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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, February 02, 1898, Image 9

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THE INVESTOR
OFFICE OF THE HERALD,
LOS ANGELES, Feb. 1, 1898.
"Reflection Increases the strength of the
mind, ns oxercisu does tho strength of tho
body."
000
Some Indication of the way In which the
commercial Interests of tho United States
aro extending In foreign parts may bo
gathered from certain items ln the diplo
matic and consular appropriation bill
which has just been reported to the house.
A consulate Is proposed to be established
at Dawson City on account of the large
Influx of Americans, owing to the gotu dis
coveries. Because of the growing business
of tho country at Vancouver, ln British
Columbia, it ls recommended that the ap
propriation for tho consulate be Increased.
Provision is also made for the establish
ment of a consulate at Pretoria, in tho
South Africa republic, owing to the growth
of American Interests In mining and other
enterprises ln the Transvaal. Still another
proposed consulate ls at Tamsul, on tho
Island of Formosa, recently transferred to
Japan. It appears that slnco the transfer
the trado of the Island has shown a rapid
development and that there ls every Indi
cation that it will Increase still further.
000
The total of exports of merchandise for
1697 ls the largest ln our history, amount
ing to $1,099,129,619. The nearest approach
to that was the total of the preceding year,
which was slightly over $1,000,000,000. Re
culling tho total of 1891, $970,509,040, and
the total of 1592, $935,420,6C0, as the largest,
excepting the two years above mentioned,
Shows what a phenomenal period wo have
Just had in the exportation of our products.
Adding the next exports of silver and sil
ver ore, which may be properly consid
ered merchandise, to the total of what is
technically called merchandise, tho ex
ports of 1597 were $1.157,790,811, against $1.
--0119,893,982 In 1896. Tho favorable balance
of trade In merchandise, says the Econo
mist, for 15,17 was $356,498,664, against $324,
--257,685 in 1596. Both of these totals are far
In excess of those of any previous year.
The total balance of trade for 1897, Includ
ing silver, wus $352,083,974, against $358,034.
--680 In 1896. carrying out tho llgures that
hnve been presented ln the Economist from
month to month for about two years, we
find that for the past 27 months the ex
cess of exports of merchandise and silver
over Imports of merchandise and silver is
$810,721,921. These totals almost stagger
anybody who has been In the habit of
Bt'udying tho llgures of former years. The
totals for December are quite as remark
able.. The merchandise exports for that
flfonth, 2121,474,135, aro tho largest for any
month In our history, the nearest approx
imation being In December. 1891, $119,935,596.
There aro only eleven months In our his
tory when tho total exceeded 6100,000,000,
excess of exports for December
Is partly duo to tho moderate imports,
which, though not down to tho lowest In
oW recent history, are below the average
for the past three or four years. It will
be sceu that tho exports of silver ln 1897
were'considerably less than those of 189 U.
It Is well known that tho reduced de
mand for the metal In the far cast ls a
leading cause for th decline in price. It
Is quite easy to believe that thero will be
no exports of gold In the first half of 1898
on aCcpupt of the Immense balance of
in otu; favor that has been rolled up
ln the last 27 months. A country that
over a million dollars' worth of
goods to the rest of the world more than
it Is buying need not worry about the
movement of gold, even though It is pay
ing out a good deal of money for transpor
tation and lntorest.
000
Boston has a bank called the Five Cents
Savings bank. This Institution has been
paying its depositors 4 per cent per annum.
On a recent Saturday night 1700 people
were waited upon over the bank's coun
ters, and of these 1300 were depositors.
While the aggregate deposits wore but
$5Q,000, the largo number of depositors
would appear to show prosperity for the
working classes. The above Illustration
•ufcjgests the thought to the San Francisco
Bulletin that a bank organized on the
lines' of this bank might meet the wants
of every largo city. "Tho experiment,"
Says the Bulletin, "has been tried in Sun
Francisco, but without success. That,
however, was years ago, when a 5-cent
piece did not look as large as It does today.
Were tho experiment to be renewed now.
It might prove to be Just what is wanted.
But tlie promoters must be men in whom
there ls the utmost confidence."
000
Tho French Savings and Loan society
Of Ban Francisco has re-elected the old
of directors for 1893, with E. J. Lo
Breton as president and Howard Park
socretary.
000
The annual meeting of the State Mutual
Building and Loan association was held
recently. The old board of directors and
officers, consisting of Dr. W. G. Cochran,
president, A. E. Pomeroy, vice president,
Frank A. Gibson, treasurer, C, J. Wade,
secretary, and F. W. Wood, director, was
re-elected. Tho association changes Its
plan February Ist to what ls known as
the Dayton plan, which ls becoming very
popular In the east.
Incorporations
R. E. Jack company, San Luis Obispo;
|l,O00,000; subscribed, !UOOO.
The Rosenholz Rock Drill company, San
Francisco; $100,000; subscribed, $50.
J. Marks & Co., San Francisco; $25,000;
all subscribed.
