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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, February 19, 1898, Image 3

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ACTION NOT YET TAKEN
TO SAVE WHAT IS LEFT OB THE
BATTLESHIP
JOINT RESOLUTION ARGUED
Appropriation of Funds for Salvage
Operations Leads to Furious De
bate in the Senate
■* - -
Associated Press Special Wire
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18.—A debate, de
cided In its sensations, was unexpectedly
precipitated In the senate today over the
considerations of the resolution of Allen of
Nebraska directing the committee on na
val affairs to Investigate tbe disaster to
the Maine. An arrangement had been made
tor its adoption with a minority amend
ment without debate.
Mason of Illinois, however, proposed a
substitute providing for an investigation
to be conducted by a joint committee of
tbe two branches of congress.
Upon this tbe Illinois senator, disregard
ing an appeal not to force a discussion at
this time of so melancholy an affair, de
livered a speech tn which he said that the
people demanded the truth concerning the
explosion, and declaring that they would
not be satisfied with the Investigation to
be conducted by the officers of the navy,
who would virtually try their own case
and would cover up any blame that, the
Officials might show attached to ttiem. He
fiercely denounced the policy of the gov
ernment In dealing with the Cuban ques
tion. Info which he went at length, and
declared that the United States bad
adopted the policy of Spain-In putting ev
erything off until tomorrow.
Sharp replies to Mason's charges were
made by Wolcott of Colorado and Lodge
Of Massachusetts.
The speeches of both senators
with cutting criticisms of the remarks
made by the senator from Illinois, and it
was clear that both senators regarded the
situation as grave ln the extreme. Sena
tor Wolcott freely admitted that war
might come and he thought the day might
■ot be far distant. He, like Senator
Lodge, deprecated any utterances on the
floor of the senate calculated to further ag
gravate the serious state of affairs.
Tha resolution which precipitated tho dis
cussion finally went to the calendar.
Boon after the senate met Hale of Maine
Introduced the following joint resolutton:
"Resolved, that the secretary of the navy
be and he is hereby authorized to engage
the services of a wrecking company, or
companies, having proper facilities for the
prompt and efficient performance of sub
marine work, for the purpose of raising the
remains of the offfcers and men lost on the
United States steamer Maine, and of sav
ing the vessel, or such parts thereof and so
much of her itores, guns, material, equip
ment, fittings and appurtenances as may
be practicable; and for this purpose the
sum of J200.000, or so much thereof as may
be necessary. Is hereby appropriated and
made Immediately available."
The resolution was prepared at the navy
department and Introduced at the request
of Secretary Long, who, in forwarding it
to Mr. Halo also sent a letter explaining
Its purpose. He Bays ln this letter that
"It Is deemed proper and important that
steps should be taken Immediately to raise
the remains of the officers and men lost
on the occasion of the most deplorable ac
cident, and to raise the vessel or to save
such parts of her armament and equipment
as may be practicable."
To this the secretary adds: "The meager
information received respecting the nature
and extent of the tnjury sustained by the
hull of the Maine renders It difficult to de
termine at this time whether there is rea
son lo hope that the vessel herself may be
raised, but It seems probable, as she lies
within Ihe protection of a harbor and Is
not wholly submerged, that much valuable
property may be recovered if the necessary
action Is taken without delay. The vessel,
with her storos, guns, material, equipment,
fittings and appurtenances cost approxi
mately $5,000,000. As an illustration of the
value of single Items which may have es
caped serious Injury, it may be said that
the 10-inch guns, of which the Maine car
ried four, are worth, with their mounts,
113,500 each. Aside from the melancholy
duty resting upon the government to re
cover and to bring to this country for
burial, if this may be done, the bodies of
(he officers and men who lost their lives
In this disaster, it Is believed that much
valuable property may yet be saved from
the vessel. In any event, It Is of the ut
most Importance that whatever is done
In this matter should be enetred upon with
out delay.
"The sinking of the Maine will be made
the subject of Immediate and exhaustive
Inquiry and congress will be fully advised
Of the result of such Investigation."
Mr. Long states*, in fixing the sum asked
for. thai the department is at this time
unable to estimate, the necessnsy expense
with any degree of accuracy, but he says
he has conferred wilh the bureau of con
structton and repair, and If tho appropria
tion required bo made, only so much of it
as may be found necessary will be ex
pended In the work.
The secretary incloses a table showing
the cost of a number of items of the ord
nance outfit of the vessel, aggregating
$502,152.
Allen thought it very desirable that a
provision be inserted in the resolutfon for
the transportation and burial ot those who
lost their lives in the disaster.
Hale called attention to the fact that
reference was made to the transportation
of the bodies ln the letter of the secretary
of the navy, ln many cases, he said. It
would be Impossible to bring to this coun
try the remains of the men killed, as the
bodies were so badly mutilated nnd the
facilities for embalming so Inferior in
Havana that already the remains of many
of the dead were decomposing, and it
would be necessary probably to bury them
at once.
MASON AMENDS
Senator Mason hoped that provision
would he made for tho transportation of
the bodies to the United States and for
their burial In this country. To that end
he proposed nn amendment to the resolu
tion, as follows:
After the word "thereof" and before the
word "and," Insert the following: "And
for the transportation and burial «of the
remains of the officers and men, so far as
possible."
The amendment was agreed to and the
resolution as amended was passed.
The resolution offered yosterdav by Allen
of Nebraska, directing the commit ten on
naval affairs to make an Investigation of
the disaster to the Maine, was then laid
before the senate. It precipitated the most
furious debate.
Chandler of New Hampshire thought
tnat it the word "immediate" be stricken
out and the matter left wlthln'the discre
tion of tho enmmtttee, there would be no
objection to the resolution
Mason of Illinois proposed an amendment
striking out all after the word "Resolved "
and inserting the' following:
"By the senate, tho house concurring,
that a joint committee of flvo, conslsrrhc
Of throe members of the house of renre
■entatlves and two member* of the sen
ate, be appointed to investigate the dis
aster to the battleship Maine."
