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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, October 18, 1897, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1897-10-18/ed-1/seq-2/

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Co.. $30,000; A. E. Relsinon, $12,000;
Churchill's block, $28,000; Keith's build
ing, $12,000; Wilson. Bros., $22,000; Ger
ry's block. $21,000; Borden's block, $14,
--080; postofflce and custom house, $20,000;
Empire block, $16,000; J. Lynch & Sons,
$10,000; Avon hotel, $6000; Somerset
house, $12,000; Gorriah hall, $15,000;
Courthouse, $19,000; Methodist church,
$15,000; Baptist church. $22,000; Presby
terian church. $12,000; Catholic church.
$4000: Dr. Haley's residence, $14,000; C.
D. Wolfmouth's residence. $20,000; Kings
Iron Foundry company. $40,000; Electric
Light company, $32,000; Windsor Plas
ter company, $12,000.
Among the finer residences destroyed
were those of Dr. Black, Dr. Moody,
Dr. Gossip, Dr. Reiti, Windsor hotel,
John Keith John Lynch, Mrs. G. E.
Forsyth, John Dorac W. O'Brien, T. B.
Smith, William Christine, William
Smith, J. A. Graham, Mrs. J. S. Cam,
M. H. Gaugge, Major Smith, G. C. Gel
dler and Arthur Smith.
IOWA HILL BURNED
IOWA HII.L. Cal., Oct. I".—lowa Hill,
a mining town situated in the mountains
of Placer county, was visited by fire
early this morning. The Are started in
the Central hotel, owned by William
Christian, and within a very few min
utes the hotel was a mass of flames and
the walls were falling in. Two of the
lodgers in the Central hotel, William
Golden and William Owens, perished in
the flames. From the position of the
remains of William Golden it is sup
f posed that he never awakened. Wil
liam Owens, it is supposed, leaped from
his room in the second story, but landed
on a fence, and was seriously injured
and unable to go further. The remains
of both were burned beyond re-cogni
tion, and the only means of identifica
tion was the location of their rooms in
the hotel and the position of the bodies
in the ruins. As to the origin of the
Are there are many conflicting stories,
many seeming to think that it w-as the
work of an Incendiary. Coroner Mitchell
of Auburn ison theground investigating
The following are the heaviest losers:
William Chrlstan. Centra! hotel and
lodging house; Weber & Co., general
merchandise; Thornton King, saloon;
Spr-ague & Rossi, saloon; J. F. Brown,
general merchandise; Papa & Peters,
saloon and livery stable: Sam Delmue
residence; R. F. Canton, residence; Mrs
Cavanaugh. restaurant and lodging
house; G. W. Cross, residence; John
Reed, residence; Dan MoAulay, black
smith; Stehr, lodging house, 'several
and a portion of Chinatown,
The total loss is estimated at about
$40,000; insurance, about $10,000. Th
fire destroyed one of the oldest and
most prosperous mining towns in Placer
county. Fortunate!}- for the few re
maining buildings the night was calm
Had there bsen a wind, it is probab!:
that all would have been burned, as
there Is absolutely no protection against
fire Bucket brigades were formed, and
by dint of hard work the Stehr hotel and
other buildings were saved.
A NEW TORK FIRE
NEW TORK. Oct. 17.—A $300,000 fire ir.
the seventh story nf th? factor} - build
ing at 270 and 281 Spring street taxed the
energies of the fire department this af
ternoon. The basement, first and sec
ond floors of the building were occu
pied by Fltzpatrick & Co., manufactur
ers of mirrors, plate glass, stained glass,
coach and carriage windows and doors.
The five upper floors were occupied by
the Bradley-Currier company, manufac
turers of doors, sash, frames and man
tels of the most expensive sort. This
firm had among its stock the driest of
woods and the most inflammable of oils
and varnishes. After an hour or so the
floors become weak, one after the other
gave way, and at last the flames shot up
through the roof. The building was
erected ten years ago by the Trinity
Church corporation, at a cost of $100,000
Nothing of it now remains but the black
ened walls, and they will have to be re
built. The stock of Fltzpatrick & Co.
and the Bradley-Currier company, all of
which was destroyed, was estimated to
be worth $200,000.
Cormus Bristol, 60 years old. and his
nephew, Michael Best, 14 years old, ln
their fright jumped to the ground from
a near-by tenement house. They were
burned terribly, and the old man died
soon afterward.
A BLAZE AT SAN LUIS
SAN LUIS OBISPO, Oct. 17.—At 9
oclock tonight a fire broke out in the
millinery store of Mrs. M. J. Schmidt
and ln a short time the fire department
was on the scene. The building being a
frame structure., it was soon destroyed.
There was another frame building on
one side of it, and that soon went also.