Mortgages, $1000 and Over
3. P. and P. Stelrihart to B. P. No
ble—Part lot 8, blk 11, O. S., 4 yrs.,
BV4 per cent, $ 1,000
H. J. Cone et ah to D. G. Ives—Lot
3, blk A, Marengo trt, 2 yrs, 10 per
cent 3,500
L. A. and 11. Doty to J. Lake—Lots
20 to 24, Amos Wright's sub., 3 yrs,
8 por cent 2,000
I. M. and I. W. Powers to I. Phillips
—Lot 2, blk L, Jones trt; lot 31, Ab
bot & Margaret trt; lot 57, Star
trt; 3 yrs, 11 percent 2,500
B. L. King to W. C. Brown—Lots 4,
6 and «, sub. ot S!i of S\V»i Sec. 17
3 S 13 2.000
D. C. Norton to P. Ord—Part Sec. 25
1 N. 10, 4 yrs, 6 per cent 2 000
Mrs. M. K. Dent to G. M. Smith-
All Int. which first party now has or
may hereafter acrpdre in that cer
tain real property in city and coun
ty of L. A., which was granted by
authorities of pueblo of L. A. to
Julian Pope, 2 yrs, 8 per cent 1 500
P. C. Howes et al. to Sec. L. & T '
Co. of So. Cal.—Lot 2(1 and part 25*
Belgravla, 1 yr., 10 percent .... l 000
3. and S. P. Roes to Main St. Say '
Bk—Lot 15, blk A, Potter & West's
sub., 3 yrs, 10 per cent 1 000
C. M. Persons et al. to O. A. Stass- '
forth-410.32 acs in Ro. San Antonio
1 yr, 10 per cent ' „om
J. P. Erie et al. to Security Say '
Bk—Lots 11 and 12. blk N, Work
man Park trt and trt adj said lots
originally in streets but vacated
about Mnr. 10, '90; 2 yrs, 11 per
cent 3 t,qq
G. A. Murphy et al. lo J. J. Murphy "
—Part Ro. Santa Gertrudes, 1 to 5
yrs, 5 per cent 2 000
H. C. Llchtenberger to C. H. Wedgel
wood—Part lot 4, blk 38, 11. S 2
yrs, 7 per cent lm
CONDUCTED BY QEO- A. DOBINSON
S. S. Strong ot al. to W. F. Leonard
—Part govt lot 7, Sec. C 1 S. 8 2,500
Twelve mortgages under $1000 10,200
Total $42,200
Releases, $1000 and Over
H. N. Rogers to E. Frlck, 148-267.... $1,000
t. A. Carr to M. Gco ot nl, 416-169.... 1,000
A. O. Watts to E. D. Goodo, 484-148.. 3,000
Equitable 13. & 1* Ass'n to S. A.
Prlndle, 652-232, 551-85 1,800
L. A. B. & Li. Ass'n to M. Viscovich,
507-91 •.. 1,600
Mater & Zobelein to F. Hoppe, 458-174 2,000
State Mut. B .& L. Ass'n to E. Bur
goyne, 546-192 1.000
Main St. Say. 13k to T. Labory LSOO
Fourteen releases under $1000 0,872
Total $21,772
ON 'CHANGE
Conditions Shown by the Dealings on
Wall Street
NEW YORK, Feb. I.—The stock market
today had a load of liquidation to carry
hUII heavier than yesterday, and there
were fewer prominent stocks to exercise
sustaining force by their strength. The
heavy offerings were well absorbed, and
not declines are for the most part con
fined lo fractions, but are general. For a
time after the opening there seemed to be
no diminution from yesterday's activity.
There had been apparently a large accu
mulation of outside orders over night, and
London was also a buyers of stocks. This
demand was satisfied, however, without
effecting any marked advance In priceß,
the offerings being very large. Later,
prices began to yield under the weight of
aontlnued offerings, but the pressure was
not so great, the market fell into dull
ness, holders apparently being content to
wait a rally to continue the liquidation.
London bought stocks early ln this mar
ket, but sold more later, which probably
had an Influence ln giving a somewhat
higher tone to the market. It is to be
noted, however, that apart from the cash
from the Interior which is being received
In New York Is duo to remittances on ac
count of Australian gold received at San
Francisco to the order of New York
huoses. The rate of call loans worked to
a lower basis, in spite of the withdrawal
of the second 10 per cent Installment of the
government's deposits of tho Union Pacific.
This withdrawal was called for tomorrow,
but most of It was made today.
In the bond market the Kansas Pacific
consols were the most conspicuous fea
ture, with an advance of S% per cent, to
US. The bond market generally showed a
continuance of activity and prices contin
ued to advance. Total sales. $0,140,000.
United States fours advanced > /8 bid, and
coupons, ex-dividend.
Official announcement was made on the
stock exchange today that trading in
"puts" and "calls" is a violation of the
regulations of the stock exchange, and
will be punished by a line or suspension.
Silver Bullion
SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. I.—Bar silver,
55%; Mexican dollars, 47047 ft
NEW YORK, Feb. I.—Bar silver, 66%;
Mexican dollars, 45(4.
LONDON, Feb. 1.-Ear silver, 26 1-lCd.
Treasury Statement
■WASHINGTON, Feb. I.—Today's state
ment of the condition of the treasury
shows: Available cash balance, $223,871,786'
gold reserve, $164,236,792.
CHICAGO MARKET
Prices and Prospects of the Trade in
Cereals
CHICAGO, Feb. I.—The opening in wheat
furnished a genuine surprise to traders.
It was generally believed that, following
the heavy liquidation of last week and
tho closing out of long lines by many of
the prominent bulls that the market was
ln a period of reaction, some traders even
predicting 90c for May again. The news
from Liverpool, however, completely upset
these calculations and caused a general
skurrylng of shorts for cover. Liverpool
opened Hffllftl. lower, responding well to
yesterday's decline, but by 2:30 p. m.
showed a complete reversal of form, prices
at that time being KOftd. over yesterday's
prices. The sensation of the day's news
was the decrease for January.' 1,248.000
bushels, in the stocks at Liverpool. Stocks
there now amount to 1,621,000 bushels, or
only two months' supply. This was what
started the buying furore. The market
was further strengthened by New' York
advices of good forulgn buying of wheat
futures. May shot up to %-" t before stop
ping. Then It slowly declined. No real
weakness developed, however, until Brad
street's visible report was posted, show
ing an Increase of 56.000 bushels. Liver
pool closed %©%d. higher, but continental
cables were rather weak, and Bradstreet's
estimate turned the market In the last
hour. May fell to W'i, but closed steady
at 85T4096.
There was a fair trade In corn, at nar
row range of prices. May closed un
changed.
ln oats the market was steady and May
closed a shade higher.
The market for provisions was weak,
the packers selling. At the close May
pork was 10c lower and May lard and ribs
5c higher.
SAN FRANCISCO MARKET
Call Board Dealings and Prices of
Produce
SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. I.—Wheat-
December, 1.82 ft; May, 1.39%.
Barley—Easy, May, 92 1 ;.
Corn, large yellow, LO7ftol.lO.
Bran. 20.30©21.50.
Flour—Family extras. 4.6594,65; bakers'
eixtras, 4.8004.40.
Wheat—Shipping, L41?4 for No. 1 nnd L 12«.
