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The herald. [microfilm reel] (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1893-1900, July 15, 1898, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn85042461/1898-07-15/ed-1/seq-1/

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TWENTY-FIFTH YEAR. NO. 288.
THE STARS AND STRIPES
ARE OVER EASTERN CUBA
Washington, July J4. —The adjutant general received the following from Playa del Este at 2:30 this afternoon:
"Adjutant General, Washington: Just returned from interview with Toral. He agrees to surrender on basis of being returned to Spain. This proposition
embodies all of Eastern Cuba from Acerraderos on the south to Sagua on the north, via Palma, with practically the Fourth army corps. Commissioners meet
this afternoon at 2:30 ocloek to definitely arrange the terms. SHAFTER, Major General."
Washington, July 14. —The official announcement of the agreement of Gen. Toral was received about 2:30 ocloek in the brief dispatch from Gen.
Shafter. The president was the first to be made acquainted with the action of the Spanish general, the dispatch making the announcement being sent direct to liim.
He was in the private apartments of the White House conversing with Mrs. McKinley when the operator handed in the dispatch. He quickly read it aloud to
Mrs. McKinley and then sent for Secretary Alger and Adjutant General Corbin. Meantime, an instant after its receipt by the president, the dispatch was sent
to every part of the world.
New York, July 14. —Santiago formally surrendered at 3 p. m.
DEADLY SIEGE
The In vest meet of Santiago

Costs Manny Lives
CampaSgin off Two Weeks Was One
off the Blood 5est on Record.
VSet5ms Yet to Count
BT THE ASSOCIATED PRESS SPECIAL WIRE.
WASHINGTON, July 14.—The first chapter in the land campaign
of the United States against Spain olosed today, when the Spanish colors
gave place over Santiago to the American flag. Next will follow the
transportation of the Spanish troops back to their native land and the
capture of the island of Porto Rioo, unless peace soon intervenes.
The siege of Santiago had lasted two weeks, and was remarkable in
many respects, and in none more than the heavy percentage of loss from
death, wounds or sickness of the soldiers and sailors engaged on both
tides. Locking back over the record of these two weeks, it is seen that
a great ironclad squadron has been destroyed; that nearly a thousand
Spanish sailors have been drownedor killed by shell and flame, and that
an untold number.of Spanish soldiers have died in the trenohes of San
tiago. On the other hand, about two hundred and fifty American soldiers
have been killed, and in round numbers two thousand more have been
sent to the hospitals from wounds, even and other ailments. Our fleet
had a remarkable exemption from disaster in the many engagements it
had with the forts at the entrance of the harbor and the Spanish squad
ron.
NEXT IS PORTO RICO
"Next is Porto Rico," said Secretary Alger, after receiving news of
Santiago's formal surrender, "and then, if need be, Havana."
The secretary was in excellent pirits. He has been more anxious
than he dared to show as to the condition of our sick soldiers, and looked
with apprehension upon the possibility of a prolongation of the struggle
in the unhealthy valley of Santiago
The secretary stated that the Porto Rican expedition would go for
ward immediately. It will comprise new men entirely. The warriors
in the trenches before Santiago have distinguished themselves, and it is
not deemed prudent to bring them in unnecessary contaot with new
troops, in view of the danger of spreading contagion. The sick soldiers
will be nursed back to health and brought to the United States as soon
as they can be safely removed. Immune regiments will be ordered to
Santiago to garrison the town, and, as stated in these dispatches yes
terday, two of these regiments are already under orders to proceed.
MILES WILL COMMAND IN PERSON
The Porto Rican expedition will be commanded by Gen. Miles in
person, though Gen. Brooke, now in command at Camp Thomas, is ex-
l ' O— , —- »«vuuw, la CA"
(Continued on Page Four.)
THE HERALD
Map Showing the Territory Ceded to the United States by the Terms of Gen
eral Toral's Surrender —"All of Eastern Cuba From Acerraderos on the
South to Sagua on the North."
SUES FOR PEACE
SEHI-OFFICIAL TERMS PRESENTED
TO THE PRESIDENT
WASHINGTON, D. C, July 14—(Special to The Herald.) With the fall of
Santiago Spain is already on her knees.
Independence for Cuba.
The transfer of Porto Rico to the United States in exchange for the Philippines.
A Coaling station in the latter islands ior the United States.
Spain is willing to make these concessions to obtain peace, according to a dis
patch received by President McKinley from semi-official sources. An administration official
says that an ofiicial proposition embracing these terms would be accepted by the United
States. If this information is correct, peace in the near future is an absolute certainty.
The dispatch stated that the Spanish ministry at a meeting today definitely deter
mined to abandon the struggle, and had decided to sue for peace on the terms set forth.
TO ENTER SANTIAGO LAST NIQHT
BEFORE SANTIAGO, July 14, 12:15 p. m., via Playa Del Este, Guantanamo
Bay.—A commission of two Spaniards, one Englishman and three Americans is now
arranging terms.
Probably the Spanish will accept a parole and be returned to Spain. We insist on
immediate possession of the city, pending arrangements as to details and probably will
enter Santiago tonight
Our army will remain outside the city, but our sick will be taken in and a general
hospital headquarters will be established.
LOS ANGELES, FRIDAY MORNING, JULY 15, 1898
TORAL TALKS
Miles and Shatter Meet the
Spanish General
The Situation Explained—The Span
iards Equally Ready to Sur
render or Die
BT THB ASSOCIATED PRESS SPECIAL. WIRE.
GEN. WHEELER'S HEADQUARTERS, before Santiago de Cuba,
July 13, 4 p. m., via Kingston Jamaica, July 14.—A request for a per
sonal interview with the Spanish commander-in-chief was made and ac
ceded to today, and at about 4 ocloek Gen. Miles, Gen. Shelter, Gen.
Wheeler, Gen. Gilmour, Col. Course, Capt. Wiley and Capt. Maus rode up,
passed over our intrenchments and went down into the valley beyond.
They were met by Gen. Toral and his chief of staff, under a spreading
mango tree, at the bottom of the valley, about half way between the
lines. The interview that followed lasted an hour.
"WE CAN DIE," SATS TORAL
Gen. Miles said later that the tenor of Gen. Toral's remarks all be
trayed his realization that he could not hold out long. When Gen. Shaf ter
explained that our reinforcements were coming up, that he was complete
ly surrounded and that new batteries were being posted, Gen. Toral
simply shrugged his shoulders.
"I am but a subordinate," said he, "and I obey my government."
If it is necessary, we can die at our posts."
Gen. Toral is a man of 60 years of age, with a strong, rugged face
and fine, soldierly bearing. His brave words inspired a feeling of respect
and admiration in the hearts of his adversaries. Nevertheless, the anx
iety of the Spanish general to avoid a further sacrifice of life in his
command was manifested, and he did not hesitate to ask for time to com
municate the situation to Madrid, although he dubiously shook his head
when he spoke of the probable response.
LINARES WILL LOSE HIS ARM
In the course of an interview Gen. Toral said that the bombardment
of Sunday and Monday had done little damage. He admitted that shells
from the guns of the fleet had destroyed four houses, but he asserted
that only half a dozen soldiers of the garrison had been injured. He
also volunteered the information, when Gen. Miles gallantly inquired
after Gen. Linares' condition, that the latter would probably have to un
dergo the amputation of his left arm at the shoulder.
Gen. Miles, at the interview, did not attempt to assume the direc
tion of the negotiations, but as general of the United States army he
vouched for the conditions Gen. Shafter offered. Upon the return of our
Twelve Pages
PRICE FIVE CENTS

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