HALE MAKES OBJECTION
Senator Halo expressed tho hope that
Mason would not press his substitute The
disaster, he said, was even now being thor
oughly Investigated by the executive de
partment of tho government, and that as
soon as tangible results were reached the
facts would be communicated to congress
Hale urged that Mason withdraw his sub
stitute, as It would tend only to embarras
the executive department.
"I had hoped," said Hale, "that this en
tire matter might be disposed of today
without debate. It seems to me that in tho
circumstances and In the'light of the ut
most facllltles.lt la idle to Indulge in de
bate."
Hale said he was willing to withdraw his
objection to the resolution of Allen, but
the substitute suggested by Mason was
•yen more objectionable in its formula,
MASON GBT.S EXCITED
Mason followed Hale in a speech replete
mith sensational St^oSaT»fs3S*l
beginning, that ho had no disposition to
Inflame a situation already so exciting-, but
lie felt that his substitute was fully justi
fied by the feelings and doalros of the
pooplo.
"I understand,", said he, "that the navy
department U making an investigation of
the disaster, but I also understand that
congress has not authority to make an In
vestigation. It Is a congressional investi
gation that people are demanding. They
are fast coming: to the conclusion that mas
ters concerning this Cuban affair. Includ
ing the Do Lome letter incident and the
loss of the Maine, of which they ought lo
know, are being concealed from them. The
people want to know the facts, and they
will know them."
Mason said he did not desire to reflect
upon the motives or honor of anybody, but
he suggested that the offlctals of the navy
department, in making tho Investigation,
would be trying their own case, and would
naturally endeavor to cover up any blame
that might attach to them.
"The trouble with Os," declared Mason,
with great vehemence, "Is that we have
adopted the Spanish policy of putting
everything off until tomorrow. Let tho fn
, vestigatlan of this disaster to our navy and
to our country be thoroughly Investtgatcd
by congress, and then we shall know that
It will be done right."
Spanish diplomats, he snld, hnd sat at our
tables and partaken of our hospitality,
while we were still waiting, and had, until
the series of calamities had been crowned
by the Maine catastrophe, with Its loss of
357 American lives. In view of these facts,
he oould never consent to striking out the
word "immediate."
"We want an investigation," he said,
"and we want It now, now—the eternal and
everlasting now!"
HALE INTERRUPTS
Hale interrupted Mason to make a state
ment. He said that, so far from having any
desire for delay, he was anxious to have
It go forward from this very time, as the
Investigation proposed by the navy de
partment would, if not Interfered with.
There was no proposition to postpone In
quiry.
"Is any one so much Interested as the
navy department and the officers of that
department tn ascertaining the real facts
and locwfTng tho responsibility of the dis
aster?" asked Halo. "Who could conduct
the' Investigation so well as they, or who do
as much to get at the bottom of the facts?"
Ho hoped the senate would see the pro
priety of not making this an occasion for
making Inflammatory speech, and that all
would take the view that ln the presence
of tho great calamity which had befallen
us—a calamity which had appalled the
whole world—today was not the proper
time for an appeal to passion and prejudice.
Replying, Mason said there was no calam
ity so great as a failure on the part of thoße
In power to appreciate the situation when
It was so serious as It now Is, nnd no sor
row so profound ns that of Indifference to
this situation. He was surprised that Hale
would admit that the occasion was a sol
emn one, surprised thnt the Maine senator
would admit that any thing, any occur
rence in Cuba, was of a solemn character.
THE OCCASION MADE
As for himself, ho had no desire to make
this an occasion for anything; the occa
sion was already made. Whnt he was con
tending for was that all the facts shoidd
be brought to the surface, and he could
not see how a congressional investigation
would in any way interfere with tho navy
department's inquiry.
The people were sick and tired of secret
Investigations and reports by cipher, and
of having information suppressed and
doled out to them as some executive officer
might think suitable. He wanted a con
gressional investigation, and wanted it
open to the world. An Investigation by con
gress would only strengthen the finding of
the navy department, in case the explo
sion proved to be by accident. He had no
desire to stir up trouble, but would only
Insist, as he has done before, upon the
stopping of human slavery and inhuman
warfare In this adjacent island. As for
himself, he would not, if eligible, he will
ing to serve on the proposed committee,
as ho would not want to sit at the table
with a Spaniard who might have a stilloto
under his clothes.
SPANISH TREACHERY,
The record of the Spanish nation, con
tinued Mason, who nppenred to be laboring
under considerable excitement. Is one of
continuous treachery, and we have ex
perienced that treachery In our own his
tory for the past 100 years. It had been
made evident that the Spaniard could not
be trusted In any capacity, and for this
reason we should now have American div
ers Investigating the hull of the Maine, and
not bo depending upon those of an un
friendly power.
"Who knows but that some more dyna
mite will be put in and evidence of the cat
astrophe averted?" He repeated that he
wanted Immediate action, but did not want
to be on the committee. He did not want
to be anywhere that a Spaniard could
reach him. There were, however, senators
who would be safe among the SpanlHh, and
he was willing that they should take the
chances Involved ln the service of the pro
posed committee. He closed with an ap
peal for prompt Inquiry, nnd said that he
thought the senate, which had voted $200,000
to save the property of the United States,
could and should vote $200,000,000, if neces
sary, to save its honor nnd its dignity.
DISPUTATION BEGINS
Senator Wolcott followed He said: 'The
senator from Illinois, however inoppor
tune it may be at this time, In the opinion
of some of us, might well have been per
mitted lo pass without comment had ft
not been for the remarkable utterance
which he hns given to the fact
that tbe people of these United States have
lost confidence in one of the great de
partments of the government."
Mason had resumed his standing posi
tion, and he Interrupted to say that the
senator from Colorado was entirely mis-'
taken.
"I made, no such statement," ho said.
Wolcott—l decline to be Interrupted. 1
ask lo have the remarks read from the re
porter's notes.