01.43 ft for choice; milling wheat, 1.4601.50.
Barley—Feed, good to choice. 9?ft01.OO;
fancy, L02H01.03K; brewing. [email protected]>1.17ft,
Oats—Poor to fair. 1.12ft01.16; good to
choice. 1.17ft01.22ft; fancy feed, 1.2tft©1.26;
gray. 1.1501.17 ft; milling. 1.17ft01.22ft; sur
prise, 1.2601.86; black for seed, L8601.5O;
red, [email protected],45.
Feed and MtllstUffs— Middlings,[email protected]
per ton; bran, 20.50021.50.
flay-Wheat, 16.00ffll8.50; wheat nnd oat
16.00© 17.50: alfalfa. 10.50411.50; clover, 11.00©
12.50; stock, [email protected]; compressed wheat,
[email protected] per ton; straw. 40043 per bale.
Dry Beans—Pink. 2,5002.60; Lima, 1.70
I. 75: small white, 1.8601.45; large white 1 25
©1.40.
Vegetables—Early Rose potatoes, 65075 c
per cental: River Burbanks. 50070 c; River
reds, 45055 c; Oregon Burbanks. 60090 c;
Salinas do., R5C01.1O; onions, 2.6002.75 per
cental; green peas, [email protected] per lb.; string
beans, 20(ij25 per lb.; green peppers, 20025;
dried okra. 15.
Citrus Fruits—Navel oranges. 1.2502.60;
Mexican limes, repack, 6.00(1(7.00 per
box; common California lemons. 75fH
1.25 per box; fancy California lemons, 1.50
02.00.
Butter—Fancy creamery, 27<iT28c per lb.;
do. second, [email protected]; fancy dairy, 21023 c;
do. second. 21<7T23c.
Eggs—Calf ornia. 22®23; fancy ranch,
24ff125c per dozen.
Poultry—Live turkey gobblers, [email protected]
per lb.; do. hens. 9010 c: old roosters. 3.50 I
03.75 per dozen; young roosters, 4.5005.00:1
small broilers, 3.00ff14.00; large broilers, 4.50 j
4(5.00; fryers. 4.5005.00; hens. 3.0004.00: old j
ducks, 4.00©5.00; young ducks. 4.0003.00: j
geese, 1.2501.50 per pair: old pigeons, 1.00:
per dozen; young, 1.2501.75.
Available Grain
NEW YORK, Feb. I.—Special cable and
telegraphic dispatches to Bradstreet's, cov
ering the principal points of accumulation,
indicate the following changes ln avall
LOS ANGELES HERALD. WEDNESDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 2, 1898
ble supplies ot grain last Saturday, as com
pared with the preceding Saturday:
Wheat—United States and Canada east
of tho Rocky mountains, decrease, 1,044,000
bushels; afloat for and ln Europe, Increase,
1,106,000 bushels; werld's net supply, net
increase. 66,000 bushels.
Corn—United Sattcs and Canada east of
the Rocky mountains, lricrease, 606,000
bushels.
Oats—United States and Canada east of
tho Rocky mountains, Increase, 801,000
bushels.
Dried Fruit Prices
NEW YORK, Feb. 1.-Californla dried
fruits steady. 1
Evaporated apples—Common, s<?i7')ic5 < ?i7')ic per
pound; prime wire tray, B'/ 2 c; wood dried,
prime, B%c; choice, B%c; fancy, 809 ft&
Prunes—3oßc.
Apricots—Royal, [email protected] Moorpark, 7
011 c.
Peaches—Unpeeled, 8010 c; peeled, 12020 c.
Kansas City Live Stock
KANSAS CITY, Feb. I.—Cattle—Re
ceipts, official, 8300 natives; 400 southerns.
Market slow, but not quotably lower, ex
cept on Inferior beef grades, which are
5010 c lower. Texas steers, 3.8004.60; Texas
cows, 5.6003.45; native steers, 3.7506.00;
bulk, 4.3504.00; native cows and heifers,
2.2604.25; stockers and feeders, 3.5004.75;
bulls, 2.5004.75,
Petroleum
OIL CITY, Pa., Feb. 1.-Credlt balances,
60c; certlllcates opened, no quotations;'
cash sales, 60000 at 66ftc, 5000 at (16c; closed,
no quotation. Shipments, 108,721 barrels;
runs, 12U.787.
Local Quotations
BUTTER—Extra local 32-ounce squares.
5005214; fancy creamery, Northern, 32-oz.
squares. 46047 ft; dairy, 32-oz., 42%@45;
dairy, 2S-oz., 37%; fancy tub, per lb.,
23© 26.
EGOJB—Choice to fancy ranch, 20(322;
Easterns, —.
CHEESE—Martin's New York Cheddars,
per lb., 14; eastern, full cream, per lb.,
13013%; California half cream, per lb., —:
Coast full cream, per lb., 12; California,
Downey or Anchor, per lb.. 12%; do Young
America, per lb., 13%; do 3-lb. hand,, per lb.,
14%; domestic Swiss, per lb., 16%; imported
Swiss,. t4%035%: Edam, fancy, per doz., 8.50.
POULTRY—Hens. 4.0005.60 per dozen;
your.g roosters. 4.7506.00; broilers, 4.600
6.00; fryers, 4.2504.75; old rooster 3, 4.250
5.0Q; ducks. turkeys, live, 12©14:
turkeys, dressed, 1601"; geese. 1.0001.80
apiece; young stock of all kinds very
scarce.
GREEN FRT.'lTS—Fancy apples, 1.150
I.23per box; choice, 1.0001.23; poorer grades,
50076; bananas, per bunch, 1.5002.25,
crates extra; pineapples, per dozen. 5.00©
6.00: Winter Ncllls pears, box, 1.6001.75.
CITRUS FRUlTS—Oranges: extrti fancy
Redlands navels, 2.00: fancy. 2.O0; choice,
1.50; extra fancy Redlands seedlings, 1.50;
fancy, 1.25; choice, 1.00; lemons: cured,
fancy, 1.23: choice, 1.00; green lemons, 75.
