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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, January 01, 1898, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1898-01-01/ed-1/seq-6/

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6
TODAY'S SPORT
: Amusements of All Kinds
for Everybody
NEW COURSING PARK OPENS
ALSO COURSING AT AGRICUL
TURAL PARK
Excellent Baseball Game Promised at
Fiesta Park—Games r.t Pasa
dena and Elsewhere
There will be no dearth of outdoor
amusement In and about this city today.
Lovers of almost every class of sports
will have an opportunity of participat
ing In or witnessing their favorite game
or contest at some place or other. There
will be two coursing matches, one at the
new grounds between Los Angeles and
Santa Monica, and the other at Agricul
tural, park. Baseball enthusiasts will
be' Sole to root for their favorites at the
game between the New Los Angeles
team and the San Diego club at Fiesta
park. An all-day game of golf will be
played at the grounds at Alvarado and
Pico streets. Athletic sports of almost
every description will be a part of to
day's festivities at Pasadena. Cycle
races will also be run there in the after
noon in connection with the athletic
games.
The really Important football game
of the day in this part of the state will
be played at Ventura between teams
of the University of Southern Califor
nia of this city and the Ventura eleven.
There will be several boys' games of
football on the local gridiron. As tbls
holiday comes at the end of the week the
sportsmen will take advantage of the
opportunity for two days' sport with gun
and dog in the fields or behind the blinds
in the marshes, and there will be quite
an exodus of them this morning. The
several shooting club grounds near the
city will be attended by nearly a full
membership.
THE NEW COURSING CLUB
Beginning at 11 oclock there will be
an all-day coursing match at the new
grounds of the recently organized South
ern California Coursing club on the
Santa Monica electric road west of the
city. Only the run-off of the match will
be decided today and tomorrow the ties
and the final will be run. As the match
is a forty-eight dog event there will be
enough sport to keep the slippers busy
all afternoon.
Thomas Brennan of San Francisco will
act as Judge of today's events. He has
been In the game several years and If
familiar with every detail of It. He fia3
officiated at some of the big matches at
San Francisco both this season and lost,
and has acted in every position on the
field. The other officers of the day are
as follows: Slipper, William GiTder
mann; flag steward, David Cahill; slip
steward, M. Cota; field steward, H. H. H.
Stape Munton.
The new grand stand will accommo
Dr. Lyon's
PERFECT
Tooth Powder
AN ELEGANT TOILET LUXURY.
Used by people of refinement
* « rn-m-ber of fi century.
HALF MAN
HALF MAN
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HALF MAN
HALF MAN
HALF MAN
HALF MAN
HALF MAN
Half man
HALF MAN
HALF MAN
HALF MAN
HALF MAN
HALF MAN
HALF MAN
HALF MAN ■
S HE WHOSE NERVES ARE SO POOS
1 that he must needs Jump—yea Jump—at
the least noise. When your nerves are Jump
ing nerves, when your brain whirls, when
your nights are bad. when your & reams art
horrible, when you woke up in despair and
misery, when your days are long, gloomy,
melancholy days. It is time to act. You ars
suffering from Nervous Debility and. if not
careful, it may lead To complete Nervous
prostration. The very be-Bt cure for this
condition is the great ulscovery of the wise
doctors of Hudson Medical Institute. It is
the great Hudyan. Hudyan cures faiiini
manhood, despondency, lack of ambition,
restlessness, unwise dissipation, prematur
ity, abuses and corrects the errors of Ufa
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Hudson Media! Institute
Ellis, Stockton and Market Streets
SAN FRANCISCO. CAL,
Ziska Institute
1718 Sacramento Street,
Hear Van Ness Aye.
Home and Day School for Girls
From Primary through Colle.; late work Su
Iwrlor advantage*-, in Languages and Muslo
(■dividual attention. Small classes. Specla
students ad ltted.
Mill. B. ZISKA. A. M.. Principal.
Allen's Press Clipping Bureau
105 HAS! FIKST ST.
I.os Angelee, Cal.