The firemen were unable to check the
flames, which soon caught the San Lui.
hotel, a large two-story structure. I:
was then thought that the entire block
would be consumed, but the firemer
managed to quell the blaze, after it had
totally destroyed the hotel and ruined
the Elks' hall, another large building
adjoining. Had it not been for the city
hall the entire block in both directions
would have gone up in smoke. The fire
wall caused by an occupant of the mil
linery store dropping a lamp on the floor.
The loss is over $10,000. This was the
most disastrous fire this city has known
in the past ten months. The buildings
destroyed" were partially insured.
AT SANTA ROSA
SANTA ROSA. Oct. 17.—At midnight
the handsome residence of Frank B. Cor
r.ue, cashier of the Santa Rosa bank,
was totally destroyed by fire. The family
had retired for the night, when Mr. Cor
nue was awakened by a crackling sound
ln the kitchen. He arose hastilyand
aroused the other membersof his family)
all of whom made their escape. The
building was one of the handsomest in
the city and was only recently erected.
Mr. Cornue had a splendid library, which
went up in the flames. The lc # s Is about
$10,000, partly insured.
BURNED TO DEATH
SAN JOSE, Oct. 17.—Mrs. Hester Cam
bridge, an inmate of the Woman's Relief
Corps home at Evergreen, died this
morning from injuries received last
Wednesday, when her garments caught
fire from a lighted candle that she had
carelessly placed on the floor.
George's Missouri Friends
KANSAS CITY, Mo., Oct. 17.—The lo
cal Single Tax league, at its regular
meeting, adopted resolutions indorsing
the candidacy of Henry George, candi
date for mayor of Greater New York,
tendering Its support and forwarding
a subscription to help defray the ex
penses of his campaign.
Civil Philanthropic
BATTLE CREEK, Mich., Oct. 17.—The
Interstate civic philanthropic conference
closed tonight after six days of sessions.
More than 3500 people were present to
day. Rev. William Denman of Battle
Creek delivered an address on "Christ,
the Great Philanthropist."
BAT RECORDS
Of League Season Just
Closed
BALTIMORE KEELER LEADS
PADDEN OF PITTSBURG GUARDS
THE REAR
The Orioles Playing Rocky Ball for
Exhibitions — State League
Games Draw Good Crowds
Associated Press Special Wire.
WASHINGTON, Oct. 17. — President
Nick Young of The National P_tse-oali
ieague today made public the batting
records of players who have taken part
In fifteen or more championship games,
as follows:
i BH. I
i TB. j
SB
I
1
I .
!
_
I
Keelcr (Baltimore)
Clark (Louisville) .'.
Keiley (Baltimore)
Btivettl (Boston)
Bitrkett (Cleveland)
Delehanty (Philadelphia)
La Joie (Philadelphia)
Stahl (Eoston)
Davis (Now York) I
Doyle (Baltimore) ]
Jennings (Baltimore)
Lanje (Chicago)
Stenzel (Baltimore) |
Demont (Washington) |
Rothfuss (Pittsburg) I
Onh (Philadelphia) [
Collins (Boston)
Wagner (Louisville) |
Hamilton (Boston) I
Duffy (Boston)
Wallace (Cleveland)
McGuire (Washington)
Childs (Cleveland)
Mercer (Washington) |
Van Haltren (New York) I
Tiernani (Ne w York) |
Cooley (Philadelphia)
Douglas (St. Louis)
Donovan (Pittsburgh)
Tenney (Boston)
Jones (Brooklyn)
Griffin (Brooklyn)
Selbach (Washington)
Lowe (Boston)
Smith (Pittsburgh)
Gleason (New Y'ork
Ryan (Chicago)
La Chance (Brooklyn)
Werden (Louisville)
Hartman (St. Louis)
McKean (Cleveland)
Irwin (Cincinnati)
Hoy (Cincinnati)
Shindle (Brooklyn)
Reitz (Baltimore)
Corcoran (Cincinnati)
Cross (St. I.ouis)
McCreary (Louisville)
Dowd (Philadelphia)
Ely (Pittsburg) I
Padden (Pittsburg) 1
128
129
129
49
12S
129
126
111
131
114
115
117
131
1S2
31
42
133
61
125
134
131
S2
114
42
131
129
131
127
120
131
135
134
126
121
122
134
133
125
132
126
127
134
128
134
127
108
130
136
125
133
135
562
525
50|
196
519
530
545
468
525
463
436
482
538
563
112
147
529
241
506
554
522
32S
443
135
571
534
566
522
475
066
553
530
4S6
500
463
555
510
523
504
527
505
493
510
476
444
462
515
539
520
515
127
122
113
43
12S
110
107
111
114
93
131
119
113
92
19
26
102
38
153
131
99
52
105
22
122
123
124
83
125
133
137
' 114
87
101
88
104
86
76
67
86
88
83
82
76
76
60
91
• 93
65
S4
243 I
213 j
196
76
I J 99
200 j
198 j
168
18S
165
154
170
189
197
39
61
183
S3
171
1S9
177
111
149
45
190
177
185
171
155
1S4 I
178
170
154
157
145
173
160
161
153
157
144
148
144
156
138
128 I
133 j
147
153
147 I
145
.432
.406
.3S9
.388
• 3s3
.377
.363
.359
.358
.356
.353
.325
.351
.349
.34S
.347
.346
.344
.344
.341
.339
.33S
.336
.333
.332
.331
.327
.327
.326
.322
.320
.317
.314
.311
.311
.309
.30S
.303
.301
.273
.293
.290
.289
.28!)