GAME—Per doz.: Quail, 1.2501.60; duoks
widgeon, 2.0002.50; teal. 1.5002.00: sprig,
L'.2.",i/2.75: mallard. [email protected]; canvas backs,
5,00jj7.00; spoonbill. 1.5001.75; snipe, 1.000
1.23; plover. 33050; doves, 7501.00; cotton
tails. [email protected]
GRAlN—Wheat, 1.3001.35: corn; small
yellow. 90096; large yellow, 83090; bar
ley, common, 85090.
HAY—Wheat, per ton, 11.00ffil2.00; barley,
U. 00012.00; oat. —: alfalfa, baled, 11.OOfi 12.00;
loose. —; straw. 5.00.
VEGETABLES—Beets, per 100 lbs., 75;
cabbage, per 100 lbs. 75; chiles, dry, per
string, 65®75; Mexican, per lb.. 10® 11; green,
per lb.. 25: garlic. 4©5; onions, 3.00;
beans, string, per lb.. 14gl8; carrots, per 100
lbs., 75; green peas, per lb., 8; turnips, per
lb., S3; Hubbard squash .per 100 lbs., 95;
parsnips, per 100. OOfil.OO: green onions,
doz.. 40; leeks, per doz., 15; parsley, per
dozen. 25; radishes, per dozen. 20; cauli
flower, per dozen. 30JT40; summer squash,
per box. 1.50: egg plant, per lb., —; spinach,
per dozen bunches. 20: tomatoes, per box
1.0081.50; egg plant, per lb., —; celery, doz.,
45^50: sprouts, per lb., Sl£.
MILLSTCFFS—FIour, local mills, 4.80
per bbl.; Stockton brand.;, 4.85: Oregon. —:
Easte.n, 8.75®7.25; shorts, ton. local. 20.00:
whole barley, per 100 lbs., 1.00; rolled bar
ley, per 100 lbs.. 1.06; whole corn, per 100
lbn., 1.06#1.10; cracked corn, por 100
lbs., 1.10; feed meals, per 100 lbs., 1.20:
bran, per ton, 24.'K>.
RAISINS -Fancy clusters. 20-th boxes.
1.75; 4-crown I,L clusters, 1.40; 3-crown L 1.,.
per box. 1.15; 2-crown, loose. In sacks, per
lb.. 4: 3-croWn, loose. In sacks, per lb.. W
4'i; 4-crown. per lb.. 5; Sultnna. seedless,
per lb.. 7 1 S; in boxes. \' 2 c higher.
HIDES-Dry (as they run). 14>£; do kip,
12; do calf. 16H: bulls. 7; salt steer, sfi;o;
do stags and bulls, S; cows. 4V 2 l»I>Vi; sheep
skin. 105.
POTATOES—Per 100 pounds: Potatoes.
common, [email protected]; Early Rose, seed. I.oo©
1.10; Burbanks. 1.008 1.290; sweet, 1.0051.10.
CURED MEATS —Rex Hams. 9V4; pic
nic hams. 554: No. 2, B'4; select mild cure,
8%; special fancy breakfast, 12; special
breaktast bacon, HHi Rex bacon, 10; Rex
boneless hams, sugar cured, 9; Rex bone
less butts, —; summer sausage, 16;
Rex dried beef, Inside*. 14%; Rex dried
OUtSides, —; smoked tongues. 15; Diamond
C breakfast bacon, backs, per lb.. 9; bacon
bellies, 9; light medium bacon. 9(4; medi
um bacon, 9>.i: medium bacon, 8; dry salt
Clear bellies, MOM; avg., dry salt
clears, 35840; avg., 7: salt clear back., 6%;
Res pure leaf lard, tierces, 6%; Ivory,
tierces, &%; cottolene, tierces, OH; Rexo
lene, tierces, 5%; special kettle rendered
lard, 7; Orange brand, 50s, 6%; 10s, TU;
ss, 7V4; 3s, 1%.
BEANS AND DRIED PEAS-Plnk, 3.00;
Lima, 1.9052.00; Lady Washington.
1.05(61.73; small white, [email protected]; green field
peas, 2.50®2.76; black-eyed beans, 2.0082.26;
garvancos, 3.50513.76; lentils, imported, 7.00
Srs.oo; lentils, California, 3.50574.00.
NUTS—Walnuts, Los Angeles, [email protected]: me
dium soft, 7<!?8: soft-shell, Los Nletos.
fancy, 7. Almonds: soft-shell, 9;
paper shell. 10; hard-shell. 4(g5; pecans,
104(12; Alberts. 1154*12; Brazils, [email protected]: pln
ons, 11018; peanuts. Eastern, raw, 5}[email protected];
roasted, S{rßV4; California, raw. 4®6;
roasted. Will-
DRIED FRUITS-Apples. sun dried,
sacks, per lb., 6; boxes, —; evaporated,
fancy, 809; apricots, fancy, 8: choice. [email protected]
7Vi: peaches, fancy, unpeeled, 7; pears,
fancy evaporated. [email protected]; plums, pitted,
choice. 95)10; prunes, choice, boxed, [email protected];
sack, 6: dates. 66654; silver prunes, choice
sack, [email protected]: boxes, 9©10; Ags. California
whjte, per Ib, 51(6; California black, per lb,
65J5V4; California fancy, per lb, [email protected]; im
ported Smyrna, 1254916.
LIVESTOCK-Per lb: Beeves, 2%®3%;
hogß. [email protected]»4; lambs, per head, [email protected];
sheep, per cwt„ [email protected]; calves, per lb,
HONEY AND BEESWAX-Honeycomb,
7610 per lb.; strained, [email protected]; beeswax, 20®
25 per lb.
DRESSED MEATS—AII per pound: beef,
dm%: loins of beef, N0.,1,12V4; loins of beef,
No. 2. 11: ribs of beef, No. 1,11; ribs of beef,
No. 2, 10; veal, [email protected]; mutton, 7; lambs, 8;
pork, 6%.
TALLOW—Per lb., 2«f3H.
Heal Estate Transfers
TUESDAY. February 1.
M .F. and H. Mooney to J. and C. Rake
straw—South half lot 165, Victor Heights;
$700.
