG RANGE MINING
OMAHA, Neb., August 10.—By the
arrest of E. J. Davis, the local police
think they have discovered! a big. swin
!dle under the guise of "The Washing
j ton and Alaska Gold Mining Company."
Davis has a stack of contracts in his
| possession from which it waa believed
he was engaged in a questionable
scheme whereby he offered 1 to engage la
i borers to go to Alaska and' work in the
mines at a salary of $100 per month. To
I receive free transportation all that
j was necessary for the applicants to do
I was to pay Davis $5 to Insure good
I faith. It has developed that Davis had.
several names. He has been working in.
lowa and Missouri, and his receipt book
shows' hundreds of victims.
THIS BEATS ALASKA
REDDING, Aug. 10— J. B. and R. B.
Graves boarded the overland train to
night, having in their possession $42,000
in gold, the result of four days' work In
Morrison gulch, a tributary of Coffee,
creek, beyond Carville in Trinity county.
They have been mining in the gulch for
a year past and ran a tunnel on the ledge
of red and black Iron formation three and
a half feet wide. They struck several
pockets of pure gold embedded In the
ledge, one of the pockets yielding $4000,
while several others yielded from $3 to
,S3OO. On August 4th, at a point 24 feet

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