.288
.2SS
.285
.284
. 882
.281
I
304
250
III
216
281
309
240
263
211
204
235
258
245
60
69
255
114
212
204
I 264
152
1S7
237
242
239
209
185
216
218
227
224
217
214
19S
240
235
217
197
201
186
185
215
172
176
1.%
199
1S5
186
1S6
12
S
9
1
10
8
5
5
6
2
17
9
t
14
1
2
8
4
13
14
I 1
17
4
6
1
10
3
9
27
13
12
6
13
6
6
10
g
5
4
6
10
23
21
8
12
1 U
■0
I 14
! 15
120
63
60
50
2
27
2S
22
14
64
62
60
S3
S3
3
M
22
70
45
17
11
25
45
34
30
12
39
3S
02
23
58
IS
28
40
35
30
16
18
18
25
40
25
26
16
36
25
41
12
18
CINCINNATI, 0., Oct. 17.—About 1500
people witnessed the game between Bal
timore ar.d the All Americans here to
day. The champions gave a very poor
exhibition of ball playing, while the All
Americans put up a very pretty game
and won with ease. Score:
Baltimore 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 o—3
Basehits 12, errors 8.
Americans ...0 1 1 0 0 3 2 2 o—9
Basehits 11, errors 2.
THE STATE LEAGUE
SACRAMENTO, Oct. 17—Over 2000
people saw the Reliance club of Oak
land defeat the Gilt Edge baseball team
at Snow-flake park today, by a score of
8 to 5. The game was one of the best
played here this season, and while there
was a sprinkling of costly errors many
of the individual plays were of a phe
nomena! order.
Van Haltren and Stanley filled the
points for the Reliance team and Harvey
and Farrell did likewisefor the Brewers.
Van Haltren after the first three In
nings settled- down and pitched'a splen
did game, and Stanley's work behind the
bat Is seldom equaled for sureness and
efficiency. Farreli's hands were sore
and he could not hold Harvey's delivery.
Neither pitcher was hard hit, and the
Reliance club won out by superior base
running. Riley at short made two costly
errors ar.d was jollied by the crowd.
The feature of the game was Lange's
phenomena! work at third base, Where
he accepted a dozen chances without
a break. Lockhead for the home team
played a great game at short. Score:
Gilt Edges'—Runs 5, basehits 9, er
rors 5.
Reliance —Runs 8, basehits 9, errors 5.
San Francisco —At Central park to
day the Santa Clara college team de
feated the Will & Flncks by a wore of
7 to 4. The Will & Flncks owe their de
feat to their carnival of errors in the
tlrst Inning, which netted the visitors
three runs. The home team tied the
score in the third inning ar.d added one
more in the fourth, and had an excel
lent chance to bat out a victory, but
their hopes perished when Pitcher Doyle
substituted Stoffani in the fifth inning.
Doyle managed to hold them down to
one hit for the balance of the game.
Knell pitched a good'game for the local
boys, but his support at critical mo
ments was very ragged.
Four thousand people witnessed the
baseball game today at Recreation park.
The competing teams were the Stock
tons and the Olympics of this city. The
feature of the game was the pitching of
Harper, who has just arrived from the
east. He held the local team down to
three hits. The score was 4too in favor
of Stockton.
HARE AND HOUNDS
Whitney's Two Puppies Surprise the
Ingleside Talent
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 17.— G. Whit
ney of San Jose sprang a surprise on th»
talent at Ingleside coursing park today
with two pups which he entered in the.
open stake race. They were the only
young dogs entej-ed. and as against th -
cracks of the aged division, were not,
thought to have a chance. But instead
of being down early in the day, as was
expected, they both ran in the last ties,
and one of them, called Zoe, ran in the
final, but was beaten by Diana. Then
there was an unofficial race, in which
Zoe easily beat Diana. The crowd
numbered fully 6000, and the betting was
heavy. The ties resulted:
First ties—Princess Marie ran a bye,
Tod Sloan beat Wlldfiower, Said Pasha
beat Kao and Magician, St. Cloud beat
Sam, Magic beat Victor, Connemara
beat Mission Tip, Diana beat Skyball,
LOS ANGELES HERALDt MONDAY MORNING, OCTOBER JB, J897
Move On beat Skyrocket, Jr.. Black
Prince beat Systematic, Sylvia ran a
bye, Zoe beat Eclipse, Theron beat
Snowbird. Beau Brummel beat Tom
Hayes, Tipperary Lass beat Whit';
Chief.