Kurnifh advance reports on all contract work,*
rucli a- • ewers, reservoirs, Irrigation and pump
ing plants and public buildings. Personal clip
limn- from all papers ia tn* United states. j
r
1 date 800 people and a betting stand 50x1.">0
has been erected, and there will be sev
eral books on the reults of each of the
runs. Two hundred "jacks" have been
on the grounds for the past three weeks,
and as they have been running all over
* the field they are supposed to be familiar
* with the location of the escapes. This
makes it certain that the sport will bj
excellent, as the dogs will not have any
advantage but will have to put up good,
fast runs to secure kills.
The dogs entered In today's events arc
, among the best In the state. A number
* of them were brought here from north
ern points, several of them having par
ticipated In the Merced matches. Air
of them will be sent to the park on a'
special dog train at 9 oclock this morn- I
ing. Beginning at 10:30 oclock, cars will j
run to and from the park at intervals |
of five minutes.
AT AGRICULTURAL PARK |
Preparations for one of the best cours
: Ing matches that has ever been run at
the Agricultural park have today been
completed. The course Is familiar to j
nearly all local lovers of the sport, for
weekly matches have been held there,
and several of them excellent ones, for
nearly two months. The officers for to
day will be the same as have been pre»
siding there this season. Perhaps the
best dog In the runs Is the now famous
Queen 8., but, as several "dark horses"
(dogs that have not heretofore been en
tered there) are Included In the draw
ing, that champion may have to get on
more speed today than she has needed
before. The running will begin promptly
at 1:30 oclock.
BASEBALL AT FIESTA PARK
After several weeks of hard work,
Manager Morley of Fiesta park has suc
ceeded in organizing a Los Angeles base
ball club which he thinks Is as good as
any other team in the state. It is com
posed partly of profeslsonals, who have
been doing service In the eastern leagues
md are now wintering here, and the
best of the local players who have ap
peared in the recent tournament here.
Among the professionals are Harvey,
Steinfelt, Decker, Dungan and Henry 1
M.ingerlna. The latter is a little man.
but as a catcher he is one of the biggest I
men In this part of the country. His 1
work in San Francisco has been «ueh i
that he is In receipt of a number of offers
from eastern magnates. Of the other?
mentioned, little can be said that the
lovers of the sport do not know. They i
are among the best men in the game and
can be relied upon to play well any posl- i
Hon In which they are placed.
Today this tgara will cross bats with
the San Diego club, which is itself a
strong team. There Is a number of east
ern players who have come to San Diego
to spend the winter, and these have been
=orralled by the manager of the club
md drafted Into service for this and
future games. The San Diego players
are particularly anxious to win today,
as there will be a series of games later in
the season, both in this city and in San
Diego, and the southerners want this
first game, in order to be assured of a
good attendance when they play at home.
Among their team are Donlan, the crack
"southpaw;" Sunday, formerly of the
Pittsburg club; Van Arman and Stevens
of the Dcs Moines club, and Morrow,
Kensington and Cameron of the Western
league. The positions in today's game,
which will be called promptly at 2
oclock, will be filled as follows:
San Diego. Los Angeles.
Donl'an-Kutz P Harvey-Tripp
Kel.iar C Mangerina
Stevens F.B Decker
Cameron S.B Early
Vanarman T.B Stefnfelt
Sunday S.S E. Moore
Morrow L.F Leland
Little C.F Hopkins
Kensington R.F Dungan
MR. M'COY IS WILLING
BUT CHOYNSKI CAN'T SEE IT
THAT WAY
The Ambitious Kid Sees His Chance
for a Match With Fitz
Slipping Away
NEW YORK, Dec. 31.—McCoy's origi
nal declaration that he would meet
Choyneki at 158 pounds as a stepping
none to a match with Fitzslmmons,
brought up a nice point of ring proced
ure. McCoy could have insisted that
Choynski meet him at 158 pounds. At
the same time McCoy was perfectly well
aware that Choynski could not reach
the middle-weight limit. He has de
eded to make a concession to Choynski.
Speaking on the subject, McCoy said:
"In order to get a meeting with Choynski
I will agree to concede four pounds over
the middle-weight limit. I will meet him
at the ring side at 162 pounds, which I
consider a very fair proposition. To be
sure, if he is willing to go at 158 I would
have no objection. I make this conces-j
sion to Choynski solely on the under- 1
standing that if I win Fitzsimmons will
then meet at the middle-weight limit of
158 pounds."
It is not unlikely that Choynski wili
accept the 162 pounds proposition, al
though he would go into the ring rather
fine.