W. H. and M. J. Smith to J. Bledebach
—Part lots 14, 15 and 16, block 1, Chester
tract; $260.
C. A. Fuller to M. L. Leach—Lot 7, block
G, Nadeau Orange tract; $SOO.
F. M. Kelsey. public administrator, to
M. E. Payne—Part rot 7, Clark's subdivis
ion, Pasadena; $100.
B. and A. O. Gardner to E. P. Mitchell—
Lot 7, block 6, Sycamore Grove tract; $lf>o.
Geo. H. Bonebrake to J. H. Culler—Lots
37 and 38. block 38. Azusa; *13».
S. Jj. and H. M. Dodge to Dr. J. M. Colby
—Part block 200, Primrose tract; $600.
IS. V. James to Mrs. C. Fitzgerald—ln
Williamson tract, part lot 6, block 36, H. 8.;
part of City Center tract; $400.
O. and I-:. Plccolol to M. M. Harris-
Part block 31, O. S.; $500.
S. J. and J. P. Judy to F. J. Walker-
Part Sec. 33 1 S. 14; $10,000.
N. C. and A. M. Carter to E. B. Wheat
ly—Part lot 21, Sierra Madre tract; 2300.
N. J. and J. Sanders to E. A. Steele—
Part Sec. 18 IS. 10; $3500.
C. J. and S. M. Fox to J. E. Cox—Lot 17,
block 4, Finney tract; $2000.
C. F. and N. A. Baxter to M. A. Flint-
Lot 63, block 1, Vermont Avenue tract; 609.
It. S. A. and E. D. Tarbell to W. J. Pat
terson—Lots 6 and G, (1. & D. subdivision
of Brlswalter tract; $150.
SUMMARY
Deeds 45
Nominal SO
Total considerations $22,245
WEATHER REPORT
Monthly Meteorological Summary for
January, 1898
: o
: v
1
2
3...:
6
«
7.:
s
9.A
10
Ise
14
\i = :
17
18
1?
20
21
a
2a
24
H
I::::::::::
18
»
» {.
il
84
72
to
62
64
60
68
01
63
49
63
52
68
00
03
1)4
61
01
03
60
61
69
68
64
49
59
01
59
1)2
70
66
57
61
60
30
40
44
61
U
44
86
40
;8
36
38
40

40
39
42
46
41
39
42
3'J
:;t>
31
32
40
39
44
47
70
62
68
56
55
52
64
154
48
42
44
45
47
49
61
CO
62
52
53
51
49
:>j
46
42
45
48
52
50
57
5C
52
u
o
12
T
Clear
Clear
Cloudy
Cloudy
P.eloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
Cloudy
P.eloudy
Cloudy
P.eloudy
Cloudy
Clear
Ck'Hr
(^lear
clear
1'.cloudy
P.eloudy
SUMMARY.
Mean atmospheric pressure, 30.09.
Highest pressure, 30.32; date, 29 th,
Lowest pressure. 29.81; date, leth.
Mean temperature, 52,
Hjghest temperature, HI, date Ist Lowest
temperature, 31; date, 20th,
Greatest daily raugc of temperature, 32; date,
27 tli.
Least daily range ot temperature, 7; date,
7th.
MEAN TEMPEKATURE FOB HUH MONTH IN
187(1 53 1889 52
IMO 04|1890 AO
1881 58 1891 '. 56
1882 ! 60 1892 57
188:1 .13 J893 57
1884 54 1894 51
1885 6611890 52
1880 66j1596 58
1887 5511897 66
1888 5611898 52
Mean temperature for this month for 20
years, 53.
Average Dellclenry of daily mean tempera
ture during month. .2.
Accumulated deficiency of daily mean tem
perature since January 1, 31.
Average daily deficiency since January 1, .2.
Prevailing direction of wind. Northeast.
Total movement of wind, :U">2U miles.
Maximum velocity of wind, direction and
date, 24, East, 12th.
Mean dew point, 37. Mean humidity 05.
Total precipitation, 1.20.
Number of days with .Ul inch or more of
precipitation, 0.
TOTAL IT.ECII'ITATION (IN INCHES) FOR THIS
MONTH IN
1879 3.5111889 25
1880 1.83 1890 7.88
IXBI 1.441891 25
1882 1.0011892 88
1883 1.02|1893 6.29
18*1 3.15,1894 94
1885 1J8'1895 5.84
1880 7.72:1890 .1.23
1887 2" 1897 3.70
1888 0.0311898 1.26
Average precipitation for this month for 20
years, 2.93 inches.
" total deficiency in precipitation during; the
month, I.t>7 Inches.
Total precipitation from Septemberl, 1897, to
date 3 lo inches.
Average rrec pltation from September 1, to
date, 7*l inches
||foal deficiency f »m September 1, 1897, to
date. .1 ?2 filches
Average precipitation for 6 wet seasons, 20.92
inches.
Number of clear days, 12; partly cloudy
days, 10; cloudy days, ;i.
Dates of frost 11. 18, 14, 15, Pi, 18, 19, 21, 22. 20,
27 and 29.
Note—Pressure reduced to sea level. ■'T M
indicates trace of precipitation
GEORGE E, FRANKLIN,
Observer Weather bureau.
WEATHER AND CROPS
California Crops Suffering for Lack of
Rain
SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. I—The fol
lowing is a summary of the Weather
Bureau's crop and climate bulletin for
the week ending February Ist:
For the third consecutive week the.
rainfall has been deficient. In the ex
treme north, the deficiency amounts to I
an inch and a half for the week, and In
the central portions about one inch.
Rain fell on the 24th and 25th, but not'
in large amounts. Light rains occurred
south of the Tehachapi, in the middle of
the week. The temperature averages
about five' degrees below the normal.
Over the greater portion of the State
the minimum temperatures for at least
five mornings have been close to the freez
ing point. Heavy and killing frosts have
been frequently reported. Many reports
speak of severe cold, but state that no
damage to citrus fruit occurred; others
frankly admit that some damage has
been done.