Second ties« —Tod Sloan beat Princess
Marie, Said Pasha beat St. Cloud, Con -
nemara beat Magic, Diana beat Move
On, Sylvia beat Black Prince. Zoe beat
Beau Brummel, Theron beat Tipperary
Lass.
Third ties-Tod Sloan beat Said
Pasha, Diana beat Connemara, Zoe
beat Sylvia. Theron ran a bye.
Fourth ties—Zoe ran a bye, Diana beat
Theron.
Final—Diana beat Zoe.
A LONG SWIM
John Coughlan Swims Across the
Golden Gate
SAN FRANCISCO. Oct. 17.—John
Coughlan, the long distance swimmer of
the Dolphin Swimming and Boating
club, today accomplished the remark
able feat of crossing the Golden Gate
from Fort Point to Lime Point. Ho
swam against flood tide, and made the
distance in 52 minutes. A large num
ber of people in boats accompanied the
swimmer.
This is the first time any one has swum
across the Golden Gate from point to
point. Cavil!, the Australian, swalm
from Lime Point, intending to land at
Fort Point, but he was carried,far be
yond the fort to the beach. He swam
from shore to shore in 1 hour. 18U min
utes. Coughian's swim was much more
remarkable, as. he had his objective
point, and made the trip in 26U minute.
quicker time, just two-thirds of Cavill's
record.
The rough water swimnflng race for
members of the California Swimming
club took place this afternoon in the
ocean near the cliff and was won by R.
B. Cornell. The course laid out was
from the Olympic Water company's
pier around the seal rocks' and return.
The following members of the-club par
ticipated: R. R Cornell, O. C. Schultc-
F. Barrett, D. Cart oil, G. Gafeirt, A
Baker and S. Simeo.
SUNDAY CYCLING
VALLEJO. Oct. 17.—The meet of the
Ariel Bicycle club held here this after
noon was a success, the racing being
of a high class, and the attendance
large.
Two-thirdis mile. amateur-Ton by
Rttss, Whit* second, Fuller third Time
1:321,:..
One mile, 2:25 class-Won by Deacon
Smith second, Cotter third Time
2:26%.
Half mile—Won by George Fuller E
F. Russ second, N. Oilman third. Time
1:05.
Match race, one mile—Won by C F
McCauley, J. A. Bruce second. Time'
2:24.
HARNESS HORSES
Famous Performers Gather in Force
at Louisville
LOUISVILLE, Ky., Oct. 17.-Eight
carloads of horses, the fastest harness
performers to be found in America
have arrived at the track of the Louis
ville Driving and Fair association from
Lexington. There arc- now quartered at
the track nearly 400 horses and 200 men
are expected to arrive tomorrow. S. R.
Bowne, the driver of Robert J. ar.d Johr
,R. Gentry, said tonight that he Would
drive Gentry in the match race next Fri
day and Ed Geers would drive Rob
crt J. These- two great pacers will pacv
the best three in live heats. Mr. Bowm
was out at the track yesterday after
noon and exercised his charges both ay
a team and s;parate!y. All day th.
track was alive with horses which wen
,sent around for quarters and halves at
a lively clip. The track is in splendid
condition.
A JOYFUL REUNION
An Aged Argonaut rinds His Lone;
Lost Family
WICHITA, K:k„ Oct. 17. — John
Chance was married In Indiana in 184S
and ten years later he left his wife and
4-year-old son, Eiisha, to seek his for
tune in the then recer.lly discovered Cal
ifornia gold fields. Let ten mis-carried,
and when an Indiana mischief maker
told Chance that his wife had thought
him dead and had become another man'i
wife, Chance believed him and did not
return home. He reached Kansas in hi*
wanderings, acquired a farm In Butle;
county and heard of an Eiisha Chanc.
at Kiowa, Barber county, whom he found
to be his son, convincing ihe latter by o
scar of his identity. Mrs. Chance, who
had not been re-married, was sent for.
a joyful reunion took place and th.
couple will now live together on his farm
after thirty-five years' separation.
Japan's Delegates
WASHINGTON, Oct. 17.—The dele
gates from the Japanese government to
the coming Bering sea conference ln this
city arrived here today.
MONEY MISSED
Nobody Knows Where It
Went To
WELLS-FARGO OFFICE ROBBED
BUT MOST OF THE SWAG WAS IN
CHECKS
An Arrest Made, But no Booty Recov
ered—An Unusual Number of
Suicides Reported
Associated Press Special Wire.