Mason—l said that some people were los
ing confidence* and
Wolcj^t—l decline to be Interrupted. 1
ask tofTave the reporter's notes read.
This was done
Wolcott then continued. The senate
would, he said, bear him out that he did
not misquote tho senator from Illinois to
the extent of a single word or a single syl
lable.
Resuming, he said: "I desire to resent
as utterly unfounded the suggestion that
there Is n patriotic citizen in the broad
confines of this land who has not the fullest
confidence in every department of this gov
ernment and In the department of the
navy particularly. It has been true in
every administration since the time of
Washington.
NOT DISTRUSTFUL
"The people of the United Stales have
never yet been called upon to distrust one
of the co-ordinate branches of the govern
ment and they never will while the flag
floats. Least of. all Is it decent. In my
opinion, that In this chamber there should
be Insinuations cast at this critical time
that there Is a lack In tho minds of the
people of tfre United States of confidence
In tho navy of our country. The officers
appointed to lnvcstlgato will do their duty.
I do not know What slums the senator from
Illinois may have dragged to find an ex
pression of opinion that them is lack of
confidence In the personnelot our navy,
but I know he cannot find an honorable or
a patriotic citizen who will stand up be
fore the country and indorse for an Instant
the utterances which Iho senator has
mode. There are times for speaking and
limes for silence, and this is the time when
we face tho awful calamity that has over
taken us, when we should restrain any, ex
pression of an opinion or our- belief as to
bow this awful disaster was brought about
until a proper, regular and formal Inves
tigation may be had. which we all know
will be conducted with the utmost up
rightness and the utmost Integrity.
"Mr. President, I speak as one who sym
pathizes deeply with the citizens of that
unfortunate island now engaged in this
terrible, deplorable conflict. I yield to no
body in my desihj to see the conclusion of
that war, but I do say if ever there was a
moment when wo should abstain from out
rageous and gratuitous Insult to a friendly
nation that time is today. If ever there was
a time when we should tender our help to
every department of oar government «
should be today. If ever tb.ro was a time
whan we should refrain from unjust and
LOS ANGELES HERALD: SATURDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 19, 1898
Ignorant criticism It is today. Ah, Mr.
President, war may come. I think myself
the day may not be far distant, and when
It comes we will fight ft alone, for there
will bo no other nation to lift a hand to
fight with us. When that day comes our
cause must be eternally grounded on the
right, and whon it comes there Is nothing
that so belittles this people, in my opinion,
as these unjust and outrageous attacks
upon a friendly government. Ah, Mr. Pres
ident, wnr Is grim decision, and when it
comes It must come ao that the people
of tho world, whether they light with us
or not.cnn at least respect our conduct and
our position; and, above all, Mr. President,
It must come under circumstances which
make us respect ourselves.
WOLCOTT JOINS IN
Mr. Wolcott was followed by Lodge of
Massachusetts, who had eat very restive
under Mr. Mason's reflections on tho navy
department. Ho also spoke with Intense
earnestness, saying:
Mr. Presldont: I have no desire and
no intention of saying ono word In regard
to the war which Is raging in Cuba. No
one oould doteßt tho horrors enacted in
that island more than I. No ono desires
more than I to see tho Spanish power
swept from that island as it has been
from all tha states of the South America,
but, Mr. President, that question is not
here. We are face to face at this moment
with a great national oalamlty. The Amer
icans have received the awful news of the
sinking of the warship Maine with a
splendid silence and self-restraint, both
In congress und throughout the country.
They are waiting sternly, quietly to know
the truth, and the truth thoy will have.
This is not a question which involves Cu
bans or Spaniards. This Is a question which
Involves brave American seamen, gone to
their death In a foreign port. In the pres
ence of thut e:alamity what we want is
the truth. How are we to get ft by the
Investigations of a committee of congress,
which knows nothing, which is miles from
the place where tho disaster occurred?
There is only one way to get at the truth
of this matter, and that Is through the
naval officers who have been selected al
ready to perform that duty. Can any one
Buppose that the naval officers of the
United States, men on whose career in the
past and whoso conduct in the present
there is not and never has been a blemish,
would seek to conceal the facts in such a
;aso as this? I would rather trust this
Investigation to the officers of the Amer
ican navy than to any othor men in the
country.
WANT THE TRUTH
We want to know the truth. If ft was an
accident which destroyed the Maine, then
let us provide so far as human foresight
can agulnt a recurrence. If it was treach
ery, then the righteous wrath of the Amer
ican people will take a signal vengeance
from the treachery that sent the ship to
the bottom, and let no one think to stay It.
Mr. Mason replied: "Misquotation and
general spasm will not drive me from the
dlsoußslon of this question in the senate."
He shared, ho said, in the general admi
ration of the various departments of the
executive branch of the government, and
Mr. Wolcott would not excel him in that
respect. "I am sorry," he said, "that
while the Colorado senator was giving us
such a lecture about the navy department
he does not slop over and give the treas
ury department somo of his praise."
He also resented the Intimation that he
had gone Into the slums to find words with
which to characterize the navy depart
ment, and repeated his loyalty to the navy
and other dejiartments.
Mr. Allen of Nebraska said he desired
to secure a vote upon the resolution, but
he desired to reiterate the suspicions ex
pressed by Mr. Mason that the investiga
tion by the navy department would not
be satisfactory to the country.
"1 want to say," said Allen, "that I have
not in my five years' experience ln the
senate known one of these investigations
to result In anything."
Mr. Hale rose and said : "I have here a
dispatch received at the navy department
from Captain Sigsbee. It shows that there
Is not in the city of Havana a single dis
cordant note. All are in mourning for the
dead. The city Is filled with an atmosphere
of pity, commiseration and sympathy."
Mr. Bacon of Georgia introduced a res
olution for the erection of a brass-tablet
in statuary hall bearing the names of offi
cers and men who perished with the sink
ing of the Maine.