CHOYNSKI WON'T DO IT
CHICAGO, Dec. 31.—"Parson" Davles,
manager for Joe Choynski, the heavy
weight pugilist, today issued th.c follow
ing ultimatum in answer to Kid Mc-
Coy's announcement that he would
meet the Californian at 162 pounds;
"Joe Choynski will fight Kid McCoy
it catch weights at any place and time
lor a purse of $5000. He will agree to no
particular weight."
Prospects for a meeting between the
two pugilists, therefore, are not very
bright at present. McCoy's first propo
sition to Choynski was a meeting at 158
pounds. He afterwards agreed to allow
Choynski to enter the ring at 162 pounds,
but Parson Davles will not listen to any
proposition limiting the weight of
Choynski.
"Heretofore the question of weight
does not seem to have bothered Mr-Coy
so much," he said today. "Now, why is
he so particular In this Instance? He
fought Creedon at catch weights and to
Joe after the Long Island City match he
said nothing about 162 pounds.
"We will not agree to pull the fight
off at Carson City just to please Dan
Stuart. That is too far away. And we
won't postpone the match until next
summer, either, to please McCoy and
Dan Stuart."
A New Year Race
NEW YORK, Dec. 31.—James Michael
of Wales and Eduardo Taylore of France
will meet in the Madison-square garden
tomorrow in a paced race of 25 milee.
LOS ANGELES HERALD t SATURDAY MORNING, JANUARY i, 1898
THE NEW BOSS
In Charge of Union Pacific
Affairs
DEMORALIZATION OF RATES
I SHOWS THE NEED OF A TRAFFIC
AGREEMENT
I —
The Valley Road Managers Trying
an Experiment in Building a
Boad Across a marsh
Associated Press Special Wire
OMAHA, Dec. 81.—President Horace
G. Burt, formally took charge of the
Union Pacific headquarters this morn
ing.
TRAFFIC TROUBLES
CHICAGO, Dec. 31.—Another effort is
to be made in the near future to reor
ganise the old Transcontinental Passen
ger association. The longer the roads
work without an association the more
urgently do they feel the need of one,
and the demoralization of rates in trans
continental traffic has been so great
during the most of the year that the
roads declare that they have lost much
revenue which might have been saved
If they had been working under a strong
traffic agreement. The principal ob
stacle to the reorganization of the asso-
elation has been the position taken by
the Union Pacific, which has,, by its re
fusal to Join any passenger association,
caused more trouble to the transcon
tinental lines than it has to those of the
Western Passenger association.
Most of the passenger men who favor
the reorganization of the association are
now of the opinion that they will have
little trouble in inducing the Union Pa
cific to become a member, and It is likely
that a meeting of all the transcontinent
al roads will be called in this city some
time in January.
A meeting of the western lines was
held today, for the purpose of doing away
with the home-seekers' excursions,
which, it is said, have been a demoraliz
er of winter tourist rates.
The same old straw was threshed over
again, with the same old result, and the
excursions will be continued for the re
mainder of the winter. It is probable,
however, that they will be confined to the
first three months of the year.
THE VALLLEY ROAD
STOCKTON, Dec. 31.—Construction of
the Valley Railway's, roadbed from
Stockton to Richmond Point began to
day at Old River, under the supervision
of Contractor J. D. McDougald. The
bed of the road Is being laid In a novel
manner and to some extent the work Is
experimental. The spot selected for
commencing operations Is in the worst
stretch of marsh land between here and
Brentwood. Borings show the depth to
solid ground to be thirty feet. To sup
port the railroad embankment, a bed of
brush, seventy feet wide will be laid,
and for the Initial work 500 cubic yards
of brush have been cut. It has been
done up into fascines fifteen Inches in
diameter, each bundle being bound
tightly with wire. These fascines will
be laid as compactly together as possi
ble, breaking Joints to make the bed
llrnier. There will be two layers of fas
cines, the top layer to be covered with a
few inches of earth, when ties and rails
will be laid on it, forming a temporary
track. Over this roadbed trains will
eventually be run from the vicinity of
Brentwood, hauling sand and gravel for
the permanent embankment. The brush
support is intended to remain perma
nently where it iv placed, the earth
hauled in from Brentwood being dumped
on top of it.