OROVILLE, Oct. 17.—When the Reno
= tage was leaving Qulncy, early yester
day morning, the driver and express
messenger found that the office of W< !>.
Fargo & Co. had- been robbed of the ex
press box, containing $2000 In gold. The
telegraph wires leading from Qulncy had
been cut, so that no intimation of the
robbery reached any other towns until
brought by the stage today, thus giving
the robbers ample opportunity to con
ceal their identity and make good their
escape.
A SUSPECT ARRESTED
RENO, New, Oct. 17— The Wells-
Fargo express office at Quincy, Cal.,
was rgbbed some time during Friday
ctight, the robbers taking the express
box which was awaiting the outgoing
stage. The box was carried to a field
half a mile distant, where it waabroken
open. The robbers secured gold coin
and dust amounting to $400 ar.d $3800 in
checks. When Messenger Montgomery
called for the box he found l it gone, and
at once notified Sheriff Bransford. Sus
picion pointed to Lowell Maxwell, and
the sheriff and the messenger went to
where Maxwell stopped, and found him
in bed. He was arrested and placed In
jail. He is considered- a bad character.
None- of the treasure was found, but the
. fllcers think they have the right man.
HOW IT WAS DONE
OROVILXE. Oct. 17.—The messenger
whose duty It Is to guard'valuable ship
ments from Qulncy goes up twice a
month, on the- loth and on the last of
the month. This fact was probably
known to the robbers', who could thus
tell when treasure was to be shipped
f rum Qulncy. The stage for Reno leaves
Qulncy at 4 oclock in the morning, and
the driver, James Dempsey has a key
to the express cnTlce. He drives up and
gets the express box himself, as the
agent does not get up to deliver it to
him. The express matter Is put iti the
box ar.d the box left In the store and
office combined. The driver and express
messenger each have a key to the front
door. On Saturday morning, when they
opened the door and looked for the box.
there was none to be found. They hasti
ly examined the room and found the
transom over the back door had been
broken, showing that the robber had en
tered the room at that point.
A NEGRO MURDERER
FOND DU LAC, Wis., Oct. IT. —John
Beaman. aged CO, proprietor of the-Bea
man house, was murdered this morn
ing by William Payne, colored, Payr.e
was drunk and shot Beaman while
standing at the hotel bar. Payne es
caped during the excitement. Several
hundred men organized ln squads arc
scouring the country.
A NEGRO LYNCHED
DERMOTT, Ark., Oct. 17. —A white
man named Cole was lynched near Wil
mot early Friday morning for murder
ing Constable James Jones In cold
blood. Cole had been arrested for some
misdemeanor but released on bonds.
He secured a shotgun, ar.d shot the con
stable in the back, killing him instantly.
Cole was found in the woods and was
.-■wung up without ceremony.
THE SUICIDE COLUMN
SACRAMENTO, Oct. 17.—The body of
an unknown man was found on the
banks of the Cosumnes river near the
Slough house, eighteen miles east of
this city, early this morning. The
stranger had fired a bullet through his
head. Stuck in his hatband was the fol
lowing note:
"October 16, 1897: To Whom It Mas-
Concern —This Is an act of my own. I
■im almost blind and realize that I will
be in less than a year totally so, and in
:ny occupation it is Impossible to make
a living and do not care to become a
oublic charge. lam a K. of P. in good
standing and would ask that they bury
me. T. J. ROGERS,
"Chicago, 111."
"P. S.—lf you don't think that it takes
pluck to do thisj, try It. T. J. R."
DRANK CARBOLIC ACID
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 17.—0. H.
Timm, surveyor, native of Germany. SO
years of age, committed suicide thlh af
ternoon In front of the Rosedale hotel
an Ellis street by drinking over half an
cnince of carbolic acid. He fell to the
Sidewalk, where he writhing in
pain by Officer McGee, who immediately
sent for the ambulance. He was re
moved to the receiving hospital, but
died on the way.
SHOT HIMSELF
BUTTE. Mont., Oct. 17.—John W. Bai
ler, formerly assistant city treasurer,
killed himself this morning by shooting
himself through the head.
FOUND THE BODY
ELGIN, 111., Oct. 17.—The body of Al
bert Hammers, an official of the Modern
Woodman, who. disappe.Ved several
weeks ago, and for whom all the Wood
men camps had been searching, was
found today In an abandoned mill, a few
miles north of here. He had taken his
life.
A STRANGE STABBING
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 17.—At 6
oclock this morning Thomas Rlordan,
a Southern Pacific brakeman, was
stabbed three- times by an unknown man
amd. received wounds which are pro
nounced fatal. The stabht»g occurred
in. the hallway of a Ic.-lelng house at
409 Grant avenue. According to Rior
um's story he was walking along Bush
street when he was accosted by a well
dressed stranger who engaged him in
conversation. At his Invitation Rlor
dan accompanied him to his room ln the
lodging house, where the stabbing oc
curred Riordan claims that while pass
ing through the hallway the stranger
I insulted him and he promptly knocked)
him down. As the strangerregainedhlß
feet, according to Riordan, he drew a
knife and stabbed hiim ln the left side.