At 3:40, ns a mark of respect to ex-Con
gressman Wright of Massachusetts, the
senate adjourned until Monday next.
CABINET MEETING
The Maine Horror the Only Subject
Discussed
WASHINGTON, Feb. 18.—The only ab
sentees from the cabinet meeting today
were Secretaries Sherman and Alger. The
disaster to the Maine was the principal
topic of discussion. Secretary Long re
ceived a cablegram from Captain Sigsbee,
giving an account of the funeral of four
teen of the victims, substantially as cabled
last night to the Associated Press und
printed in the morning papers. Although
the president and members of the cabinet
await with interest the results of the In
quiry into the cause of the disaster, there
remains scarcely a doubt ln their minds
but that It was an accident purely, such
as might happen at any time. This view
of the matter, however, will not influence
the president to stop short of a most
searching investigation into all facts that
may have any possible beuring upon the
case. Until facts are shown to tho con
trary the president will assume that the
■explosion came? from within. The presi
dent is receiving a large number of mes
sages commending him for the course he
has pursued in this matter as well as ln
the late De Lome case.
The president announced to the cabinet
that he would send a bouquet of flowers lo
Mrs. Sigsbee. a doclsion which was ap
proved by the cabinet. Accordingly En
sign Kettle, son-in-law of Captain Sigsbee,
was summoned from the navy department
to the White House and laden with.an im
mense bouquet, tied with white satin rib
bons. Floral tributes were also ordered
sent to families of the six members of the
Maine's crew living here who met their
death in the explosion.
IN THE HOUSE
Funds Appropriated for Raising the
Cruiser Maine
V uViTON, Feb. 18.— The house de
bated on the bankruptcy bill until noon,
and then, immediately after the reading of
the journal, Houtelle of Maine, Repub
lican, chairman of the naval committee.
asked unanimous consent for tho consider
ation of the resolution prepared by the
navy department and passed by the sen
ate.
The mere mention of tho Maine disaster
on the floor brought members In crowds
from the clonk rooms and lobbies, and
they thronged down the aisle to listen.
The spectators in the galleries leaned
over with breathless interest, ns Secretary
Long's letter was read.
"It Is unnecessary to say," said Boutellc.
at the conclusion of the letter from Sec
retary Long, "that the work of salvage
should begin at once, and that arrange
ments with tho wrecking companies which
have necessary outfits should not be de
layed. I deem it proper to call attention
to the fact that Secretary Long, recogniz
ing that congress is in session, has come
here for authority to do this work, instead
of straining any authority he might pos
sess Independently."
Bailey called attention to the fact that
the resolution only spoke of recovering
the bodies, not of their return to this
country, but he added that there need be
no stickling on this point.
Boutello replied that the secretary had
referred ln his letter to his duty ln that
regard. He said he had Just recived a
telegram from Secretary Long this morn
ing, containing the latest Information from
Captain Sigsbee, and that it might be of
interest to the members.
"Read it!" "read it!" came in chorus
from tho members, and Boutellc then read
tho cablegram from Captain Sigsbee,
which had already been givon out by the
navy department.
Sulzer of New York, Democrat, asked
Boutello If he had any information other
wise that threw any light upon the cause
of the disaster.
"1 must reply, as I did yesterday," re
plied Boutelle, "that I regret to say I have
not. But all information ai band seems
to strengthen the belief that It was duo
to accident."
The resolution was then adopted unani
mously.
The debate on the bankruptcy bill filled
ln the day, the speakers being Sulzer of
New York, Democrat; Stronde of Nebras
ka, Republican; Connelly of Illinois, Re
publican; Rixey of Virginia, Democrat;
Grosvenor of Ohio, Republican; Bayers of
Texas, Democrat, and Day of New York,
Republican, ln favor of the bill; Kitchlngs
of North Carolina, Republican, Linney of
North Carolina, Republican: Love of
Mississippi, Democrat; 801 lof Texas, Dem
ocrat; Honry of Mississippi, Democrat;
Maguire of California, Democrat; Bland of
Missouri, Democrat; Bell of Colorado,
Populist; Do Armond of Missouri, Demo
crat; Wheeler of Alabama, Democrat, and
Lloyd of Missouri, Democrat, against it.
At 6:55 p. m. the house adjourned.
NOMINATIONS
The president today sent tho following
nominations to the senate: Postmasters—
Arizona, Russell H, Chandler, Yuma; Cali
fornia, O. W. Maulsby, Santa Barbara.
CONFIRMATIONS
The senate today confirmed these nomi
nations: Poßtmuster—California, 1. N-
Hoag, Redlands; J. M. Gleaves, to be sur
veyor general of California.
Between tho ticks of a watch a ray of
light could move eight times around the
globe.
All prices of wall paper greatly reduced.
A. A. Eckstrom. 324 South Spring street
The Herald.
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1-26-99
I. W. LEWIS' NEW GRILL AND FRET
work shop can save you money and give
satisfaction. 61S W. Sixth, near Olive.
2-27
SHOES REPAIRED—MEN'S 86c;
ladles' soles. 30c. 405 8. Spring. 6-13-98
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
"fohT s a le—one" of" the" best"pay"
ing businesses ln Southern California,
netting 2250 per week clear of all ex
penses, near Los Angeles; will take $6000
cash; stock will invoice at $6500, Includ
ing liquor, etc.. on hand; will sell one-half
interest to tight party who is capable to
take charge. For further information
inquire at UNION LOAN CO., 114 Stim
son block.