Contractor McDougald left for the
scene of operations this morning. He
takes down with him, on a barge, a lot
of earth dredged from Mormon Channel,
in this city, to be used as a covering for
the brush roadbed. The brush has al
ready been cut or. Old River and bound
Into fascines. Twenty-two head of
horses and half a dozen wheel scrapers,
to be employed in taking the earth from
the barge to the brush bed, were sent
down on the vessel this morning.
This method of railroad construction
Is very costly, as may be Judged from the
fact that at the opening of bids at Sac
ramento not long ago, for furnishing
fascines to be used In the work on the
Sacramento river, the lowest bid was 80
cents a cubic yard, and the next lowest
¥1.10. How much Contractor McDou
jald Is to receive from the Valley Road
Is unknown. The cost, however, is less
lhan if piles had to be driven into the
marshy ground to support the rails.
Vast quantities of sand and gravel are
jbtalnable in the vicinity of Brentwood,
and as the material for the embankment
is to be obtained from that side of the
tule basin. It is probable that the Valley
Road Intends to change its base of op
erations to Brentwood as soon as the
3tretch of roadway begun today is fin
ished.
Mr. McDougald's contract calls for
only 100 feet. The work was evidently
begun Ih the worst part of the swamp to
make sure that such a roadbed Is feasi
ble. As soon as it is demonstrated that
the plan Is feasible, similar work will be
commenced on the Brentwood side of the
basin and continued across the tules to
Stockton, gravel and sand being hauled
on the brush as fast as the fascines are
laid down.
FIRE AND SHAVINGS
A New Year's Blaze in an Empty
House
An alarm was turned In at 11:56 last
evening from box 46, at Sixth and Flg
ueroa streets, for a fire In a three-room
cottage at 724 West Third street, belong
ing to Dr. J. C. Zahn. The house had
been rented to C. A. Judd for the pur
pose of storing some furniture, bedding,
etc. The blaze originated in a pile of ex
celsior shavings, which showed through
a window and alarmed a passerby. The
department responded promptly and ex
tinguished the blaze by means of the
chemical engine. The damage could
hardly be stated exactly, but it will run
very near 1150. There Is no Insurance on
the property. The fire Is of mysterious
origin and it is thought to have been in
cendiary. When the department arrived
the front door was unlocked, although
no One was supposed to have access to
the interior with the exception of Dr.
Zahn and Mr. Judd. The police will in
vestigate.
Ingleside Race Entries
The following are the entries and weights
for the races to be run at Ingleslde track,
San Francisco, today. Commlsalons received
and placed by the Los Angeles Turf club, I
Black A Co., at Agricultural Park. Take
Mam atreet cars. Down town office in rear
of No. 143 S. Broadway. First quotations
received at 1:90 oclock p. tn.:
First race, three-fourths of a mile, aell
lng— Brambella 84, Glenower 86, MaSnbar
89, Towanda 90, Chappie 101, Sonlro 101.
Minx 102, MolHe R. 102, Mlsa Rosa 102, Ful
lerton Laaa IDS, Easel 10«. Elano 108, Sir
Richard 107, Mulberry 107, Ike L. 111.
Second race, three-fourths of a mile, al
lowance— Hermonsa. Traverer 94. Santa
CataKna 99, Imp, Tupping 104. San Tuzza.
Mamie Scott 107, Ortmar, Red Glen 109, Cash
Day 113.
Third race, steeplechase, short course—
Nonchalance 125, Esperance. Reno. Mo
nita, Mestor, Copt. Reese 140, Silverado
143, Governor Budd 154.
Fourth race, the New Year's handicap,
two miles—Billy McCloskey 98, Doyle 101,
Don Clarenclo. Charles Relff 102, The Bach
elor. Coillna 104, Yankee Doodle 105. Song
and Dance 107, Can't -Dance 109, Nlneltor.
Marquise 112, Judge Denny 116, Wheel of
Fortune 117, Buckwa 122.
Fifth race, one and one-eighth mile,
selling—Nolt, Doyle, Little Cripple 109,
Marcel, Oscuro in.T, San Marco, Joe Terry,
Walter J., Peter 11., Cromwell 112.