A struggle ensued and Riordan re
ceived two more wounds. The police
suspect that the cuts were Inflicted by a
notorious character known as "Mys
tery."
Riordian, when taken to the hospital,
gave his name as Thomas Reynolds.
He afterward adimitted that he had
given an assumed, name. The wounded
man is well known in Sacramento,
where he has lived for a number of
years. His wife and two children, he
says, reside In that city.
A CHICAGO ROW
CHICAGO, Oct. 17.—Alderman J. B.
Haborkorn was shot and perhaps fatal
ly wounded by George Jensen in a sa
loon quarrel today. Jensen, who is un
der arrest, claims that the alderman at
tempted! to bite off his nose.
RAMPART CITY
To Be the Biggest Camp on the
Yukon
SEATTLE, Wash., Oct. 17.—"Rampart
City, on Minook creek, le to be the big
gest mining camp on the Yukon river
before another season." said G. W. Ross,
1 deputy collector of customs at Circle
! City. Ross arrived here today on the
: steamer City of Kingston, having come
! down from St. Michaels on the steamer
Danube, which reached Victoria yester
day. Claims, according to Roes, are sell
! ing at an average of $6600 for a half in
terest on Little Minook, Hunter and
Hoosier creeks. Dr. Baxter and C. O.
Johnson of San Francisco bought No.
12. above Discovery, for $4000 and were
offered an advance of $1000 for their bar
gain two days later. Johnson, who owns
No. 6 on Eittle Minook, in twenty days
took out $2000. The owners of No. 4
took out $1500 in. five days, all In nuggets.
It is claimed that the gold on the Minook
is of a higher grade than that of the
Klondike.
OF THE TRITON'S CREW
FORTY-ONE ARE BROUGHT BACK
TO HAVANA
Lives Lost Thought to Number a Hun
dred and Fifty—All the Women
Drowned
HAVANA, Oct. 17.—The gunboat
Maria Christina, which left this port
yesterday for the scene of the wreck of
the coasting steamer Triton, bound from
Havana to Bahla Honda, Pinar del Rio
which sank yesterday morning between
Dominica ar.d Marie], has returned, ac
companied by the tugboat Suri, which
went with her. The two vessels.arrived
here at 1 o'clock this afternoon, the gun
boat having on board 19 and the tugboat
23 of the members of the lost ship's
company, of which thirteen are civilians
and soldiers. The whereabouts of the
others of the company is unknown. The
Triton struck the rock during a heavy
rain storm Her cargo shifted, ar.d fif
teen minutes later she sank In 120
fathoms of water. A scene of terrible
confusion and panic ensued as soon ay
the passengers realized the meaning of
the crash. In a wila struggle they
rushed for the boats. ,The first boat
that was. lowered capsized immediately,
ar.d all of its occupants were drowned in
the whirling waters. The next was
struck by an enormous wave and turned
over, drowning twenty, but the frail
craft righted again, and eight who had
been thrown out regained it. Some were
good swimmers, and kept themselves
afloat for hours; others floated for about
twenty-four hours on planks. Four
soldiers on planks, whom the strong cur
rents carried east of Havana, opposite
Moro Castel were saved by a pilot
boat going toward Cardenas.
They declare that last evening there
were many others near them on planks
but when this morning came all these
had disappeared. Some of them prob
ably became food for sharks.
Those who were rescued tell heart
rending stories of the scenes during the
terrible quarter of an hour before the
Triton sank. An army captain, wife
and daughter went down together, lock
ed in a iast embrace. A mother with
twins fifteen months old drifted-help
lessly away on the crest of a great wave.
All the other ladies and children were
drowned. "
Just as the Triton was sinking Cap
tain Rlckardo, her captain, committed
suislde by shooting himself with his
revolver.
It is impossible to give the exact num
ber of those who were lost, but It is esti
mated that there were no less than 150.
No passenger list has been found. The
vessel, which carried a general cargo
was not insured.
The forty-two rescued personssuffer»d
severely from exposure AH of them
were more or less bruised, and many of
them badly wounded.
A Fight Off
NEW ORLEANS, Oct. 17..—McPart
lana arrived prepared, lo meet
Jack Everhardt before the Tulane Ath
letic club tomorrow night. Later in the
day Dr. Haitian, the club's physician,
visited both men. He found that Ever
hardt had developed malarial fever dur
ing the day, and although Everhardt
wanted to keep his engagement, the
club declared the fight off. The club
will try and get Owen Ziegler or Jack
Daly to meet McPartland inside of ten
days.