FOR SALE—BEST ~ PAYING LIQUOR
business ln Southern California, $6000, In
cluding building, stock, fixtures, etc.; will
invoice for the amount; guaranteed pay
ing not $800 to $1000 per month; parties
must sell. O. A. VICKERY & CO., 110%
S. Broadway. 20
PARTY INDEBTED HERE IS FORCED
by law lo sell at public auction the best
assorted stock of new ladies' clothing,
cloaks, wraps, dresses, boas, ulsters, etc.,
at 250 S. Spring St., this (Saturday) night;
a chance of a lifetime. 10
FOR SALE—BUSINESS lIOUSE~A.ND
stock of merchandise, together or sep
arately; end of Sunta Fe pier. South
Bench, Santa Monica. 21
NOTICE—ENTIRE TAMALE BUSINESS,
with sandwich wagon for sale cheap:
willing to instruct parties. Inquiro 720
Wall st. 2i
FOR SALE—STOCK OF BOOTS, SHOES
and fixtures; great sacrifice; must be
sold by April Ist for cash. Call 220 South
Main St. 2-26
I7~D. BARNARD, 103 S. BROADWAY
will soil out your business. (f
PERSONALS
MEDICAL ELECTRICIAN REMOVED
from 819 S. Grand aye. to 618 W. Eighth
■t.; female diseases treated by ci& 'trin
ity: cure guaranty. f
MUSICAL INSTRUCTION
PLVNO~HOUSE-A. G GARDNER~IIB
Winston St., near the Postoffice building.
Brlggs Pianos, new and second band;
also, other makes. tf
WATCHMAKERS
STERLING SILVER SPOONS; LARGE
assortment, new designs, moderate
prices. W. J. GETZ. Jeweler, 336 8.
Broadway
CHURCH AND SOCIETY NOTICES
Sunday gospel services February 20th
will be led, by Mrs. J. B. Brown. All wom
an Invited. 20
WANTED
Hale Help
HUMMEL EROS. & CO..
EMPLOYMENT AGENTS.
California Bank building,
300-302 W. Second St., In basement.
Tolephono 609.
MEN'S DEPARTMENT
Man and wife, orchard and cook, $30,
etc.; pruner, $20, etc.; German hoy. house
work, etc., $15; chore boy, ranch, $10, etc.;
6 me n, logging camp, $1.25; 2 ranch hands,
$1, etc.; orange packer, 2V4c box, long Job;
married man, orchard, $25, house, etc.
MEN'S HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Walter, country hotel, $15; dishwasher,
same house, $15; hotel cook, city, $40;
pastry cook and second, $40; boy baker,
■hop, $10; house cleaner (first class), $20,
etc.; ranch cook, $25, early this morning.
Waffle man, $7 week.
HOUSEHOLD DEPARTMENT
Two first class cooks, $30; German
cook, $25; housegirls. San Fernando, Co
rona, $20; Santa Paula. $18; Redlands,
$16; Redondo, $15; seoond girl, country,
$20; 6 housegirls, $20; 3 $15; nurseglrl, $20;
2 housegirls, country, $16 to $16; girls lo
assist, $10 to $12; young girts wanted;
housekeeper, country, $25.
LADIES' HOTEL DEPARTMENT
Four chambermaids, country, $20;
chambermaid, home nights, $2.50 week;
German cook, restaurant, $7 week; laun
dress, Arizona, $25; waitresses, city and
country, at once.
HUMMEL BROS. & CO.
Situations—Female
WANTED—A LADY LIVING IN THE
country would like the care of one or
two children, either for the summer or
permanently. For further particulars
write MRS. 8., El Rio, Ventura county,
Cal. 21
Live Stock
WANTED—TO BUY HORSE AND WAG
on cheap. MORGAN, 760S Arapahoe St. 20
Miscellaneous
WANTED—CHEAP FOR CASH, CALl
fornla Reports Digest, code, etc.; also
office furniture. Address 11., 129 W.
Ninth st. 19
WANTED—HIGHEST PRICES PAID
for household goods, carpets, etc, MAT
THEWS, 454 S. Main. 'Phone green 624. tf
MONEY TO LOAN
UNION LOAN
block, corner Third and Spring, loans
money on all kinds of collateral security,
watches, diamonds, furniture and pianos,
without removal; low interest; money
at once; business confidential: private of
fice for ladies. CLARK A. SHAW, man
ager, rooms 113, 114 and 115, first floor.
Tel. 1651. References, Citizens' bank, Se
curity Savings Bank. tf
TO LOAN—MONEY IN LARGE OR
small amounts at lower rates of interest
than others charge on nil kinds of col
lateral security, diamonds, watches, Jew
elry, pianos, furniture; life insurance and
all good collateral; partial payments re
ceived; money quick; private office for
ladies. G. M. JONES, rooms 12-14, 254 S.
Broadway. • 1-30-99
MONEY TO LOAN ON DIAMONDS.
Jewelry and sealskins; also on pianos and
household furniture, without removal;
business confidential; private office for
ladies: low rates of interest. PACIFIC
LOAN CO.. W. E. DE GROOT, manager,
rooms 2, 3 and 4,114 S. Spring st.
lOWA LOAN CO., LOANS ON DlA
monds, Jewelry, sealskins and house
hold furniture; business confidential;
money at once. W. E. SANSOME, man
ager, rooms 55 and 56, Bryson block,
Second and Spring sts. 4-4
MONEY TO LOAN IN SUMS FROM $1000
to $200,000, on inside gilt-edged income
beuring property only. Inquire of F. Q.
STORY, room 303 Henne block, 122 West
Third st.
MONEY LOANED ON DIAMONDS,
watches. Jewelry, pianos, sealskins, car
riages, bicycles, warehouse receipts and
all kinds of collateral security; storage
free in our warehouse. LEE BROS., 402
S. Spring st. tf
THE KING PAWN SHOP MOVED TO
114 N. Main street, now the Diamond loan
office. Money loaned ln any amounts on
collaterals. Fair dealing guaranteed. B.
FANTA, proprietor. 1-26-99
TO LOAN—A BARREL OF MONEY ON
diamonds, pianos, furniture and all first
class securities; business confidential.
CREASINGER, 247 S. Broadway, rooms
1 and 2. 6-29-tf
TO LOAN—IF YOU WANT MONEY ON
real estate security. I have It in any
amount; $5000 to $50,000 at 6 per cent.