Sixth race, three-fourths of a mile, sell
ing—Sorrow 86, Highland Ball 99. George
Rose 101, Stentor, Scotch Rose 103, Rebel
Jack 104, Lena, Judge Stouffer 106, Her
manlta 106, Midas 107, George Miller, Oflee
ta 108, Kamaen, Olive 110. The Dragon 111.
Seventh race, seven-eighths of a mif#,
allowances—Morinel, Yule, 99, Royal Prise,
Los Prietos 101, San Antonio, Eddie Jones.
Marplot 104, Torslda 107.
A SUDDEN STIFFENING
APPARENT IN THE CHINESE
BACKBONE
1
Germany Asked to Evacuate Xiao
Chau—The Belief General That
England Is Acting
LONDON, Jan. I.—According to a spe
cial from Shanghai a sudden stiffening
has taken place in the attitude of the
Tsung Li Yamen toward Germany, re
sulting In a demand for the evacuation
of Klao Chau and leading to the belief
that Great Britain is bringing pressure
to bear upon Pekin.
A dispatch from St. Petersburg says
that on Tuesday Emperor Nicholas
granted an audience to the Chinese min
ister Tang Tv, who handed the czar a
personal letter from the emperor of
China.
It is reported that the conversation
turned on the proposed Chinese loan.
The St. Petersburg Herald announces
that some Russian vessels have left Port
Arthur and gone into the harbor of Tal
ien Wan with China's consent, the har
bor at Port Arthur being too small for
the movement of the Russian vessels.
A dispatch from Hong Kong, to the
Times says there Is the greatest activity
in the navy yards there, while profound
secrecy Is maintained. The movements
of the British fleet and its whereabouts
are not known at Hong Kong. The
cruiser Grafton, having taken on sup
plies of coal and ammunition, leaves fa
day (Friday).
THE MONET QUESTION
PEKIN, Dec. 31.—Although desirous of
obtaining a British loan the Chinese
government refuses to agree to foreign
control of the internal revenue, either
immediate or In case of default.
Li Hung Chang, however, Is disposed
to favor the control of the Internal rev
enue in case of default.
In the event of a loan not being pro
curable, China will not pay her war In
demnity until 1902, in accordance with
one of the provisions of the treaty of
Simoneskl. The final decision Is post
poned until after the holidays.
Further German missionary trouble is
reported from the Chantung province.
It will possibly delay and complicate the
negotiations.
SECRET MISSION
LONDON, Dec. 31.—A special dispatch
from Paris says that M. Roume, head of
the Asiatic Department of the French
Colonial Office, starts on a secret mis
sion to China Sunday, In connection with
the crisis In the Far East. The dispatch
adds that.a special military mission will
start for China shortly.
A COMPROMISE EFFECTED
PEKIN, Dec. 31.—Advices Just re
ceived from Seoul, the capital of Corea,
say that a compromise has been effected
by an agf-eement according to which
Mr. J. McLeavy Brown, the British Cus
toms Agent, and M. AlexiefH, the Rus
sian agent, to make room for whom Mr.
Brown was removed, will work the Co
rean customs together. The British
warships which were present at Che
mulpo, Seoul, are there In order to give
moral support to Mr. Brown.
STARTED FOR HONG KONG
LONDON. Dec. 31.— Vice-Admiral Sir
Ward Hobart Seymour, K. C. 8., who
has been appointed British commander
in-chief on the China station, succeed
ing Admiral Boiler, started for Hong
Kong today, accompanied by his staff.
Robbed His Father
SAN FRANCISCO, Dec. 31.—Adolph
Bahr and William Potts were taken to
jail this evening for robbing the father
of the former. For some time the store
of William Bahr, shoe dealer, has been
systematically pillaged. Detectives
caught the young men selling 86 pairs
of shoes to a pawnbroker for one-fifth
their value. Whether the thieves will be
prosecuted depends upon the father of
Bahr.
Bryan Back From Mexico
SAN ANTONIO, Tex., Dec. 31.—Hon.
W. J. Bryan arrived here this evening
from his tour of Mexico. He proceeded
at once to Austin, where he will spend
one day as the guest of Governor Culber
son. Mr. Bryan stated that he had not
changed his opinion on the sliver ques
tion. He complimented President Diaz
and the hospitality of the Mexicans in
the highest terms.