Grain has suffered from the lack of
rain. In some sections farming opera
tions are at a standstill.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA
The past week was cold, windy and
dry, except a few places on the coast
where there were quite favorable show
ers which enabled plowing and seeding
to continue besides refreshing vegeta
tion. Elsewhere the rainfall was scant
and the lack of moisture is becoming
serious. Grain is feeling the effects of
the continued dry, cold weather and
the scarcity of pasture is alarming cat
tlemen; citrus and deciduous fruit or
chards are being generally Irrigated.
The reports received from correspond
ents for this bulletin, while few, show
that the cold weather of the past week
was the severest of the season and that
in localities tender vegetation, lemons,
loquats and early vegetables were badly
hurt by frost. Warm weather and gen
erous rains are needed in all sections.
VENTURA COUNTY
West Satlcoy—The first three days of
the week were very cold with traces or
rain, followed by a cold drying north
east wind. A little early sown grain is
coming up, but with the cold weather
does little good. Pasture is getting very
light.
LOS ANGELES COUNTY
Los Angeles City—The week was cold
and quite windy at times, with several
sprinkling rains and frequent frosts
which were heavy in loV grounds. The
mean temperature for the week was
five degrees below the normal.
La Canada—The' weather has been
cold and partly cloudy; heavy frosts on
low lands injured tender growth; north
erly winds dried the soil, and pasture
and grain are in great need of rain.
Long Beach—Sixty one hundredths of
tuumless, and a strong toalc In building op the week
and debilitated. It cures acute or muscular rheuma
tism lo from ons to flva days. Bbarp, snooting pains
In any part of the Body stopped In a few doses. A
prompt, complete arul permanent cure for lameness,
soreness, stiff bark and alt pains la hips and loins.
Chronic rheumatism, aclatfca, lumbago or pain ln
the baric aro apeedlly oursd. itceldom falls to give
relief from one to two doses, and almost Invariably
cures before one bottls has been ussd. TheMunyon
Remedy Company prepare a separate cure for each
disease. A! all drn«Kl*v W cents a via! If you need
medical advice write Prof. Mnnyon, 1605 Arch
utreet. Philadelphia. It Is abeofotely free.
an inch o£ rain fell, which put the soil
in good condition and farmers are tak
ing advantage of it. Lemons on low
grounds were badly hurt by frost.
Artesia —The past week was cool and
dry with a northwest wind on Monday;
on Tuesday and Wednesday the wind
blew from the east with great velocity,
taking the moisture from the soil very
rapidly. Thursday threatened rain.
Plowing and seeding still going on.
RIVERSIDE COUNTY
Elslnore—Rough, changeable weather
has marked the week; there was a high
north wind Monday and Tuesday.
ORANGE COUNTY
Orange—The frost on the 21th did more
damage than any previous one this
winter; early vegetables are cut down
everywhere, and the fruit of loquats
are also badly nipped. Mild north winds
prevailed; rain ls badly needed.
Tustln—The weather was fair with
some drying winds; a light sprinkle of
rain fell on the 27th. There were frosts
on several mornings; the morning of
the 24th being the coldest of the season.
Both citrus and deciduous orchards are
being irrigated; grain is looking well
and will not suffer for two weeks yet,
but rain will be needed by that time.
SAN DIEGO COUNTY
San Diego City—The temperature has
continued much below the normal, rang
ing from twelve degrees below the
average on the 21th to two degrees be
low on the 28th, the average dally de
ficiency being six degrees. The lowest
temperature since December 30, 1895, oc
curred on the 27th, when a minimum of
thirty-six degrees was recorded. As
far as can be learned no damage re
sulted from the unusual cold weather.
There was 12-100 of an inch of rain, mak
ing for the season, 3.11 inches.
Santee-El Cajon—The temperature
during the week just closed was vari
j able but running somewhat low, conse
quently grain has grown very slowly.
| Taking it all in all, this Is the coldest
I January in a dozen years in this locality,
j The weather continued dry; a light rain
j fell Thursday, scarcely more than a
i trace. No damage occurred to oranges.
STARTLED HER
But All Coons Looked Alike to
Ben
The story is told for an actual fact,
and the relator is noted for her veracity,
It took place at a large boarding house
which is the temporary home of a great
I many very nice people. On this partic
i ular occasion they were gathered in the
dining room for dinner, and the colored
waiters were as usual at such a time.
I doing their best to edify the guests with
I the most obsequious service. Ben in
i particular was most attentive. Ben was
not a regular, but one of the regular
I waiters being away for a time he was
substituting. And he did his best.
As the dinner progressed it was en
livened from the outside by the strong
j and not unmusical notes of a piano or-
I gan.
, "What a pretty tune," exclaimed Mrs.
i Blank, a sweet-faced, white-haired el
derly woman, as a familiar melody pen
j etrated the room. "1 wonder whut It
! is?" Then she speedily forgot the music
and her remark. But Ben did not.
Waiting for a leisure moment, he
Slipped outside to ask the piano organ
music maker for the name of that par
ticular tune. Presently Mrs. Blank
heard Ben's voice at her elbow speaking
in low but very distinct tones. He was
speaking to her:
"All coons look alike to me." said Ben.
"What?" said Mrs. Blank, a little
startled by the suddenness of the re
mark.
I "All coons look alike to me, ma'am,"
repeated Ben respectfully,
i A bewildered look crept over Mrs.
Blank's face. Did her ears deceive her,
, was she crazy, or had Ben lost his mind?
"I don't—l don't understand," she
gasped.
"It was the tune, ma'am, you wished
to know what it was," said Ben with a
tone nf reproach in his voice. Then there
was a sudden and spontaneous burst of
laughter from the listening roomful, and
i Ben never could understand why his lit
tle act of thoughtfulness should have
caused so much amusement.—New York
; Times.
6000 MILES IN A QUEER WAGON
The Lasleys and Their "Palace on
Wheels"
M. E. A. Lasley, the man from Seattle,
Wash., who has traveled across the con
tinent in a "palace on wheels" of his own
manufacture, invaded the downtown
district yesterday and exhibited his
queer looking outfit in the streets near
the city hall. Lasley has been In New
York about live weeks now, and Intends
to stay as long as business continues
good. He said yesterday that he in
tended to take his "palace" to the Paris
exposition in 1900. He is very proud of
the fact that the affair was built by
himself and his wife unaided. No one
could doubt this for a moment after see
ing the product of their labors. Weather
beaten, rickety and unpainted, it sug
gests a squatter's shanty on wheels, yet
it has been laboriously dragged across
mountains and deserts, rough roads and
deep rivers for more than 6000 miles.