WM. F. BOSBYSHELL, 107 S. Broadway.
6-20-tf
POINDEXTER & WADSWORTH. ROOM
3uB Wilcox building, lend money on any
good real estate; building loans made; if
you wish to lend or borrow call on us. tf
MONEY TO LOAN ON REAL ESTATE
ln any amount, 5 to 8 per cent Interest;
light expense. HOWE & OBEAR, 316
Bradbury building. tf
MONEY TO~LOAN—S2OO~ TO $95,000 O.N
city or country real estate. LEE A. Mc-
CONNELL & CO., rooms 302 and 303. 218
S. Broadway. tf
MONEY TO LOAN UPON EASY
terms of repayment. STATE MUTUAL
BUILDING AND LOAN ASS N. 141 S.
Broadway. 6-20-tf
TO LOAN-InIsUMSTO SUIT ON REAL,
estate security; current rates; no com
mission. Apply MAIN ST. SAVINGS
BANK. 2-26-93
MONEY TO LOAN ON COLLATERALS;
75 boys' suits of clothes at $1 to $1.25 per
suit. COLLATERAL BANK, 313 S. Main.
2-20
TO~ LOAN—ON REAL ESTATE, ANY
amount, 5 to 8 per cent net; light ex
pense. W. H. LYON, 218 S. Broadway,
TCAN MAK¥YoTTIaRGE OR"SMALL
loans at very light expense. HENRY
HART, 103 E. Second St. tf
MONEY TO LOAN—NO DELAY; LIGHT
expense. ERNEST G. TAYLOR, 412-413
Bradbury building. (f
MONEY TO LOAN—BUILDING - LOANS
a specialty. EDW. D. SILENT & CO., 212
W. Second. • tf
TO LOAN—MONEY QUICKLY, QUIET
]y, reasonably. R. D. LIST. 226 Wilcox
block. tf
MONEY - TO LOAN IN ANY AMOUNT.
EDWARD C. CRIBB, 218 S. Broadway.
2-24
TO LOAN—6 TO 8 PER CENT. MONEY"
mtADSHAW BROS.. 202 Bradbury blk. tf
MINING AND ASSAYING
THE BIMETALLIC ASSAY OFFICE
and Chemical Laboratory. 124 S. Main st.
R. A. PEREZ. K. M„ manage- 12-4 tf
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
BROUSSEAU A MONTGOMER V—
Attorneys-a t-Law
403 Bradbury block. Los Angeles, tt
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
LUDWIG & MATTHEWS, WHOLESALE
and retail fruits and vegetables. MOTT
MARKET. 136 S. Main st Tel. ESQ tf
BOOKS
and exchanged. JONES' BOOK STORE,
220 and 228 W. First at. tf
MASSAGE
«3m£ halfuusT «9~~a Broadway,
room 41. fourth floor; take elevator, tf
FOB SALE
Houses
FOR SALE-GREAT BARGAIN—NEW
cottage, 5 rooms, bath, water closet, en
ameled sink, pantry, 3 closets, front
porch, screen porch, mantel with plate
mirror, pine finish, 3 bedrooms, 40-foot
lot, fenced, cement walk, Bidewalk, Take
Vernon car to see the best value in a home
for $950; $200 cash, on White street, 140
feet west of Central avenue. WIESEN
DANGER CO., 427 S. Broadway. 21
FOR SALE—FOR $7.50 A MONTH AND A
small cash payment I will build you n
new 4-room cottage, plastered and palm
ed to suit ln my Third Addition, Eighth
and Mateo sts. Why pay rent, when you
can own your home? C. A. SMITH, 213
W. First st. tf
FOR SALE—MODERN, NEARLY NEW
8-room 2-story house; gas and electricity;
all street work in; close In, north of
Twelfth St.; can be bought for less than
$2500; cheap at $3000. SHERWOOD &
KOYER, 141 S. Broadway. 20
FOR SALE—WE SELL THE EARTH.
BASSETT & SMITH, Pomona, Cal. tf
City Lots and Lands
FOR SA LE—AT A BARGAIN, 8 LOTS
with 7 cottages at corner ot Wall
and Winston st. CITY, 439 Wall St.
3-10-98
Business Property
FOR SALE—IN SAN DIEGO—TO CLOSE
an estate, I offer for sale the following
property ln San Diego: Lots A, B. C,
L, X, J, in Block 352. Horton's Addition,
between Second and Third streets, at the
extremely low price of $2000. Oo and
look them up; must be sold immediately.
W. H. ALLEN, Exclusive Agent, 123 W.
Third St., Los Angeles. 20
FOR SALE — CHEAP; BRAND NEW
barley roll mill, complete. Including plant,
buildings, horses and wagons; owners
want to go to Mexico. Address U., box
39, Herald. 21_
Country Property
FOR SALE—CHEAP, FINE ORANGE
and lemon land; easy terms; ln blocks of
11 acres; near Altadena; four shares of
stock of the Precipice Canyon Water
company goes to each acre. Apply L. R.
GARRETT, Bryson block. tf
FOR SALE—7 ACRES IN DOWNEY;
good stand of alfalfa; assorted fruits for
family use; 7 shares water; b-room house,
good barn, well, windmill and tank; only
$2500; worth $3000. SHERWOOD & KOY
ER, 144 S. Broadway. 20
FOR SALE—LAND IN PARCELS TO
suit at Colegrove, a near suburb of Los
Angeles, on Santa Monica electric road.
COLE & COLE, attorneys, 232 N. Main
St., Los Angeles. tf
Hotels and Lodging Houses
FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE—A WELL
furnished rooming house of 11 rooms, 12
to 15 regular boarders, at good prices. A
paying proposition to the one who is able
to handle It. Some cash, balance In
trade, will take the property. R. E.