The Price of Silver
D* o - Sl—The director
of the mint has made his quarterly esti
mate of the value of foreign standard
silver coins for the guidance of officers
of the government. The average price
of silver for the three) taonths ended
Dec, 1 was .58565, as against .56933.f0r
Oct. 1, which would Indicate Increase of
about one-fifth ot 1 per oen*
DISTANCE WHEELING
*
A LOB AHGELES BOY BACK FROM
A LONG TRIP
Gustsve Baas Returns From a Trans
continental Journey of Over
14,000 Miles—lncidents
Gustavo Haas left Los Angeles on
January 24, 1897, upon his twentieth
birthday, and arrived here last evening
at 8 oclock, having ridden 14,000 miles on
his wheel in that time, claiming to have
broken all world's records for cross
country riding.
When he left he rode through Arizona
and New Mexico, after taking a side
spin through Lower California, then
through the southern states to Atlanta,
Ga., then to the Nashville exposition, on
to St. Louis, Chicago, and thence to
Canada, then south to Mexico, then »ast
again to New York, crossing the conti
nent from west to east and the United
States from north to south.
During his trip Mr. Haas participated
in many of the eastern race meets and
was successful not only in winning, but
broke a number of track records. While
In Kentucky he visited the Mammoth
cave and from there he rode to the great
Horse cave, a distance of 114 miles, in
one day, breaking the Kentucky record
for cross country riding.
His experiences in Louisiana and
Mississippi were exciting. He passed
through that country during the yellow
fever epidemic and was thrown into the
pest house at a number of places. At
others he was even less fortunate, the
citizens turning out with rifles and driv
ing him out of the neighborhood as rap
idly as his wheel could carry him. Near
Texarkana, Ark., he was taken prisoner
by the moonshiners, who suspected him
of being a government official. After
being satisfied as to his Identity he was
liberated and paid $1.50 per day for the
time of his detention.
Mr. Haas considers that his trip was
an eminently successful one as It was
taken in the interest of the government
to determine the practicability of
using bicycles for sending dis
patches long distances. He car
ried fifty pounds, the same as a cavalry
man, riding one wheel the entire dis*
tance, and on his way home used but one 1
pair of tires from Chicago, one of which
has never been punctured. On his ar
rival In Pasadena yesterday afternoon
he was given a reception at the Y. M. C.
A. headquarters and today he will head
the bicycle division of the parade in the
annual tournament of roses.
Bank Clearings
NEW YORK, Dec. 31.-The foHowing
table, compilied by Bradstreet, shows the
bank clearings for the week ended Dec.
30th, with the percentage of increase and
decrease, as compared with the corre
sponding week lost year:
Per cent.
Inc. dec.
New York $743,298,977 02.9
. Boston 84,041,202 23.5
Chicago 95.135,633 36.7
Philadelphia 61,157,128 24.1
• St. Louis 24,914,877 24.1
I Pittsburg 16,232,326 32.1 ....
i Baltimore 18.707.139 9.6
. San Francisco 14,316,620 24.3 ....
Cincinnati 11,262.360 12.0
Kansas City........ 8,386.488 11.4
New Orleans 9,943,768 6.7
Minneapolis 10.U03.9u7 51-5 ....
Detroit J.,..., 6,783,417 16.4 ....
Cleveland 6,210,670 7.8
Loulsvllfe 4,879,692 3.8 ....
Providence , 4.507,700 .... 8.1
Milwaukee 4.892.930 11.3 ....
St. Paul 3.941.972 1.8
Buffalo 8,762.563 13.2 ....
Omaha 4,674,074 13.4
Indianapolis 4.707.623 40.2 ....
Columbus, 0 3.830,900 18.2 ....
Savannah 2.697,739 21.7 ....
Denver 2,127.165 6.5
Hartford 2,318,287 32.0
Richmond 1,981,779 6.4
Memphis 1,981,380 30.0
Washington 1,704,681 40.6
Peoria 1,671.873 31.4
Rochester 1,472,986 1.8
New Haven 1,264,886 6.3
Woreeater 1,226.341 6.1
Atlanta 1,296.020 .... 8.5
Salt Lake City 1,732,163 9.4
Springfield. Mass.. 1,229,938 24.5
Fort Worth 1,478,955 16.6
Portland, Me 1,106,644 .... 6.1
Portland, Ore 1.759.259 44.7
St. Joseph 1,721,927 36.5
Los Angeles 1,318,268 60.5
Norfolk 865,303
Syracuse 945,270 10.2 ....