Baron Hartmann's Bride
ALAMEDA, Oct. 17.—Baron Hans
Paul Emlle yon Hartmann and Miss
Llllle Bertha Christine Decker of this
city were married this afternoon. Baron
yon Hartmann is well known on the
coast. He was for some time an at
tache of the German consulate at Van
couver, B. C. Miss Decker, the bride,
met her lover in a small notion store, of
which she was the proprietor. The
baron wtill take his wife to Germany.
The San Gabriel Electric company, now
developing the water powers ln the San
Gabriel river, will be In position to supply
arc and incandescent lights and power for
all purposes February 1, 1898, at prices
lower than can be made by companies
using steam. They would, therefore, re
speotfuly request that users of light and
power make no contracts extending be
yond February 1, 1898. Consumers will find
It to their Interest to wait. San Gabriel
Electric Company.
Wall paper, lata styles, low prices, at
A. A. Eckstrom's, 824 South Spring street.
WORMS
Which Excite the Fears of
Orchardists
EVERY PRECAUTION IS TAKEN
t
TO PREVENT A LODGEMENT IN
CALIFORNIA
Quarantine Officers and Railroad Men
Unite to Head Off the Mexican
Orange Worm
Associated Press Special Wire.
SACRAMENTO, Oct. 17.—0f late there
has been, considerable discussion as to
the probable Introduction of the Mexi
can orange worm into this state. The
state board of agriculture has taken all
precautions possible to prevent its in
troduction. All shipments of fruit ar
riving in this state will be thoroughly
inspected before being admitted and if
any fruit should be found, to be infected
by this pest it will be promptly de
stroyed.
The quarantine officer of the state
board of horticulture, Alexander Craw,
has been instructed to take every pre
caution to prevent the introduction of
this pest, and William Sproule, assist
ant general freight agent of the South
ern Pacific company, has agreed to co
operate with the board as far as legal
requirements will permit. This pest, the
scientific name of which is trypeta iu
de'ns, has not yet secured lodgment in
California.
The California insect is the larva of a
small tortricid moth, and not one orange
in a thousand is attacked by it. It only
pierces the rind and. never enters the
pulp. The Mexican orange worm is the
larva ot a fly and enters the pulp.
The Mexican orange worm is report
ed to be confined lo two states south of
the City of Mexico. In answer to a tei
egram sent to Dr. L. O. Howard, United
States entomologist, by the quarantine
officer, asking if this pest is known to
exist in any other state in Mexico, Dr.
Howard replied: "No certain knowledge
except as to Moreles and Fuebla, but
must occur elsewhere; investigating
now." Both these states arc- south and)
southeast of the City of Mexico and ad
jo'n each other.
Mr. Sproule said that no oranges have
been brought to California by rail for
two or thnee years past, and those only
from the extreme northweslern part of
Sonora. Mexican oranges are shipped
to Chicago and other northern cities
from the end of October until December
or January, and, go by way of Eagle
Pass or El Paso, Texas.
The gei.cral freight and passenger
agent of the Mexican Central railway
has been communicated with by the
state board of horticulture, requesting
him to notify Mexican shippers not to
moke shipments of citrus fruits to any
point In California, for In the event of
the fruit being infected with the Mexi
can orange worm it w ill be immediately
destroyed by the horticultural quaran
tine officer and that such notification
will prevent any misunderstanding andi
loss to his patrons.
THE NEW YORK ISSUES
AS OUTLINED BY EX-PRESIDENT
HARBISON
Benny Is Bight in His Belief That
Free Silver Cuts Too Much
Ice This Season
NEW YORK, Oct. 17—In an interview
with Murat Halstead tonight, Former
President Harrison said: "I have beer,
watching the campaign in New York
with increasing interest. The issu.'
seems to me to be whether you shall have
any issues—the Citizen's union, holding
the negative, and the Republicans the
affirmative.
"There is great force in the suggestion
that ordinarily a city ejection ought to
turn on questions of city administra
tion, but there are national question*
that will not be ignored. The men who
voted for McKinlcy in IS9C—whether Re
publicans or Gold Democrats—will not
fail to inquire how the candidates for
mayor of Greater New York stand upon
the question, whether public and pri
vate debts are to be paid at forty cents
on. the dollar, and whether the just pow
ers of the courts are to be upheld against
the assaultsof the mob. They will want
to know further whether a particular
election is gslng to scatter or weaken the
forces that won these Issues in 1896.
New York's mayor, they will think, ought
not to be a repudiationlst or a friend of
the mob.
"It is folly to say that the St. Lou's
platform is not an. issue, and that th»
business men of this Greater New York
are not to take account of the influence
the election may have in the further
fight that is to be made before the ad
vocates of repudiation and disorder are
dispersed. Good local purposes and
management are not the worse for be
ing associated with good national pur
poses and measures. Business men
have not forgotten that the Republican
party met these grave and threatening
issues boldly, and offered a rallying
point to the Democrats who had been
overwhelmed in their own convention.