MUNCY, 108% W. 3rd st. 21
FOR SALE—FIRST CLASS LODGING
house; 60 rooms; good business. Apply
room 12 Freeman block. tf
Live Stock
FOR BALE-SPAN OF MATCHED
chestnuts, 16 hands, aged 6 and 7; ex
tension top platform cabriolet; double
harness and robes; would make good
private turnout. Address or call on
OWNER, 316 Park street, Pasadena, tf
WANTED—GOOD FAMILY DRIVING
horse and rig for one month, for keep,
with privilege of buying; best of care and
references. 1014 S. Hill st. 19
FOR SALE—GOOD, GENTLE, YOUNG,
sound horse, good looking, $50; worth
$100. Apply Glass' horseshoeing shop,
Ninth and Main sts. 8-7
FOR BALE-IF YOU WANT A GENTLE
surrey horse or a work horse cheap, call
on W. M. BIDDLE, 710 E. Tenth St., near
San Pedro st. 3-7
FOR SALE—IF YOU WANT A GENTLE
surrey horse or a work horse cheap, call
on W. M. BIDDLE, 710 E. Tenth St., near
Ban Pedro st. S-7
FOR SALE—TWO FINE 3-YEAR-OLD
Jersjey cows; price, $45 each, at 1706 Man
limt uve., East Lob Angeles. 20
Miscellaneous
FOR SALE—NEW SANTA ANA INCU
bator; holds 270 eggs; will swap for cow
or chickens. 260 N. CHESTNUT ST. 21
FOR SALE—THE FRANKLIN ROOM
ing house furniture. Apply 141% N.
Bruadway. 19
EDUCATIONAL
WOODBURY BUSINESS COLLEGE, 220
8. Spring St., Los Angeles, the oldest,
largest and most elegantly equipped
commercial school In Southern Califor
nia; hundreds of successful graduates in
banking and business houses; ln session
all the year; enter any day; evening
school on Monday, Wednesday and Fri
day evening; three complete courses,com
mercial, English and shorthand and
typewriting; a thorough, practical and
progressive school; large faculty of ex
pert teachers; rates of tuition reasonable.
Call or write for catalogue.
OCCIDENTAL COLLEGE, 614 8. HILL
st; classical, Latin-scientlftc and Eng
lish courses; preparatory department fits
for best northern and eastern colleges:
February Sth grade graduates and tour
ists attention! REV. GUY' W. WADS
WORTH. President. 10-12-14-16-18-19
LOS ANGELES BUSINESS COLLEGE.
212 W. Third st.. Currier block: up-to
date, progressive, advantages unsur
passed; day and evening sessions; write
for catalogue and booklet on new budget
system. 2-2S
BATHS
SUPERIOR STEAM BATHS, HAlR
dressing and manicuring by New Eng
land lady. 355% S. Spring, room 6. 3-12
lis ADO RE FRANCIS, CABIENT BATHS
and massage; 253 W. First, room 4, be
tween Spring and Broadway. 3-11-9S
I.EORA DARWIN, VAPOR AND ELEC
trlc baths; only select patronage sollc
j ited. 224 S. Main, room 6.
DR. ETTA RALPH, FROM THE EAST;
thormal cabinet baths; massago. 230 W.
First St., rooms 30 and 31. 3-2
THE ONLY TURKISH BATHS IN LOS
Angeles. 210 S. Broadway. tf
DENTISTS
ADAMS BROS.. DENTAL PARLORS,
239% S.Spring St.; painless extracting, 60c;
fillings; plates, from $4; all work guar
anteed; established 12 years. Hours. 2-6;
Sundays, 10-12. Telephone, bl:.ck 1272. tf
FRANK STEVENS, 324% 3. SPRING BT.,
opm days and evenings; also Sundays;
electrio light Tel.. black 82L
DR B. W. DAY, DENTIST. REMOVED
to 142 S. Broadway, room 127, New Hell
man building. 2-16
DR. BALDWIN, DENTIST, GRANT
bldg.. 4th and Broadway. Tel. G. 1071. 3-11
PATENTS AND COPYRIGHTS
DAY & DAY OBTAIN PATENTS FOR
inventions, designs, register trade-mark
and copyrights. Offices, 233, 2M and W
Stimson block. Established Ut*. 1-WS
A.
FOB BENT
Houses
FOR RENT—A MODERN 6-ROOM COT
tage at northwest corner of Twelfth and
Georgia, $18, with water; ln good condi
tion and good location. 20
TO LET—4-ROOM FLATS, UNFUR
nished, bright and clean; close In, $8 and
$10. Inquire at 416 S. Hope st. 19
Furnished Booms
FOR RENT—3 ROOMS, COMPLETELY
furnished for housekeeping; screen
porch; separate entrance. 930 S. Flower.
19
FOR RENT — FURNISHED SUNNY
rooms; new, olean; best in city. 695 8.
Spring. tf
FOR RENT—SUNNY - ROOMS,~2Sc. PER
night; $1 per week and up. 619 S. Spring.
2-28
FOR RENT—UNFURNISHED ROOIW;
prices reasonable. 61314 S. Spring st 1
Board and Rooms
FOR RENT—NEATLY FURNISHED,
sunny rooms, with board; private family.
853 S. FLOWER ST. 20
MEDIUMS
REMOVED—MRS. PARKER, MEDIUM
and palmist, life reading, business specu
lations, mineral locations, removals, law
suits, travels, marriage, children, dis
positions and capabilities; all affairs ot .
life. 230 V. S. Spring St., room 4. Fees, 60c. '
and $1. tf
MME. LEO, MEDIUM AND CARD
reader; tells past, present and future;
gives luoky charms, brings the separated
together; causes speedy marriage; all .
those in trouble, love, business and fam
ily affairs, see her. 123 W. Fourth St.
MME. GRACE, CARD MEDIUM AND
Palmist; the wonder of the 19th century;
reveals the past, present and future. 644
8. Los Angeles street, between Fifth and
Sixth sts. 3-6-98
KNOW YOUR FUTURE—THE GREAT j
Palmist and Psychic tells all your past !
and future life correct and true. 224 S.