Dcs Moines 956.971 9.7 ....
Nashville 920,930 14.8 ....
Wilmington, Del.. 694.424 25.9
Fall River 770,388 .... 9.6
Scranton 923,278 .... 17.1
Grand Rapids 868,430 34.4
Augusta, Ga 813,952 2.6 ....
Lowell 675,854 .... 5.6
Seattle 758,676 80.4 ....
Tacoma ' 778.671 86.5 ....
Spokane. ~.. 598.428 8.5 ....
Galveston 5,956,200 22.4
Houston 6,779,545 .... 6.4
Totals, U. S $1,188,351,046 42.4 ....
Totals outside of
New York 446,052,069 22.2 ....
DOMINION OF CANADA
Montreal $10,367,193 23.7 ....
Toronto 6,812,242 28.8 ....
Winnipeg 1,816,264 34.1
Totals $21,165,279 22.6
LOST AND_FOUND
LOST—A YELLOW SIDECOMB SET
with rhlncstones. Return to CHAS. E.
PLAISANCE, 202 S. Spring St., and get
reward. 81
LOST—BUNCH OF KEYS. FINDER
will receive reward at 601 Upper Main
St., Plaza saloon. J. F. GAUL. 1
LOST—SILVER CHATELAINE. Rel
turn Herald office. Reward. ' 1
MUSICAL INSTRUCTION
PIANO HOUSE—A. G. GARDNER, 118
Winston St., near the Postofflce bulkllng.
Brlggs Pianos, new and second hand;
also, other maker.. tf
HENRY SCHULTZ, TEACHER OP VlO
lin and cornet; bind instructor. 806 s.
Grand aye. 1-7
PERSONAL
FIVE CM ? T . g A_ JLIW
PARTY WHO HAD BICYCLE DAM
aged on night of' Dec. 30, in front of
Broadway Stables please call and have
settlement. No. 206 Morchessault st. 3
METRICAL ELECTRICIAN REMOVED
from 819 S. Grand aye. to 618 W. Eighth
it.; female dlseues treated by electric
ity; cure guaranteed. ti
DR. MEYERS ** <*<% I ,
srcuAusTs rod DISEASES Of M
-^■"^E£a»swsaßk—. , V you have an aiiient recently contnt
. VB&> \ not d *'*y ,n ,he - skil!t,J ,|d of «
•MM^^^lS*^' f tors who can make (you sound and well i
M jEt 'Tm snort time. Dr. Mfyers & Co. can do this
a you - Has your troible been treated by Ino
jflVyl . JBi Petent doctors untlllt has become chronic
|X dangerous > If is the case, do not
{(fSn VSKIH I ?P* lr ' but consul* Dr. Meyers & Co. It
Ylfc *>• X^ 1 * been by the curing of Just such dlffi.
A.*lp troubles that they have built up a great V
< V I ''Übsskl A " eSS ,nd becorae f | mous »" over California
, LOST MAIWOOO RESTORE
1 'I^THW.;eiyr^ l F«Tor lf L y° u nave a viakness that is robbing j
1 "iS 1 \ft '//, of strenr*. happiness, pleasure, m
% XTriMwfoi Jftm Vzn nood > consult fit physicians of Dr. Mevert
i yWSBbk "'-vWHsiaSBSBBW /flm Co ' s ,nstitute - r ne y can restore your !
2<SH\. strength and vidlity and stop those feaj
'TTTr l ! i lll»TWlWr d,ains - They w l' make * P erf * c ' man of y
*dr%\ \\ SaW jflyPtatw The restoration Ml be not only perfect ;
*■ *** - m • nTTniraro speedy, but perri nent as welt
NO MONEY REQUIRED TILL YfU ARE CURED
Dr. Meyers & Co. have such faith in their methods and rfiedies that they do not 1
for a dollar until the patient is cured or restored, as the cbe may be.
Consultation and Advice free. It is well worth your fine to sea or write the doct<
i whether you want to take the treatment or not. A frienlly talk or a confidential lei
, will result in great good in any event. Private book for mci sent sealed to tny address, f i
t K.,.bli.hed iS Utean MEYERS 8 40. * 18 Sff \«f£^ %
Specialist! for alt Weak nets »nd Diseases ofMen. <
I Omce Howw—9 to v; 1 to i. Dally; Kvenlfle, 7 to 8; Bundavs, 9to U.