Not the least wonderful thing about
this exhibit is the little book which de
scribes the wanderings of the Lasleys.
It is written with a quaint disregard for
the ordinary rules of English composi
tion and Is embellished at intervals with
bits of verse, of which the following is
a specimen:
0o not turn your back upon him.
Do not coldly walk away,
Just because you think you're made of
Some superior kind of clay.
When you come to think about it.
As sometimes we mortals must,
There is nothing very striking
In the finest kind of dust,
Lasley says that he, together with his
wife and four children (there were but
two when he left Washington in 1594),
is in the best of health and that business
is good.—New York Sun.
Queer Press Law in France
Owing to the existence of a peculiar
law in France, which exacts that "any
OLDEST AND LARGEST BANK IN SOUTHBKN CALIFORNIA.
pARMERS AND MERCHANTS' BANK OF LOS ANQELES, CAL.
Capital paid up . . . ... 8500,000.00
Surplus and reserve 8875,000.00
| W. HELLMAN. President; H. W. HELLMAN. Vlce-Pres.; H. J. FLEISHMAN.
Cashier; G. HEIMANN, Assistant Cashier. Directors —W. H. PERRY, O. W.
CHILDS. J. F. FRANCIS. C. E. THOM. t W. HELLMAN, JR.. H. W. HELLMAN.
A. GLASSELL, T. L. DUQUE. L W. HELLMAN.
Special Collection Department. Correspondence Invited. Our Safety Depostt Do
partmnt offers to the public safes for rent ln Its new Fire and Burglar-Proof Vault,
which ls the strongest, best guarded and b est-llghted ln thl» elty.
THE NATIONAL BANK OF CALIFORNIA
At Los Angeles
Capital and Profits. $270,000.00.
OFFICERS: DIRECTORS
__.„.. J. M. C. MARBLE. O. H. CHURCHILH,
'• M. C. MARBLE President o. T. JOHNSON. H. M. LUTZ,
O. H. CHURCHILL Vice-President NELSON STORY, GEORGE IRVINE.
H. M. LUTZ Vice-President N. W. STOWELL. E. F. C. KLOKKK
A. HADLEY Cashier,W. S. DE VAN. JOHN E. MARBLE),
JOSEPH D. RADFORD.Assistant Cashier FRED O.JOHNSON, T E NEWLIN.
R. L ROGERS Asaitant Cashier, A HADLEY.
|_0S ANGELES NATIONAL BANK
United States Depository
CAPITAL 1500,000.00 SURPLUS $50,000.0*
Total $350,000.00
GEO. H. BONEBRAKE President WARREN GILLELEN...Vice-President
F. C. HOWES Cashier E. W. COE Assistant Cashier
DIRECTORS;
Geo. H. Bonebrake, Warren Glllelen, P. M. Green, Chas. A. Marrlner, E. P. John
son Wm. M. Van Dyke. W. C. Brown, L.C. McKeeby, F. C. Howes.
This bank has no deposits of either the county or city treasurer, and therefore
no preferred creditors.
SECURITY SAVINGS BANK,
Corner Main and Second Streets
OFFICERS: DIRECTORS:
H. W. Hellman, J. F. Sartorl.W. L. Graves.
J. F. SARTORI President H. J. Fleishman. C. A. Shaw, F. O. John-
MAURICE S. HELLMAN..Vice President son, J. H. Shnnkland, J. A. Graves, M L.
W. D. LONGYEAR M. S. Hellman, W. D. Longyear.
Interest paid on term and ordinary deposits
Money loaned on flrst-olass real estate
* ■
piRST NATIONAL BANK OF LOS ANGELES
CAPITAL STOCK $400,000 Surplus and undivided profits 0ver..5250,000
J. M. ELLIOTT President W. G. KERCKHOFF Vlce-Prealdtat
FRANK A GIBSON Cashier W. T. S. HAMMOND....Assistant Cashier
DIRECTORS:
J. M. Elliott, J. D. Blcknell, F. Q. Story, H. Jevne, J. D. Hooker. W. C. Patterson.
Wm. G. Kerckhoff.
No public fends or other preferred deposits received at this bank.
gTATE LOAN AND TRUST COMPANY OF LOS ANGELES
Capital 8600,000
OFFICERS:
W. J. WOOLLA.COTT President WARREN GILLELEN, Second Vlce-Pres.
J. F. TOWELL First Vice-President J. W. A. OFF Cashier
3d. B. LEWIS Assistant Cashier
A general banking business transacted. Interest paid on time deposits. Safe de
posit boxes for rent.
fJ|AIN STREET SAVINGS BANK
Capital paid up 8100,000
Junction of Main and Spring and Tern pie sts., (Temple block), Los Angeles,
OFFICERS AND DIRECTORS—T. L. Duque. President: LN. Van Nuye, Vice-
President; B. V. Duque, Cashier; H. W. Hellman, Kaspare Kohn, H. W. O Melvent
J. B. Lankershim, O. T. Johnson, Abe Haas, W. G. Kerckhoff.
Money loaned on real estate. Interea t paid on term and ordinary deposits.
I OS ANGELES BAVINGS BANK ,
230 North Main Street
J. E. Plater, President: H. W. Hellman, Vice-President; W. M. Caswell, Cashier.
Directors. I. W. Hellman, J. E. Plater, H. W. Hellman, L W. Bellman, Jr.. Wl
M. Caswell.
Interest psdd on deposits. Money to loan on flrat class real estate.
QERMAN -AMERICAN SAVINGS BANK
Paid up Capital and Profits, 8145,400.
COR. MAIN AND FIRBT STS. Victor Ponet, President; L. W. BHnn and C. N.
Flint, Vice Presidents; M. N. Avery, Caahler; P. F. Schumacher, Assistant Caahler.
Interest paid on deposits. Money lonaed on real estate.
SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA SAVINGS BANK
152 North Spring St. Interest Paid on Deposits
DIRECTORS—J. H. Braly, J. M. Elliott, H. Jevne, Frank A. Gibson. Simon Maier.
W. D. Woolwlne. W. C. Patterson. Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent.
M. W. STIMSON, Pres. WM. FERGUS ON. Vice-Pres. W. E. McVAY, Cashier.
UNION BANK OF SAVINGS 223 S. SPRING ST., Los Angeles, Cal
DIRECTORS: M. W. Stimson. S. H. Mo tt, Wm. Ferguson, A. E. Pomeroy, R. H. F.
Varlel. C. S. Crlsty, F. C. Howes. Five per cent interest paid on term deposits.
FIDELITY SAVINGS AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
152 N. Spring Street. (Incorporated 1891)
H. G. Bundrem, Secretary. Officers and Direotors—W. A. Spalding, Pres.; John W. A. 09, Viae.
Pres.; A. C. Bilicke, J H. Braly, H. Jevne, H. F Vollmer, A. It. Braly: Southern California
Savlngflßank, Treas. Money to loan on easy terms of repayment.
gOUTHERN CALIFORNIA GRAIN AND STOCK COMPANY
NEW YORK AND CHICAGO MARKETS.
Plreet Wires. "7 s "71 «2 £„,;„„ C* Reference:
Quickest Service *> l *-a ©• spring Ok Naflonal Bank ofCallfornta,
Telephone Main 941 Los Angeles National Baalc.
MARGIN ACCOUNTS SOLICITED. COMMISSIONS FAITHFtfLtY EXECUTED.
Dally Report Mailod upon application F. P. BtyttOg * CQ^.
niflCC & I nflff Bookbinders and . . .
UldfeS <X LUIIg Blank Book Manufacturers
213-215 NEW HIOII ST. Los Angeles rhone U in
When Others Fail Consult o r> Lleblg, 8 CO.'» WOt"ld Dispensary
"V 123 SOUTH MAIN STREET. The oldest Dispensary on the
/ —*»!>JSfT*\ Coast—established 2.5 years. In all private diseases ol men
If % \\ NOT A DOUAS NEED BE PAID UNTIL CURED
I K/f m J\\ CATARRH a specialty. We cure the worst cases ln two or three
\lt 4 ■ J E«*StST'S ) months Special surgeon from San Francisco Dispensary in eon-
B 4.A '\rfl stant attendance. Examination with microscope, including an.
SfflLVv & '*H ( < alysis, FREE TO EVERYBODY. TUe poor treated free from 10 to
X-f-fci*. \- 12 Fridays. Our long experience enables us to treat tue worst
/ > AyVS eases of secret or prfy.te disease, with ABSOLUTE CERTAINTY
/ ft il OF SUCCESS. No matter what your trouble is. come and talk
it /THIVi lk' with us; you will not regret it. Cure guaranteed for Wastlni
Jj_ j)* ""<*"«'°P« d 0r *"» ' ten' MAIN STREW.
person named or referred to In any peri
odical publication shall have the right
to reply in the next number. In the same
place and in the same type, providing
the reply does not extend to more than
twice the length of the offending arti
cle," one of the forthcoming numbers of
the Revue dcs Deux Mondes, the most
important and influential monthly re
view in France, will contain an article of
unusual length and couched In extrava
gant language, which will appear in its
pages, despite the opposition of the ed
itor. It will bear the signature of a
dramatic author, who, infuriated by the
nature of the criticism passed by the
Revue on one of his plays, has invoked
his rights under article 13 of the press
laws—rights which were in vain con
tested by the editor.—New York Tribune.
A Fifty Dollar Foot Warmer
One of the softest and warmest of
footwarmers Is also—and It seems more
appropriately—Russian. It was a large
affair, looking like an enormous tea
cosy. The front is decorated with—of
all strange things for an article of fur
and warmth—a butterfly. But it is a
beautiful butterfly, made of as bright
colors as a fur butterfly can be, and
representing very well some species, all
inlaid, different kinds and colors of fur,
a beautiful mosaic work, looking very
I soft and warm, on a white woolly
ground. The back is of white Persian
lamb, and the interior is lined with long
haired, light colored fur. Four feel on
a fender has become traditional, but
four feet in a foot wormer is twice as
sentimental, and this is plenty big
enough. So is the price—it costs $50.
But it is a beauty.—New York Times.
It Is a Shame
White hoodlums disturbing the Chi
namen In their New Year's celebration
arc no credit to Los Angeles. They are
the representatives of a Christian na
tion, the Mongols of a heathen one; but
In practice the situation is reversed. If
foreigners disturbed Americans ln a for
eign city as Americans are allowed to
disturb foreigners here the result would
doubtless be some diplomatic correspon
dence and a probable apology and cor
rection of the evil. —Pasadena Star.
If a man was careful in scraping ac
quaintances, he might avoid many of
the scrapes acquaintances get him into.
—Chicago News.
for Alaska
THE STEAMER
ALICE BLANCHARD
Of the North Pacific Steamship Co. will start
from San Pedro February 10th, 1898, for
Alaska via San Francisco and Seattle
for Ft. Wrangel, Dyea, Skaguay, Juneau,
and Copper River.
Fare $100.00 to Alaskan
Points. Each passenger allowed
1500 Pounds freight
This is the only expedition leaving
Southern California. Procure passage
at once. For full information call on
or address
H. R. DUPFIN, Manager
212 S. Spring St., Los Angeles Cal.
iL h w Crystal Palace |
t ... IS NOW OPEN ... I
J Meyberg BrM. 3*3-3*5 S. Spring St. |
New York Specialists
We are pre-Eminent in Diseases of
Uaii A m |.| Cures Guaranteed
nien uniy Nora^„
S. Main St., Los Am ■
C. f. HEINZEMAN
Druggist and Clv Ist
222 N. Main Street, Los Angele.
Prescriptions carefully compounded a. / or
night
Garland Stoves and Ranges
"The World's Best"
Michigan Stoves and Ranges
Always Dependable
*.«t lo Quality ta "GartaJs" _
9

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