Main. tf
MISS KATE LAMPMAN, TEST MEDIUM
—Life readings dally at room 19, Ramona
hotel; test circle Tuesday evenings.
3-40-98
GRACE GILMORE, CLAIRVOYANT.
Card Reader. Ladsles, 25c; gents, 60c
124% 8. Spring st., rooms 7 and 8. tf
MRS. E. mTdUVAL, CLAIRVOYANT,
the most wonderful ln her profession;
now at 618 S. Los Angeles St. 2-26
MME. VALLIANT, THE NOTED CLAlR
voyant, card reader. 330% S. Spring
St., room 26, 3-1
AGNES H. PLEASANCE, TRANCE
spirit medium; sittings dally. 855% 8.
Spring st. tf
PHYSICIANS
battery for all chronlo diseases. Room
4, 242% Broadway. 2-M-3S
DR. UNGER CURES CANCERS AND
tumors. No knife or pain. 107% N. Main
street. tf
LOST AND FOUND
REWARD r6~RARTY rTStorTJiNG
brown roll floor plans lost yesterday, to
A. J. JEFFERY, 218 Stlmscn block. 20
FO^UND—A GREYHOUND. CALL AT
142 N. Griffin aye. 19
EXCUBSIONS
ROCK ISLAND PERSONALLY CON
ducted excursions every Tuesday and
Wednesday; low rates; quick time; Un-
I lon depot, Chicago; unequaled service.
Office, 214 8. Spring st. 2-25
LEGAL NOTICES
An Old Los Angeles Firm Dissolved
THE OLD FIRM OF SENTOUS BROS.
has been dissolved by mutual consent.
Louis Sentous, sr., the founder and busi
ness manager of the firm, continuing the
wholesale and retail butcher business on
his own account at 620 San Fernando at.,
(lately called Upper Main st.) and having
no concession or Interest ln the new firm of
Sentous Bros, carried on at the corner of
Aflso and Los Angeles sts.
Notice
THE FOLLOWING ARTICLES: THREE
buggies, 1 surrey, 1 sulky, will be sold
at public auction for payment of storage,
on Monday, February 21st, at 10 oclock in
the forenoon, at DAVIN'S WAREHOUSE,
Aliso street. 6-13-20
LINES OF TRAVEL
The company's elegant steamers SANTA
ROSA and POMONA leave REDONDO at
11 a. m. and PORT LOS ANGELES at 2:20
p m. for San Francisco, via Santa Barbara
and Port Harford, Feb. 4, 8, 12, 10, 20, 24, 28.
Mar. 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 , 28, Apr. 1, 6, 9, 18, 17,
21 25, 29. Leave PORT LOS ANGELES at
6 'a. m. and REDONDO at 11 a. m. for
San Diego via Newport, Feb. 2. 6, 10, 14. 18.
22, 26, Mar. 2, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30, Apr. 3, 7,
11,' 15, 19 23 27. The Santa Rosa will not stop
at Newport. Cars connect via Redondo
leave Santa Fe depot at 9:45 a. m. or from
Redondo railway depot at 9:30 a, m.
Cars connect via Port Los Angeles leave
S. P. R. R. depot at 1:35 p. m. for steamers
north bound.
The steamers HOMER and COOS BAY
leave SAN PEDRO and EAST SAN PE
DRO for San Francisco, via Ventura, Car
penteria, Santa Barbara, Gavlota, Port
Harford, Cayucos,- San Simeon, Monterey
nnd Santa Cruz at 6:30 p. m., Feb. 1, 6, 9,
IS 17. 21, 26, Mar. L 6, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 29, Apr. I
2 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30. Cars connect with
steamers via San Pedro leave S. P. R. R.
(Arcade depot) at 5:03 p. m. and Terminal
railway depot at 6:15 p. m.
The company reserves the right to change
without previous notice steamers, sailing
dates and hours of sailing.
W. PARRIS. Agt., 124 W. Second St., Los
Angeles.
QOODALL, PERKINS & CO., General
Agents San Franclsca
LoS ANGELES TERMINAL RAILWAY—
NOV. 22,1897.
PASADENA—Leave Los Angeles: 8:20
a. m., 9:30 a, m.. 12:16 p. m.. 3:25 p. m., 5:10
p. m.
Arrive Los Angeles: 9:22 a .in.. 11:13 a,
m 1:42 p. m.. 5:05 p. m.. 6:20 p. m.
MT. LOWE AND ALTADENA—Leave
Los Angeles'. 9:30 a. m., 3:25 p. m.
Arrive Los Angeles: 11:10 a. m., 5:05 p. m.
The only line from Los Angeles making
connection with Mt. Lowe railway without
change of cars.
GLENDALE—Leave Los Angeles: 7:00
a. m., 12:30 p. m., 6:15 p. m.
Arrive Los Angeles: 8:12 a in., 1:36 p. m..
0:30 p. ro>
LONG BEACH AND SAN PEDRO—
Leave Los Angeles: 9:25 a. m., 1:15 p. m.,
"6:15 p. m., *6:80 p. m.
Arrive Los Angeles: «8:15 a. m.. •9:00 a
m 1:25 p. m.. "4:50 p. m.,5:10 p. m.
CATALINA ISLAND-Leave **9:26 a. m.;
arrive *'1:26 p. m.
•Sundays only. "Sundays excepted.
Boyle Heights car pass Terminal sta
tion. S. B. HYNES. General Manager.
i i,OS ANGELES AND REDONDO RAlL
way Company.
Los Angeles depot: Cor. Grand aye. and
Jefferson St.
' Leave Leave
Los Angeles Redondo for
for Redondo Los Angeles
2:10 a. m. 8:00 a. m.
1:30 p. m. 11:00 a. m.
4:10 p. m. 8:15 p. m.
11:30 p. m. Sat. only 6:20 p. m. Sat. only
Take Grand aye. electrio cars or Mala
st and Agricultural park ears.
L. J. PERRY Superintendent
3

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