RebsW
IBpv
bbsbV
Amt a^aW
I wllliP \ IX^LvSlaT*|J 111 l B
n Compare--*
j [ the New wit| the Old Five-Cent Piece
I PIPER
I HEIDSIECK
I PLUGTOBACCO
X (CHAMPAGNE FLAVOR)
M Forty per cent, laryr than before—the new five
& cent piece of Pipff Heidsieck Plug Tobacco has
3? captured the coupy. Try it.
gjps Angus t&W* Co-
FOR SALE—MISCELLANEOUS
FINE UPRIGHT PIANO, flS* FROM
the factory; a bargain fofright party;
cheap for caah, or will sail on the in
stallment plan. THE HStALD PUB
LISHING CO. Call for J/3. RODMAN.
r • tf
FOR SALE—ORESC EN jj BICYCLE,
512.E0; Cleveland. 315; Cleveland, 130.
WINSTON, 584 S. $roa*?ay. 1-1
FOR SALE—A STEINWA&f PIANO, FOR
cash or on time, cheap.'; 040 Wall st. 2
WANTED—HOUSES
WANTED—WE HAVH CUSTOMERS
for furnished . and unfurnished houses.
Bring in location and particulars. We do
the rest. JOHNSON & KEENEY, 204 8.
Broadway. 1 '' ■ 2 1
HOTELS
:
HOTEL HOLLBNBECK—SPRING AND
Second ats„ Los Angeles. tf
HOTEL BROADWAY, 429 8. BROA~i>WY.
tf
HYPNOJISM
FIVE CUNTS A LINE
HYPNOTISM AND MESMERISM
taught; full course, 35; success.guaran
teed or money refunded. PROF. H. H.
LILIENTHAL, late of Paris; office, 8«2
Buena Vlsts St., north from court house:
P. O. box Sis. 1
HYPNOTISM TAUGT; TUITION, *5.00 IN
class. PROF. BARLEY, *23* i S. Spring.
j 1
AnOßNtfirS AT LAW
BROUSSEAU & MONTGOMERY—
Attoirneys-st-Law
Ml Bradbu .• > block. Los Angeles, ti
CHARLES o'VJ RGAN~ ROOMS 101 AND
122, Hellman r ! jck, corner Second and
Broadway. , V-
D_ASSAYING
THJB BIMeJ OFFICE
,nd VTifc 1« 8. Main st.
/• KvidtMce t '•- ■.[
II SCIENCE | VALUABLE, jj 1 ) 0
II ORIENTALi , N VALIDS 11
I MEDICINES! PR'" 01 ' Wr
"SCIENCE OF ORIENTAL MEDICIN
Latest and Best Hook on a Live Subject
The Only Complete Work on this to
ever printed In the English language. Ti
all about the Chinese system of medlcl
its founding and early history, its impo
ant secrete acquired through vivlsectl
its Wonderful, puife diagnosis, its unlfo
use of absolutely non-poisonous her)
remedies, Its rapid progress tn the Unt
States, its eminent leading practitlone.-,
its novel theories of the origin, causes and
treatment of many prevalent diseases, and
the experiences of some of Its patrons In
Southern California. Also gives valu
hints and advice on diet and ways ol
ing.
Invaluable to Invalids —Interesting to /
' 240 pages, printed on heavy book ps
Jn clear, readable type: nicely bound
lust rated; price, paper, 50 cents; clot!
Sent by moll on receipt of price. Add
The Foo and Whig Herb Company, l
Ushers, 903 8. Olive street, Los Angeli
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦•
I JOE POHEIM'S
] $15.50 Salts
ji Made to Order
I S Are the best in the country. "WHY?"}
! T Because they are well cut and well
i X made and guaranteed to fit. All
♦ goods thoroughly shrunk. 1 have;
% received too pieces of
| All Wool Suiting ''-
X Which I will make to order for
I $15.50 and $17.50 a Saf
| Well worth $25 aoi $2lp
X Call Early to Get Fta-st Choice as
f ♦ Thoy are Going UK* He* OAkes
'joe ?mm^m
143 S. Sprtßg St., Los Aagilss

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