What has the Republican party done
since to forfeit the confidence of those
who voted its ticket ln 1896?"
Judge McCleverly Ill
FORT SCOTT, Kas., Oct. 17.—Judge
J. McCleverly Is seriously sick at his
home ln this city with a complication of
stomach and organic troubles, from
which it is feared he will not recover.
Judge McCleverly has for many years
been one of the leading lawyers of Kan
sas. In 1894 ha was the Democratic can
didate for justice of the supreme court.
The Sealing Patrol
SAN FRANCISCO, Oct. 17.—The gun
boat Marietta came down from the navy
yard this morning and anchored ln the
stream close to ths battleship Oregon.
The vessel is preparing to leave for
Alaskan waters, and her officers expect
to get away for the north on Thursday
next. The Marietta has several men
that she will take north to fill out the
icrew of the Concord, which has been in
Bering sea all summer. The Concord
will start for home on the arrival of the
Marietta in the north. Shortly after the
gunboat dropped her anchor in the
stream she was visited by the command
er of the French cruiser Daguay Trouin.
THE LONDON MARKETS
Heavy Gold Withdrawals Stiffen the
Money Bate
LONDON, Oct. 17.—Thursday's ad-
vance in the bank rate to 3 per cent w»»
not a surprise, since a million sterling
ln gold has been withdrawn within a
week, making five million sterling since
June last. Gold continues in strong de
mand, but the withdrawal of eagles has
been checked by the raising of the price
to 76s l%d per ounce. Higher sales and
dearer money may be looked for.
Stocks are inactive, though home rail
roads have improved. American rail
way securities have suffered a sharp
reaction of from 2 to 4V& points, owing
to liquidation in New York and the ten
dency to await developments. Grand
Trunk railway shares lost through spec
ulators selling, as the result of the semi
annual meeting. Grand Trunk guaran
teed shares fell Vi. point and Grand
Trunk first preferred Canadian Pa
cific shares advanced % on the fine traffic
returns, at one time touching 84%. The
favorable reception of the London com
mittee's proposals as to Central Pacific
management Is encouraging. Mexican
railway shares are firm in anticipation
of the dividend on the first preferred
stock. Central Pacific advanced 1 point,
Union Pacific %, Northern Pacific pre
ferred %, Santa Fe preferred *4 and
Denver & Rio Grande preferred ad
vanced >4. Argentine and Brazilian
bonds are better, while Spanish bonds
are lower.
This is fine sowing weather. As wheat
is supported by the contlnetal demand,
English buyers are careless. California
wheat, October and November, last week
brought 38s per quarter and Walla Walla
September brought 375. Flour was
rather lower and the demand was poor.
Spot Barley was steay, but American
barley was not offered. Oats were active,
mixed American clipped oats, 13s to
13s l%d.
A Fruitless Search
NEW YORK, Oct. 17—The revenue
cutter Chandler, having on board United
States Marshal McCarthy, in charge of
a dozen deputy United States marshals
and three Pinkerton detectives, spent
nearly four hours this morning cruising
about the harbor in search of the Silver
Heel, a Bangor, Me., schooner, which,
it was said, had sailed for Cuba with a
filibustering party. The Silver Heel had
nine hours' starton the tug. The Chand-
Jer was compelled to put back to the city
without having sighted the filibuster.
A Solar Plexus Blow
LANCASTER, N. V., Oct. 17.—Edward
Voll of this village, in a boxing match
last night, knocked out Frank Kazewskl
with a blow over the heart. Kazewskl
was rendered unconscious and died this
morning. Voll has been arrested.
A Little Temblor
SAN JOSE, Oct. 17.—A slight shock ot
earthquake was felt here at 3:30 oclock
this afternoon. There were irregular
vibrations, lasting some seconds, the
motion being from northeast to south
west. No damage was done.
t LAME BACK j
+ Weak Kidneys, Lumbago.
* Rheumatism and Sci- f
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J THE DULL, ACHING TIRED FEELING T
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X evidences oi relaxe.l, weak muse lea,
which <'an be contracted and vigorous
X strength given them by X
I Dr. Sanden's I
X Electric 8e1t... $
£ It conveys a steady, soothing current of *
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Z giving them a healthy nervo power +
X which revives them. It makes them +
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at the office. Address ♦
Sanden Electric Co.
South Broadway, corner Second .street,
Los Angeles. Cal,
Office hours—s to tf; evenings 7 to 8; Sun
days 10 to I.
Dr. Sanden's ElectricTrnsaCurea Rupture
DRINK
4.JWOOUACOTT
WTBI WTOft 124 -126 N MXIKrS
Lo> ANOCLE6 CAL-

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